Learn about the beta

Section IV.—Disputes and revision of permanent clauses (Art. 376 to 378)

Article 376.

Disputes which may arise between interested Powers with regard to the interpretation and application of the preceding Articles shall be settled as provided by the League of Nations.

Note to XII, 376

In addition to the provision for settlement of disputes by the Organization for Communications and Transit, the Statute of the Permanent Court of International Justice provided in article 27 for a special chamber of five judges to hear cases “relating to transit and communications, particularly cases referred to in Part XII” of the treaty of peace with Germany. The special chamber was not called upon to function.

[Page 687]

Article 377.

At any time the League of Nations may recommend the revision of such of these Articles as relate to a permanent administrative regime.

Article 378.

The stipulations in Articles 321 to 330, 332, 365, and 367 to 369 shall be subject to revision by the Council of the League of Nations at any time after five years from the coming into force of the present Treaty.

Failing such revision, no Allied or Associated Power can claim after the expiration of the above period of five years the benefit of any of the stipulations in the Articles enumerated above on behalf of any portion of its territories in which reciprocity is not accorded in respect of such stipulations. The period of five years during which reciprocity cannot be demanded may be prolonged by the Council of the League of Nations.

Note to XII, 378

The Council of the League of Nations took no decisions in virtue of this article. No specific revisions of the articles listed were undertaken by it, though the general conventions and statutes concluded by the sessions of the General Conference of the Organization for Communications and Transit had the effect of making some provisions inapplicable between those parties to this treaty which also ratified them.

In virtue of the second paragraph all non-reciprocal provisions as indicated ceased to have effect on January 10, 1925.