Uganda


240. Telegram 1 From the Embassy in Uganda to the Department of State, January 2, 1973, 0700Z

Ambassador Thomas P. Melady described the Amin regime as racist, erratic, brutal, inept, bellicose, irrational, ridiculous, militaristic, and, above all, xenophobic. He recommended that the United States continue to reduce its presence in Uganda.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970-73, POL Uganda. Secret; Exdis. Repeated to Addis Ababa, Bujumbura, Dar Es Salaam, Khartoum, Kigali, Kinshasa, London, Lourenco Marques, Lusaka, Mogadiscio, Nairobi, Paris, Rome, and USCINCEUR.


241. Intelligence Note RAAN-6 Prepared in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research, Washington, March 1, 1973

The intelligence note analyzed the prospects for General Amin's political survival, the future of Uganda, and the status of Uganda's relations within the region and with the United States.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970-73, POL Uganda. Secret; No Foreign Dissem; Controlled Dissem. Drafted by Summ, cleared by Reid, and approved by Denney.


242. Memorandum From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Nixon, Washington, March 6, 1973

Kissinger informed Nixon that the Department of State wished to phase out all USAID programs in Uganda because of deteriorating internal security. He recommended approval of Ambassador Melady's return to Kampala to oversee the phase out. Nixon disapproved the recommendation.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 746, Uganda, Vol. 1. Secret. Sent for action. A notation on the memorandum reads: ”The President has seen.” Nixon circled the number 450 in the last sentence of the memorandum and added a handwritten notation that reads: ”absolutely not — cut to 100 maximum for all govt. agencies.” He also highlighted the recommendation with a handwritten notation that reads: ”No; Let the chargé do it - no appeal.” Tab A, the text of a telegram to the President from General Amin on the signing of the Vietnam Peace Agreement, was not attached.


243. Memorandum From Secretary of State Rogers to President Nixon, Washington, March 9, 1973

Rogers asked Nixon to reconsider his decision not to send Ambassador Melady back to Kampala, arguing that Melady's failure to return could endanger U.S. citizens in Uganda.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 746, Uganda, Vol. 1. Confidential. Rogers highlighted the last sentence of the second paragraph and added a handwritten note that reads: ”What I mean is that he is crazy—and we have to recognize it. WRR”


244. Memorandum From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Nixon, Washington, March 22, 1973

Kissinger explained that security concerns in Uganda had caused him to withhold a decision on Ambassador Melady's return to Kampala, but that the threat seemed now exaggerated, and he recommended disapproving Secretary Rogers' appeal. Nixon agreed with the recommendation.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 746, Uganda, Vol. 1. Secret. Sent for action. A notation on the memorandum reads: ”The President has seen.” Nixon initialed next to "Agree.” Tab A is Document 243; Tab B is Document 242.


245. Memorandum From the Executive Secretary of the Department of State (Eliot) to the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger), Washington, July 6, 1973

Eliot reported that General Amin had sent two telegrams to President Nixon and Cambodian President Lon Nol criticizing U.S. policy in Cambodia, and that the Department responded by publicly announcing that Ambassador Melady would not return to Uganda nor would a new ambassador be nominated.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970-73, POL 15-1 Uganda. Confidential. Drafted by Schreiber (AF/E); Concurred in by AF/E and AF; Robert Blackwill signed for Eliot.


246. Memorandum From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Nixon, Washington, July 8, 1973

Kissinger informed Nixon that 112 Peace Corps Volunteers traveling by air charter to Zaire were detained in Uganda and held by General Amin.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 746, Country Files, Africa, Uganda, Vol. I. Secret. Sent for information. A notation on the memorandum reads: ”The President has seen.”


247. Memorandum From Acting Secretary of State Rush to President Nixon, Washington, July 17, 1973

Rush noted that the Embassy staff in Kampala had helped secure the release of Peace Corps Volunteers held by General Amin, and this showed the importance of maintaining a diplomatic presence in Uganda.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 746, Country Files, Africa, Uganda, Vol. I. Confidential. A notation on Kissinger's covering memorandum of August 6 to the President, transmitting the Rush memorandum, reads: ”The President has seen.”


248. Telegram 208637 From the Department of State to the Embassy in Uganda, October 20, 1973, 1838Z

The Department reviewed AF/E Director Wendell Coote's meeting with Ugandan officials in New York. Coote said that he could not dismiss General Amin's recent threats to U.S. citizens, and although the United States did not intend to break relations with Uganda, it did plan to reduce Embassy staff in Kampala.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Policy Files, 1973. Confidential; Priority. Repeated to Dar Es Salaam, Kinshasa, London, and USUN. Drafted and approved by Coote.


249. Minutes of the Secretary of State's Department Staff Meeting, Washington, October 25, 1973, 3:15 p.m.

In the portion of the minutes relating to Uganda, Assistant Secretary Newsom told Secretary Kissinger that General Amin's irrational behavior led the Africa Bureau to conclude that there was no purpose served by maintaining a U.S. presence in Uganda and that the Embassy should be closed without breaking off diplomatic relations. Kissinger agreed.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Transcripts of Secretary of State Henry Kissinger's Staff Meetings, 1973-1977, Entry 5177, Box 1, Secretary's Staff Meetings. Secret. The Embassy closed on November 10. (Telegram 3355 from Kampala, November 10; ibid., Central Policy Files, 1973)


250. Telegram 20388 From the Department of State to the Embassy in the Federal Republic of Germany, January 29, 1975, 0003Z

The Department reported on General Amin's efforts to improve relations with the United States, but concluded that it was not in the U.S. interest to make an early return to Uganda.

Source: Department of State, Nairobi Post Files: Lot 78 F 173, POL-DEF 19-8, POL Uganda 1975. Confidential. Repeated to London, Nairobi, and USUN.


251. Memorandum of Conversation, Washington, March 4, 1975

Acting Assistant Secretary Mulcahy and AF/E Director Coote discussed U.S.-Uganda relations with Ugandan Minister of Cooperatives and Marketing Moustapha Ramathan. The Americans indicated that a U.S. Embassy in Kampala would have difficulty operating in an atmosphere of suspicion and baseless accusations of spy activity.

Source: Department of State, Nairobi Post Files: Lot 78 F 173, POL-DEF 19-8, POL Uganda 1975. Confidential. Drafted by Theodore M. Ford (AF/E), cleared by Coote and Mulcahy.


252. Telegram 14733 From the Embassy in the Federal Republic of Germany to the Department of State, September 10, 1975, 0700Z

The FRG Ambassador in Uganda, representing U.S. interests, urged the United States to reopen its embassy in Kampala to counter growing Soviet influence.

Source: Department of State, Nairobi Embassy Files: Lot 78 F 173, POL-DEF 19-8, POL Uganda 1975. Confidential. Repeated to Nairobi, Dar Es Salaam, Lusaka, Kinshasa, Addis Ababa, Khartoum, Pretoria, and Tananarive.


253. Telegram 9854 From the Embassy in Zaire to the Department of State, November 12, 1975, 1110Z

Chargé Lannon Walker recommended acceding to Amin's request for a meeting with a high-level U.S. representative in Kinshasa on November 24, so long as the meeting remained secret.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for Africa, Box 7, Zaire-State Department Telegrams, SECSTATE Nodis, 11/1/75-12/31/75. Secret; Eyes Only; Immediate; Nodis.


254. Telegram 10163 From the Embassy in Zaire to the Department of State, November 25, 1975, 1910Z

Chargé Walker transmitted a report of Acting Assistant Secretary Mulcahy's meeting with General Amin, in which they discussed problems in U.S.-Uganda relations and Angola. Mulcahy deflected a request for U.S. arms, but offered tentative help in identifying mining experts.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for Africa, Box 7, Zaire-State Department Telegrams, SECSTATE Nodis, 11/1/75-12/31/75. Secret; Eyes Only; Niact Immediate; Nodis; Cherokee.


255. Telegram 499 From the Embassy in Kenya to the Department of State, January 17, 1976, 0815Z

Ambassador Marshall presented pros and cons for reopening the U.S. Embassy in Uganda and recommended that the Embassy be reopened.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Policy Files, 1976. Secret; Exdis.


256. Telegram 251082 From the Department of State to the U.S. Mission to the United Nations, October 8, 1976, 1947Z

The Department transmitted a Briefing Memorandum for Deputy Assistant Secretary Seelye's meeting with Uganda Foreign Minister Juma Abdalla Oris. The memorandum instructed Seelye not to raise false hopes about reopening the U.S. Embassy in Kampala.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Policy Files, 1976. Confidential; Immediate. Drafted by Baker (AF/E), approved in AF/E and AF. The meeting did not take place after Liberian Foreign Minister Dennis showed the Ugandans a U.S. paper cataloging General Amin's hostile statements. (Telegram 253377 to Monrovia, October 13; ibid.)