Poland


44. Telegram 1337 From the Embassy in Poland to the Department of State, March 22, 1973, 0856Z.

In this 8 page telegram, the Embassy provided an assessment of recently adopted Polish policies advancing détente with the West.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970-73, POL 12-6 POL. Confidential. Repeated to Belgrade, Berlin, Bucharest, Budapest, Moscow, Munich, NATO, Prague, Sofia, Vienna, and the U.S. Mission to the EC in Brussels.


45. Telegram 1634 From the Embassy in Poland to the Department of State, April 7, 1973, 1218Z.

Ambassador Davies reported on a conversation with Polish Acting Foreign Minister Trepczynski in which he protested the Polish and Hungarian conduct on the International Commission of Control and Supervision in Vietnam.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files. Confidential; Exdis; Immediate. Repeated immediate to Jakarta, Ottawa, Saigon, the White House, and the Delegation to the JEC in Paris. In telegram 59897 to Warsaw, March 31, the Department detailed Deputy Secretary Rush's protest to Hungarian Ambassador Szabo. (Ibid.)


46. Memorandum From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Nixon, Washington, June 18, 1973.

Kissinger noted two letters from First Secretary Gierek that indicated an improvement in Polish-U.S. bilateral relations. Kissinger suggested that the President address the issue of Polish conduct on the International Commission of Control and Supervision in Vietnam before extending an invitation for Gierek to visit the United States. Attached to this memorandum is Tab A, a June 20 letter from Nixon to First Secretary Gierek, highlighting Nixon's appreciation for the improving relations between the two countries.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 699, Country Files—Europe—Poland, Vol. III, 1973. Confidential. Sent for action. A stamped notation on the memorandum indicates the President saw it. Attached but not published is a second letter to Ambassador Trampczynski, also June 20, acknowledging the gift of the Copernicus commemorative facsimile edition. Nixon signed both letters. Tabs C and D are attached but not published.


47. Memorandum From A. Denis Clift of the National Security Council Staff to Secretary of State Kissinger, Washington, February 22, 1974.

Clift recommended that the U.S. invite First Secretary Gierek to visit the United States in 1974.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, NSC Staff for Europe, Canada, and Ocean Affairs, Convenience Files, Box 71, October 1974—Poland—First Secretary Gierek (1) WH. Confidential; Nodis. Sent for action. Attached but not published are Tab A, an undated draft schedule for Gierek's visit, Tab B, a February 15 memorandum from Executive Secretary Springsteen to Scowcroft on preparations for Gierek's visit, and Tab C, memorandum of conversations, December 4, 1973, Davies had had with staff of the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding their positive reactions to the proposed Gierek visit to the U.S. Kissinger did not initial any option.


48. Memorandum From the Executive Secretary of the Department of State (Springsteen) to the President's Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs (Scowcroft), Washington, September 9, 1974.

The Department of State noted the status of U.S.-Polish negotiations in preparation for Gierek's official visit. Springsteen attached a list of agreements that should be either concluded or noted during the visit.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for Europe and Canada, Box 9, Poland (1). Confidential.


49. Memorandum From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Ford, October 8, 1974.

Kissinger recommended two Joint Statements on U.S-Polish economic and political relations to be signed by President Ford and First Secretary Gierek.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, NSC Staff for Europe, Canada, and Ocean Affairs, Box 72, October 1974—Poland—First Secretary Gierek (12) WH. Secret. Sent for action. Ford approved the recommendations. Attached but not published are Tab A, the Joint Statement on Principles of U.S.-Polish Relations, and Tab B, the Joint Statement on the Development of Economic, Industrial and Technological Cooperation. Ford and Gierek signed both Statements on October 9 in the Cabinet Room of the White House. For the texts of these Joint Statements and a transcript of Ford and Gierek's remarks upon their signing, see Public Papers: Ford: 1974 (Washington, 1975), pp. 256-74.


50. Memorandum of Conversation, Washington, October 8, 1974, 11 a.m.-12:40 p.m.

President Ford and First Secretary Gierek met and conducted a wide-ranging discussion of U.S.-Polish bilateral relations including the effect of détente in both Poland and Europe, the Conference on Security and Cooperation, and the Vietnam conflict.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, NSC Staff for Europe, Canada, and Ocean Affairs, Convenience Files, Box 72, October 1974-Poland-First Secretary Gierek (11) WH. Secret; Nodis. The meeting took place in the Oval Office of the White House.


51. Memorandum of Conversation, Washington, October 8, 1974, 1:15 p.m.

Secretary of State Kissinger and First Secretary Gierek continued their earlier discussion of U.S.-Polish bilateral relations.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, NSC Staff for Europe, Canada, and Ocean Affairs, Convenience Files, Box 72, October 1974—Poland—First Secretary Gierek (12) WH. Secret; Nodis. Drafted by Hartman and approved on October 24 in S. The meeting took place in the Secretary's Dining Room at the Department of State.


52. Memorandum of Conversation, Washington, October 8, 1974, 7:30 p.m.

President Ford and First Secretary Gierek discussed U.S.-Polish economic relations and Polish relations with the Federal Republic of Germany and France.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, NSC Staff for Europe, Convenience Files, Box 72, October 1974—Poland—First Secretary Gierek (12) WH. Secret; Nodis. The meeting took place in the Residence of the White House.


53. Briefing Memorandum Prepared by the National Security Council for President Ford, Washington, undated.

The National Security Council prepared a briefing book for President Ford's visit to Poland and for his meetings with Polish First Secretary Gierek.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Trip Briefing Books and Cables for President Ford, Box 13, July 26-August 4, 1975, Europe Briefing Book—Warsaw (1). Secret. A stamped notation on the memorandum indicates the President saw it. Attached but not published is Section III of the Briefing Book, Talking Points. The Department of State's briefing material is a memorandum from Kissinger to Ford of July 24. (Ibid., Europe, General (14) )


54. Memorandum of Conversation, Warsaw, July 28, 1975, 5:15-6:15 p.m.

President Ford and First Secretary Gierek met in Warsaw prior to the Helsinki Conference to discuss bilateral relations.

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, NSC Staff for Europe, Canada, and Ocean Affairs, Convenience Files, Box 70, July-August 1975—European Trip—Poland (1) WH. Secret; Nodis. Drafted by Andrews and approved by Hartman. The meeting took place in the Sejm of the Polish Parliament.


55. Telegram 4657 From the Embassy in Poland to the Department of State, July 6, 1976, 1448Z.

Ambassador Davies reported a conversation with First Secretary Gierek in which he protested Radio Free Europe's commentary on Polish price increases.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files. Secret; Exdis. Gierek's government enacted a drastic increase in food prices in June 1976; Gierek withdrew the increases shortly after Polish citizens, chiefly in Radom and Warsaw, reacted to the policy with violent strikes and riots.


56. Telegram 4666 From the Embassy in Poland to the Department of State, July 6, 1976, 1547Z.

The Embassy commented on the Polish Government's negative reaction to Radio Free Europe's coverage of its price increases, stating that “No more convincing demonstration could be imagined of the fear with which the regime regards RFE.”

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files. Confidential; Exdis.


57. Intelligence Memorandum CI 76-10173 Prepared in the Central Intelligence Agency, Washington, November 10, 1976.

In this intelligence memorandum, titled “Poland: What Next?”, assessed the state of Polish politics and society in the wake of the June riots.

Source: Central Intelligence Agency, Job 85-T00353R, NIC Files. Secret; Noforn; Nocontract; Orcon.