No. 445.
Mr. Bayard to Mr. Manning.

No. 74.]

Sir: I inclose for your information copies of two communications from the military authorities on our frontier which have been referred hither by the Secretary of War under dates of the 25th and 26th ultimo, in relation to the recent occurrences at Nogales, Ariz.

I am, etc.,

T. F. Bayard..
[Inclosure 1 in No. 74.]

Captain Lawton to the Adjutant-General.

Sir: I Lave the honor to report that upon my arrival here yesterday I met Captain Dorst, who informed me that Governor Torres had expressed a desire to see me as soon as I arrived. I immediately proceeded with Captain Dorst to Governor Torres’s headquarters, and was very cordially received by him. He expressed his great regret at the unpleasant occurrences, and assured me that every effort would be made to bring the guilty parties to justice. He referred to his pleasant associations with General Miles, both in his private as well as official relations, and hoped these pleasant relations would continue.

It appears, from the best information obtainable, that the troubles of the night of the 3d instant occurred in the following manner: A colonel, Arvizu, commanding a detachment of Mexican irregulars (twenty-five men), stationed in Nogales, Mexico, had been abandoned by his mistress, who took refuge on this side of the line. This colonel had made frequent efforts to induce the woman to return without avail. The evening of the 3d a well-known Mexican named Rincon went to the house of the woman and endeavored to induce her to go walking with him. Suspecting treachery she sent for an officer. Constable Littlepage [sic] went in obedience to the summons, and was soon followed by Deputy Sheriff Sheedy, accompanied by a citizen, Dr. Purdy. These parties induced Rincon to desist, go away, and leave the woman alone, they ail walking away together. They had scarcely, left the house when an armed man emerged from concealment, presented a revolver in the face of Constable Little John (?) and demanded that he should release his prisoner, evidently presuming that Rincon, who was walking by the side of Littlejohn, was a prisoner. Littlejohn satisfied the person, who proved to be Lieutenant Gutierrez, of the Mexican irregulars, that Rincon was not prisoner, and as soon as the lieutenant returned his pistol, Littlejohn drew his and arrested the lieutenant on the charge of drawing a weapon on an officer. The party then proceeded with the lieutenant as a prisoner, observing, however, several Mexican soldiers run ahead of them. Arriving opposite the railroad water-tank, a Mexican soldier stepped out, presented his rifle at Littlejohn and demanded he should release his lieutenant. Mr. Sheedy, who was behind, immediately fired on the soldier, who turned his piece on Mr. Sheedy and fired. Promiscuous firing then commenced, in which one Mexican soldier was wounded, who has since died, the others, including the lieutenant, escaping to the other side the line. It is surmised the colonel induced the parties from the Mexican side the line to engage in an enterprise to kidnap the woman in question, which was frustrated in the manner indicated above. There can scarcely any serious complications arise out of this escapade, as the action of the governor of Sonora has been prompt and vigorous. The Obnoxious parties have been removed, the colonel by arrest and the lieutenant by desertion. The best people on both sides deprecate the action of the Mexicans concerned. Perfect quiet prevails and no trouble is anticipated. The presence of troops is really not necessary, although I would recommend their being retained sometime longer. A detachment of infantry would be better under the circumstances than cavalry, as they could be held closer to the town, and would not be encumbered with horses and the expense of transporting forage.

Having no uniform, bedding, or camp equipage with me for my own use, I will return to Huachuca to-day to procure the same and return at once, Captain Dorst remaining [Page 701] in command during my absence. The command is encamped in a fairly good place 3 miles north of town.

Very respectfully, etc.,

H. W. Lawton
,
Captain, Fourth Cavalry.

[First indorsement.]

Headquarters Department of Arizona,
Los Angeles, Cal. , March 12, 1887.

Respectfully forwarded to headquarters Division of the Pacific.

Nelson A. Miles
,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Second indorsement.]

Headquarters Division of the Pacific,
San Francisco, Cal. , March 16, 1887.

Respectfully forwarded to the Adjutant-General of the Army.

O. O. Howard
,
Major-General, Commanding.

[Third indorsement.]

War Department, March 25, 1887.

Official copy respectfully furnished for the information of the honorable the Secretary of State.

Wm, C. Endicott
,
Secretary of War.
[Inclosure 2 in No. 74.—Telegram.]

Captain Lawton to Lieutenant Dapray.

Prisoners are in custody of Mexican authorities and are being tried by Mexican court. They were to-day separated and are allowed no communication with each other or with the outside. Consular agent here states that Mexican authorities have acted satisfactorily in every particular. No official demand has yet been made by our Government for the prisoners, although Mexican authorities have expressed their willingness to turn them over on extradition or otherwise. All is quiet. There is no disagreement between officials of the two Governments and no trouble can occur. Governor Torres has notified me he will visit my camp to-day.

H. W. Lawton
,
Captain.

[First indorsement.]

Respectfully forwarded to headquarters Division of the Pacific.

Nelson A. Miles
,
Brigadier-General, Commanding

[Second indorsement.]

Respectfully forwarded to the Adjutant-General of the Army.

O. O. Howard
,
Major-General, Commanding

[Third indorsement.]

Official copy respectfully furnished for the information of the honorable the Secretary of State.

Wm. C. Endicott,
Secretary of War.