J. C. S. Files

Joint Chiefs of Staff Minutes

[Extracts]
top secret

1. Basic Objectives, Strategy and Policy

(C. C. S. 877/43 and J. C. S. 1366/24)

Admiral Leahy recommended for clarity that the term “this war” be changed wherever appearing in J. C. S. 1366/2 to “the war against Japan”.

General Somervell read out the wording5 which he expected Lord Leathers to propose in lieu of the paragraph on cargo shipping appearing on page 21 of the enclosure to J. C. S. 1366/2. He recommended that the United States Chiefs of Staff oppose the change since it does not take into account various shipping problems that are the concern of the United States only. He said that Lord Leathers would wish to include this paragraph in the statement of the basic objectives. He considered that the United States Chiefs of Staff might well accept Lord Leathers’ proposal in this regard.

In reply to a question by General Marshall, Admiral Gardner said that he saw no reason for singling out the question of shipping for inclusion in the statement of the basic objectives since there were other matters such as questions of food and of petroleum products, of the same nature as shipping, that might equally well be included in the statement.

General Somervell said that Lord Leathers would also propose to insert in paragraph III 4 c “for use as base or line of communication troops” after “areas” in the third line. He suggested that the United States Chiefs of Staff accept this change provided it was made clear that the change related to British bases in India.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff:—

Approved the memorandum in the Enclosure to J. C. S. 1366/2, as amended during the discussion and directed that it be presented to the Combined Chiefs of Staff. (Subsequently circulated as C. C. S. 877/5.6)

2. Review of Combined Procedures for Munitions Assignments

(J. C. S. 1397/2 and 1397/47)

General Arnold proposed a new paragraph 2 to replace that in the enclosure to J. C. S. 1397/4. The change proposed by General Arnold was accepted by the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

[Page 199]

Admiral Leahy said that there were so many important matters for the President and the Prime Minister to discuss that he thought that the question raised in this paper might well be handled in a routine manner after the conference is over. He asked if there was any pressing reason why this should be handled at the present time.

General Somervell said that the only reason was that there was now an opportunity for the President and Prime Minister to discuss the question.

Admiral King suggested that the Joint Chiefs of Staff approve the draft memorandum to the President and that if Admiral Leahy found an opportunity to take the matter up with the President during the conference that he might do so.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff:—

Approved the memorandum in the Enclosure to J. C. S. 1397/4 as amended during the discussion and requested Admiral Leahy to present it to the President at such time as he considered most appropriate.8

3. Internationalization of the Danube River

(J. C. S. 14269)

Admiral Cooke pointed out the urgency of acting on this matter at the present time and recommended that the memorandum to the Combined Chiefs of Staff contained in the enclosure be presented to the Combined Chiefs of Staff.

General Hull said that the Department of State had developed a similar policy in regard to the internationalization of the Danube River10 and said that a paper approved by the Combined Chiefs of Staff would support the Department of State and the Foreign Office in obtaining an agreement.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff:—

Approved the memorandum in the Enclosure to J. C. S. 1426 and directed that it be presented to the Combined Chiefs of Staff. (Subsequently circulated as C. C. S. 896.11)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5. British Troop Ship Employment in U. S. Trans-Atlantic Programs—First Half of 1946

(C. C. S. 679/712)

General Somervell said that the British Chiefs of Staff would request a delay in consideration of this question since sufficient data [Page 200]were not available to them at the present time and since it was affected by the decision which might be reached on C. C. S. 679/6.13 He thought that the United States Chiefs of Staff should urge the British Chiefs of Staff to complete their studies of personnel shipping and be prepared to discuss the matter with the United States Chiefs of Staff by 15 September 1945.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff:—

a.
Confirmed their position as indicated in C. C. S. 679/7 and
b.
Agreed to urge that the British Chiefs of Staff complete their survey of passenger ships and be prepared to discuss this subject with the United States Chiefs of Staff by 15 September 1945.

6. Disposition of Captured German Passenger Ships

(C. C. S. 679/6)

General Somervell said that he understood that the British would offer the Europa for trans-Atlantic service on a 50–50+ basis and that they would agree to the assignment of five of the captured German passenger ships for United States use in the Pacific. He said that the United States wanted all seven of the captured German passenger ships and he thought that the British would agree to the assignment of seven provided the United States Chiefs of Staff made a flat statement that the ships would be used in the Pacific and would not replace there any United States ships for repatriation in the Atlantic.

General Gross said that the British might propose that the Europa be used for repatriation of 16,000 Canadians before 31 December 1945.

Admiral Flanigan suggested that the Joint Chiefs of Staff should agree that half the capacity of the Europa be used for the repatriation of Canadian troops up to a maximum of 16,000, by 31 December 1945.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff:—

a.
Confirmed their position as indicated in C. C. S. 679/6.
b.
Agreed to accept a proposal, if made by the British Chiefs of Staff, to employ the equivalent of half the capacity of the Europa for the repatriation of Canadian troops up to a maximum of 16,000 by 31 December 1945.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9. Collection of Weather Information in Eastern Siberia

Admiral King proposed a memorandum to the President on the above subject.

Admiral Cooke said that this memorandum related to getting United States personnel into Russia in connection with coming operations [Page 201]and that he considered the matter most vital. He thought that the President should press the question involved with Generalissimo Stalin.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff:—

Approved the memorandum for the President on this subject proposed by Admiral King.14

  1. Document No. 1263, post.
  2. Not printed.
  3. Not found. Cf. document No. 1265, post.
  4. Document No. 1264, post.
  5. Neither printed.
  6. For the memorandum submitted to Truman, see document No. 1198, post.
  7. Not printed.
  8. See vol. i, document No. 266.
  9. Document No. 754, post.
  10. Document No. 1191, post.
  11. Document No. 1190, post.
  12. Document No. 1277, post.