Guinea Bissau


66. Intelligence Note RAAN-4 Prepared in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research, Washington, February 1, 1973

The note commented on the motives behind the assassination of Amilcar Cabral, Secretary General of African Party for the Independence of Portuguese Guinea and the Cape Verde Islands (PAIGC), and the possible complicity of Portugal Guinea.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970-73, POL 13-9 PORT-GUIN. Secret; No Foreign Dissem; Controlled Dissem. Drafted by Johnnie Carson (INR/AAR), cleared by Summ, and released by Mark


67. Airgram A-172 From the Embassy in Portugal to the Department of State, September 11, 1973

The Embassy described the internal situation in Portuguese Guinea, the prospects for independence, and the likelihood of a political agreement between PAIGC and Portugal.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970-73, POL 19 PORT-GUIN. Confidential. Repeated to Abidjan, Banjul, Conakry, Dakar, London, Lourenco Marques, Luanda, Madrid, Paris, Oporto, Ponta Delgada, and the U.S. Missions to NATO and the UN. Drafted by Thomas F. Herron, cleared by Wingate Lloyd and by Col. Perley L. Mosier, and approved by Charg é Richard S. Post


68. Memorandum of Conversation, New York, October 3, 1973

Portuguese Foreign Minister Rui Manuel Patricio denounced the PAIGC declaration of independence and urged the United States to withhold recognition. Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs William J. Porter said the United States would not be "stampeded" into recognition.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970-73, POL 19 PORT-GUIN. Confidential. Drafted by Robert E. Barbour, Special Assistant to Under Secretary Porter. Only Part I is published here


69. Intelligence Note RAAN-27 Prepared in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research, Washington, October 5, 1973

The note examined the political, military, and international ramifications of Guinea-Bissau's declaration of independence. It indicated that a U.S. veto on recognition in the UN would alienate African nations, and that Portugal would likely increase pressure for a quid pro quo for renewal of the Azores Bases Agreement.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970-73, POL 19 PORT-GUIN. Confidential; No Foreign Dissem; Controlled Dissem. Drafted by Heyniger, cleared by Summ, and released by Mark.


70. Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs (Newsom) to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs (Springsteen), Washington, October 22, 1973

Newsom recommended that the United States not bow to increased Portuguese pressure to change policy on discouraging the use of American military equipment in Portuguese Africa.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, AF/S Files: Lot 76 D 475, Portugal 1974, DEF-15 Azores. Secret. Drafted by Newsom. The memorandum is an unsigned copy


71. Minutes of the Secretary of State's Staff Meeting, Washington, December 3, 1973, 3:10 p.m.

Kissinger and his senior Department of State staff debated whether to press Portugal for a change in policy toward its African territories. Kissinger asked for a NSSM to study the issue.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Transcripts of Secretary of State Kissinger's Staff Meetings, 1973-1977, Entry 5177, Box 1, Secretary's Analytical Staff Meetings. Secret.


72. Briefing Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs (Easum) to Secretary of State Kissinger, Washington, February 1, 1974

Easum noted that the Organization for African Unity (OAU) might move to strengthen the striking power of the African Party for the Independence of Portuguese Guinea and the Cape Verde Islands (PAIGC), thus endangering the Portuguese position.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, AF/S Files: Lot 77 D 104, Box 1, Portuguese Guinea 1974, POL 3, International Organization. Secret. Drafted by W. Paul O'Neill (AF/S) and Julius Walker (AF/RA), concurred in by Carson.


73. Minutes of the Secretary of State's Staff Meeting, Washington, July 10, 1974, 3:20 p.m

Secretary of State Kissinger and Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs Easum discussed Portugal's relations with Guinea-Bissau. Kissinger said the United States would not vote for Guinea-Bissau's admission to the United Nations until Portugal had granted it independence.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Transcripts of Secretary of State Kissinger's Staff Meetings, 1973-1977, Entry 5177, Box 4, Secretary's Analytical Staff Meetings. Secret.


74. Telegram 3408 From the Embassy in Portugal to the Department of State and the Mission to the United Nations, August 10, 1974, 1608Z

Ambassador Scott reported that the Government of Portugal had agreed in principle to recognize an independent Guinea-Bissau and welcomed immediate U.S. recognition of independence.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Policy Files, 1974. Confidential; Flash. Repeated to Algiers, London, Paris, Moscow, Conakry, and Dakar.


75. Telegram 175783 From the Secretary of State to the Mission to the United Nations, August 12, 1974, 2100Z

The Department of State authorized the mission to support the admission of Guinea-Bissau to the United Nations.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Policy Files, 1974. Confidential; Immediate. Drafted by Reis (IO/UNP), cleared in S, P, EUR/IB and AF/S, and approved by Blake (IO).