Byrnes Papers

No. 1033
The Assistant Secretary of State (Dunn) to the Secretary of State1

Memorandum for the Secretary

On July 26 the European Advisory Commission signed the Agreement amending the protocol of September 12, 1944 on zones of occupation [Page 1005]in Germany and the administration of greater Berlin. This Agreement makes provision for a French zone of occupation in Germany, as agreed at the Yalta Conference.

The Agreement, the covering report, and the accompanying exchanges of letters2 were negotiated in the EAC in full conformity with the detailed instructions agreed between the Department and the JCS. I suggest that the President may now wish to give his approval to this Agreement and inform Ambassador Winant accordingly. The Agreement comes into force when approved by the four Governments. Its provisions are already being carried out directly by the military authorities concerned.

James Clement Dunn

Approved: ________________3
Secretary of State

Approved: Harry S. Truman, July 28, 1945.4
The President

  1. Printed from a carbon copy on which there is an uncertified typed signature.
  2. For the text of the agreement of July 26, see Treaties and Other International Acts Series No. 3071; United States Treaties and Other International Agreements, vol. 5, pt. 2, p. 2087. For the covering report, see document No. 1032.

    The exchanges of letters referred to comprised the following (copies transmitted to the Department of State under cover of Winant’s despatch No. 24517 of July 27, file No. 740.00119 EAC/7–2745):

    (a)
    A letter from Winant to Massigli, informing the latter that the United States Government “will be prepared, at a later stage in the Allied occupation of Germany, to review with the Provisional Government of the French Republic the assignment of areas of occupation between the French and U. S. zones, in the light of the then prevailing conditions of occupation and the requirements of the respective forces of occupation.”
    (b)
    A parallel letter from Campbell to Massigli, giving similar assurances with respect to a review of the assignment of areas of occupation between the French and British zones.
    (c)
    A letter from Winant to Massigli, informing the latter “that the U. S. military authorities in Germany will be prepared to make available to the French military authorities in Germany the records and archives located at Karlsruhe and relating to the area of French occupation in Baden.”
    (d)
    A letter from Massigli to Winant containing the following assurances: “… the French Government will assure to the United States forces of occupation the right of free passage across the French zone of occupation as well as the right of free overflight above that zone. It is likewise understood that the United States forces will exercise in that zone exclusive control over the bridges across the Rhine constructed by the United States, as well as over communications lines and installations constructed in Germany under the same conditions. The French forces will have free use of the said bridges, lines, and installations located in or leading into the French zone. The detailed arrangements regarding these matters will be worked out by mutual agreement between the United States and French commanders-in-chief in Germany.”
    (e)
    Acknowledgments of the above letters.

  3. There is no indication of Byrnes’ approval.
  4. The source copy bears a holograph signature by Truman. It appears that this copy was signed by Truman as a souvenir rather than as an official record of Presidential approval. There is no doubt, however, that Truman approved Dunn’s memorandum officially, presumably after it had been approved by Byrnes. See document No. 1034.