Learn about the beta
Office of the Historian

China, March-December 1972


205. Memorandum of Conversation

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 523, Country Files, Far East, China, Vol. X. Secret; Sensitive. The meeting was held in the White House. According to a March 20 covering memorandum by Froebe, Kissinger approved this memorandum of conversation “with no further distribution to be made.” Memoranda of conversation between Kissinger and the ROC Ambassador to the United States are also in the Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Kissinger Papers, Memoranda of Conversation. On February 24 Shen met briefly with Clark MacGregor at the White House to “elicit some background information from me on ‘how things were going in Peking.’ “ Shen requested a meeting with Kissinger on February 29 or March 1 and a meeting with Nixon on March 2, 3, or 4. (Memorandum from MacGregor through Kissinger to Nixon, February 25; National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 523, Country Files, Far East, China, Vol. X) See Document 207 for a record of Shen's March 6 meeting with Nixon and Kissinger.


206. Memorandum From President Nixon to Secretary of State Rogers, Secretary of Defense Laird, and the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger)

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1036, Files for the President—China Material, China—General—February 27–March 31, 1972. Secret; Eyes Only.


207. Conversation Among President Nixon, his Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger), and the Ambassador of the Republic of China (Shen)

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, White House Tapes, Oval Office, Conversation No. 678–4. No classification marking. The editor transcribed the portion of the conversation printed here specifically for this volume.


208. Memorandum From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Nixon

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 529, Country Files, Far East, Homer, USPRC Negotiations, Paris. Top Secret; Nodis; Homer. Sent for information. A typed note attached to the document reads: “Mr. President: Tab A has been removed and is available if you wish to see it. BAK, Staff Secretary.”


209. National Security Study Memorandum 148

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 86, Country Files, Far East, U.S. China Policy, 1969–1972. Secret.


210. Memorandum From President Nixon to his Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger)

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Subject Files, Box 341, President/Kissinger Memos, HAK/President Memos, 1971. Personal.


211. National Security Study Memorandum 149

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, NSC Institutional Files (H-Files), Box H–189, NSSM Files, NSSM 149. Secret. Also issued as Council on International Economic Policy Study Memorandum 21.


212. Conversation Among President Nixon, his Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger), and his Chief of Staff (Haldeman)

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, White House Tapes, Oval Office, Conversation No. 683–4. No classification marking. The editor transcribed the portion of the conversation printed here specifically for this volume.


213. Memorandum From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Nixon

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File—China Trip, China Exchanges. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Sent for information. A notation on the memorandum indicates the President saw it.


214. Backchannel Message From the Ambassador to France (Watson) to the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger)

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1038, Files for the President—China Material, China, Mansfield/Scott Trip to China [April–May 1972]. Secret. A shortened version of this message was sent through Department of State channels as telegram 5316 from Paris, March 20. (Ibid., RG 59, Central Files 1970–73, POLCHICOMUS) See also Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, vol. E–13, Document 115.


215. Memorandum for the President's File by John H. Holdridge of the National Security Council Staff

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, White House Special Files, President's Office Files, Box 88, Memoranda for the President. Secret; Nodis. According to the President's Daily Diary, the meeting was held from 4:08 to 5:02 p.m. (Ibid., White House Central Files)


216. Memorandum From Phil Odeen of the National Security Council Staff to the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger)

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 523, Country Files, Far East, China, Vol. X. Secret. Sent for action. Concurred in by Holdridge and Kennedy. Attached was a March 31 covering note from Kennedy to Kissinger, which reads in its entirety: “Henry: This all adds up to a suggestion that we need to cool off all comment on Taiwan force levels and stop further pronouncements. It would be best handled by a call from you to Secretaries Laird and Rogers or a call from Haig to Eliot and Pursley, if you agreed that this is the course to be followed.” Kissinger's handwritten comment on this note read: “I want no reductions made on Taiwan until end of VN war under any pretext.”


217. Memorandum From John H. Holdridge and Robert Hormats of the National Security Council Staff to the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger)

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, NSC Institutional Files (H-Files), Box H–061, SRG Meeting, NSSM 148–149, 3/31/72 [1 of 2]. Secret. Sent for action.


218. Memorandum for the Record

Source: Washington National Records Center, RG 330, OSD Files: FRC 330 77 0094, China (Reds), 1972. Secret; Eyes Only. Drafted by Doolin on April 7 and approved by Nutter. Copies were sent to Laird, Rush, and Nutter. A notation on the memorandum indicates that Laird saw it. The meeting was held in the White House Situation Room. The time and place of the meeting are taken from a more extensive record in National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 93, Country Files, Far East, China Trade/Exchanges, February 2, 1972–July 4, 1973, 2 of 2.


219. Message From the Government of the United States to the Government of the People's Republic of China

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File—China Trip, China Exchanges. No classification marking. According to an attached April 3 memorandum from Lord to Kissinger, Lord delivered the message to PRC representatives in New York on the evening of April 3. See Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, vol. E–13, Document 119.


220. Memorandum of Conversation

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File–China Trip, China Exchanges. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. According to the attached April 16 covering memorandum from Lord, Kissinger approved this memorandum but did not forward it to Nixon. Apparently no summary memorandum was prepared.


221. Memorandum From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Nixon

Source: Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Kissinger Papers, Box CL 295, Memoranda to the President, April 1972. Secret. Sent for information. A notation on the memorandum indicates the President saw it. An April 17 covering memorandum to Kissinger indicates that Lord drafted this memorandum.


222. Memorandum of Conversation

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File—China Trip, China Exchanges. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. No summary memorandum of this conversation has been found.


224. Memorandum From John H. Holdridge of the National Security Council Staff to the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger)

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 523, Country Files, Far East, China, Vol. X. Secret. Sent for information. Sent through Haig. Kissinger's handwritten comment at the top of this memorandum reads: “What are the answers to these questions? Zumwalt freewheels too much.”


225. Memorandum of Conversation

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 523, Country Files, Far East, China, Vol. X. Secret; Sensitive. According to the attached May 10 covering memorandum from Froebe to Kissinger through Holdridge, Kissinger approved this memorandum of conversation and wanted no further distribution of it. The meeting was held in the White House from 3:20 to 3:35 p.m. (Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Kissinger Papers, Box 438 Miscellany, 1968–1976, Record of Schedule)


226. Letter From President Nixon to the Premier of the People's Republic of China Chou En-lai

Source: Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Kissinger Papers, Box CL 114, Geopolitical Files, China, Nixon, Richard M., Letters to Mao and Chou. No classification marking.


227. Memorandum From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Nixon

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 849, President's File—China Trip, China Exchanges. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Sent for information. The memorandum is marked “not forwarded” and was not initialed by Kissinger.


228. National Security Decision Memorandum 170

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970–73, FT 1 CHICOMUS. Secret; Nodis; Homer. The typewritten date on this memorandum, June 10, was changed by hand. Also issued as a Council on International Economic Policy Decision Memorandum.


229. Memorandum From Richard H. Solomon of the National Security Council Staff to the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger)

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 1317. Harold Saunders Files, Richard Solomon Chron Files, 1972. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Sent through Haig.


230. Memorandum From Richard H. Solomon of the National Security Council Staff to the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger)

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 525, Country Files, Far East, PRC, Vol. IV. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Sent for information. Kissinger and Haig initialed the document.


231. Memorandum of Conversation

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 97, Country Files—Far East, China, Dr. Kissinger's Visit June 1972, Memcons (Originals). Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. This meeting was held in the Great Hall of the People. Kissinger sent a brief synopsis of this meeting to Haig on June 20. Haig then prepared a 1-page memorandum for the President. (Ibid.) The first meeting was held the evening of June 19. In a June 19 telegram to Haig, Kissinger described this meeting as “inconclusive.” The 11-page memorandum of conversation is ibid. In addition to the Kissinger–Chou meetings, counterpart talks were held among Jenkins, Holdridge, Solomon, Chang Wen-chin, Tsien Ta-yung, and Chao Ch'i-hua. They discussed trade and exchanges. Memoranda of conversation for the June 21 and 22 meetings are ibid., Box 87, Country Files—Near East, PRC Counterpart Talks, 1971–1973. See Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, vol. E–13, Documents 140144.


232. Memorandum of Conversation

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 97, Country Files—Far East, China, Dr. Kissinger's Visit June 1972, Memcons (Originals). Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. This meeting was held in the Great Hall of the People. Kissinger sent a brief synopsis of this meeting to Haig on June 21. (Ibid., NSC Files, Box 1139, Jon Howe—Trip Files, HAK's China Trip, June 1972) See Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, vol. E–13, Document 143.


233. Memorandum of Conversation

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 97, Country Files–Far East, China, Dr. Kissinger's Visit June 1972 Memcons(Originals). Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. The meeting was held at a “Guest House (near Villa #5).” Kissinger and Chou also met from 7:10 to 7:35 p.m. on a boat near the Summer Palace. They discussed the first Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War, the history of imperialism, and the Communist Party in China. A final meeting was held from 11:03 p.m. on June 22 to 12:55 a.m., June 23. During this meeting, Kissinger and Chou largely reiterated the points made in their earlier meetings. These memoranda of conversation are ibid. See Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, vol. E–13, Documents 145 and 146.


234. Memorandum From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Nixon

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 97, Country Files–Far East, China, Dr. Kissinger's June 1972 Visit. Top Secret; Sensitive; Exclusively Eyes Only. Sent for information. A notation on the memorandum indicates the President saw it. The President wrote on the first page: “K—an excellent account. In the long run this is more important than day to day substance.” Kissinger also forwarded to Nixon a June 27 16-page memorandum that reviewed the substance of the trip. (Ibid.) Nixon wrote on that memorandum, “Superb job—covers all the bases with expert tactics.” He also underlined much of the text. See Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, vol. E–13, Document 147. Summary memoranda by Holdridge and others who accompanied Kissinger on the June trip are in National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Kissinger Office Files, Box 97, Country Files–Far East, China, Dr. Kissinger's June 1972 Visit.