4. Yugoslavia


58. Memorandum From the Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs (Eagleburger) to Secretary of Defense Richardson, Washington, March 10, 1973.

Eagleburger outlined U.S. strategic interests and policy in Yugoslavia.

Source: Washington National Records Center, RG 330, Records of the Secretary of Defense, OSD/ISA Files: FRC 330-76-117, 381 Yugoslavia. Secret. Published from a copy that bears Eagleburger's stamped signature. Attached but not published is a one-page March 10 addendum, “Considerations in Supplying Yugoslavs Matériel.”


59. Memorandum From the Chairman of the National Security Council Under Secretaries Committee (Rush) to President Nixon, Washington, May 18, 1973.

The NSC Under Secretaries submitted a report to the President on the current status of U.S.-Yugoslav relations and consultations, and exchanges and cooperation in economic, scientific, technical and military fields.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials,NSC Files, Box 734, Country Files—Europe—Yugoslavia. Secret. The full report is attached but not published.


60. Interdepartment Policy Paper Prepared by the Departments of State and Defense, Washington, undated. (7/5/73)

The Department of State and the Department of Defense provided a joint study on U.S. policy on military arms sales to Yugoslavia.

Source: Washington National Records Center, RG 330, Records of the Secretary of Defense, OSD/ISA Files: FRC 330-76-117, 400.3295 Yugoslavia. Confidential. The policy paper is attached to a July 5 memorandum from Lobdell to the Chairman of the NDPC. (Ibid.) Attached but not published are the following: Tab A, an itemized summary of FMS to Yugoslavia; Tab B, a text of President Nixon and President Tito's Joint Statement of October 30, 1971; and Tab C, telegram 884 from the U.S. Embassy in Belgrade to RUEHC/the Department of State, March 2, 1973.


61. National Intelligence Estimate 15-73, Washington, July 5, 1973.

The NIE assessed prospects for Yugoslavian political stability in the eventuality of President Tito's death.

Source: Central Intelligence Agency, NIC Files, Job 79-R01012A. Secret. According to a note on the cover sheet, the CIA and the intelligence organizations in the Departments of State and Defense, NSA, and the Treasury prepared the estimate. All members of the U.S. Intelligence Broad concurred in the estimate except the representative of the FBI, who abstained because the subject was outside of his jurisdiction.


62. Airgram A-385 From the Embassy in Yugoslavia to the Department of State, July 23, 1973.

The Embassy reported on the state of Yugoslav political and economic stability. It maintained that U.S. policy toward Yugoslav should continue to support independence, unity, stability, and economic viability once Tito left office.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970-73, POL 1 US-YUGO. Confidential. Drafted on July 18 by Thompson and Bolen; approved by TOON; and cleared by Johnson, Tice, Littell, and Klingelhoefer. Repeated to the DIA, USIA, Athens, Berlin, Bonn, Bucharest, Budapest, London, Moscow, Paris, Prague, Rome, Sofia, Warsaw, Vienna, US Mission to NATO, Zagreb, POLAD SHAPE/Casteau, POLAD EUCOM/Vaihingen, POLAD UAREUR/Heidelberg.


63. Action Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs (Stoessel) to Secretary of State Kissinger, Washington, October 3, 1973.

Stoessel outlined Yugoslavia's most significant pressure points and recommended that Ambassador TOON be instructed to express concern at the Yugoslav Government's “failure to take U.S. interests into due consideration” in its public statements. Kissinger conditionally agreed to the first recommendation on October 8.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970-73, POL 17 US-YUGO. Confidential. Drafted on October 3 by Armitage, Johnson, Gilmore, and Segall. Kissinger, in approving Stoessel's first recommendation, wrote: “But isn't it better for Stoessel to check with the Ambassador here? I am open-minded—what is the argument for or against?”


64. Telegram 200523 From the Department of State to the Embassy in Yugoslavia, October 10, 1973, 0120Z.

Assistant Secretary Stoessel met with Yugoslav Ambassador Granfil to express concerns about recent Yugoslav statements and actions damaging to U.S. interests.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files. Confidential; Priority. Drafted by Gilmore and Baker; and approved by Stoessel and Armitage. Repeated to Zagreb and USUN.


65. Memorandum From the Military Assistant to the Secretary of Defense (Wickham) to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs (Hill), Washington, October 17, 1973.

Secretary of Defense Schlesinger suspended the Department of Defense's activities to facilitate greater U.S.-Yugoslavian military cooperation.

Source: Washington National Records Center, RG 330, Records of the Secretary of Defense, OSD Files: FRC 330-78-001, Yugoslavia. Confidential. The attached memorandum was not found.


66. Memorandum of Conversation, Belgrade, October 19, 1973, 9-9:45 a.m.

Ambassador TOON met with Deputy Federal Secretary Petric to discuss recent tensions in U.S.-Yugoslavian relations over the Middle East crisis.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970-73, POL 17 US-YUGO. Confidential; EXDIS. Drafted on November 5 by Swihart; and approved by Tice. The memorandum of conversation was enclosure 1 to Airgram A-623 from Belgrade, November 5. The Department's instructions for TOON's conversation with Petric in telegram 205524 to Belgrade, October 17, are not published. (Ibid., Central Foreign Policy Files) The meeting took place in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. For Stoessel's October 9 meeting with Granfil see Document 64.


67. Memorandum of Conversation, Washington, February 15, 1974, 3:09-3:30 p.m.

Ambassador TOON met with Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense Peet to discuss the possibility of resuming military relations with Yugoslavia.

Source: Washington National Records Center, RG 330, Records of the Secretary of Defense, OSD Files: FRC 330-77-0054, 333 Yugoslavia. Confidential. Drafted by Cpt. Ronald J. Kurth (ISA) and approved on February 22 by Peet. The meeting took place in the office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (ISA).


68. Telegram 77815 From the Department of State to the Embassy in Yugoslavia, April 17, 1974, 1726Z

Secretary Kissinger met with Yugoslavian Foreign Minister Minic on April 15 to discuss bilateral relations and alleged U.S. challenges to Yugoslavia's non-aligned status.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 734, Country Files—Europe—Yugoslavia. Secret; EXDIS. Drafted by Baker and approved by Hartman. Repeated to USUN.


69. Memorandum of Conversation, Washington, June 25, 1974, 2:37-3 p.m.

Ambassador TOON met with Assistant Secretary of Defense Ellsworth to discuss U.S.-Yugoslav relations.

Source: Washington National Records Center, RG 330, Records of the Secretary of Defense, OSD/ISA Files: FRC 330-77-0054, Yugoslavia 000.1 (1974). Secret. Drafted by Kurth (ISA) and approved by Ellsworth. The meeting took place in the office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (ISA). Ellsworth met with officials of the Yugoslavian Defense Secretariat in Belgrade in December 1974 to facilitate greater Yugoslav-U.S. military cooperation. See Belgrade telegram 6250, December 13 (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files)


70. Memorandum of Conversation, Belgrade, November 4, 1974, 11:32 a.m.-12:05 p.m.

Secretary of State Kissinger met with Prime Minister Bijedic to discuss Yugoslav-U.S. bilateral relations.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, NSC Europe, Canada, and Ocean Affairs Staff, Box 52, General Subject File, HAK European Trip 1974 (3) WH. Secret; Nodis. Drafted by Hartman. The meeting took place in the Prime Minister's Office at the Federal Executive Council Building.


71. Memorandum of Conversation, Belgrade, November 4, 1974, 12:45 p.m.

President Tito and Secretary of State Kissinger met to discuss Yugoslav-U.S. bilateral relations, the Middle East, and the Soviet Union.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, NSC Europe, Canada, and Ocean Affairs Staff, Box 52, General Subject File, HAK European Trip 1974 (7) WH. Secret; Nodis. Drafted by Hartman. The meeting took place in the White Palace.


72. Memorandum From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Ford, Washington, January 10, 1975.

Kissinger recommended Ford signal, in a letter to Tito, the desire for continued improvement in U.S.-Yugoslav relations and to accept Tito's invitation to visit Yugoslavia. Ford accepted the recommendation.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Correspondence with Foreign Leaders, Box 5, Yugoslavia—President Tito. Secret. Sent for action. A stamped notation on the first page indicates the President saw it. Attached but not published at Tab A is Ford's signed January 13 letter to Tito. Tabs B and C, Tito's letters, were not found. Kissinger had visited Yugoslavia on November 4, 1974. For Kissinger's discussions, November 4, with Bijedic and Tito, see Documents 71 and 72.


73. Memorandum of Conversation, Belgrade, August 3, 1975, 7:35-9 p.m.

Presidents Ford and Tito met to discuss Yugoslav-U.S. relations and multilateral negotiations for security in Europe.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, NSC Staff for Europe, Canada, and Ocean Affairs, Convenience Files, Box 70, Ford Trips File, July-August 1975—European Trip—Yugoslavia (2) WH. Secret; Nodis. The meeting took place in the Federal Executive Council Building.


74. Memorandum of Conversation, Belgrade, August 4, 1975, 9:50-11:30 a.m.

Presidents Ford and Tito met to discuss the Middle East situation and bilateral relations.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, NSC Staff for Europe, Canada, and Ocean Affairs, Convenience Files, Box 70, Ford Trips File July-August 1975—European Trip—Yugoslavia (2) WH. Secret; Nodis. Drafted by Hartman. The meeting took place in the Federal Executive Council Building.


75. Department of Defense Staff Paper Prepared for the Military Assistant to the Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (McFARLANE), Washington, undated.

The Department of Defense summarized U.S. military relations with Yugoslavia and noted that “momentum is accelerating” for a bilateral agreement on arms sales.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for Europe and Canada, Box 22, Yugoslavia (2). Confidential. For Sonnenfeldt's reaction see Document 77. For Kissinger's meetings with Bijedic and Tito, November 4, 1974, see Documents 71 and 72.


76. Memorandum From the Counselor of the Department of State (Sonnenfeldt) to the President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (Scowcroft), Washington, August 29, 1975.

Sonnenfeldt commented on the Department of Defense's staff paper “U.S. Military Relations with Yugoslavia.”

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for Europe and Canada, Box 22, Yugoslavia (2). Secret; Sensitive; Eyes Only. A handwritten note on the first page reads: “Gen. S has seen.” The Department of Defense paper is Document 75. Silberman's note, Tab A, was not found.


77. Memorandum From the Military Assistant to the Secretary of Defense (Wickham) to the Deputy Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs (Scowcroft), Washington, September 6, 1975.

Wickham provided an overview of U.S. policy on the supply of military equipment to Yugoslavia.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for Europe and Canada, Box 22, Yugoslavia (2). Confidential. Wickham signed JA Wickham J. above his typeset signature. Attached but not published is an itemized list of Yugoslav requests and U.S. reactions.


78. Memorandum From the President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (Scowcroft) to the Military Assistant to the Secretary of Defense (Wickham), Washington, September 22, 1975.

Scowcroft instructed the Department of Defense to report on the status of the sales of U.S. military equipment to Yugoslavia and noted the President's “keen interest” in the issue.

Source: Washington National Records Center, RG 330, Records of the Secretary of Defense, OSD Files: FRC 330-78-0058, Yugoslavia 091.3. Confidential. Wickham's original September 6 report is Document 77. A copy was sent to Springsteen. The Department of Defense's revised report, November 21, is Document 79.


79. Memorandum From the Deputy Secretary of Defense (Clements) to the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Scowcroft), Washington, November 21, 1975.

Clements reported on the progress of Yugoslavian arms sales.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for Europe and Canada, Box 22, Yugoslavia (2). Confidential. Attached but not published is an itemized list of military items requested by Yugoslavia and their approval status. Scowcroft's request, September 22, is Document 78. The Department of Defense's previous status report is Document 77.


80. Backchannel Message From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Scowcroft) to the Ambassador to Yugoslavia (Silberman), Washington, January 11, 1976.

Scowcroft reported to Silberman on the sale of TOW missiles to Yugoslavia.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for Europe and Canada, Box 22, Yugoslavia (3). Secret; Eyes Only. The text is the message as approved for transmission.


81. Memorandum From A. Denis Clift of the National Security Council Staff to the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Scowcroft), Washington, May 5, 1976.

Clift conveyed a report on Tito's health.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for Europe and Canada, Box 22, Yugoslavia (4). Secret; Sensitive. Sent for information. Attached but not published at Tab A is the report,. Scowcroft made two handwritten notations: “Thanks” at the top of the page (and initialed the comment) and “otherwise he's OK” at the bottom.


82. Briefing Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs (Hartman) to Secretary of State Kissinger, Washington, undated.

Hartman offered an analysis of a EUCOM contingency study prepared on Yugoslavia.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Records of Helmut Sonnenfeldt, 1973-1977, Entry 5339, Box 13, Quadripartite Ministerial Dec. 12, 1975. Top Secret. The briefing memorandum was sent under a March 9, 1976 covering memorandum from Bridges to Dobbins. (Ibid.) Enclosed but not published is a copy of the January 15 Haig Contingency Plan.


83. Memorandum Prepared in the Central Intelligence Agency's Office of Current Intelligence, Washington, December 10, 1976.

The CIA reported on tensions among the upper echelons of Yugoslavia's political leadership.

Source: Central Intelligence Agency, OCI Files, Job 85-T00353R. Secret; Noforn; Nocontract; Orcon; NFIB only. Attached but not published is a distribution list.