J.C.S. Files

Note by the Secretaries of the Combined Chiefs of Staff 1

top secret
C.C.S. 681/1 ( Octagon )

Message to Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek on the Results of “Octagon

The two enclosed draft messages, differing in the degree of detail included, are circulated for consideration by the Combined Chiefs of Staff.

A. J. McFarland
A. T. Cornwall-Jones

Combined Secretariat

Enclosure “A”

top secret

Draft Message From the President and the Prime Minister to Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek 2

From Admiral Leahy, Chief of Staff to the President.

My immediately following message is top secret and should be seen only by General Stilwell, a decoder appointed by him, and the Ambassador3 who is then to deliver it to the British Ambassador4 upon receipt. If possible it should be delivered by the two Ambassadors at the same time to the Generalissimo. Message should be carefully but closely paraphrased before delivery. Acknowledge receipt and delivery.

From Admiral Leahy, Chief of Staff to the President.

Top secret and personal to Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek from President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill.

We have just concluded our conference in Quebec during which we discussed ways and means to bring about the earliest possible defeat of Germany so that we can reorient the entire weight of our forces and resources against Japan. We hasten to inform you of plans for our mutual effort, particularly in Southeast Asia.

  • First: We are determined fully to employ all available resources toward the earliest practicable invasion of the Japanese homeland. To [Page 461] this end we have devised courses of action and are taking vigorous steps to expedite the redeployment of forces to the war against Japan following the defeat of Germany.
  • Second: To continue and extend present operations under Admiral Mountbatten in North Burma to provide additional security for intermediate air ferry bases in the Myitkyina area, and at the beginning of favorable weather to launch a determined campaign to open overland communications between India and China. These operations will require continued effective cooperation of the Chinese troops who have already so distinguished themselves in Burma, as well as of your armies that are now engaged west of the Salween. The detailed operations will involve overland and airborne advances by the British from Imphal to seize Kalewa, thence the Yeu-Monywa area with exploitation toward Mandalay. At the same time, the Chinese, British and American forces now in the Myitkyina area will push on to Indaw-Katha-Bhamo, thence toward Mongmit-Mogok. Concurrently, your Chinese armies now engaged west of the Salween should drive vigorously toward Hsenwi and Lashio. All these operations will be fully supported by our preponderant air strength, and by adequate air supply. Small-scale amphibious operations on the Arakan coast, and activities by long range penetration groups will contribute to our success. We feel that the vigorous prosecution of these operations should result in securing an area by next spring which will permit the extension of the Ledo Eoad with accompanying pipelines in order to support the heroic effort of your forces.
  • Third: Without prejudice to the North Burma operations to protect the air ferry line and establish overland communications, Admiral Mountbatten has been further directed to continue planning and preparations for a large scale amphibious and airborne operation in South Burma to be undertaken as soon as developments in the European Theater will allow the necessary resources to be made available.
Enclosure “B”

Draft Message From President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill to Generalissimo Chiang 5

top secret

From Naval Aide to the President.6

My immediately following message is top secret and should be seen only by Aettsna, a decoder appointed by him and the Ambassador who [Page 462] is then to deliver it to the British Ambassador upon receipt. If possible it should be delivered by the two Ambassadors at the same time to the Generalissimo. Message should be carefully paraphrased before delivery. Acknowledge receipt and delivery.

Top Secret and Personal to Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek from President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill.

1.
We have just concluded a short conference at Quebec and hasten to inform you of the broad conclusions we have reached.
2.
We have agreed that operations must be devised to accomplish the defeat of Japan at the earliest possible moment, and that to achieve this ultimately we may well have to invade Japan itself.
3.
We have agreed that in the west our object should be the recapture of Burma at the earliest date. We attach the greatest importance to the vigorous prosecution of operations in Upper Burma in order to secure the air supply route, including the air staging posts at Myitkyina, and to open overland communications with you. It is therefore intended to pursue with the utmost vigor the present operations in Upper Burma. Reinforcements, including airborne forces, are being dispatched.
4.
In addition, we are planning a major amphibious operation to take place in the Bay of Bengal next year. The date when it can be carried out will depend on the time when we find it possible to release the necessary resources from the European Theater.
  1. For the discussion of this paper by the Combined Chiefs of Staff at their 175th Meeting, September 15, 1944, see ante, p. 355. For the message actually dispatched to Chiang at the conclusion of the Second Quebec Conference, see post, p. 479.
  2. The draft message itself and the preceding message concerning its delivery were both indicated for transmission via the war Department to the Commanding General, U.S. Army Forces in China–Burma–India, Forward Echelon, Chungking.
  3. Clarence E. Gauss.
  4. Sir Horace Seymour.
  5. The draft message itself and the preceding message concerning its delivery were both indicated for transmission via Navy channels to the United States Naval Attaché, Chungking.
  6. Rear Admiral Wilson Brown.