White House Files

No. 710
Log of the President’s Trip to the Conference

[Extracts]

Log of the President’s Trip to the “Berlin Conference”

Friday, July 6th:

The President, accompanied by Mr. John Snyder, Secretary Charles G. Ross, Brigadier General Harry H. Vaughan, Captain James K. Vardaman, Jr., and Mr. Fred Canfil, left the White House at 2140 by motor car for the Union Station. The party arrived at the station (Team Track No. 2) at 2150 and boarded the special train at once. Mr. Snyder did not accompany us beyond this point. He saw the President aboard and then left the train. Secretary Byrnes came aboard at 2215. Fleet Admiral Leahy and other members of the Presidential party had boarded the train earlier in the evening.

At 2300 the special train departed Washington, via the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad lines, for Newport News, Va. At Newport News the heavy cruiser Augusta (CA31) was waiting to receive the President and his party.

Saturday, July 7th:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Our train arrived in Newport News at 0550 and was parked inside pier No. 6, at the U. S. Army Port of Embarkation. This is the same transfer point used by President Roosevelt on his trip to the Crimea and the Middle East earlier this year.

The President left the train shortly after arrival in Newport News and was met at trainside by Rear Admiral Allan E. McCann, U. S. N. (Commander Task Force 68, Atlantic Fleet), Brigadier General John R. Kilpatrick, U. S. A. (Commanding General, Army Port of Embarkation), and Captain [James] H. Foskett, U. S. N. (Commanding Officer of the Augusta).

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The President, accompanied by members of his party, went aboard the Augusta at 0601. … The party was met at the ship’s quarterdeck by Captain Foskett, Commander C. L. Freeman, U. S. N. (Executive Officer), and the various Heads of Department of the Augusta, and shown to their respective quarters.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A map room and communications center for the President was set up in the ship’s First Lieutenant’s office. It was staffed by Lieutenant George M. Elsey, [Page 5]U. S. N. R., Captain Frank H. Graham, A. U. S., and Ship’s Clerk Edwin L. Hoying, U. S. N. R., with Commander John A. Tyree, Jr., U. S. N., in general supervision. Lieutenant William M. Rigdon, U. S. N., acted as personal secretary to the President during the trip and, assisted by Ensign Cecil M. Fleener, U. S. N. R., also served as secretary for the party.

After breakfast, the President, accompanied by members of his party, ascended to the flag bridge and from there, at 0655, he gave word for the Augusta to get underway when ready. At exactly 0700 the cruiser departed from Newport News for Antwerp, Belgium.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

At 0815 the Augusta joined up with the light cruiser U. S. S. Philadelphia, also headed out to sea. The Augusta took station in column one thousand yards astern of the Philadelphia. The two cruisers operated as “Task Force 68”—a special task force constituted for the purpose of transporting and escorting the President and his party from the United States to Europe and return. Task Force 68 was under the tactical command of Rear Admiral McCann. No destroyer escort or air escort was used for our voyage to Europe or for the return trip.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sunday, July 8th:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

At 0930, the President met with Secretary Byrnes, Admiral Leahy and State Department advisers Cohen, Matthews and Bohlen in the Secretary’s cabin in the first of a series of daily pre-conference business conversations.

At 1000, the President and members of his party attended Protestant church services with the crew held below decks (#1 crew’s mess hall) because of inclement weather. The services were conducted by the ship’s chaplain, Lieutenant Commander K. D. Perkins.

After church services—at 1045—the pre-conference conversations in the Secretary’s cabin were resumed and continued until 1200.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Monday, July 9th:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The President took a nap after lunch and later in the afternoon met with Secretary Byrnes and Admiral Leahy for formal discussions.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Tuesday, July 10th:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[Page 6]

The President rested in his cabin for a few hours this afternoon and then met with the Secretary of State and Admiral Leahy for conference discussions that lasted until dinner time.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Wednesday, July 11th:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The President, Secretary Byrnes, and Admiral Leahy conferred during the forenoon, and again during the afternoon.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Thursday, July 12th:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The President conferred with the Secretary of State and Admiral Leahy at length during the forenoon. …

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The weather cleared during the afternoon and the President and Secretary Byrnes spent a short while in a brisk walk along the forecastle deck. The greater part of the afternoon, however, was spent by them in conference with Admiral Leahy.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Friday, July 18th:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

After lunch, the President, Secretary Byrnes and Admiral Leahy appeared on deck and posed together for still and motion pictures. The President, the Secretary, and Admiral Leahy spent most of the remainder of the afternoon in conference shaping up the agenda for the tripartite qonference and preparing a written brief on the problems that were expected to be brought up at the conference.1

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sunday, July 15th:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1004: The Augusta moored (port side to) to the municipal dock (Compagnia Maritime dock) at Antwerp. (Total distance traveled, Newport News to Antwerp—3837 miles.) The Philadelphia tied up astern of the Augusta.

Waiting on the dock to welcome the President were a delegation of Belgian officials, General of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower, A. U. S. (the Allied Supreme Commander), Admiral Harold R. Stark, U. S. N. (Commander, U. S. Naval Forces Europe), Lieutenant General John C. H. Lee, A. U. S. (Commanding General, Communications Zone, European Theatre), Major General G. Surtees (Commanding General, [Page 7]British Base and Lines of Communication), Brigadier General E. F. Koenig, A. U. S. (Commanding General, Chanor Section), Ambassador Charles Sawyer and Mrs. Sawyer, Major DeWitt Greer, Supervising Agent Anheier, Agents Rowley, Waters, Holmes, Campion, Torina, Boring, Kauffman, and Behn. …

1110: The President, accompanied by his party, left the ship. . . .

1115: The President and party embarked in waiting motor cars and departed for Brussels. There were approximately forty automobiles in the long motor car caravan. Riding with the President were Secretary Byrnes and Ambassador Sawyer.

1230: The President and party arrived at the Brussels-Evere airport (B–58),2 several miles northwest [northeast?] of the city of Brussels. (Approximate distance traveled, Antwerp to airfield—35 miles.) General Eisenhower, Admiral Stark and General Lee accompanied the President to the airfield.

Awaiting us at the field were Supervising Agent McGrath and Agents Barry, Gorham and Walker.

The President was accorded honors here by a band and 400 picked men of the 137th Infantry Regiment. He then reviewed the honor guard. Each man in the guard was a “five-star” combat man. The President spoke with some of them before boarding his plane.

Plane No. 2 (a C–54—Major Jesse Hayes pilot) was the first to take to the air and departed Brussels at 1245. Passengers were: Secretary Byrnes, Mr. Cohen, Mr. Matthews, Mr. Bohlen, Brigadier General E. S. Hoag, A. U. S. (A. T. C. representative), Lt-Colonel A. M. McIntire, A. U. S. (A. T. C. liaison), Commander Tyree, Lieut. Elsey, Lieut. Edelstein, Lieut. Rigdon, Captain Graham, and Secret Service Agents Anheier, Hipsley, Torina, Waters, Holmes, McGrath and Boring[.]

At 1300 the President’s plane (C–54, the “Sacred Cow”, piloted by Lt-Colonel Henry T. Myers) departed for Berlin. Passengers were: The President, Admiral Leahy, Mr. Ross, General Vaughan, Captain McMahon, Captain Vardaman, Mr. Canfil, and Secret Service Agents Maloney, Drescher, O’Driscoll and Rowley.

At 1315 plane No, 3 (C–54) departed Brussels for Berlin. Embarked were: Ensign Fleener, Ship’s Clerk Hoying, Chief Pharmacist’s Mate Preston C. Taylor, U. S. N. (of the Augusta, who accompanied us to the Conference as Captain McMahon’s assistant), Chief Photographer’s Mate Belknap, Chief Stewards Prettyman, Abiba, Bautista, [Page 8]Calinao, Custodio and Estrada, and Chief Cooks Floresca, Olivares, Ordona, Orig, Palomaria and Licodo, Sergeant Philler, Secret Service Agents Behn, Kellerman, Gorham, Barry, Haman and Weir, and Lieutenant C. D. Sherman (A. T. C. liaison).

Our baggage was transported in two C–47’s. A third C–47 was dispatched to Tempelhof Airport, Berlin with the seven White House newspaper correspondents and photographers accompanying the Presidential party. They proceeded on to Berlin despite the knowledge that, by agreement between the Big Three, they were not to be permitted to enter conference area.3

The route followed by our flight was from Brussels to Liege, thence to Frankfurt, to Kassel, to Magdeburg and to Berlin (Gatow airport). We picked up a fighter escort (P-47’s) at Frankfurt that accompanied us on to Berlin. Twelve fighters covered the President’s plane and four each, planes No. 2 and No. 3. From Frankfurt to Berlin we were over Kussian-controlled territory and were required to stay within a ten-mile air corridor.

Plane No. 2 arrived at Gatow at 1558. (Distance traveled, Antwerp to Berlin, 460 miles.) Plane No. 1 arrived at 1613. Plane No. 3 arrived at 1628.

The President disembarked at once and was greeted here by a large delegation including Secretary Stimson, Assistant Secretary McCloy, Assistant Secretaries Clayton and Dunn, Ambassadors Harriman, Pauley and Murphy, Fleet Admiral King, Minister Lubin, Lieutenant General Clay, Major General Floyd Parks (Commanding General, Headquarters Berlin District), Soviet Ambassador Gromyko and Soviet Ambassador Gusev.

Honors were accorded the President here by a detachment from the Second Armored Division (“Hell on Wheels”). The President then inspected the honor guard.

At 1630 the President and party departed Gatow for his quarters in Babelsberg, approximately 10 miles distant. Secretary Byrnes, Ambassador Pauley, General Vaughan and Captain Vardaman rode in the car with the President.

We passed through a section of Potsdam enroute from Gatow to Babelsberg. Part of the route was guarded by American and British troops, but the greater part of the route was patrolled by green-capped Soviet frontier guardsmen as this was a Soviet-controlled area. The American and British delegations to the conference were housed in Babelsberg in little territorial “islands” within the Soviet-occupied zone [sector] of Greater Berlin.

[Page 9]

1700: The President and party arrived at his assigned quarters in Babelsberg. Babelsberg is a suburb of Berlin, about 12 miles southwest of the city, between Berlin and Potsdam. It lies along winding Griebnitz Lake and is in a thickly wooded area. It has a pleasant climate at this time of the year, with an average mean temperature in the low 60’s. The town was quite popular with the Germans as a summer resort and was also the seat of Germany’s movie colony.

The President’s quarters at No. 2 Kaiser Strasse (called the “Little White House”) was a three-story stucco residence which was formerly occupied by the head of the German movie colony, who is now with a labor battalion somewhere in Russia. It is right on Lake Griebnitz and is surrounded on three sides by groves of trees and shrubbery forming a very beautiful garden that reaches down to the lake. The house was stripped of its furnishings during the war but had been refurnished by the Russians. It was nicely furnished during our stay but, like most European homes, the bathroom and bathing facilities were wholly inadequate. Nor was it screened, so that the mosquitoes gave us a “working over” during our first few nights there until the weather had cooled somewhat.

The President occupied a suite on the second floor (north side), consisting of bedroom, sitting room, office and breakfast room. He also had a private sunporch outside his office. Secretary Byrnes occupied a suite (bedroom, sitting room and office) on the first floor. Also in residence here were Admiral Leahy, Mr. Ross, General Vaughan, Captain McMahon, Captain Vardaman, Mr. Bohlen, Mr. Matthews, Lieutenant Rigdon, Ensign Fleener, Ship’s Clerk Hoying and Chief Warrant Officers Caldwell and Stoner.

The President maintained his own mess at Babelsberg, employing Filipino cooks and stewards brought from the Potomac. Messing with the President were Secretary Byrnes, Admiral Leahy, Mr. Ross, General Vaughan, Captain McMahon and Captain Vardaman. Food supplies and bottled water were brought from Washington and from the Augusta. Additional supplies were obtained through the Army Mess Officer at Babelsberg. Other members of the party messed in various Army officer messes in the area.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff and State Department parties also lived in Babelsberg in close proximity to the Little White House.

A map room and communications center was installed in the President’s house with direct wire service to Frankfurt and Washington. The center was staffed by Colonel Bowen, Commander Tyree, Major Greer, Lieutenant Elsey, Captain Graham, Ship’s Clerk Hoying, Warrant Officers Caldwell and Stoner and Sergeant Philler. The White House party had its own telephone exchange (“Amco). [Page 10]The switchboard was set up in the basement of the President’s house and was operated by WACs, Cpl. Alma Bradley, Cpl. Mary Whiteus, Cpl. Charlotte Szostek, and Cpl. Eleanor Moynihan, of the WAC Detachment, Headquarters Command, U. S. F. E. T. (Main).

The Prime Minister lived at 23 Ringstrasse in Babelsberg—about two blocks from the Little White House. His was a similarly large house but perhaps a bit better furnished than the President’s. Generalissimo Stalin also resided in Babelsberg, about one mile from the Little White House, on the route from the White House to Cecilienhof where the conference meetings were held. This arrangement required that the President and the Prime Minister make a three mile drive for each session of the conference, while the Generalissimo had a much shorter distance to travel.

The Filipino messmen went into action immediately on arrival at the Little White House and at 1800 dinner was served the President and his party. Mr. Cohen, Mr. Matthews and Mr. Bohlen dined at the Little White House as guests of the President.4 Mr. Maloney, Mr. Drescher and Mr. Rowley were subsisted from the President’s mess during our stay at Babelsberg. They ate in a separate dining room, however.

After dinner, Ambassadors Harriman and Pauley called on the President.5

Having had a full day, the President and most members of the party retired early this evening. It was still light at midnight, as this country has but about four hours of darkness each night at this time of the year. This was not conducive to much rest as one seemed to forget to go to bed until it was dark.

Monday, July 16th:

During the forenoon the President worked on his mail and conferred with Secretary Byrnes and Admiral Leahy.5

At 1100 Prime Minister Churchill, accompanied by the Right Honorable Anthony Eden, Sir Alexander Cadogan, Commander C. R. Thompson, R. N. (Naval Aide to the Prime Minister), and the Prime Minister’s daughter (Junior Commander Mary Churchill of the A. T. S.) called on the President. After exchanging greetings, the President, the Prime Minister, Mr. Byrnes, Mr. Eden, and Mr. [sic] Cadogan conferred for some two hours.6

A White House mail pouch arrived this afternoon. It had been sent from Washington by a J. C. S. courier. The President signed [Page 11]this mail, which included legislative bills S134, S233, S234, S574, S672 and S956.

Generalissimo Stalin had not arrived at Potsdam, so the opening session of the conference scheduled for this afternoon was postponed to await his arrival.

The President took advantage of the delay in the opening of the conference and made an unscheduled visit to Berlin. He left the Little White House by motor car at 1540, accompanied by Secretary Byrnes and Admiral Leahy. . . .

The President and his party returned to the White House at 1735.

The three Foreign Secretaries held regular daily meetings to prepare the work of the conference. The first of these meetings was held this afternoon at Cecilienhof with Secretary Byrnes presiding.7 It was agreed, however, that the chairmanship of these planning meetings would be rotated.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff held daily meetings in their conference hall at Babelsberg.

After returning to the Little White House the President worked on his mail. He approved legislative bills S. J. Res. 31 and H. E. 3368.8

2000: Ambassadors Harriman and Pauley and Mr. Davies were dinner guests of the President this evening.9 A band from the Second Armored Division played a concert on the lower White House grounds during and after dinner.

At 2200 Mr. Davies returned to the Little White House to deliver an urgent message to the President.10

Tuesday, July 17th:

While at Babelsberg the President arose at his customary early hour; had breakfast at 0800; and spent the forenoons working on his mail and papers, and studying reports on matters to come before the conference.

This forenoon Colonel Henri [Monti] L. Belot, Medical Corps, U. S. A., called on the President and delivered to him a letter from the Mayor of Reims, France, inviting the President to visit Reims. Colonel Belot is commanding officer of the 178th General Hospital located at Reims.

[Page 12]

1200: Generalissimo Stalin, accompanied by Mr. V. M. Molotov (People’s Commissar for Foreign Affairs) and Mr. V. N. Pavlov (interpreter), called on the President at the Little White House. This was the first meeting of the President and Mr. Stalin. After greetings had been exchanged, the President, the Generalissimo, Secretary Byrnes, Mr. Molotov, Mr. Bohlen and Mr. Pavlov met in closed conference for more than an hour.11

1320: The President entertained at lunch at the Little White House in honor of Generalissimo Stalin. Present were: The President, the Generalissimo, Mr. Byrnes, Mr. Molotov, Admiral Leahy, Mr. Bohlen and Mr. Pavlov. After lunch the party moved to the porch and posed for pictures.

1430: Ambassadors Harriman and Pauley called at the Little White House this afternoon and conferred briefly with the President and also with the Secretary of State.12

1640: The President, accompanied by his personal staff, left the Little White House by motor car for Cecilienhof for the opening session of the conference. The President arrived at Cecilienhof at 1650. The Prime Minister and the Generalissimo were there when he arrived.

At 1700 the President, Prime Minister Churchill and Generalissimo Stalin, and the delegates of the three Allied nations, assembled in the conference room (the former reception room of the Palace), where greetings were exchanged and motion and still pictures were made.

At 1710 the Berlin Conference was officially called to order.13 At the suggestion of Generalissimo Stalin, the President was selected to act as chairman of the conference. Delegates for the United States during the course of the conference included: President Truman, Secretary Byrnes, Fleet Admiral Leahy, Ambassador Joseph E. Davies, Ambassador Edwin W. Pauley, Ambassador W. Averell Harriman, General of the Army George C. Marshall, Fleet Admiral Ernest J. King, General of the Army H. H. Arnold, General Brehon B. Somervell, Vice Admiral Emory S. Land, Assistant Secretary of State William L. Clayton, Assistant Secretary of State James C. Dunn, Mr. Ben Cohen, Mr. H. Freeman Matthews and Mr. Charles E. Bohlen. Delegates for the United Kingdom included: Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill, Prime Minister Clement R. Attlee, The Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs Anthony Eden, the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs Ernest Bevin, Lord Leathers (Minister of War Transport), Sir Alexander Cadogan (Permanent Under Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs), Sir Archibald Clark Kerr (British Ambassador at [Page 13]Moscow), Sir Walter Monckton (Head of the U. K. Delegation to Moscow Reparations Commission), Sir William Strang (Political Adviser to the Commander in Chief, British Zone in Germany), Sir Edward Bridges (Secretary of the Cabinet), Field Marshal Sir Alan Brooke (Chief of the Imperial General Staff), Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Charles Portal (Chief of the Air Staff), Admiral of the Fleet Sir Andrew Cunningham (First Sea Lord), General Sir Hastings L. Ismay (Chief of Staff to the Minister of Defense), Field Marshal Sir Harold Alexander (Supreme Allied Commander, Mediterranean Theatre), and Field Marshal Sir Henry Maitland Wilson (Head of the British Joint Staff Mission at Washington). The Soviet Delegation included: Generalissimo J. V. Stalin, Mr. V. M. Molotov (People’s Commissar for Foreign Affairs), Mr. A. Ya. Vyshinski (Deputy People’s Commissar for Foreign Affairs), Mr. F. T. Gousev (Soviet Ambassador in Great Britain), Mr. I. M. Maisky (Deputy People’s Commissar for Foreign Affairs), Mr. A. A. Gromyko (Soviet Ambassador in U. S. A.), Fleet Admiral Kuznetsov (People’s Commissar for the Navy), and Mr. V. N. Pavlov (interpreter).

Today’s meeting adjourned at 1855, when the conferees proceeded to the banquet room in the Palace where a buffet lunch was served them. It was noted that the maitre d’hotel at Cecilienhof was none other than Mr. Goberidge, who managed President Roosevelt’s cuisine at Yalta.

The President and party left Cecilienhof at 1909 for the Little White House, where they arrived at 1920.

Mail arrived from Washington this afternoon.

1945: Dinner at the Little White House. Secretary Stimson, General Marshall, Admiral King and General Arnold were guests of the President.14 Dinner music was provided by an excellent stringed orchestra with Sergeant Eugene List, noted American pianist, at the piano.

After dinner the President signed mail that arrived in today’s pouch.

At 2300 the President’s nephew, Sergeant Harry Truman (son of Mr. J. Vivian Truman) arrived at Potsdam. While talking to Lieutenant General Lee at Antwerp last Sunday, the President mentioned that his nephew was in the European Theatre and that he would like to see him. Sergeant Truman was on board the Queen Elizabeth ready to sail for home at the time, but General Lee got him off the ship in time and had him flown to Babelsberg for a visit with the President.

Cecilienhof Palace in Potsdam—where the conference was held—was [Page 14]the country estate of the former Crown Prince Wilhelm. The residence, a two-story brownstone house, is located near Griebnitz Lake and has beautifully landscaped gardens. The high-roofed house is built in four wings forming a square with a courtyard in the center. The courtyard was brilliantly carpeted with a 24–foot red star of geraniums, pink roses and hydrangeas planted by the Soviets. The flags of the three Allied nations flew over the main entrance to the Palace.

Cecilienhof had been used as a hospital during the war by both the Germans and the Soviets and had been stripped of all its furnishings. The Russians performed a marvelous job in refitting it for the conference, however. It was, perhaps, furnished even better during the conference than originally. Its furniture and furnishings had been brought in from Moscow.

At Cecilienhof President Truman, Mr. Churchill, and the Generalissimo each had a suite, and each delegation had a retiring room and offices.

Wednesday, July 18th:

Sergeant Truman had breakfast with the President this morning.

The President conferred with the Secretary of State and a number of his advisers during the forenoon.15

At 1315 the President, accompanied by Mr. Ross, General Vaughan, and Captain Vardaman, left the Little White House by foot for the Prime Minister’s quarters. There the President lunched privately with the Prime Minister16 while Mr. Ross, General Vaughan, and Captain Vardaman had lunch with Junior Commander Mary Churchill and some, other members of the Prime Minister’s personal staff.

At 1450 the President, together with the Prime Minister and Miss Churchill, left the Prime Minister’s residence and walked down the street to Mr. Eden’s quarters where they met Mr. Eden and Secretary Byrnes. The party then returned to the Prime Minister’s house. The President’s party assembled at the Prime Minister’s and left with him for Generalissimo Stalin’s quarters so that the President could return Marshal Stalin’s earlier call.

At 1500 a pouch with mail for the White House was dispatched to Washington.

1504: The President and his party arrived at the Generalissimo’s quarters. The President was met as he alighted from his car by [Page 15]Mr. Molotov who escorted him and his party inside where Mr. Stalin awaited. Although most of our party had just left the luncheon table, we were ushered to a large dining table where a buffet lunch was served us. After lunch with attending toasts, the President talked briefly with the Generalissimo.17 Then they posed for still and motion pictures. The President and party left the Generalissimo’s house at 1600 for Cecilienhof. We arrived at the Palace at 1608.

At 1615 the second meeting of the Berlin Conference was convened.18 The meeting adjourned at 1800, and the President and his party left immediately to return to the Little White House.

1930: Assistant Secretary Clayton, Assistant Secretary Dunn, and Mr. Donald Russell were dinner guests of the President.19 The U. S. Headquarters, Berlin District, Army Band, under the direction of Warrant Officer Frank J. Rosato, played during the dinner hour. . . .

Thursday, July 19th:

1000: [Assistant] Secretary McCloy and Lieutenant General Lucius D. Clay (Staff of General Eisenhower) called at the Little White House and conferred with the President.20

1300: Lunch at the Little White House. First Lieutenant James M. Vardaman, A. U. S. (Captain Vardaman’s nephew), Colonel Howard A. Rusk, Medical Corps, A. U. S., and Sergeant Truman were guests.

The President and party left the Little White House at 1545 for Cecilienhof. The third session of the conference was called to order by the President at 1605.21 The meeting adjourned at 1655 when the President and party left for the Little White House. Mr. Stalin invited the President to stay for a buffet lunch, but the President declined. We reached the Little White House at 1710.

At 2030 the President entertained at a State Dinner at the Little White House in honor of Generalissimo Stalin and Mr. Churchill. Present were: The President, Prime Minister Churchill, Generalissimo Stalin, Mr. Byrnes, Mr. Attlee, Mr. Molotov, Admiral Leahy, Mr. Vyshinski, Sir Alexander Cadogan, Mr. Harriman, Mr. Gromyko, [Page 16]Lord Cherwell, Mr. Pauley, Mr. Davies, Mr. Sobolev, Mr. Bohlen, Mr. Pavlov, and Major Birse.22

Friday, July 20th:

Lieutenant Colonel James A. Blair, an old friend of the President on duty in the Berlin area, and Sergeant Truman had breakfast with the President. Shortly after breakfast Sergeant Truman left Babelsberg for Gatow to enplane for Paris and return to the United States.

1200: Generals Eisenhower and Bradley (Omar N. Bradley) called on the President.23

1230: General Eisenhower, General Bradley and Colonel Howard A. Rusk were luncheon guests at the Little White House.

1330: The President, accompanied by Secretary Stimson, Assistant Secretary McCloy and Generals Eisenhower, Bradley, Patton, and Clay, left the Little White House by automobile for Berlin. Generals Eisenhower and Bradley rode with the President in an open car.

1400: The President and party arrived at the U. S. Group Control Council Headquarters (Teltower District, Berlin), where the President participated in the official raising of our flag over Berlin. . . .

The President left the scene immediately after the ceremony and returned directly to the Little White House. At 1500 mail was dispatched to Washington.

At 1545 the President and his party left the Little White House for Cecilienhof.

At 1605 the President called the fourth meeting of the Berlin Conference to order.24 The meeting adjourned at 1840 when the conferees assembled in the Palace dining room for a buffet lunch. Our party left the Palace at 1855 for the Little White House.

Colonel L. Curtis Tiernan, Chaplain Corps, U. S. A., arrived in Babelsberg this afternoon and was a guest of the President for the next several days. Colonel Tiernan was the chaplain of the President’s outfit during World War I, and is now Chief of Army Chaplains in the European Theatre.

2000: Dinner at the Little White House with Assistant Secretary McCloy, Admiral Land and General Clay as guests.25 Sergeant List, accompanied by Pfc Stuart Canin (concert violinist), played during dinner.

[Page 17]

Saturday, July 21st:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1500: Mail arrived from Washington.25a

1545: The President conferred with Secretary Byrnes.26

1635: The President and his party left the Little White House for Cecilienhof. We arrived at the Palace at 1645.

The fifth meeting of the conference was called to order at 1700.27 The conference adjourned at 1925, and the President returned to the Little White House at 1935.

At 2015 the President, accompanied by Mr. Davies, Mr. Byrnes and Admiral Leahy, left the Little White House for Generalissimo Stalin’s residence where they attended a dinner given by the Generalissimo. Present were: The President, Mr. Byrnes, Mr. Harriman, Admiral Leahy, Mr. Davies, Mr. Bohlen, Prime Minister Churchill, Mr. Eden, Mr. Attlee, Lord Leathers, Major Birse, Generalissimo Stalin, Mr. Molotov, Mr. Vyshinski, Mr. Beria (People’s Commissar for Internal Affairs), Mr. Gousev, Mr. Gromyko, and Mr. Pavlov.28

The President returned to the Little White House at 2330.

Sunday, July 22nd:

The President, accompanied by his Military and Naval Aides and Captain McMahon, and Colonel Tiernan, attended Protestant church services at 1000.28a The services were held in the Coliseum building (a former film laboratory) in the “Masterwork” area of the American Army camp and were conducted by Lieut. Colonel Lawrence Nelson, Second Armored Division Chaplain. Captain Ernest M. Northern, Jr., 67th Armored Regiment Chaplain, assisted Colonel Nelson. The President returned to the Coliseum at 1130 to attend a Catholic Mass conducted by his old friend, Colonel Tiernan.

Prime Minister Churchill called on the President at 1215. They conferred for a full hour,29 and Mr. Churchill left the Little White House at 1330. The Prime Minister declined the President’s invitation to lunch as he, himself, was having guests for lunch.

1500: Mail was dispatched to Washington.

[Page 18]

1645: The President and his party left the Little White House for Cecilienhof where he arrived at 1655.

1700: The sixth meeting of the conference was called to order.30 The meeting adjourned at 1950 and the President and party returned to the Little White House immediately.

2030: Private John R. Thomas, Jr., U. S. A. (Captain McMahon’s nephew) was a dinner guest at the Little White House this evening. Music was furnished during and after dinner by the Headquarters Berlin District (U. S. Army) Band, playing from the lower White House lawn.

Monday, July 23rd:

Mail arrived from Washington during the forenoon; the President signed this mail shortly after it was delivered to him.

1000: General Parks called on the President and presented him the flag that had been raised at Berlin last Friday.

Lieutenant-Colonel Wallace H. Graham, Medical Corps, U. S. A. (attached to the 24th Evacuation Hospital, Bremen) spent the day visiting with the President and members of his mess.

1100: Secretary Stimson called on the President.31

1500: Mail was dispatched to Washington.

At 1640 the President left the Little White House for Cecilienhof where he and his party arrived at 1650.

At 1710 the seventh meeting of the conference was called to order.32 The meeting adjourned at 1900 at which time the President and his party left to return to the Little White House.

At 2020 the President, Secretary Byrnes, and Admiral Leahy left the Little White House by foot for the Prime Minister’s residence where they attended a State Dinner given by Prime Minister Churchill in honor of the President and Generalissimo Stalin. Those present included: The President, Secretary Byrnes, Admiral Leahy, General Marshall, Admiral King, General Arnold, Mr. Bohlen, Generalissimo Stalin, Mr. Molotov, Army General A. I. Antonov, Marshal of the Soviet Union G. K. Zhukov, Marshal of Aviation F. Ya. Fodalev [Falaleyevf], Admiral of the Fleet N. G. Kousnetsov, Prime Minister Churchill, the Right Honorable C. R. Attlee, Mr. Eden, Field Marshal Sir Harold Alexander, Admiral of the Fleet Sir Andrew Cunningham, Field Marshal Sir Henry Maitland Wilson, Sir Edward Bridges, Field Marshal Sir Bernard Montgomery, Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Charles Portal, Field Marshal Sir Alan Brooke, Commander C. R. Thompson, and Major A. Birse.33 Music for the occasion was [Page 19]furnished by a stringed orchestra from a Royal Air Force band. The menu included: Cold clear soup, hot turtle soup, fried sole, roast chicken, boiled new potatoes, peas, cold ham, lettuce salad, fruit salad, ice cream, and Scotch woodcock.

The President, Secretary Byrnes, and Admiral Leahy returned to the Little White House at 2330.

Tuesday, July 24th:

Mail arrived from Washington this forenoon. The President signed this mail shortly after it was delivered to him. It included legislative bills HR 905, HR 3295 and H. J. Res. 228.

1000: The President took time out from his work to pose for pictures with Major Greer’s communications personnel, who included several of the WAC telephone operators who handled the “Amco” board.

1020: Secretary Stimson called on the President.34

1035: Secretary Byrnes conferred with the President.35

1130: The Combined Chiefs of Staff (U. S. and British) assembled at the Little White House and met in plenary session with the President and Prime Minister Churchill.36 Their report37 was approved by the President and the Prime Minister.

1430: The first meeting of the Tripartite military staffs (U. S., British, and U. S. S. R.) was convened at Cecilienhof.38

1500: Mail was dispatched to Washington.

1620: A delegation of Poles (consisting of the President of the National Council of Poland and three members of the Polish Provisional Government of National Unity39), escorted by Ambassador Harriman, called on the President at the Little White House.40 They departed at 1645.

1650: The President and his party left the Little White House for Cecilienhof, where they arrived at 1700.

At 1715 the eighth meeting of the conference was called to order.41 The meeting adjourned at 1930, and the President left Cecilienhof immediately to return to the Little White House.

[Page 20]

Wednesday, July 25th:

0920: Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten (Supreme Commander, Allied Forces in the India–Burma Theatre) called on the President at the Little White House.42

1000: General Marshall called on the President.

1035: The President and his party left the Little White House for Cecilienhof where they arrived at 1045. Before the conference was called to order, the President, the Prime Minister, and the Generalissimo posed in the Palace garden for still and motion pictures. Photographers (service and civilian) from all three nations were represented.

1100: The Big Three and other delegates entered the conference room and the ninth meeting of the Berlin Conference was called to order by the President.43 The meeting adjourned at 1200, at which time the President left to return to the Little White House.

Admiral Leahy, accompanied by Rear Admiral H. A. Flanigan, U. S. N., Captain Vardaman, Colonel Rusk, Lieutenant Elsey, Lieutenant Edelstein, Lieutenant Rigdon, and First Lieutenant Vardaman left Babelsberg this morning for a flight to London. They returned to Babelsberg Thursday afternoon.

2000: Ambassador Murphy, Ambassador Caffery, and General Somervell were dinner guests at the Little White House this evening.44 Dinner music was played by an eight-piece band from the 278th Army Ground Force band with Staff Sergeant Joe Borrelli conducting. Vocal selections were rendered by Pfc Jules Navarra.

Thursday, July 26th:

At 0730 the President and certain members of his party left the Little White House by auto for the airport at Gatow. At Gatow they enplaned for Frankfurt to inspect U. S. Army personnel and facilities in that area.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1830: The President’s plane arrived at Gatow. He and his party entered waiting motor cars here and left at once for the Little White House where they arrived at 1900.

1915: General Marshall called on the President.45

Captain John B. Ross, Medical Corps, U. S. A. (Secretary Ross’ son) and Major Alfred K. Lee, JAGD, U. S. A. (a personal friend of the President) were dinner guests at the Little White House this evening. Captain Ross spent several days in Babelsberg visiting with his father.

[Page 21]

2200: Ambassador Harriman called on the President.46

The President, jointly with Prime Minister Churchill and Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, issued a proclamation from Berlin this evening calling on the Japanese to surrender unconditionally now or suffer complete destruction. This document later became known as the “Potsdam Declaration”. A copy is appended.47

There was no meeting of the Big Three today as Mr. Churchill, Mr. Attlee, and Mr. Eden were in England in connection with the official election count.

Friday, July 27th:

There was no meeting of the conference today as the British Delegation had not returned to Babelsberg.

The President worked on his mail during the forenoon.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff, except for Admiral Leahy, departed Babelsberg this morning for the return trip to Washington. They traveled by air.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1200: The President conferred with Secretary Byrnes and Admiral Leahy.48 A definition of lend-lease and the prospects of bringing the conference to an early close were among the subjects they discussed.

Mail was dispatched to Washington this afternoon.

1830: Mr. Davies called on the President.46

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2030: Judge Samuel I. Rosenman, Special Assistant to the President, arrived Babelsberg this evening and joined the President’s party.

Sergeant List played selected piano solos during dinner hour.

The President today presented an autographed photograph of himself to Colonel Ernest R. Lee, U. S. A.

Saturday, July 28th:

This morning the President presented an autographed photograph to Major General Floyd L. Parks, U. S. A.

0930: The President conferred with Secretary Byrnes and Admiral Leahy.49

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[Page 22]

1930: Secretary Forrestal and Vice Admiral C. M. Cooke, U. S. N., were dinner guests of the President this evening.50

Prime Minister Attlee and British Foreign Minister Ernest Bevin returned to Babelsberg from London this afternoon. Their party having been defeated in the recent British election, Mr. Churchill and Mr. Eden remained in England.

2115: Prime Minister Attlee, Mr. Bevin, and Sir Alexander Cadogan called at the Little White House and conferred briefly with the President and Secretary Byrnes.51

2215: The President and his party left the Little White House for Cecilienhof. The tenth meeting of the conference was called to order at 2230.52 The new Big Three posed for still and motion pictures before the meeting. Tonight’s meeting was adjourned at 0005, or five minutes past midnight.

The President returned to the Little White House at fifteen minutes past midnight, at which time he was handed a telegram from Washington informing him that the Senate had ratified the United Nations Charter.53 The President immediately dispatched the following statement to the press: “It is deeply gratifying that the Senate has ratified the United Nations Charter by virtually unanimous vote. The action of the Senate substantially advances the cause of world peace.”

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sunday, July 29th:

1000: The President attended Protestant church services at the Coliseum. The services were conducted by Captain Northern.

1130: Mr. Molotov, accompanied by Mr. Galounsky (interpreter) called at the Little White House. The President, Secretary Byrnes, Mr. Molotov, Admiral Leahy, Mr. Bohlen and Mr. Galounsky conferred for more than an hour.54 Generalissimo Stalin was indisposed and could not attend.

The President presented autographed pictures to Colonel General S. N. Kruglov, Lieutenant General N. D. Gorlinski and Colonel M. M. Koretsky of the Red Army. These officers, members of the Soviet Advance party, had charge of arrangements at Babelsberg for the housing and security of the Big Three.…

Mail was dispatched to Washington this afternoon.

1630: Prime Minister Attlee, Mr. Bevin, and Sir Alexander [Page 23]Cadogan called at the Little White House. They conferred for some time with the President and Secretary Byrnes.55

There was no meeting of the Big Three today. Generalissimo Stalin was still indisposed.

1930: Captain Ross was a dinner guest at the White House this evening. Dinner music was furnished by an Army band.

Monday, July 30th:

Secretary Forrestal, General Eisenhower, Admiral Cooke, Admiral Cochrane, General Clay, Commodore Schade and Captain E. B. Taylor, U. S. N., had breakfast with the President. Later they conferred with the President, Secretary Byrnes and Admiral Leahy.56

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Generalissimo Stalin was still indisposed so there was no meeting of the Big Three today.57 The Foreign Secretaries had a very long session however.58

1800: Ambassador Pauley called on the President.59

1900: Dinner at the Little White House. Sergeant List played a number of Chopin selections—the President’s favorites—during the dinner hour.

Tuesday, July 31st:

At 0900 Brigadier General Stuart Cutler, Commanding General, Berlin Headquarters District, came to the Little White House and called on the President and General Vaughan.59

1000: Mr. Rowan, Prime Minister Attlee’s secretary, called on the President.59

Mail was dispatched to Washington this afternoon.

1545: The President left the Little White House for Cecilienhof.

1600: The eleventh meeting of the Big Three was convened.60 This turned out to be a long session as the meeting did not adjourn until 1915. The President left immediately for the Little White House.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Wednesday, August 1st:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The President spent the forenoon working on his mail and studying [Page 24]reports on subjects due to come up for discussion in the afternoon session of the conference.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1445: The President left the Little White House for Cecilienhof, where he arrived at 1455. Shortly after his arrival at the Palace, the President and other members of the Big Three, together with their Foreign Secretaries and Admiral Leahy, posed for newsreel and still pictures.

1530: The twelfth meeting of the Big Three was convened.61 The meeting adjourned at 1750, when it was announced that a final session had been called for 2100 tonight.

The President left Cecilienhof at 1800 and returned to the Little White House.

1900: Captain Ross and First Lieutenant McDonald were dinner guests at the Little White House this evening.

2145: The President and party left the Little White House for Cecilienhof. The 2100 meeting was delayed until 2200 to permit the various delegations more time to complete drafts of the communiqué to be considered at tonight’s meeting of the conference. The President and Secretary Byrnes arrived at Cecilienhof at 2155 and devoted the next 30 minutes to the study of our proposed draft of the conference communiqué.62

2230: The thirteenth meeting of the Berlin Conference convened.63 This session was devoted almost entirely to the study of, and approval of, the final tripartite communiqué. The communiqué was agreed on shortly after midnight. Release time was agreed for 1730 (local time) tomorrow in Washington and concurrently in London and Moscow. A copy of the communiqué is appended hereto.64 At 0030 (August 2nd, 1945) the Berlin Conference formally adjourned. The delegates spent the next few minutes saying goodbyes. The President and his party then, at 0040, left the Palace to return to the Little White House.

Thursday, August 2nd:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The President and his party left the Little White House at 0715 by motor car for Gatow Airfield. We arrived at the airfield at 0740. All hands immediately embarked in their respective planes. Ambassador Harriman and General Parks were among those on hand to see the President off. By special request of the President, no honors were rendered him at the airport.

[Page 25]

At 0755 Plane No. 2 (a C–54, Major Jesse Hayes pilot) departed for St. Mawgan Airport in Southwest England. The principal passenger was Secretary Byrnes. With him were: Mr. Ross, Mr. Matthews, Mr. Cohen, Mr. Russell, Mr. Brown, Lt-Colonel McIntire, Major Mitchell, Lt. Elsey, Lt. Edelstein, Captain Graham, Lt. Rigdon, CWO Stoner, CWO Caldwell, Sgt. Philler, Agents Holmes, Haman, Campion, Waters, Spicer, Kearney and Gilliam, and Mr. Romagna.

Plane No. 1 (a C–54, Lt-Col. H. T. Myers pilot) departed Gatow at 0805 for St. Mawgan. Passengers were: The President, Admiral Leahy, Judge Rosenman, General Vaughan, Captain McMahon, Mr. Maloney, Mr. Drescher and Mr. Hipsley.

0815: Plane No. 3 (C–54) with all other members of our party departed Gatow for England. Lieut. McCarthy returned to Plymouth with us in this plane.

Our route from Gatow was via Magdeburg, Kassel, Brussels, Cape Gris Nez, Newhaven, over the Isle of Wight and Portland.…

Our plans to land at St. Mawgan, where an official welcoming committee (including Ambassador Winant and Admirals Stark and McCann and General Lee and British civic officials) awaited us, were thwarted by the weather. When our planes were over Harrowbeer—about 10 miles outside Plymouth—we received word that the airport at St. Mawgan was closed at the moment because of fog. Observing that Harrowbeer was clear, the President decided to take no chance on the weather and instructed his pilot to set his plane down there. Plane No. 1 landed at Harrowbeer at 0940. Planes No. 2 and No. 3 followed in shortly afterwards in that order. (Distance traveled, Berlin to Harrowbeer, approximately 800 miles.)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Transportation was soon assembled and the President left Harrowbeer at approximately 1020 for the drive to Plymouth.…

The President arrived at Mill Dock, Plymouth, at 1105. He was met here by Admiral Sir John [Ralph] Leatham, Commander in Chief, Plymouth. The President, Secretary Byrnes, Admiral Leahy and Admiral Leatham embarked in Admiral Leatham’s barge and left immediately for the Augusta, then at anchor in Plymouth Roads. They arrived on board the Augusta at 1120.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

At 1131 Ambassador Winant, Admiral Stark, General Lee and Admiral McCann arrived on board the Augusta and called on the President. They had been at St. Mawgan awaiting us, but on learning of the President’s landing at Harrowbeer, had hurried on to Plymouth.

[Page 26]

The British battle cruiser Renown and the U. S. S. Philadelphia were at anchor in Plymouth Roads with the Augusta. King George VI was in the Renown. He had come down from London by train this forenoon especially to welcome the President to England.

At 1235 the President, Secretary Byrnes and Admiral Leahy left the Augusta for the Renown to call upon the King. They lunched with the King on board the Renown. Other guests were Lord [Sir Alan] Lascelles, Viscount [the Earl of] Halifax, Admiral Leatham and Captain Campbell.…

1400: Lieut. McCarthy was dispatched to Washington via air with White House mail.

At 1504, King George VI, accompanied by the Earl of Halifax, Sir Alan Lascelles, Admiral Leatham and Captain Campbell, came on board the Augusta to call on the President.…

The King was greeted on the quarterdeck by the President, Secretary Byrnes, Admiral Leahy and Captain Foskett. He inspected the Marine Guard and made a brief tour of inspection of personnel on the weather decks forward. The party then retired to the President’s cabin.

The visit concluded, the King and his party left the ship at 1534, at which time full honors were again rendered. After the King had left the Augusta the British White Ensign was hauled down.

The Augusta got underway at 1549 and stood out of the harbor. The Philadelphia got underway at 1555 and followed in column astern.…

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The President met with the members of the press (White House Correspondents Smith, Nixon, Vacarro and Beatty) shortly after our clearing the harbor and discussed the conference with them.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Friday, August 3rd:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The President received the members of the press during the afternoon. He saw them frequently during the return voyage although he held no official press conferences.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Saturday, August 4th:

The President was up at 0500 this morning and spent some time strolling about decks. He appeared completely rested from the strain of the long and tiring conference discussions. He had breakfast early and spent most of the forenoon studying conference reports and working [Page 27]on the address he planned to deliver on his return to the United States.65

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The President spent the afternoon working on his mail and his forthcoming speech and studying conference reports.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sunday, August 5th:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The President spent most of the afternoon poring over voluminous conference reports and working on his report to be delivered to the nation on his return to Washington.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Monday, August 6th:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The President and members of his party spent some time on deck this morning enjoying the sun and listening to a band concert by the ship’s band. Afterwards, the President worked on his address to the Nation.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The President received the first news of the successful bombing of Japan with the newest and most powerful weapon ever invented by man, the atomic bomb, while he was eating lunch with the crew today. A few minutes before 1200, Captain Graham carried him a brief message from the Navy Department informing him that the Japanese port of Hiroshima had been bombed a few hours before, under perfect weather conditions and with no opposition. The results of the bombing were reported to be even more successful than previous tests of the new weapon had led us to hope for.…

A few minutes later, the ship’s radio began to carry news bulletins from Washington about the atomic bomb, and radio stations throughout the United States broadcast a statement by the President which he had approved just before leaving Germany.66 A draft of this statement had been sent to Babelsberg by special courier by Secretary Stimson.67

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[Page 28]

Tuesday, August 7th:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The Augusta moored to Pier No. 6, Army Embarkation Dock, Newport News, Va., at 1654, completing a record run from Europe. The task force averaged 26.5 knots from the point of departure off Plymouth to buoy XS, off the Chesapeake Bay. (Distance, Plymouth to Newport News, 3,230 miles.)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Mr. John Snyder, Vice Admiral P. N. L. Bellinger, Rear Admiral D. M. LeBreton, Admiral McCann, and Brigadier General Kilpatrick came aboard the Augusta, as soon as we had tied up, to call on the President.

Baggage and equipment had been transferred to the train by 1728. The President left the ship then and boarded the special train which was parked on the pier.

Just two minutes after the President had left the ship (at 1730), the Augusta got underway from Pier No. 6 for the Naval Operating Base, Norfolk.

At 1740 the special train departed Newport News for Washington. Mr. Snyder joined the party for the return trip to Washington.

After a quick run, we arrived in Washington at the Bureau of Engraving Station, at 2245. The President and party disembarked at once and proceeded to the White House by automobile. The President found a number of members of his Cabinet on hand to greet him and welcome him back home.

Summary of distance traveled: Miles
Washington to Newport News and return 384
Newport News to Antwerp 3837
Antwerp to Berlin 495
Berlin to Frankfurt and return 600
Berlin to Plymouth 800
Plymouth to Newport News  3230
Total 9346
  1. See vol. i, documents No. 214.
  2. The information in parentheses is apparently a map coordinate.
  3. See vol. i, documents Nos. 88 and 89.
  4. No record has been found of the discussion that took place during this dinner meeting.
  5. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at this meeting.
  6. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at this meeting.
  7. Concerning the discussion that took place at this meeting, see post, p. 35.
  8. Cf. the minutes of the meeting of Foreign Ministers on the morning of July 18, post, p. 66.
  9. Stimson called on Truman shortly after 7:30 p.m. Concerning the discussion that took place at this meeting, see document No. 1303, footnote 2.
  10. No record has been found of the discussion that took place during this dinner meeting.
  11. In a conference which Department of State historians had on January 24, 1956, with Truman and members of his staff, the information was supplied that the “urgent message” referred to at this point in the Log was not of an official character.
  12. Concerning the discussion that took place at this meeting, see post, pp. 43, 1582.
  13. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at these meetings.
  14. For the minutes of the First Plenary Meeting, see post, p. 52.
  15. No record has been found of the discussion that took place during this dinner meeting other than the extract from Stimson’s diary entry of July 17 quoted post, p. 43, footnote 3.
  16. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at the meeting or meetings referred to other than the extract from Stimson’s diary entry of July 18 quoted in footnote 2 to document No. 1304.
  17. Concerning the discussion that took place during this luncheon meeting, see post, p. 79.
  18. Concerning the discussion that took place at this meeting, see post, pp. 86, 1587.
  19. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 88.
  20. No record has been found of the discussion that took place during this dinner meeting.
  21. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at this meeting.
  22. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 116.
  23. No record has been found of the discussion that took place during this dinner meeting, except for the fragmentary information cited post, p. 137, footnote 2.
  24. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at this meeting or during the luncheon which followed.
  25. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 165.
  26. No record has been found of the discussion that took place during this dinner meeting.
  27. Stimson called on Truman at 3:30 p.m. Concerning the discussion that took place at this meeting, see document No. 1157, footnote 1; document No. 1305, footnote 1.
  28. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at this meeting.
  29. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 203.
  30. No record has been found of the discussion that took place during this dinner meeting.
  31. Stimson had called on Truman at 9:20 a.m. Concerning the discussion that took place at this meeting, see document No. 1157, footnote 1; document No. 1310, footnote 3.
  32. Concerning the discussion that took place at this meeting, see post, p. 243.
  33. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 244.
  34. Concerning the discussion that took place at this meeting, see post, p. 1266, footnote 6.
  35. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 300.
  36. Concerning the conversation that took place during this dinner meeting, see post, p. 319.
  37. Concerning the discussion that took place at this meeting—which, according to Stimson’s diary entry, bes;an at 9:20 rather than 10:20—see post, p. 1267, footnote 6 (to document No. 1236); p. 1324, footnote 3; p. 1373, footnote 2.
  38. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at this meeting.
  39. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 340.
  40. Document No. 1381.
  41. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 345.
  42. The Polish delegation which called on Truman included President Bierut, Vice President Grabski, Prime Minister Osóbka-Morawski, Deputy Prime Ministers Mikołajczyk and Gomułka, Foreign Minister Rzymowski, Deputy Foreign Minister Modzelewski, and Marshal Rola-Zymierski.
  43. For the record of this meeting, see post, p. 356.
  44. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 357.
  45. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at this meeting or at Truman’s meeting with Marshall which followed.
  46. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 382.
  47. No record has been found of the discussion that took place during this dinner meeting.
  48. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at this meeting.
  49. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at this meeting.
  50. Document No. 1382.
  51. Concerning the discussion that took place at this meeting, see William D. Leahy, I Was There: The Personal Story of the Chief of Staff to Presidents Roosevelt and Truman Based on His Notes and Diaries Made at the Time (New York, 1950), p. 420.
  52. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at this meeting.
  53. Concerning the discussion that took place at this meeting, see ibid., p. 420.
  54. Concerning Forrestal’s conversation with Truman, see Walter Millis, ed., The Forrestal Diaries (New York, 1951), p. 78.
  55. Concerning the discussion that took place at this meeting, see post, p. 458.
  56. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 459.
  57. Signed at San Francisco, June 26, 1945; ratification advised by the Senate, July 28, 1945 (Department of State, Treaty Series No. 993, 59 Stat. (2) 1031).
  58. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 471.
  59. Concerning the discussion that took place at this meeting, see post, p. 476.
  60. See Millis, ed., The Forrestal Diaries, p. 81.
  61. Stalin had suggested that Molotov might replace him at the plenary meetings (see post, p. 471, footnote 2), but plenary meetings were not resumed until Stalin was able to attend on July 31.
  62. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 483.
  63. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at this meeting.
  64. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at this meeting.
  65. No record has been found of the discussion that took place at this meeting.
  66. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 511.
  67. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 566.
  68. See the attachment to document No. 1380.
  69. For the minutes of this meeting, see post, p. 586.
  70. See document No. 1384.
  71. See Department of State Bulletin, vol. xiii, p. 208.
  72. Document No. 1315.
  73. See document No. 1313.