Chargé Carter to the Secretary of State.

No. 103.]

Sir: With reference to your telegram to Mr. Reid of the 15th ultimo with regard to the boycott of American goods by the Chinese at Singapore I have the honor to inclose a translation of your cable, together with Mr. Reid’s reply thereto of the same date, and also a copy of the memorandum left at the foreign office, and a copy of Lord Lansdowne’s note of the 8th in reply.

From the latter it will be seen that Mr. Lyttelton, the secretary of state for the colonies, will forward a copy of the correspondence on the subject to Sir J. Anderson, the governor of the Straits Settlements, who, it is stated, will doubtless take such measures as may be practicable to deal with any unlawful acts or combinations on the part of those concerned in the proceedings complained of.

Mr. Lyttelton, however, points out that unless actual offenses against the colonial laws have been or are being committed it may be difficult for the colonial authorities to take any effective action in the matter.

I have, etc.,

John Ridgely Carter.
[Page 504]
[Inclosure 1.]

The American Embassy to the Foreign Office .

memorandum.

My government has been informed by the American consul-general at Singapore that the boycott against American interests there by the Chinese has taken a decidedly serious turn. That anonymous letters are in circulation and that the trade in general is at a standstill. It is feared that the trouble has only begun, and that circulars are posted on all Chinese shops.

My government has instructed the consul-general to notify the local authorities at Singapore of these anonymous threats and unlawful combinations, and I am instructed to invite the consideration of His Majesty’s Government respecting the gravity of this unfriendly action by aliens in a friendly port and the adoption of whatever protective and repressive measures that may be practicable.

[Inclosure 2.]

Lord Lansdowne to Ambassador Reid.

Your Excellency: I have the honor to state that I have been in communication with His Majesty’s secretary of state for the colonies with regard to the representation made by your excellency on the 15th ultimo, respecting the boycott of American goods by the Chinese at Singapore.

Mr. Secretary Lyttelton will forward a copy of the correspondence on the subject to Sir J. Anderson, the governor of the Straits Settlements, who will doubtless take such measures as may be practicable to deal with any unlawful acts or combinations on the part of those concerned in the proceedings complained of. Mr. Lyttelton, however, points out that unless actual offenses against the colonial laws have been or are being committed it may be difficult for the colonial authorities to take any effective action in the matter.

I have, etc.,

(In the absence of Lord Lansdowne.)

F. A. Campbell.