File No. 812.5034/36

Mr. Thurston, in charge of American interests, to the Secretary of State

No. 652

Sir: I have the honor to refer to my telegram of January 8, 10 p.m. relating to the publication of a further decree relating to the renouncing of citizenship rights by foreigners acquiring certain real properties in the Republic of Mexico, and transmit herewith a copy of said decree, together with a translation of same, in duplicate. I also [Page 1059]transmit a translated copy of the previous decree16 upon this same subject, as requested by the Department.

I have [etc.]

Walter C. Thurston
[Inclosure 1—Translation]

circular

On the 15th of August of this year, this office, by direction of the First Chief of the Constitutionalist Army, in charge of the Executive Power of the Nation, issued a circular setting forth the obligatory dispositions relating to the requisitions which must be met by foreigners who attempt to acquire, within national territory, uncultivated or national land, waters of federal jurisdiction, mining claims or permission for the exploration or exploitation of natural riches, such as forest products, petroleum, fisheries, etc.; warning them that they must previously present, through written document and before the Department for Foreign Affairs, a formal, express and final declaration that, in their capacity of proprietors or concessionaires, and for all effects and purposes relating to the properties they desire to obtain, they consider themselves as Mexicans, renouncing their rights as foreigners, and that of applying for protection or presenting complaints to their respective Governments.

In the third clause of that circular it was declared that all denouncements then filed before this office, or its administrative agencies upon any of the classes of properties above referred to should be suspended until the interested person should present the certificate mentioned, with the understanding that these denouncements should be placed in the files and considered forfeited unless the certificate were presented before the expiration of four months.

The Citizen First Chief of the Constitutionalist Army, taking into consideration the fact that many foreigners, due to causes beyond their control have not been able to present said certificate, and he being desirous of preventing harm to those who have acquired in good faith legitimate rights, has seen fit to dispose that the period referred to in said third clause shall be extended four months longer, and will expire April 15, 1917.

Eduardo Hay
Subsecretary (Fomento)