Treaty Series No. 862

Treaty Between the United States of America and Poland, Signed at Washington, June 15, 193113

The United States of America and the Republic of Poland, desirous of strengthening the bond of peace which happily prevails between them, by arrangements designed to promote friendly intercourse between their respective territories through provisions responsive to the spiritual, cultural, economic and commercial aspirations of the peoples thereof, have resolved to conclude a Treaty of Friendship, Commerce and Consular Eights and for that purpose have appointed as their plenipotentiaries:

The President of the United States of America, Henry L. Stimson, Secretary of State of the United States of America, and

The President of the Republic of Poland, Tytus Filipowicz, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Poland in Washington,

who, having communicated to each other their full powers found to be in due form, have agreed upon the following articles:

Article I

The nationals of each of the High Contracting Parties shall be permitted to enter, travel and reside in the territories of the other; to exercise liberty of conscience and freedom of worship; to engage in professional, scientific, religious, philanthropic, manufacturing and commercial work of every kind; to carry on every form of commercial activity which is not forbidden by the local law; to own, erect or lease [Page 939]and occupy appropriate buildings and to lease lands for residential, scientific, religious, philanthropic, manufacturing, commercial and mortuary purposes; to employ agents of their choice; and generally the said nationals shall be permitted, upon submitting themselves to all local laws and regulations duly established, to enjoy all of the foregoing privileges and to do anything incidental to or necessary for the enjoyment of those privileges, upon the same terms as nationals of the State of residence, except as otherwise provided by laws of either High Contracting Party in force at the time of the signature of this Treaty. In so far as the laws of either High Contracting Party in force at the time of the signature of this Treaty do not permit nationals of the other Party to enjoy any of the foregoing privileges upon the same terms as the nationals of the State of residence, they shall enjoy, on condition of reciprocity, as favorable treatment as nationals of the most favored nation.

The nationals of either High Contracting Party within the territories of the other shall not not be subjected to the payment of any internal charges or taxes other or higher than those that are exacted of and paid by its nationals.

The nationals of each High Contracting Party shall enjoy freedom of access to the courts of justice of the other on conforming to the local laws, as well for the prosecution as for the defense of their rights, in all degrees of jurisdiction established by law.

The nationals of each High Contracting Party shall receive within the territories of the other, upon submitting to conditions imposed upon its nationals, the most constant protection and security for their persons and property, and shall enjoy in this respect that degree of protection that is required by international law. Their property shall not be taken without due process of law and without payment of just compensation.

Nothing contained in this Treaty shall be construed to affect existing statutes of either of the High Contracting Parties in relation to emigration or to immigration or the right of either of the High Contracting Parties to enact such statutes, provided, however, that nothing in this paragraph shall prevent the nationals of either High Contracting Party from entering, traveling and residing in the territories of the other Party in order to carry on international trade or to engage in any commercial activity related to or connected with the conduct of international trade on the same terms as nationals of the most favored nation.

Nothing contained in this Treaty is to be considered as interfering with the right of either party to enact or enforce statutes concerning the protection of national labor.

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Article II

With respect to that form of protection granted by National, State, or Provincial laws establishing civil liability for injuries or for death, and giving to relatives or heirs or dependents of an injured party a right of action or a pecuniary benefit, such relatives or heirs or dependents of the injured party, himself a national of either of the High Contracting Parties and injured within any of the territories of the other, shall, regardless of their alienage or residence outside of the territory where the injury occurred, enjoy the same rights and privileges as are or may be granted to nationals, and under like conditions.

Article III

The dwellings, warehouses, manufactories, shops, and other places of business, and all premises thereto appertaining of the nationals of each of the High Contracting Parties in the territories of the other, used for any purposes set forth in Article I, shall be respected. It shall not be allowable to make a domiciliary visit to, or search of, any such buildings and premises, or there to examine and inspect books, papers or accounts, except under the conditions and in conformity with the forms prescribed by the laws, ordinances and regulations for nationals.

Article IV

Where, on the death of any persons holding real or other immovable property or interests therein within the territories of one High Contracting Party, such property or interests therein would, by the laws of the country or by a testamentary disposition, descend or pass to a national of the other High Contracting Party, whether resident or non-resident, were he not disqualified by the laws of the country where such property or interests therein is or are situated, such nationals shall be allowed a term of three years in which to sell the same, this term to be reasonably prolonged if circumstances render it necessary, and withdraw the proceeds thereof, without restraint or interference, and exempt from any succession, probate or administrative duties or charges other than those which may be imposed in like cases upon the nationals of the country from which such proceeds may be drawn.

Nationals of either High Contracting Party may have full power to dispose of their personal property of every kind within the territories of the other, by testament, donation, or otherwise, and their heirs, legatees and donees, of whatsoever nationality, whether resident or non-resident, shall succeed to such personal property, and may take possession thereof, either by themselves or by others acting for them, and retain or dispose of the same at their pleasure subject to the payment [Page 941]of such duties or charges only as the nationals of the High Contracting Party within whose territories such property may be or belong shall be liable to pay in like cases.

Article V

The nationals of each of the High Contracting Parties in the exercise of the right of freedom of worship, within the territories of the other, as hereinabove provided, may, without annoyance or molestation of any kind by reason of their religious belief or otherwise, conduct services either within their own houses or within any appropriate buildings which they may be at liberty to erect and maintain in convenient situations, provided their teachings or practices are not contrary to public morals; and they may also be permitted to bury their dead according to their religious customs in suitable and convenient places established and maintained for the purpose subject to the mortuary and sanitary laws and regulations of the place of burial.

Article VI

Between the territories of the High Contracting Parties there shall be freedom of commerce and navigation. The nationals of each of the High Contracting Parties equally with those of the most favored nation, shall have liberty freely to come with their vessels and cargoes to all places, ports and waters of every kind within the territorial limits of the other which are or may be open to foreign commerce and navigation. Nothing in this Treaty shall be construed to restrict the right of either High Contracting Party to impose on such terms as it may see fit, prohibitions or restrictions designed to protect human, animal, or plant life and health, or regulations for the enforcement of police or revenue laws, including laws prohibiting or restricting the importation or sale of alcoholic beverages or narcotics.

Each of the High Contracting Parties binds itself unconditionally to impose no higher or other duties or charges, and no condition or prohibition on the importation of any article, the growth, produce, or manufacture of the territories of the other Party than are or shall be imposed on the importation of any like article, the growth, produce or manufacture of any other country. Administrative orders effecting advances in duties or changes in regulations applicable to imports shall not be made operative until the elapse of sufficient time, after promulgation in the usual official manner, to afford reasonable notice of such advances or changes. The foregoing provision does not relate to orders made operative as required by provisions of law or judicial decisions, or to measures for the protection of human, animal or plant life or for the enforcement of police laws.

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Each of the High Contracting Parties also binds itself unconditionally to impose no higher or other charges or other restrictions or prohibitions on goods exported to the territories of the other High Contracting Party than are imposed on goods exported to any other foreign country.

Neither High Contracting Party shall establish or maintain restrictions on imports from or exports to the territories of the other Party which are not applied to the import and export of any like article originating in or destined for any other country. Any withdrawal of an import or export restriction which is granted even temporarily by one of the Parties in favor of the articles of a third country shall be applied immediately and unconditionally to like articles originating in or destined for the other Contracting Party. In the event of rations or quotas being established for the importation or exportation of articles restricted or prohibited, each of the High Contracting Parties agrees to grant for the importation from or exportation to the territories of the other Party an equitable share in the allocation of the quantity of restricted goods which may be authorized for importation or exportation.

Any advantage concerning charges, duties, formalities and conditions of their application which either High Contracting Party may extend to any article, the growth, produce or manufacture of any other foreign country, shall simultaneously and unconditionally, without request and without compensation be extended to the like article the growth, produce or manufacture of the other High Contracting Party.

All articles which are or may be legally imported from foreign countries into ports of the United States of America or are or may be legally exported therefrom in vessels of the United States of America, may likewise be imported into these ports or exported therefrom in Polish vessels without being liable to any other or higher duties or charges whatsoever than if such articles were imported or exported in vessels of the United States of America; and, reciprocally, all articles which are or may be legally imported from foreign countries into the ports of Poland or are or may be legally exported therefrom in Polish vessels, may likewise be imported into these ports or exported therefrom in vessels of the United States of America without being liable to any other or higher duties or charges whatsoever than if such articles were imported or exported in Polish vessels.

In the same manner there shall be perfect reciprocal equality in relation to the flags of the two countries with regard to bounties, drawbacks and other privileges of this nature, of whatever denomination, which may be allowed in the territories of each of the Contracting Parties, on goods imported or exported in national vessels so that such bounties, drawbacks and other privileges shall also and in like manner [Page 943]be allowed on goods imported or exported in vessels of the other country.

With respect to the amount and collection of duties on imports and exports of every kind, each of the two High Contracting Parties binds itself to give to the nationals, vessels and goods of the other the advantage of every favor, privilege or immunity which it shall have accorded to the nationals, vessels and goods of a third state, whether such favored state shall have been accorded such treatment gratuitously or in return for reciprocal compensatory treatment. Every such favor, privilege or immunity which shall hereafter be granted the nationals, vessels or goods of a third state shall simultaneously and unconditionally, without request and without compensation be extended to the other High Contracting Party for the benefit of itself, its nationals, vessels and goods.

No distinction shall be made by either High Contracting Party between direct and indirect importations of articles originating in the territories of the other Party from whatever place arriving. In so far as importations into Poland are concerned, the foregoing stipulation applies only in the case of goods which for a part of the way from the place of their origin to the place of their ultimate destination had to be carried across the ocean.

Either Contracting Party has the right to require that articles which are imported from the territories of the other Party and are entitled under the provisions of this Treaty to the benefit of the duties or charges accorded to the most favored nation, must be accompanied by such documentary proof of their origin as may be required in pursuance of the laws and regulations of the country into which they are imported, provided, however, that the requirements imposed for this purpose shall not be such as to constitute in fact a hindrance to indirect trade. The requirements for furnishing such proof of origin shall be agreed upon and made effective by exchanges of notes between the High Contracting Parties.

The stipulations of this article shall not extend:

(a)
To the treatment which either High Contracting Party shall accord to purely border traffic within a zone not exceeding ten miles (15 kilometers) wide on either side of its customs frontier.
(b)
To the special privileges resulting to States in customs union with either High Contracting Party so long as such special privileges are not accorded to any other State.
(c)
To the treatment which is accorded by the United States of America to the commerce of Cuba under the provisions of the commercial convention concluded by the United States of America and Cuba on December 11, 1902,14 or any other commercial convention which hereafter may be concluded by the United States of America [Page 944]with Cuba. Such stipulations, moreover do not extend to the treatment which is accorded to commerce between the United States of America and the Panama Canal Zone or any of the dependencies of the United States of America, or to the commerce of the dependencies of the United States of America with one another under existing and future laws.
(d)
To the provisional customs regime in force between Polish and German parts of Upper Silesia laid down in the German-Polish Convention signed at Geneva on May 15, 1922.15

Article VII

The nationals and merchandise of each High Contracting Party within the territories of the other shall receive the same treatment as nationals and merchandise of the country with regard to internal taxes, charges in respect to warehousing and other facilities.

Article VIII

No duties of tonnage, harbor, pilotage, lighthouse, quarantine, or other similar or corresponding duties or charges of whatever denomination, levied in the name or for the profit of the Government, public functionaries, private individuals, corporations or establishments of any kind shall be imposed in the ports of the territories of either country upon the vessels of the other, which shall not equally, under the same conditions be imposed on national vessels. Such equality of treatment shall apply reciprocally to the vessels of the two countries respectively from whatever place they may arrive and whatever may be their place of destination.

Article IX

For the purposes of this Treaty, merchant vessels and other privately owned vessels under the flag of either of the High Contracting Parties, and carrying the papers required by its national laws in proof of nationality, shall, both within the territorial waters of the other High Contracting Party and on the high seas, be deemed to be the vessels of the Party whose flag is flown.

Article X

Merchant vessels and other privately owned vessels under the flag of either of the High Contracting Parties shall be permitted to discharge portions of cargoes at any port open to foreign commerce in the territories of the other High Contracting Party, and to proceed with the remaining portions of such cargoes to any other ports of the [Page 945]same territories open to foreign commerce, without paying other or higher tonnage dues or port charges in such cases than would be paid by national vessels in like circumstances, and they shall be permitted to load in like manner at different ports in the same voyage outward, provided, however, that the coasting trade of the High Contracting Parties is exempt from the provisions of this Article and from the other provisions of this Treaty, and is to be regulated according to the laws of each High Contracting Party in relation thereto. It is agreed, however, that the nationals of either High Contracting Party shall within the territories of the other enjoy with respect to the coasting trade the most favored nation treatment.

The provisions of this Treaty relating to the mutual concession of national treatment in matters of navigation do not apply to special privileges reserved by either High Contracting Party for the fishing and shipbuilding industries.

Article XI

Limited liability and other corporations and associations, whether or not for pecuniary profit, which have been or may hereafter be organized in accordance with and under the laws, National, State or Provincial, of either High Contracting Party and maintain a central office within the territories thereof, shall have their juridical status recognized by the other High Contracting Party provided that they pursue no aims within its territories contrary to its laws. They shall enjoy freedom of access to the courts of law and equity, on conforming to the laws regulating the matter, as well for the prosecution as for the defense of rights in all the degrees of jurisdiction established by law.

The right of such corporations and associations of either High Contracting Party so recognized by the other to establish themselves within its territories, establish branch offices and fulfill their functions therein shall depend upon, and be governed solely by the consent of such Party as expressed in its National, State, or Provincial laws and regulations.

Article XII

The nationals of either High Contracting Party shall enjoy within the territories of the other, reciprocally and upon compliance with the conditions there imposed, such rights and privileges as have been or may hereafter be accorded the nationals of any other State with respect to the organization of and participation in limited liability and other corporations or associations, for pecuniary profit or otherwise, including the rights of promotion, incorporation, purchase and ownership and sale of shares and the holding of executive or official positions therein. In the exercise of the foregoing rights and with [Page 946]respect to the regulation or procedure concerning the organization or conduct of such corporations or associations, such nationals shall be subjected to no conditions less favorable than those which have been or may hereafter be imposed upon the nationals of the most favored nation. The rights of any of such corporations or associations as may be organized or controlled or participated in by the nationals of either High Contracting Party within the territories of the other to exercise any of their functions therein, shall be governed by the laws and regulations, National, State or Provincial, which are in force or may hereafter be established within the territories of the Party wherein they propose to engage in business.

The nationals of either High Contracting Party, shall, moreover, enjoy within the territories of the other, on condition of reciprocity, and upon compliance with the conditions there imposed, such rights and privileges as may hereafter be accorded the nationals of any other State with respect to the mining of coal, phosphate, oil, oil shale, gas, and sodium on the public domain of the other. It is understood, however, that neither High Contracting Party shall be required by anything in this paragraph to grant any application for any such right or privilege if at the time such application is presented the granting of all similar applications shall have been suspended or discontinued.

Article XIII

Commercial travelers representing manufacturers, merchants and traders domiciled in the territories of either High Contracting Party shall on their entry into and sojourn in the territories of the other Party and on their departure therefrom be accorded the most favored nation treatment in respect of customs and other privileges and of all charges and taxes of whatever denomination applicable to them or to their samples.

If either High Contracting Party shall deem necessary the presentation of an authentic document establishing the identity and authority of commercial travelers representing manufacturers, merchants or traders domiciled in the territories of the other Party in order that such commercial traveler may enjoy in its territories the privileges accorded under this Article, the High Contracting Parties will agree by exchange of notes on the form of such document and the authorities or persons by whom it shall be issued.

Article XIV

There shall be complete freedom of transit through the territories including territorial waters of each High Contracting Party on the most convenient routes open for international transit, by rail, navigable [Page 947]waterway, and canal, other than the Panama Canal and waterways and canals which constitute international boundaries, to persons, their luggage and goods coming from, going to or passing through the territories of the other High Contracting Party, except such persons as may be forbidden admission into its territories, or goods or luggage of which the importation may be prohibited by law. Persons, their luggage and goods in transit shall not be subjected to any transit duty, or to any unnecessary delays or restrictions, or to any discrimination as regards charges, facilities or any other matter.

Goods in transit must be entered and cleared at the proper custom house, but they shall be exempt from all customs or other similar duties.

All charges imposed on transport in transit shall be reasonable, having regard to the conditions of the traffic.

Nothing in this Article shall affect the right of either of the High Contracting Parties to prohibit or restrict the transit of arms, munitions and military equipment in accordance with treaties or conventions that may have been or may hereafter be entered into by either Party with other countries.

Article XV

Each of the High Contracting Parties agrees to receive from the other, consular officers in those of its ports, places and cities, where it may be convenient and which are open to consular representatives of any foreign country.

Consular officers of each of the High Contracting Parties shall after entering upon their duties, enjoy reciprocally in the territories of the other all the rights, privileges, exemptions and immunities which are enjoyed by officers of the same grade of the most favored nation. As official agents, such officers shall be entitled to the high consideration of all officials, national or local, with whom they have official intercourse in the State which receives them.

The Government of each of the High Contracting Parties shall furnish free of chargé the necessary exequatur of such consular officers of the other as present a regular commission signed by the chief executive of the appointing state and under its great seal; and it shall issue to a subordinate or substitute consular officer duly appointed by an accepted superior consular officer with the approbation of his Government, or by any other competent officer of that Government, such documents as according to the laws of the respective countries shall be requisite for the exercise by the appointee of the consular function. On the exhibition of an exequatur, or other document issued in lieu thereof to such subordinate, such consular officer shall be [Page 948]permitted to enter upon his duties and to enjoy the rights, privileges and immunities granted by this Treaty.

Article XVI

Consular officers, nationals of the state by which they are appointed, shall be exempt from arrest except when charged with the commission of offenses locally designated as crimes other than misdemeanors and subjecting the individual guilty thereof to punishment. Such officers shall be exempt from military billetings, and from service of any military or naval, administrative or police character whatsoever.

In criminal cases the attendance at court by a consular officer as a witness may be demanded by the prosecution or defence. The demand shall be made with all possible regard for the consular dignity and the duties of the office; and there shall be compliance on the part of the consular officer.

Consular officers shall be subject to the jurisdiction of the courts in the State which receives them in civil cases, subject to the proviso, however, that when the officer is a national of the state which appoints him and is engaged in no private occupation for gain, his testimony in cases to which he is not a party shall be taken orally or in writing at his residence or office and with due regard for his convenience. The officer should, however, voluntarily give his testimony at court whenever it is possible to do so without serious interference with his official duties.

Article XVII

Each of the High Contracting Parties agrees to permit the entry free of all duty of all furniture, equipment and supplies intended for official use in the consular offices of the other, and to extend to such consular officers of the other and their families and suites as are its nationals, the privilege of entry free of duty of their baggage and all other property intended for their personal use, accompanying the officer to his post; provided, nevertheless, that no article, the importation of which is prohibited by the law of either of the High Contracting Parties, may be brought into its territories. Personal property imported by consular officers, their families or suites during the incumbency of the officers shall be accorded the customs privileges and exemptions accorded to consular officers of the most favored nation.

It is understood, however, that the privileges of this Article shall not be extended to consular officers who are engaged in any private occupation for gain in the countries to which they are accredited, save with respect to governmental supplies.

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Article XVIII

Consular officers, including employees in a consulate, nationals of the State by which they are appointed other than those engaged in private occupations for gain within the State where they exercise their functions, shall be exempt from all taxes, National, State, Provincial and Municipal, levied upon their persons or upon their property, except taxes levied on account of the possession or ownership of immovable property situated in, or income derived from property of any kind situated or belonging within, the territories of the State within which they exercise their functions. All consular officers and employees, nationals of the State appointing them, shall be exempt from the payment of taxes on the salary, fees or wages received by them in compensation for their consular services.

The Government of each High Contracting Party shall have the right to acquire and own land and buildings required for diplomatic or consular premises in the territory of the other High Contracting Party and also to erect buildings in such territory for the purposes stated subject to local building regulations.

Lands and buildings situated in the territories of either High Contracting Party, of which the other High Contracting Party is the legal or equitable owner and which are used exclusively for governmental purposes by that owner, shall be exempt from taxation of every kind, National, State, Provincial and Municipal, other than assessments levied for services or local public improvements by which the premises are benefited.

Article XIX

Consular officers may place over the outer door of their respective offices the coat of arms of their State with an appropriate inscription designating the official office, and they may place the coat of arms of their State on automobiles employed by them in the exercise of their consular functions. Such officers may also hoist the flag of their country on their offices including those situated in the capitals of the two countries. They may likewise hoist such flag over any boat or vessel employed in the exercise of the consular function.

The quarters where consular business is conducted and the archives of the consulates shall at all times be inviolable, and under no pretext shall any authorities of any character within the country make any examination or seizure of papers or other property deposited with the archives. When consular officers are engaged in business within the territory of the State where they are exercising their duties, the files and documents of the consulate shall be kept in a place entirely separate from the one where private or business papers are kept. [Page 950]Consular offices shall not be used as places of asylum. No consular officers shall be required to produce official archives in court or testify as to their contents.

Upon the death, incapacity, or absence of a consular officer, having no subordinate consular officer at his post, secretaries or chancellors, whose official character may have previously been made known to the Government of the State where the consular function was exercised, may temporarily exercise the consular function of the deceased or incapacitated or absent consular officer; and while so acting shall enjoy all the rights, prerogatives and immunities granted to the incumbent.

Article XX

Consular officers, nationals of the State by which they are appointed, may, within their respective consular districts, address the authorities, National, State, Provincial or Municipal, for the purpose of protecting their countrymen in the enjoyment of their rights accruing by treaty or otherwise. Complaint may be made for the infraction of those rights. Failure upon the part of the proper authorities to grant redress or to accord protection may justify interposition through the diplomatic channel, and in the absence of a diplomatic representative, a consul general or the consular officer stationed at the capital may apply directly to the government of the country.

Article XXI

Consular officers, in pursuance of the laws of their own country may (a) take, at any appropriate place within their respective districts, the depositions of any occupants of vessels of their own country, or of any national of, or of any person having permanent residence within the territories of, their own country; (b) draw up, attest, certify and authenticate unilateral acts, translations, deeds, and testamentary dispositions of their countrymen, and also contracts to which a countryman is a party; (c) authenticate signatures; (d) draw up, attest, certify and authenticate written instruments of any kind purporting to express or embody the conveyance or encumbrance of property of any kind within the territory of the State by which such officers are appointed, and unilateral acts, deeds, testamentary dispositions and contracts relating to property situated, or business to be transacted, within the territories of the State by which they are appointed.

Instruments and documents thus executed and copies and translations thereof, when duly authenticated by the consular officer, under his official seal, shall be received as evidence in the territories of the Contracting Parties as original documents or authenticated copies, as the [Page 951]case may be, and shall have the same force and effect as if drawn by and executed before a notary or other public officer duly authorized in the country by which the consular officer was appointed; provided, always, that such documents shall have been drawn and executed in conformity to the laws and regulations of the country where they are designed to take effect.

A consular officer of either High Contracting Party shall within his district have the right to act personally or by delegate in all matters concerning claims of non-support of non-resident minor children against a father resident in the district of the consul’s residence and a national of the country represented by the consul, without other authorization, providing that such procedure is not in conflict with local laws.

Article XXII

In case of the death of a national of either High Contracting Party in the territory of the other without having in the locality of his decease any known heirs or testamentary executors by him appointed, the competent local authorities shall at once inform the nearest consular officer of the State of which the deceased was a national of the fact of the death, in order that necessary information may be forwarded to the parties interested.

In case of the death of a national of either of the High Contracting Parties without will or testament, in the territory of the other High Contracting Party, the consular officer of the State of which the deceased was a national and within whose district the deceased made his home at the time of death, shall, so far as the laws of the country permit and pending the appointment of an administrator and until letters of administration have been granted, be deemed qualified to take chargé of the property left by the decedent for the preservation and protection of the same. Such consular officer shall have the tight to be appointed as administrator within the discretion of a tribunal or other agency controlling the administration of estates provided the laws of the place where the estate is administered so permit.

In case of the death of a national of either of the High Contracting Parties without will or testament and without any known heirs resident in the country of his decease, the consular officer of the country of which the deceased was a national shall be appointed administrator of the estate of the deceased, provided the regulations of his own Government permit such appointment and provided such appointment is not in conflict with local law and the tribunal having jurisdiction has no special reasons for appointing someone else.

Whenever a consular officer accepts the office of administrator of the estate of a deceased countryman, he subjects himself as such to the [Page 952]jurisdiction of the tribunal or other agency making the appointment for all necessary purposes to the same extent as a national of the country where he was appointed.

Article XXIII

A consular officer of either High Contracting Party may, if this is not contrary to the local law, appear personally or by delegate on behalf of non-resident beneficiaries, nationals of the country represented by him before the proper authorities administering workmen’s compensation laws and other like statutes, with the same effect as if he held the power of attorney of such beneficiaries to represent them unless such beneficiaries have themselves appeared either in person or by duly authorized representative.

Written notice of the death of their countrymen entitled to benefit by such laws should, whenever practicable, be given by the authorities administering the law to the appropriate consular officer of the country of which the deceased was a national.

A consular officer of either High Contracting Party may on behalf of his non-resident countrymen collect and receipt for their distributive shares derived from estates in process of probate or accruing under the provisions of so-called workmen’s compensation laws or other like statutes provided he remits any funds so received through the appropriate agencies of his Government to the proper distributees.

Article XXIV

A consular officer of either High Contracting Party shall, within his district, have the right to appear personally or by delegate in all matters concerning the administration and distribution of the estate of a deceased person under the jurisdiction of the local authorities for all such heirs or legatees in said estate, either minors or adults, as may be non-residents arid nationals of the country represented by the said consular officer with the same effect as if he held their power of attorney to represent them unless such heirs or legatees themselves have appeared either in person or by duly authorized representative.

Article XXV

A consular officer shall have exclusive jurisdiction over controversies arising out of the internal order of private vessels of his country, and shall alone exercise jurisdiction in cases, wherever arising, between officers and crews, pertaining to the enforcement of discipline on board, provided the vessel and the persons charged with wrongdoing shall have entered a port within his consular district. Such an officer shall [Page 953]also have jurisdiction over issues concerning the adjustment of wages and the execution of contracts relating thereto provided the local laws so permit.

When an act committed on board of a private vessel under the flag of the State by which the consular officer has been appointed and within the territorial waters of the State to which he has been appointed constitutes a crime according to the laws of that State, subjecting the person guilty thereof to punishment as a criminal, the consular officer shall not exercise jurisdiction except in so far as he is permitted to do so by the local law.

A consular officer may freely invoke the assistance of the local police authorities in any matter pertaining to the maintenance of internal order on board of a vessel under the flag of his country within the territorial waters of the State to which he is appointed, and upon such a request the requisite assistance shall be given.

A consular officer may appear with the officers and crews of vessels under the flag of his country before the judicial authorities of the State to which he is appointed to render assistance as an interpreter or agent.

Article XXVI

A consular officer of either High Contracting Party shall have the right to inspect within the ports of the other High Contracting Party within his consunlar district, the private vessels of any flag destined or about to clear for ports of the country appointing him in order to observe the sanitary conditions and measures taken on board such vessels, and to be enabled thereby to execute intelligently bills of health and other documents required by the laws of his country, and to inform his Government concerning the extent to which its sanitary regulations have been observed at ports of departure by vessels destined to its ports, with a view to facilitating entry of such vessels therein.

Article XXVII

All proceedings relative to the salvage of vessels of either High Contracting Party wrecked upon the coasts of the other shall be directed by the consular officer of the country to which the vessel belongs and within whose district the wreck may have occurred. Pending the arrival of such officer, who shall be immediately informed of the occurrence, the local authorities shall take all necessary measures for the protection of persons and the preservation of wrecked property. The local authorities shall not otherwise interfere than for the maintenance of order, the protection of the interests of the salvors, if these do not belong to the crews that have been wrecked, and to carry into effect the arrangements made for the entry and exportation of the merchandise [Page 954]saved. It is understood that such merchandise is not to be subjected to any custom house charges, unless it be intended for consumption in the country where the wreck may have taken place.

The intervention of the local authorities in these different cases shall occasion no expense of any kind, except such as may be caused by the operations of salvage and the preservation of the goods saved, together with such as would be incurred under similar circumstances by vessels of the nation.

Article XXVIII

Subject to any limitation or exception hereinabove set forth, or hereafter to be agreed upon, the territories of the High Contracting Parties to which the provisions of this Treaty extend shall be understood to comprise all areas of land, water, and air over which the Parties respectively claim and exercise dominion as sovereign thereof, except the Panama Canal Zone.

Article XXIX

The Polish Government which is entrusted with the conduct of the foreign affairs of the Free City of Danzig under Article 104 of the Treaty of Versailles16 and Articles 2 and 6 of the Treaty signed in Paris on November 9, 1920, between Poland and the Free City of Danzig,17 reserves hereby the right to declare that the Free City of Danzig is a Contracting Party to this Treaty and that it assumes the obligations and acquires the rights laid down therein.

This reservation does not relate to those stipulations of the Treaty which the Republic of Poland has accepted with regard to the Free City in accordance with the Treaty rights conferred on Poland.

Article XXX

The present Treaty shall be ratified and the ratifications thereof shall be exchanged at Warsaw. The Treaty shall take effect in all its provisions thirty days from the date of the exchange of ratifications and shall remain in full force for the term of one year thereafter.

If within six months before the expiration of the aforesaid period of one year neither High Contracting Party notifies to the other an intention of modifying by change or omission, any of the provisions of any of the Articles in this Treaty or of terminating it upon the expiration of the aforesaid period, the Treaty shall remain in full force and effect after the aforesaid period and until six months from [Page 955]such a time as either of the High Contracting Parties shall have notified to the other an intention of modifying or terminating the Treaty.

In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this Treaty and have affixed their seals thereto.


Henry L. Stimson
[seal]
Tytus Filipowicz
[seal]
  1. In English and Polish; Polish text not printed. Ratification advised by the Senate, April 5 (legislative day of April 4), 1932; ratified by the President, April 21, 1932; ratified by Poland, April 20, 1933; ratifications exchanged at Warsaw, June 9, 1933; proclaimed by the President, July 10, 1933.
  2. Malloy, Treaties, Conventions, etc., 1776–1909, vol. i, p. 353.
  3. British and Foreign State Papers, vol. cxviii, p. 365.
  4. Treaties, Conventions, etc., 1910–1923, vol.iii, pp. 3329, 3385.
  5. British and Foreign State Papers, vol. cxiii, p. 965.