J. C. S. Files

No. 1279
The United States Chiefs of Staff to the Soviet Chiefs of Staff1
top secret
  • First Question—Has the Soviet High Command received any instructions regarding the proposal to establish United States weather liaison groups in Petropavlovsk and Khabarovsk as presented to Generalissimo Stalin by President Truman on 23 July 1945?2
  • Second Question—United States naval surface forces will operate without restriction in the Seas of Okhotsk and Japan. United States submarine forces will operate without restriction in the Seas of Okhotsk and Japan, south and east of a line established by connecting the following points: Coast of Korea at latitude 38° north, thence to latitude 40° north longitude 135° east, thence to latitude 45°45′ north longitude 140° east, thence along the parallel of latitude 45°45′ north. This boundary will be subject to later change as the situation may require. United States submarine operations north and west of this boundary and Soviet operations south and east of this boundary will be subject to coordination. Does the Soviet General Staff have any suggestions regarding further coordination of naval operations?
  • Third Question—United States air forces will operate without restriction south and east of the following line: Cape Lopatka, west to point at latitude 51°10′ north longitude 147° east, thence to point at latitude 45°45′ north longitude 144°20′ east, thence to point at latitude 45°4′ north longitude 139°30′ east, thence to point at latitude 41°20′ north longitude 133°20′ east, thence westward to Seishin [Chongjin], Korea, thence north to railroad at Korean border, thence westward along railroad to Yungki and Changchun, thence along the river to Liaoyuan, Kailu and Chihfeng, thence along the railroad through Tolun, Paochang, Wanchuan [Kalgan], Tatung, Fengchen, Tsining [Chining] to Kweisui, thence northwest to the border of Outer Mongolia. This boundary will be subject to later change as the situation may require. United States air operations north and west of this [Page 1328]boundary and Soviet operations south and east of this boundary will be subject to coordination. Does the Soviet General Staff have any suggestions regarding further coordination of air operations?
  • Fourth Question—Does the Soviet High Command agree to the proposal for the immediate establishment of operational coordination and liaison as proposed by the United States Chiefs of Staff in the letter sent by the Commanding General, United States Military Mission,3 to General Antonov on 5 July 1945?4
  • Fifth Question—It is assumed that, after D–day, Soviet or United States air and naval craft in emergencies will have access to the nearest Soviet or United States ports or airfields where they may obtain repairs, servicing, medical care and otherwise be assisted in making a speedy return to combat. Although in extreme emergency the nearest friendly facility would be sought, it is considered desirable to designate certain ports, airfields or areas where maximum facilities would be available. Will the Soviet Government designate such ports, airfields or areas furnishing information necessary for proper location, identification and approach together with information on recognition signals, corridors of approach and exit for general use in any emergency, landing or coastal approach? The United States is prepared to take corresponding action in the case of Soviet aircraft.
  1. Annex to the minutes of the meeting of the Chiefs of Staff of the United States and the Soviet Union, July 26. See ante, p. 408. These questions were handed to Antonov on July 24. See ante, p. 352, A copy was communicated to the British Chiefs of Staff on July 25.
  2. See document No.1278.
  3. Major General John R. Deane.
  4. Document No. 185, printed in vol. i .