660c.113 Lard and Bacon/4: Telegram

The Acting Secretary of State to the Minister in Poland (Stetson)

[Paraphrase]

63. Legation’s telegram No. 69, October 18, 5 p.m.10

(1)
The issuance of the order of October 11, forbidding the application of lower duty to goods which even touch at ports of a third country, is manifestly unjust to the exporters concerned as it was after their shipments had gone forward. You should, therefore, make every proper effort in their behalf. However, the Department considers equally important that now when the question of indirect trade is under discussion, the Polish officials have seen fit to adopt measures raising to the ultimate extreme the difficulties with which our indirect trade is already burdened. The Department considers such action as indicative of the most regrettable attitude on the part of the Polish authorities, and it desires you to lodge a vigorous protest in the above sense unless you perceive some objection.
(2)
The Department attaches great importance to the negotiations regarding indirect trade, and therefore desires you to continue to [Page 932]press strongly the point of view set forth in its telegram No. 50, August 10, 4 p.m. The Department suggests that greater emphasis be placed upon the considerations indicated in paragraph 2 thereof. Although the case rests first upon the terms of the modus vivendi, which assures the United States freedom from discrimination, our case is the stronger because of the economic considerations set forth in the foregoing.
(3)
The Department wishes to follow the negotiations very closely so as to be in a position to give any needed further instructions promptly. The Department desires direct and full reports from you so that the Department will not have to rely partly upon the reports of the Commercial Attaché to the Department of Commerce and transmitted by that Department. Since this negotiation which affects our relations with Poland must be kept in a single channel between the Department and the Legation, you will appreciate the Department’s need for ample direct reports. The Department, of course, consults and fully informs the Department of Commerce.
Clark
  1. Not printed.