List of Papers

(Unless otherwise specified, the correspondence is from or to officials in the Deparment of State.)

THE CONFERENCE FOR THE REDUCTION AND LIMITATION OF ARMAMENTS, GENEVA: 1933 PHASE

I. Work of the Bureau and Commissions, January 16–March 27

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Jan. 5 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the German Ambassador, who made inquiries about the situation in general, including disarmament; Secretary’s expression of encouragement over Germany’s return to the Disarmament Conference.
1
Jan. 7 To the American Delegate to the Bureau of the Conference
U. S. views on various questions concerning licensing systems for the manufacture of arms, with emphasis on opinion that any system established should be under the domestic control of each of the high contracting parties.
2
Jan. 16 (504) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Advice that a discussion of the French plan (presented November 15, 1932) will be held in the General Commission soon, and that it would seem advisable to consider what form any observation of the U. S. delegation should take in the discussion.
4
Jan. 18 (279) To the American Delegate (tel.)
Instructions to endeavor to have provisions such as those in chapters I and II of the 1925 Arms Traffic Convention incorporated in the General Disarmament Convention.
4
Jan. 24 (511) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Suggested draft of a speech (text printed) relative to the French plan; opinion that emphasis of U. S. delegation should be on the disarmament side of. any proposal rather than the political side.
5
Jan. 25 (282) To the American Delegate (tel.)
Request that speech be redrafted in the light of several suggestions made.
6
Jan. 28 (285) To the American Delegate (tel.)
Opinion, based on difficulty of drawing up a suitable statement under present circumstances, that any American declaration on the French plan should be avoided at least until situation has further clarified.
7
Feb. 2 (523) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Feeling that it would now be wise to make a brief statement; suggested draft (text printed).
8
Feb. 2 (289) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Approval of statement.
9
[Page X]Feb. 7 (528) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information that Committee of the Bureau is drafting articles prohibiting chemical warfare; inquiry as to whether U. S. delegation should oppose the principle of “prohibition” and fight for “universal renunciation”.
9
Feb. 8 (290) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that no importance is attached to the wording, whether “prohibition” or “renunciation”, since essential purpose of the Treaty is to do away with gas warfare as a method of hostilities. Instructions for use when question of sanctions is discussed.
10
Feb. 10 (531) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Likelihood that question may soon arise as to the inclusion of the United States and other non-European states in an affirmation not to resort to force, similar to the one contained in the Five Power Declaration of December 11, 1932.
10
Feb. 10 (532) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
British proposal on artillery, giving rise to question as to whether U. S. Government would accept a limitation of about 105 millimeters for replacement or new construction of mobile land guns.
11
Feb. 11 (292) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Instructions to exert every effort to prevent the Conference raising the issue of any extension of the projected no-force affirmation to non-European states.
12
Feb. 14 (535) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Indications that efforts put forth in accordance with telegram No. 292, February 11, have been successful.
13
Feb. 15 (537) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Political Committee’s discussion of a British draft declaration for the renunciation of force (text printed), and insistence of a number of delegations on the extension of the proposal to universal scope.
14
Feb. 23 (540) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Observations on questions involved in Japan’s possible withdrawal from the Conference, in view of her decision to withdraw from League of Nations; feeling that the decision as to whether she remains in the Conference rests largely with the Americans.
16
Feb. 23 (294) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Willingness to allow wide latitude of action, subject to certain specified limitations, toward keeping Japan in the Conference.
18
Feb. 24 (542) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Expression of view to the Japanese delegation that it would be regrettable if they were to withdraw from the Conference.
19
[Page XI]Feb. 28 (546) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
New draft declaration on nonrecourse to force (text printed) drawn up by a subcommittee; information that the French, Germans, Belgians, Italians, and British are in accord with this text.
19
Mar. 1 (547) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Receipt of information that Japanese Government has decided to continue participation in the Conference.
20
Mar. 2 (548) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Political Committee’s adoption of the new draft declaration on nonrecourse to force prepared by the subcommittee; British reservation of position on extension of the agreement to non-European States.
21
Mar. 3 (552) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Decision of the General Commission, during discussion of terms of reference for the Effectives Committee, to take legal effectives for the purpose of establishing the irreducible component, the U. S. position having been in favor of real effectives.
21
Mar. 5 (553) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Outline of some ideas on probable development of the work in Geneva, for use in discussions with Norman Davis, the appointed Chairman of the American delegation to the General Commission.
22
Mar. 8 (558) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Conversation with Henderson, President of the Conference, who produced a document called “Suggested Basis of Discussion” (text printed) outlining his conception of U. S. role in supplementing a European security scheme.
25
Mar. 9 (559) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Japanese delegation’s communication to President of Conference announcing Japan’s withdrawal from the League but intention to remain in the Disarmament Conference.
27
Mar. 9 (561) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Assertion that position of the Japanese delegation is not clear; feeling that U. S. delegation should govern itself with caution until more specific instructions are received.
27
Mar. 10 (298) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that the Ambassador to Japan is being asked to seek possible elucidation of the Japanese stand on the Conference; concurrence in the use of caution until Japanese position is clarified.
28
Mar. 10 (562) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Political Commission’s discussion of the definition of an aggressor, and appointment of a committee to deal with the subject.
29
Mar. 10 (299) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Preliminary views with regard to the Henderson suggestions set forth in the delegation’s telegram No. 558, March 8.
29
[Page XII]Mar. 11 (300) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Inability of United States to agree to a limitation of less than 155 millimeters for mobile land guns.
30
Mar. 12 (562) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Opinion that a breakdown of the Conference would be disastrous; consideration as to how the breakdown may be prevented, the main problem being how Germany may be induced to continue collaboration; estimate of the situation and of U. S. role in connection therewith.
31
Mar. 13 (301) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Receipt of information from the Ambassador in Japan that the Foreign Minister, in conversation on the subject, seemed vague as to the position of the Japanese delegation at the Conference; Ambassador’s impression that the matter lies in hands of the military rather than the Foreign Office.
34
Mar. 13 (564) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Report on conversations with members of the German, Italian, French, and British delegations on means of preventing breakdown of the Conference; Italian suggestion that there be no more meetings of General Commission and Political Commission until after Easter, with the technical committees continuing their work in the interim.
34
Mar. 13 (565) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Account of conversation with British Prime Minister MacDonald (head of British delegation to General Commission) and of his peculiarly difficult position; inclination to favor the Italian suggestion and possible visits by MacDonald to Rome, Washington, and Berlin during the interval before resumption of Commission meetings.
37
Mar. 14 (60) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Estimate submitted by the Military Attaché of the situation in regard to the Japanese land forces, and his opinion that in the Conference Japan will work to augment her land forces for her needs in Manchuria.
38
Mar. 14 (304) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Notification that the President has appointed Mr. Norman Davis Chairman of the American Delegation to the Conference, and that he is sailing within 10 days.
39
Mar. 14 (302) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
From Davis: Appraisal of the various suggestions to prevent breakdown of the Conference; indication that the Italian proposal has several advantages, if the Germans are willing to support it.
40
Mar. 14 (303) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Instructions to talk over with MacDonald the point of view expressed by Davis in telegram No. 302, March 14, and to emphasize the importance attached by the Department to a further meeting of minds through private conversations between the British, French, Germans, Italians, and Americans.
40
[Page XIII]Mar. 15 (566) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information that events have been moving rapidly, that MacDonald has decided to put before the Conference a plan for real disarmament, and that he has accordingly prepared a draft treaty with definite figures which he will present to the General Commission on March 16.
41
Mar. 17 (569) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Full outline, with quotations and references, of the draft treaty submitted by MacDonald to the General Commission on March 16.
43
Mar. 17 (570) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that the British proposal will come up for general discussion on March 23, and that an outline of Department’s views is desirable as soon as possible; indication that detailed comments on various sections of the proposal will follow in separate telegrams.
54
Mar. 17 (571) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Comment on part II, section I, effectives.
55
Mar. 17 (573) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Comment on part IV, chemical warfare.
56
Mar. 17 (574) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Comment on part II, section II, chapter II, naval armaments.
56
Mar. 17 (575) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Comment on part II, section II, material.
57
Mar. 17 (576) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Comment on part I, security.
59
Mar. 18 (577) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Comment on chapter III, air armaments.
59
Mar. 18 (578) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Preliminary list of certain outstanding omissions in the MacDonald draft in regard to which an effort will no doubt be made to insert provisions during discussions.
62
Mar. 18 (580) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Assertion that the chief interest of European states in the U. S. attitude will be in regard to the political field (part I); desire for Department’s views on this phase, and also, in this connection, on the obligation contained in article 88.
63
Mar. 20 (101) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
Conversation with the Prime Minister regarding certain aspects of the MacDonald proposal, and the difficult situation of France in various respects at the present time.
64
Mar. 20 (308) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Instructions to confine remarks to very general terms during the discussion of the British plan, and especially to avoid any expression of U. S. attitude toward security clauses until the arrival of Norman Davis.
66
[Page XIV]Mar. 21 (583) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Intention to be guided by Department’s instructions in its telegram No. 308, March 20.
67
Mar. 21 (53) To the Chargé in France (tel.)
Information for the Foreign Office that Norman Davis is sailing for London on March 22 and plans to go to Paris early in April to talk matters over with the French Government.
67
Mar. 22 (64) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Japanese press statement (text printed) purporting to be the attitude of the Japanese Navy Department toward the MacDonald plan.
68
Mar. 22 (584) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Suggestion by the Canadian delegation of a draft joint statement (text printed) giving views of the non-European states of Japan, India, Canada, and United States in reply to questions posed by the Air Commission relative to civil aviation.
69
Mar. 22 (585) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Report on efforts in some quarters to bring about an adjournment of the Conference until after Easter.
71
Mar. 23 (311) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Outline of views of the War and Navy Departments on the British proposal other than part I (security).
72
Mar. 27 (594) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Plans for meeting suggestion of the War and Navy Departments (contained in telegram No. 311, March 23) on subdivision of aircraft into military and naval aviation and on the subject of tonnage ratios.
75
Mar. 27 (595) From the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
General Commission’s completion of discussions of the British plan, and intention to begin detailed examination of the draft at its next meeting after the Easter vacation; adjournment of the Commission until April 25, with the understanding that the technical committees will function meanwhile.
76
Mar. 28 (313) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Approval of the draft joint statement quoted in delegation’s telegram No. 584, March 22.
77

II. American Planning During the Recess, March 28–April 25

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Apr. 1 (598) From the American Delegate to the Bureau of the Conference (tel.)
Discussion of War Department’s position (indicated in telegram No. 311, March 23) concerning mobile land artillery.
77
Apr. 3 (315) To the American Delegate (tel.)
Instructions to repeat this telegram and No. 598 of April 1 to Norman Davis in Paris, since Department wishes his views on mobile land artillery before formulating any conclusions.
78
[Page XV]Apr. 4 (72) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Feeling that a trip to Berlin, following brief visit to Paris, would be most desirable in evaluating the situation as regards disarmament; request for Department’s views.
79
Apr. 4 To President Roosevelt
Enumeration of reasons both for and against Davis’ proposed trip to Berlin, and inquiry as to the President’s wishes.
80
Apr. 4 Memorandum by President Roosevelt
For the Secretary and the Under Secretary: Opinion that it is important enough for Davis to go to Berlin to outweigh considerations against the trip.
81
Apr. 4 (64) To the Chargé in France (tel.)
For Davis: Approval of trip to Berlin; desire, however, that certain points be made clear to the press in order to allay speculation.
81
Undated Memorandum by the Chairman of the American Delegation of a Conversation With the President of the French Council of Ministers
Exchange of views, April 5, on general questions of disarmament and on French relations with other countries, notably Germany.
82
Apr. 5 (135) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Probability that question of abolition of mobile land artillery will come up by May 1; belief that it would be wise to have a thorough study made of the subject prior to that time.
84
Undated Memorandum by the Chairman of the American Delegation of a Conversation With the German Chancelor
Discussion, April 8, of German attitude toward disarmament and the Versailles Treaty, of relations between France and Germany, and of Germany’s fear of invasion by Poland.
85
Apr. 16 (163) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Considerations relative to the question of security; recommendation that U. S. policy emphasize measures to prevent war and particularly to increase the power of defense and weaken that of offense rather than to rely heavily on punitive measures to be taken against aggressors.
89
Apr. 16 (164) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: General analysis of the basic fundamental elements in the disarmament situation; recommendation that U. S. policy be based on a regional treatment of disarmament along certain lines suggested, combined with a determination of attitude on consultation and neutral rights.
93
Apr. 16 (165) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Reasons why a possible adjournment of the General Commission (after it reconvenes on April 25) for several weeks might be desirable; suggestion that technical committees could continue their work and thus avoid an adjournment of the Conference.
98
[Page XVI]Apr. 17 (318) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Summary of Navy Department’s comments on delegation’s telegram No. 594 of March 27.
99
Apr. 19 (171) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Expression of hope for an early indication of views on recommendations contained in telegrams No. 163 and No. 164 of April 16.
100
Apr. 20 (97) To the Chargé in France (tel.)
For Davis: Advice that telegrams No. 163 and No. 164 are being studied by both the Secretary and the President with a view to reaching a decision only after mature reflection.
101
Apr. 22 (181) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Indications that the chief delegates of the various powers will be absent from Geneva during the week of April 25, and that probably little can be done except to work out procedure.
101
Apr. 24 (320) To the American Delegate (tel.)
For Davis: Opinion that it would be a great mistake to favor an adjournment at present, and desire that every effort be exerted to keep the Conference in session.
102
Undated (Rec’d Apr. 25) Memorandum of a Conversation Between President Roosevelt and the British Prime Minister
Discussion of disarmament questions, April 23, with general accord on parts II–V of the British draft proposal. President’s feeling that a form of declaration (text printed) would be preferable, from the American point of view, to a multilateral treaty such as envisaged in part I, articles 4 and 5.
102
Apr. 25 (607) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that the General Commission will begin discussion at once of part I (security) of the British plan; inquiry as to whether United States is prepared to agree to incorporating the principle of consultation in a treaty.
105
Apr. 25 (321) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
U. S. inability to sign part I of the British plan; willingness, however, to make a declaratory statement, dependent, of course, upon a substantial disarmament result.
106
Apr. 25 (322) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Message from President Roosevelt requesting opinion on advisability of a public statement by him on the United States’ ultimate objective of practical actual disarmament and stressing necessity of concrete action at this time.
107
Apr. 26 (609) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Statement made in General Commission (text printed) suggesting that Commission temporarily defer consideration of part I of British plan and proceed to discussion of part II.
108
[Page XVII]Apr. 26 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Account of conference between President Roosevelt and French Prime Minister Herriot at the White House. Herriot’s criticism of part I of British plan in that the Germans are not denied the right to construct samples of various prohibited weapons; President’s agreement with this attitude.
109
Apr. 27 (324) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Instructions to concur with the French position in opposing the right of Germany to build sample weapons, if question arises.
111
Apr. 27 (614) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Message for the President giving opinion that a statement such as suggested in Department’s telegram No. 322, April 25, would be most appropriate a little later on, and making inquiry on certain technical details of the British plan.
112
Apr. 27 (615) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Detailed comments regarding proposed U. S. declaration of policy on neutral rights; suggestion of two articles (texts printed) to replace articles 1, 2, and 3 of British plan, and of a draft article 3 (text printed) embodying the neutral rights idea in treaty form.
113
Apr. 28 (616) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Belief that it would be a mistake to support French modifications of the British plan designed to prevent what they might call rearmament but which might make the plan totally unacceptable to Germany.
117
Apr. 28 (617) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Statement made in General Commission (text printed) prior to opening of discussion on part II of British plan, emphasizing importance of considering part II as a whole and avoiding destructive amendments.
118
Apr. 28 (618) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Explanation of suggestions for regional treatment contained in telegrams Nos. 163 and 164 of April 16.
118
Apr. 28 (1267) From the Consul General at Berlin
Report of an alleged project approved by Hitler for increasing German military efficiency within two years. Comment on the many evidences of militarism in Germany, and assertion of lack of confidence in any expressed German desire for peace.
119

III. Efforts To Resolve Difficulties Within the General Commission, April 28–June 8

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Apr. 28 (619) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Report on German delegation’s speech in meeting of General Commission indicating desire for certain amendments to part II of British plan, and on further remarks in the meeting by French, British, and Americans.
121
[Page XVIII]May 2 (326) To the American Delegate to the Bureau of the Conference (tel.)
For Davis: Advice that the President regards the British plan as a step only, and that he approves minor amendments if they do not weaken U. S. general support of the plan.
122
May 3 (627) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Request for instructions as to whether to accept article 19 fixing maximum caliber of mobile land guns at 105 millimeters, or to offer amendment fixing maximum at 155 millimeters. British position as to political importance of this point.
123
May 3 (628) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Request for instructions with respect to article 22 providing that mobile land guns above 155 millimeters “shall be destroyed”.
124
May 5 (94) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Davis: Explanation, in connection with delegation’s telegram No. 615, April 27, that U. S. idea was not to sign articles 1–3 of British plan, but to constitute part I of the plan a separate part of the disarmament convention which United States would not sign, but to which it would attach a unilateral declaration. Further details on U. S. policy.
124
May 5 (95) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Davis: Observation that if there is no opportunity of correlating effectives with those of other non-European countries, the United States may have to offer figures based on legal strength.
126
May 6 (630) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Chilean representative’s proposal for consultation among the Latin American countries to fix their own reduction of armaments, and his desire for views of U. S. delegate. Suggestion for reply that idea is good provided that the figures for all nations are contained in the final treaty when it is signed.
127
May 6 (327) To the American Delegate (tel.)
For Davis: Receipt of German request for support of U. S. delegation at Geneva to insure a reading of the MacDonald Plan as a whole before a vote is taken on the part dealing with effectives.
128
May 6 (328) To the American Delegate (tel.)
Position that if all other participating powers desire a maximum caliber of 105 millimeters for mobile land artillery, the United States can concur. Instructions to await developments in this matter.
129
May 8 (631) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Henderson’s decision, because of divergence of views of British and French on one side and Germans on the other, as to methods of procedure for further work of the General Commission, to attempt to reconcile the difference by means of private conversations.
129
[Page XIX]May 8 (98) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Davis: Information that President Roosevelt has made it clear to Dr. Schacht, president of the Reichsbank, that the United States will insist on Germany’s remaining in the status quo in armament.
130
May 8 (329) To the American Delegate (tel.)
President Roosevelt’s sympathetic attitude toward the German position favoring a first reading of the MacDonald Plan as a whole.
131
May 8 (632) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Report on first of Henderson’s private conversations with U. S., British, French, Italian, and German delegates, in which no conclusion was reached.
131
May 9 (330) To the American Delegate (tel.)
Approval of suggested reply to Chilean representative, as set forth in Delegate’s telegram No. 630, May 6.
132
May 9 (633) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Report on further meeting of Henderson and the five delegates. Advice that time is being allowed for further private conversations between Eden, the British delegate, and Nadolny, the German delegate.
133
May 10 (634) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Information from Eden that Nadolny, in private conversations, has made a wholly unacceptable proposal as to types and quantity of war material.
133
May 10 (635) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Further information on private Eden-Nadolny talks; indication that Nadolny has moderated his attitude somewhat on Germany’s material requirements.
134
May 10 (636) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Summary of a memorandum by Eden setting forth his understanding of Nadolny’s attitude; Eden’s willingness to use it as a basis for discussion if point 4, relative to “right of Germany to quantitative equality”, were eliminated.
135
May 11 (637) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Further discussion with Chilean delegate along lines approved by Department’s telegram No. 330, May 9.
136
May 11 (638) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Account of numerous private conversations and two more meetings of the five delegates with Henderson; details of the various expressions of opinion on German rearmament.
136
May 12 (119) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Conversation with the German Ambassador, with the result that the Ambassador telephoned Berlin and later indicated that he believed Nadolny would receive new instructions.
138
[Page XX]May 14 (53) To the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Request for a message indicating the probable purpose of Hitler in calling a meeting of the Reichstag for May 17.
139
May 15 (78) From the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Advice that Hitler is convoking the Reichstag in order to expound Germany’s foreign policy in general, with special reference to disarmament; speculation as to what some of Hitler’s assertions will be.
139
May 15 (213) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis for the President: Opinion that a statement by the President in the very near future may be advisable; belief that a statement prior to Hitler’s speech, rather than afterward, would have the maximum effect.
140
May 15 (215) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Further observations on the importance of a statement by the President, and belief that time is vital.
141
May 15 (79) From the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Assertion that very few people actually know just what action the German Government through Chancelor Hitler will take at the forthcoming Reichstag meeting; inability to learn any details through conversations with officials.
142
May 16 From President Roosevelt to Various Chiefs of State
Appeal to all nations for disarmament and for a universal pact of nonaggression.
143
May 16 (138) To the Chargé in France (tel.)
Personal for Davis: Comments concerning the President’s message to various Chiefs of State and his decision not to limit it to the European situation or to Germany in particular.
145
May 16 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Conversation with the Japanese Ambassador, during which opinion was given him that the President’s message was applicable to the Far Eastern situation as well as to other parts of the world.
146
May 17 (224) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
Advice that the French reaction to President Roosevelt’s message on disarmament has been generally hostile, but that the officials most immediately concerned with disarmament were much more favorably impressed.
147
May 17 (80) From the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Summary of German press reaction to Roosevelt’s message; comment that the press in general welcomed the message as being in line with Germany’s own policy.
148
May 17 (81) From the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Brief report on Hitler’s speech to the Reichstag.
149
May 18 (332) To the American Delegate (tel.)
For Davis: Authorization, confirmed by President Roosevelt, to make a statement whenever it is deemed advisable and phrased so as to supplement Roosevelt’s message and conform to developments.
150
[Page XXI]May 18 (132) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Observation that Roosevelt’s message has allayed the feeling of tension as to the continental situation; that Hitler’s speech has further tended to allay apprehension, although confirmatory action at Geneva is awaited.
151
May 19 (103) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Report that consensus of opinion among observers is that Japan will agree in principle to Roosevelt’s proposal, but will add such conditions and reservations as practically to nullify the agreement in the Far East.
151
May 19 (643) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Account of General Commission meeting, at which Henderson read official text of Roosevelt’s declaration, and various speakers expressed appreciation of it. Decision of Commission to begin discussion of part II of the British plan.
152
May 19 (644) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Text of speech to be delivered at the opening of Commission’s discussion of part II, setting forth U. S. position relative to problems of disarmament and U. S. acceptance of the chapter on material, with the hope that other delegations will join in its acceptance.
154
May 20 (646) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
List of certain changes to be made in text of speech transmitted in telegram No. 644, May 19.
158
May 20 (335) To the American Delegate (tel.)
For Davis: Suggestion that one phrase be omitted from speech, since it is considered inadvisable to emphasize, even indirectly, the idea that success in disarmament is a necessary prerequisite to success in the forthcoming World Economic Conference.
159
May 20 (2421) From the Chargé in Germany
Analysis of Hitler’s speech before the Reichstag.
159
May 21 (649) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Omission of phrase as suggested in Department’s telegram No. 335, May 20. Indication that some delegates are advocating adjournment of the Disarmament Conference on June 12 until after the Economic Conference; opinion that any such movement for postponement should be resisted.
164
May 21 (650) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Opinion that a meeting of heads of governments in Geneva might be advantageous, now that the situation seems ripe for decisive developments; request for advice.
165
May 22 (336) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Concurrence in opinion that any movement for postponement of the Conference should be resisted. Authorization to use full discretion toward bringing about a meeting of heads of governments.
165
[Page XXII]May 23 (654) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Meeting of the five to consider whether the Conference should return to discussion of security (part I) or continue discussion of war material; statement made at the meeting (text printed) giving U. S. ideas on (1) consultation and neutral rights, and (2) the nonaggression pact.
166
May 23 (337) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Opinion that statement transmitted in telegram No. 654, should be rephrased in two places.
168
May 25 (341) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Instructions to continue efforts against an adjournment of the Conference until substantial conclusions have been reached.
168
May 26 (664) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that General Commission will begin discussion of aviation chapter of British plan May 27; request for instructions relative to U. S. position.
169
May 26 (342) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
U. S. position favoring total and unconditional abolition of aerial bombardment.
169
May 27 (666) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Request for text of Japanese reply to Roosevelt’s message of May 16.
169
May 27 (667) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Plans to endeavor to arrange a meeting of the heads of governments within the next few days, and to arrange certain details so as to bring it within the framework of the Conference.
170
May 27 (668) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Desire for guidance on certain questions concerning air armaments.
171
May 28 (344) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Reply to the specific questions raised in telegram No. 668, May 27.
171
May 29 (345) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information in answer to delegation’s telegram No. 666, May 27, that no reply has been received from the Japanese.
(Footnote: Receipt of reply on June 6.)
172
May 30 (673) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Indication that Department’s telegram No. 344, May 28, was most satisfactory.
172
May 30 (675) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Statement made in the General Commission (text printed) concerning relation between proposed no-force pact and non-aggression pact; consensus of opinion that Conference should endeavor to coordinate the two.
172
May 30 (676) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information that the first reading of parts III and IV of the British plan has been completed in the General Commission.
174
[Page XXIII]May 30 (677) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Opinion that it would be wise to coordinate the no-force and nonaggression pacts either as part of the general convention or as a separate instrument to be signed coincident with the disarmament treaty. Formula worked out with the British (text printed) to serve as a guide in denning an act of aggression, and request for Department’s views.
175
May 30 (678) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Conversation with Sato, Japanese delegate, who indicated Japanese acceptance of abolition of bombing would be conditional upon the abolition of aircraft carriers; suggestion of position to be taken by U. S. delegation.
178
June 1 (681) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Summary of amendments proposed by the French delegation to part II, section II, dealing with limitation and supervision of the manufacture of, and trade in, war material.
179
June 2 (348) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Agreement with U. S. delegation as to the wisdom of coordinating the no-force and nonaggression pacts; views on the problem of definition of aggression.
180
June 2 (349) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Instructions for modification of the suggestion made in delegation’s telegram No. 678, May 30.
181
June 2 (684) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Plans for conversations with British and French representatives in further preparation for a meeting of heads of governments.
182
June 5 (687) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that the conversations with British and French representatives will take place on June 8 in Paris and will relate particularly to part II, since the French attitude toward this part is of vital significance.
183
June 6 (351) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Text of Japanese reply to Roosevelt’s message of May 16 (requested by the delegation in its telegram No. 666, May 27).
184
June 6 (688) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Résumé of discussion in General Commission of report of the Committee for the Regulation of the Trade in and Manufacture of Arms, together with the French amendments to the British plan relating to this subject.
185
June 7 (689) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Further discussion in the General Commission of the subject of trade in and manufacture of arms.
187
June 8 (692) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Sato’s explanation in the General Commission of the Japanese willingness to accept the abolition of aerial bombardment only on certain conditions; U. S. delegate’s observations in reply, supported by the British representative.
188
[Page XXIV]June 8 (260) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
From Davis: Report of conversation with British and French representatives, being an exhaustive review of the whole disarmament situation.
190

IV. The Breakdown op Direct Negotiations, June 15–October 14

Date and number Subject Page
1933 June 15 (276) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
From Davis: Outline of present situation, and belief that a return home for a few weeks would be desirable; suggested statement (text printed) to be given out in Paris and Washington if the visit home is approved.
192
June 16 (280) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
From Davis: List of questions of principle brought out in the French amendments regarding the control of trade in and manufacture of arms; comments, and desire for Department’s views.
194
June 17 (356) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Opposition to the French arms proposal, emphasizing grave objections to any system of licenses under the control of an international commission.
195
June 17 (357) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Analysis of the problem of establishing control of manufacture of and trade in arms into three phases: (1) weapons subject to qualitative limitation, (2) weapons subject to quantitative limitation, and (3) weapons not subject to either limitation.
196
June 23 (700) From the American Delegate to the Bureau of the Conference (tel.)
Opinion that it would perhaps be unwise for the General Commission to convene in the immediate future, but belief that the Bureau should continue to sit in private, since the ceasing of all Conference activities except private conversations during July might be disadvantageous.
197
June 27 (701) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Decision of Bureau to recommend to the General Commission that it authorize Henderson to continue series of private conversations, and to convoke General Commission and Bureau only when greater measures of common accord had been reached.
198
June 27 (702) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Conversations with various representatives, all of whom, except the German, favored an adjournment until private conversations had liquidated some of the outstanding questions.
199
June 27 From the American Delegate
Conversation with Sato, chief of Japanese delegation, who set forth Japanese attitude that the problem of disarmament should be treated regionally, and Japanese opposition to part I (security) in its present form.
200
[Page XXV]June 29 (704) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Meeting of the General Commission, at which the Bureau’s recommendation set forth in telegram No. 701, June 27, was adopted; adjournment of the Commission until October 16.
201
July 10 From the American Delegate
Draft articles on the control of trade in and manufacture of arms prepared by the Disarmament Section of League Secretariat for insertion in British draft at the second reading; comment that the draft maintains various divergences of opinion.
202
July 24 (98) From the Ambassador in Italy
Conversation with Baron Aloisi, Chief of Cabinet of the Foreign Ministry, which left the impression that Italy’s policy in her European relations is to be based on the Four Power Pact.
203
July 25 (713) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Report that Henderson, following his various conversations, will formulate and present to the Bureau about September 20 certain suggestions in relation to the British plan; that he will ask the Bureau to name a drafting committee to put the suggestions into treaty form.
204
Aug. 2 (212) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Advice that Davis is ready to return to Europe whenever necessary; that he will be glad to be present at possible Anglo-French conversations if it is desired.
205
Aug. 16 (241) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Information from Foreign Minister that Anglo-French conversations set for September 18 were by invitation of the French, so that any suggestion for Davis’ presence should come from French Foreign Minister.
206
Aug. 28 From the British Embassy
Inquiry as to whether there has been any change in U. S. policy on the questions of supervision and control of armaments.
207
Aug. 30 To the British Embassy
Information that there has been no fundamental change in U. S. policy on control of manufacture of arms.
207
Aug. 30 From President Roosevelt to the Chairman of the American Delegation
Enclosure of letters to be shown to the British and French, and a personal note for Prime Minister MacDonald.
208
Aug. 30 From President Roosevelt to the Chairman of the American Delegation
Letter to be shown to the British expressing deep interest in success of the Disarmament Conference.
209
Aug. 30 From President Roosevelt to the British Prime Minister
Expression of concern for the success of the Conference, with emphasis on the importance of British influence to bring about a definite success.
210
[Page XXVI]Sept. 22 From the Chairman of the American Delegation
Transmittal of (1) copy of a letter to President Roosevelt (text printed) indicating a feeling of greater hopefulness than shortly after arrival, and (2) memoranda (texts printed) of conversations with the British Prime Minister, with the French Foreign Minister, and with the French President of the Council of Ministers.
211
Sept. 23 (425) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Receipt from the French of (1) a memorandum received from Mussolini setting forth his disarmament program (substance printed) and (2) the French comments in reply, indicating substantial agreement with the Italian position.
224
Sept. 25 (275) From the Chargé in France
Memorandum of an Anglo-French-American conversation (text printed) at the Quai d’Orsay on September 22.
226
Sept. 28 (722) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Account of continuing disarmament conversations, with the Italians endeavoring to harmonize views of France and Germany; observations concerning various difficulties, such as determining status of Germany’s armaments during proposed transition period, France’s demand for sanctions in case of violation of the convention, and the unknown factor of Japan’s attitude toward disarmament.
232
Sept. 30 (370) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Appreciation of analysis in telegram No. 722, September 28; feeling that United States should leave the initiative to others in dealing with Japan in present negotiations.
235
Oct. 1 (725) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Comment that the crux of the problem at present is whether Germany will consent to the proposed 4–year transition period, with the accompanying conditions.
236
Oct. 3 (726) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Further discussion concerning Japan, and concurrence in opinion that United States should not take the lead in bringing pressure on Japan.
237
Oct. 6 (727) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Substance of answers which the German Minister at Berne has been instructed to give to certain questions which have been asked by Simon and Aloisi; comment that the German position is not encouraging.
238
Oct. 7 (729) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that the British and French delegations have been informed of details of the German reply as indicated in telegram No. 727, October 6.
240
Oct. 8 (372) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Résumé of points which it is planned to impress upon the German Ambassador at an interview, October 9; request for any comments which Davis may wish to make before the interview is held.
240
[Page XXVII]Oct. 9 (730) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Suggestions as to minor modifications to be made in the points to be brought out to the German Ambassador.
242
Oct. 9 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Statement made to the German Ambassador that the paramount purpose and matter of consideration of the U. S. Government is the promotion of disarmament.
242
Oct. 9 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Western European Affairs
Conversation with the German Ambassador, who asserted that he was unable to comprehend the reaction of the world to the latest German disarmament proposals.
243
Oct. 9 Memorandum of Trans-Atlantic Conversation
Discussion between Davis in Geneva and President Roosevelt and Secretary Hull in Washington in which Davis mentioned the failure of Italy to harmonize views of France and Germany, the need to keep trying to negotiate an agreement rather than to impose one, and belief that the French would go along with a proposal eliminating a trial period.
245
Oct. 9 (732) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Report of Bureau meeting at which Henderson suggested that an effort be made before the General Commission meeting on October 16 to find a solution of the difficulties still existing so that the Commission could go forward with the second reading of the British draft.
247
Oct. 11 (733) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Belief that certain basic alterations in the military structure of European continental states under article 16 of the British draft make possible a compromise settlement of differences between French and German opinion with regard to material.
248
Oct. 11 (735) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Draft resolution prepared by Simon and revised by a drafting committee (text printed) as an effort to find a basis of agreement; opinion that in present form it would be unacceptable to the Germans.
249
Oct. 11 (736) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Feeling that it might be unwise to present a resolution in a form unacceptable to Germany until all attempts to negotiate have been exhausted.
252
Oct. 12 (373) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Agreement with opinion that endeavors should be continued so long as a possibility exists of persuading Germany to negotiate a suitable treaty.
252
Oct. 12 (109) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Discussions with the British Ambassador and the French Ambassador about conversations which Mussolini had with each of them; information that Italy and France are practically agreed on the matter of sanctions but not on the point of the trial period. Account of conversation with the Under Secretary for Foreign Affairs.
253
[Page XXVIII]Oct. 13 (738) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President and the Secretary: Report of talks with Nadolny and with Simon; Nadolny’s contention that the denial to Germany for 4 years of the right of equality status was inadmissible to his Government; attempts of U. S. and British delegates to explain the position of their Governments.
255
Oct. 13 (739) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Conversation with Soragna, chief Italian delegate, including some discussion of the Four Power Pact.
258
Oct. 13 (215) From the Ambassador in Italy
Conversation with the German Ambassador, who said that his Government could be induced to agree to the two periods provided in the disarmament plan, that it insisted on parity of quality, and that sanctions of a military nature were out of the question.
259
Oct. 14 (742) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Statements by Davis and by Simon at Bureau meeting (texts printed).
260
Oct. 14 (743) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Summary of remarks by various other delegates at the Bureau meeting.
264
Oct. 14 (745) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Telegram from the German Foreign Minister to Henderson (text printed) announcing Germany’s withdrawal from the Disarmament Conference.
265

V. Withdrawal of Germany From the Conference, October 14–November 24

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Oct. 14 To the Ambassador in Great Britain (cir. tel.)
Request for a full analysis of British Government’s attitude toward the reported German withdrawal from the League and the Disarmament Conference.
(Footnote: The same, mutatis mutandis, to France, Italy, Czechoslovakia, and Poland.)
265
Oct. 14 (376) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Request for an analysis of the reaction at the League to Germany’s withdrawal and an analysis of the implications of this move on European political developments.
266
Oct. 14 (744) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Opinion that the German decision to withdraw had been made prior to speeches by Simon and others in the Bureau, since it came before there was time to consider those speeches.
266
[Oct. 15?] From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Account of two meetings held at Henderson’s invitation to determine future procedure of the Conference.
267
[Page XXIX]Oct. 15 (112) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Advice that Italian Government is indignant over the German action, and feels that with this development the Four Power Pact remains the only practical international treaty arrangement applicable to Germany.
269
Oct. 15 (454) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
Information that France feels that efforts at the Disarmament Conference should be pushed to a conclusion of a treaty that would demonstrate to the German people what they are refusing.
270
Oct. 15 (748) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Comments on the current situation and possible means of procedure being contemplated; observation that Germany’s withdrawal intensifies the European nature of the disarmament problem and that United States, while cooperating with European countries in any efforts to bring Germany back, should avoid influencing their political decisions.
270
Oct. 16 (292) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Belief that the British are thinking in terms of the grave crisis facing them, that they are determined to do everything possible to prevent war in Europe, and desire U. S. cooperation to that end.
272
Oct. 16 Memorandum of Trans-Atlantic Telephone Conversation
Davis’ information to President Roosevelt and Secretary Hull that Conference has adjourned for 10 days so that delegates may consult their governments; his opinion that nothing can be done with the Germans on disarmament until after their November 12 elections. Arrangements for a statement to be made by Davis on U. S. position.
273
Oct. 16 (377) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Suggested statement to be given out by Davis concerning U. S. position: That United States is interested solely in disarmament and not in the political element or in the purely European aspect of peace.
277
Oct. 16 (754) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information that statement has been given out in accordance with instructions.
277
Oct. 17 (131) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Desire for analysis of the situation in Germany from both internal and international angles.
278
Oct. 17 (756) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Receipt of confidential information from former head of the League of Nations Union in Germany of Hitler’s need to strengthen his own political position before he could make any concession on disarmament.
278
Oct. 17 (328) From the Chargé in France
Analysis of the situation created for France by Germany’s withdrawal from the League and the Conference.
279
[Page XXX]Oct. 17 (215) From the Ambassador in Germany
Detailed analysis of motivation back of Germany’s withdrawal from the Conference, statements by various German officials, press comment, and attitude of the German people.
281
Oct. 18 (57) From the Ambassador in Poland (tel.)
Information that no action is contemplated by Poland pending developments following Germany’s decision to withdraw from Conference.
286
Oct. 18 (43) From the Chargé in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Advice that Czechoslovak Government feels that the situation created by Germany’s action is serious, but that some sort of disarmament convention will probably be concluded soon even without Germany.
287
Oct. 18 (218) From the Ambassador in Germany
Further considerations with respect to developments leading up to Germany’s withdrawal.
287
Oct. 19 (758) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Report on sentiment regarding continuance of the Conference; outline of a suggestion that the General Commission set up a committee to bring the British draft up to date in the light of recent negotiations and report to the Bureau.
289
Oct. 20 (175) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Further observations on the internal situation leading to Germany’s withdrawal action; belief that the mass of German opinion is with the Government.
291
Oct. 20 (558) From the Ambassador in Japan
Résumé of reactions of Japanese leaders and press to Germany’s withdrawal action, and the speculation as to its effect on Japan’s relations with the Soviet Union.
292
Oct. 21 (381) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that editorial reaction in United States shows resentment against the Hitler government and opposition to U. S. involvement in European political developments.
296
Oct. 22 (759) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Opinion that it is vital that the Conference should be carried on in some form but without public meetings; inclination to favor the suggestion outlined in telegram No. 758, October 19.
297
Oct. 24 (383) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Belief that action suggested in telegram No. 758, October 19, has certain dangers, and that it would be wisest not to sponsor such a course but to maintain a passive attitude until the situation in Europe has clarified itself further.
298
Oct. 25 (761) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Decision of Bureau meeting to recommend to the General Commission that the latter adjourn until December 4, leaving the Bureau to carry on work of the Conference in preparation for a second reading of the British draft.
298
[Page XXXI]Oct. 28 (384) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Suggestion that it might be helpful for Davis to return to the United States for a few weeks for consultation with the President and the Department.
299
Oct. 28 (768) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that although there is an overwhelming opinion that the Conference should continue, there is not yet a unity of opinion as to what the Conference should attempt to do.
300
Nov. 3 (1714) From the Consul General at Berlin
Detailed comment on the action of the German Government in withdrawing from the League and the Disarmament Conference.
301
Nov. 16 (785) From the American Delegate to the Bureau of the Conference (tel.)
Summary of impressions resulting from a number of conversations at Geneva; assertion that the situation is not static.
306
Nov. 17 (390) To the American Delegate (tel.)
Instructions to accept any invitation from the President of the Conference to attend a meeting to discuss the course to be followed by the Conference.
307
Nov. 18 (787) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Conversation with British representatives concerning the apparent divergence of views between the British and the French relative to the British draft and the French modifications; desire for Department’s views as to what U. S. attitude should be.
308
Nov. 18 (788) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Advice that an invitation to a “tea party” has been received from Henderson and will be accepted in line with Department’s telegram No. 390, November 17.
310
Nov. 19 (391) To the American Delegate (tel.)
Instructions in reply to telegram No. 787, November 18.
310
Nov. 19 (789) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Report on the meeting of representatives of England, France, Italy, and United States at Henderson’s invitation, summarizing statements made by each.
310
Nov. 20 (791) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Account of second meeting of same group at Henderson’s house. Simon’s suggestion of a formula for procedure consisting of “parallel” and supplementary work by communications among the various powers together with a continuation of the committee rapporteur procedure.
313
Nov. 21 (392) To the American Delegate (tel.)
Approval of the suggested form of procedure set forth in telegram No. 791, November 20.
315
[Page XXXII]Nov. 21 (794) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Account of another meeting, at which discussion centered on a draft statement (text printed) to be made by Henderson at November 22 Bureau meeting; advice that it was decided that the statement, which incorporated the suggestion for parallel and supplementary work, be made as amended during the discussion.
316
Nov. 23 (393) To the American Delegate (tel.)
Advice that instructions may be issued to return home for brief consultation over the Christmas holidays; desire first, however, for a synopsis of probable nature of the contemplated parallel work.
319
Nov. 23 (796) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Information that first step in the parallel activities may be a meeting of Ambassadors accredited to Rome under chairmanship of Mussolini, and that participation of the U. S. Ambassador would be desired.
319
Nov.24 (797) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Advice that an opportunity for consultation would be greatly appreciated; suggestions as to arrangements to be made.
320
Nov. 24 (394) To the American Delegate (tel.)
Information, in connection with Delegate’s telegram No. 796, November 23, that United States does not wish to join in preliminary discussions which are essentially designed to meet the immediate political situation in Europe.
320
Nov. 25 (141) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Conversation with the British Ambassador, who thought that the preliminary steps to bringing Germany back into the Disarmament Conference would take the shape of diplomatic negotiations rather than a meeting of the four powers.
321
Dec. 2 (800) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Advice that the Committee on Control has discussed the French amendments to article 75 of the British draft, but no commitments have been made by the delegations.
322

VI. Four Power Conversations (France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy), December 3–30

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Dec. 3 (144) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Receipt of information on conversations between Hitler and Francois-Poncet, French Ambassador to Germany, relative to the Saar basin and the disarmament question.
322
Dec. 5 (147) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Receipt of information on conversation between Mussolini and Litvinov, Soviet Commissar for Foreign Affairs, concerning the League of Nations and Soviet difficulties with Japan.
325
[Page XXXIII]Dec. 8 (537) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
Information that Francois-Poncet has been authorized to inform Hitler, when he thinks it necessary, that France cannot continue to discuss the Saar and disarmament except with certain reservations of principle.
326
Dec. 9 (198) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
British Ambassador’s conference with Hitler, who proposed that Germany be permitted to have one-fourth the armament strength of her neighbors and that a 10–year pact be arranged with a general supervisory commission to be approved in Germany.
327
Dec. 9 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Aide-mémoire from the British Embassy, December 8 (text printed) setting forth preliminary impressions of the Hitler proposals, and indicating that certain inquiries are being addressed to Hitler concerning details.
328
Dec. 10 (201) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Receipt of information that the French refused to accede to the Hitler proposals.
330
Dec. 11 (147) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Request for the exact details of the suggestions put forth by Hitler, and of the French and British positions; outline of U. S. general policy.
330
Dec. 11 (804) From the American Delegate to the Bureau of the Conference (tel.)
Résumé of the trends in disarmament discussions among the European powers; assertion that the major question at issue is whether some increase in armament for Germany is to be an immediate result of any convention that may be signed.
332
Dec. 11 From the American Delegate
Report that the Committee of the Bureau on General Provisions has adjourned until after Christmas; summary of the Committee meetings, with particular reference to discussions on supervision and control.
333
Dec. 14 (203) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Summary of the Hitler proposals, comprising a series of 10–year nonaggression pacts to accompany disarmament arrangements, and insistence on an army of 300,000 regulars for Germany.
335
Dec. 14 (353) From the Ambassador in Germany
Comments on the Hitler note to the British Ambassador, dated December 11 (text printed), which sets forth the formal proposals summarized in telegram No. 203, December 14.
336
Dec. 15 (313) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to cable analysis of the British Government’s present policy and objectives in the light of the Hitler proposals.
342
[Page XXXIV]Dec. 16 (339) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Analysis of British objectives, as requested by the Department, emphasizing that they are trying to separate for greater clarity of approach the two questions: (1) Germany’s place in a disarmament convention, and (2) the disarmament to be applied to the armed powers.
342
Dec. 18 (388) From the Chargé in Great Britain
Conversation with the Prime Minister, who declared that the British Government stood solidly by the British disarmament plans and by the League, and also that they were continuing inquiries and conversations with the Germans based on Hitler’s memorandum of December 11.
345
Dec. 19 (209) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Interview with the Foreign Minister, who gave information on questions from the French Ambassador and the German replies concerning proposed change in German armaments.
347
Dec. 22 (213) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Advice from the British Ambassador that the German Foreign Minister has indicated a sympathetic attitude toward certain British suggestions in reply to the Hitler proposal on armament.
348
Dec. 24 (575) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
Information that the British and French Foreign Ministers have compared notes on the German demands in armament; that they are agreed on the need for every effort to obtain a treaty containing substantial disarmament measures.
349
Dec. 27 From the Ambassador in Poland to President Roosevelt
Observations following a tour of certain European capitals, including Berlin and Paris, with comments particularly on the military situation in Germany.
350
Dec. 28 (320) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Desire of Norman Davis to be kept informed of developments so that he may determine when his return to Geneva will be most feasible.
352
Dec. 29 (346) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Observation that the British Cabinet in its next meeting, January 10, will force the question of acceptance of the principle of Franco-British accord working rigidly within the framework of the League toward disarmament.
352
Dec. 30 To the Ambassador in Italy (cir. tel.)
Transmittal of an excerpt (text printed) from President Roosevelt’s speech before the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, December 28, dealing with disarmament and the League.
353
[Page XXXV]

EFFORTS TO SECURE FROM CONGRESS AUTHORITY FOR THE PRESIDENT TO PROHIBIT THE EXPORT OF ARMS AND MUNITIONS FROM THE UNITED STATES UNDER CERTAIN CONDITIONS

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Dec. 29 (274) To the American Delegate to the Bureau of the Disarmament Conference (tel.)
Department’s decision, because of problems arising out of Latin American situation, to urge Senator Borah to press for immediate favorable action on the Arms Traffic Convention of 1925; belief that this will not interfere with disarmament plans under discussion at Geneva
356
1933 Jan. 3 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Information from the British Ambassador of his Government’s willingness to cooperate with United States in preventing sale of arms to Bolivia and Paraguay if the President asks Congress for the requisite Executive authority
356
Jan. 11 (276) To the American Delegate (tel.)
Information that the President sent a message to Congress on January 10 urging ratification of the 1925 convention and requesting authority under certain conditions to limit or forbid the export of arms.
358
Jan. 27 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs
Explanation to the Committee Chairman of the importance of passage of the bill authorizing the President to prohibit export of arms, with particular reference to war and threat of war in South America; the Chairman’s explanation of the situation in Congress in connection with the bill.
358
Feb. 2 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Conversation with the French Ambassador, who promised to communicate with his Government regarding its willingness to cooperate with United States in the arms matter under consideration.
359
Feb. 13 (104) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Request for text, or pertinent excerpts, of the memorandum which the Paris press indicated was given out by the Department in support of the arms embargo resolution.
360
Feb. 13 (67) To the American Delegate (tel.)
Transmittal of the Department’s memorandum (text printed), and explanation of its release to the press.
361
Feb. 28 From the Swedish Minister
Advice that the Swedish Government will be willing to cooperate with United States and other interested governments in the direction outlined in the resolution now before Congress.
362
Mar. 9 (143) From the American Delegate (tel.)
Observations concerning viewpoints of the British, French, and Italians relative to the arms embargo question, and the Italian desire to know U. S. attitude.
363
Mar. 15 To the Italian Ambassador
Advice that if authority to improve embargoes under certain conditions is conferred upon the Executive, the United States will be glad to exchange views with other interested governments.
364
[Page XXXVI]

EXPORT OF ARMS AND MUNITIONS

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Apr. 5 To the Chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs
Request for support of the arms embargo resolution now before Congress; information that Senator Pittman is being asked to support the legislation in the Senate.
364
May 10 From the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
Summary of the chief objections raised in Committee meeting to House Joint Resolution 93 (text printed); desire of the Committee to receive the Secretary’s personal views if possible.
365
May 13 To Diplomatic and Consular Officers in the Latin American Republics
Statement of U. S. position with special reference to the export of arms and munitions to Latin America.
367
Undated To the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
Memorandum on H. J. Res. 93, giving background and reasons favoring enactment of the legislation, concluding with assertion that the passage of the Resolution is necessary in order that the U. S. Government may keep pace with other Governments of the world in the movement to promote peace.
(Footnote: Information that memorandum was read by an officer of the Department at Committee’s meeting on May 17.)
369
June 1 To the American Delegate (tel.)
Information that the Resolution was passed by the House on April 17, was reported out of Senate Committee on May 30 with an amendment (text printed), and that it will probably not come up for a vote in the Senate during this session of Congress.
378
Nov. 7 To the Secretary of Commerce
Résumé of instructions sent to diplomatic and consular officers on U. S. policy on the arms embargo question; request that this be brought to attention of Commerce Department officers who handle any business connected with sale of arms to foreign countries.
378

BRITISH AND JAPANESE REACTION TO AMERICAN NAVAL CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM

Date and number Subject Page
1933 July 26 (480) From the Ambassador in Japan
Analysis of reasons for Japanese agitation over American plans for naval construction, and résumé of efforts of the Japanese Navy to build up to treaty limits.
380
Sept. 14 From the British Embassy
Inquiry whether the U. S. Government would be willing, in the light of Disarmament Conference discussions and other considerations, to suspend the laying down of certain 6-inch-gun cruisers as planned if Japan would agree to do the same, pending a discussion between the three powers.
382
Sept. 14 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the British Chargé emphasizing that the United States does not intend to enter upon an armament race with any other nation or nations, and summarizing U. S. position on naval construction.
384
[Page XXXVII]

NAVAL CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Sept. 20 Memorandum by the Chairman of the Division of Western European Affairs to the Secretary of State and the Under Secretary of State
Conversation with the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy, who inquired as to press reports that the British Government was objecting to the U. S. naval building program.
385
Sept. 22 To the British Embassy
U. S. Government’s reasons for deciding to increase its navy at present, and assertion that it cannot see its way clear to alter its delayed construction program or to suspend the laying down of the cruisers as planned.
386
Nov. 3 Memorandum by Mr. Henry L. Stimson
Detailed account, prepared in the light of certain references in the British note of September 14, of negotiations with the British during the London Naval Conference of 1930, with quotations of excerpts from the records; conclusion that there was nothing said or done by any member of the U. S. delegation which could justify the British suggestion for suspending the laying down of the 6–inch-gun cruisers.
389

THE FOUR POWER PACT, AGREEMENT OF UNDERSTANDING AND COOPERATION BETWEEN FRANCE, GERMANY, GREAT BRITAIN, AND ITALY, SIGNED AT ROME, JULY 15, 1933

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Mar. 24 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Western European Affairs
Details as to the origin, background, and subsequent redrafting of a tentative proposal transmitted by Mussolini to the British, French, and German Ambassadors on March 18 for a Four Power, 10-year pact for collaboration in preserving European peace; summary of German and French reaction toward the first draft.
396
Mar. 28 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Memorandum left by the French Ambassador (text printed) giving comment and views of the French Government on the Mussolini proposal.
(Footnote: Copies of the French memorandum transmitted to the Ambassadors in France, Germany, and Italy, and to the Chairman of the U. S. delegation to the Disarmament Conference.)
398
Mar. 31 (62) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis (Chairman of American delegation to the Disarmament Conference): Advice that exact text of the Mussolini proposal has been received from the Italian Ambassador and will be cabled if desired.
400
Mar. 31 (61) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Davis: Instructions to cable full text unless New York Times story containing text can be confirmed as accurate.
400
Apr. 1 (65) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Text of the Four Power Pact as received from the Italian Ambassador.
401
[Page XXXVIII]

FOUR POWER PACT SIGNED AT ROME

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Apr. 3 (20) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Information that the British Ambassador has presented a revised text of the proposed pact to Mussolini.
402
Undated Memorandum by the Chairman of the American Delegation to Disarmament Conference
Conversation on April 11 with the Italian Ambassador, who wished to give assurance that the Four Power project was not intended as a united front against the United States or any other nation, and to express Mussolini’s hope that some word could be said in Washington indicating America’s interest in the purposes of the pact.
403
Apr. 15 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Receipt of a memorandum (text printed) from the French Ambassador giving views of the French Government, together with a draft of a Four Power Pact (text printed).
404
Apr. 21 (1875) From the Ambassador in Italy
Information from Foreign Office circles that the suggestions of the Governments concerned with the proposed Four Power Pact have now been formulated and submitted and henceforth negotiations thereon will be conducted through regular diplomatic channels.
409
May 12 (123) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Italian Ambassador’s explanation of the status of negotiations on the Pact, and hope for U. S. moral influence toward getting it consummated.
409
May 19 (37) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Information that the British are urging speedy action on the Pact, in view of precarious conditions in Europe, that Mussolini feels the same way, and apparently also the German Government.
411
May 31 (53) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
For the President: Receipt of information that agreement has been reached on the Pact, except for minor matters of form, and that it would be considered helpful if the President would make a statement commendatory of the Pact as it may concern world peace.
411
June 3 (251) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s advice that the Pact is encountering difficulties due to the provision for reaffirmation of equality of rights without any engagement on Germany’s part not to rearm except in agreement with the other signatories.
412
June 6 (10) From the Ambassador in Italy
Memorandum (text printed) of a conversation with the Under Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, who outlined the history of the Pact, his Government’s apprehension over the possibility of failure to reach agreement, and its further efforts to secure agreement.
413
Undated [Rec’d June 7] (60) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Information that the Four Power Pact is being initialed in Rome at 7:30 p.m.
415
[Page XXXIX]June 9 (66) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Conversation with the German Ambassador, who expressed pleasure that some kind of agreement had been reached but was doubtful that it meant substantial progress.
415
June 9 (30) To the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
The President’s statement (text printed) concerning the Pact initialed at Rome; instructions to inform the Italian Government of the text.
(Footnote: The same, mutatis mutandis, to France, Great Britain, Germany, and the Disarmament Conference.)
416
June 9 (33) From the Chargé in Great Britain
Transmittal of a White Paper issued on June 8 by the British Government which included the terms of the Four Power Pact (text printed).
416
June 10 (69) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
German Ambassador’s assertion that France had given an interpretation to the Pact which was not acceptable to Germany.
419
June 16 (39) From the Ambassador in France
Memorandum (text printed) of a conversation with the British Ambassador, who wished the President to be informed of his opinion as to the sincerity and intelligence of Daladier, President of the French Council of Ministers, and his moderating influence with respect to the conclusion of the Pact.
420
June 22 (43) From the Ambassador in Italy
Submittal of various sidelights on the recent negotiations for the Four Power Pact, gathered from conversations which members of the Embassy have had in Foreign Office and diplomatic circles in Rome.
421
July 21 (93) From the Ambassador in Italy
Information on the signing of the Pact on July 15; advice that Italian press comment was extremely enthusiastic and optimistic with regard to the future.
424

GERMAN NAZI ATTACKS ON THE DOLLFUSS REGIME IN AUSTRIA: EXPANSION OF THE AUSTRIAN ARMY WITH CONSENT OF OTHER POWERS

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Apr. 27 (2341) From the Chargé in Germany
Observation that the growth of the Nazi Party in Austria is significant, considering its close association with the Hitler movement in Germany; that the consensus of opinion is that some form of union between Austria and Germany is ultimately inevitable.
426
May 12 (2389) From the Chargé in Germany
Comments on Hitler’s motives and procedure in his apparent efforts to realize the Austrian Anschluss.
427
[Page XL]

NAZI ATTACKS ON DOLLFUSS REGIME

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 18 (837) From the Minister in Austria
Report of the visit of Dr. Frank, Bavarian Minister of Justice, to Vienna, May 13, of the demonstrations and disorders incident to the visit, and summary of press comment. Opinion that the visit has increased the bitterness and tension between the German and Austrian Governments. Apprehension over the situation in Austria.
428
Aug. 10 (136) From the Ambassador in Italy
Austria’s desire to increase her armed forces from 22,000 men to 30,000; advice that she has consulted the other signatories of the Treaty of St. Germain.
433
Aug. 19 (894) From the Minister in Austria
Information concerning various provocative measures of the German Nazis against Austria; opinion that the Austro-German crisis is becoming serious; indications that the British Government also views the situation with anxiety.
433
Aug. 23 (93) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Information from Foreign Office source that Italy will consider a Nazi Austria as analogous to Anschluss.
435
Aug. 24 (152) From the Ambassador in Italy
Report on Italian efforts to subdue the violent Nazi manifestations in Austria, and on a conference at Riccione between Mussolini and Dollfuss. Account of a conversation with the French Ambassador on the Austro-German situation.
436
Aug. 25 (94) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Discussion with Suvich, Under Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, upon his return from the Mussolini-Dollfuss conversations; his opinion that the Austrian situation is not dangerous, but serious; outline of Mussolini’s policy.
439
Aug. 29 (27) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain and report whether a derogation of the military clauses of the Treaty of St. Germain is imminent; also to report other pertinent information.
440
Aug. 31 (40) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Information from the Chancelor that the modification of the treaty desired by Austria was so slight that all the powers consulted had already approved informally and that he did not regard the concession granted as a derogation of the treaty.
441
Sept. 6 (42) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Chancelor’s assertion that his policy toward Germany had been a purely defensive one and that the Nazis’ terrorist acts had compelled him to take repressive measures against them.
442
Sept. 11 (98) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Conversation with Suvich, who said that the situation in Austria seemed more quiet and probably more favorable but was certainly not disposed of.
443
Sept, 13 (141) From the Ambassador in Germany
Account of continuing and more violent German attacks on the Dollfuss regime in Austria in the press and over the radio.
443
[Page XLI]Sept. 30 (180) From the Ambassador in Germany
Report that the recent reorganization of the Austrian Cabinet was viewed in Germany as strengthening Dollfuss’ position.
446
Nov. 18 (68) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Opinion of the British Minister that the Nazis will attempt a putsch soon, and that the Dollfuss Government has slightly better than an even chance to remain.
447
Dec. 21 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Italian Ambassador’s account of Suvich’s visit to Berlin, during which he had discussed with Hitler the Disarmament Conference, the League of Nations, and the relations of Hitler with respect to Austria.
447

TENSION ARISING FROM GERMAN-POLISH RELATIONS WITH RESPECT TO THE POLISH CORRIDOR AND DANZIG

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 4 (2363) From the Chargé in Germany
Information that Hitler and Foreign Minister Von Neurath had two conversations with the Polish Minister recently concerning “the political questions affecting Germany’s relation to Poland” but that no detailed information was given out on the discussions.
448
May 19 (2418) From the Chargé in Germany
Indication that developments in Danzig are again affecting Germany’s relations with Poland; that the forthcoming Danzig elections are likely to result in the accession of the Nazis to power there.
449
June 3 (2447) From the Chargé in Germany
Results of the Danzig general election in which the Nazis were the chief gainers, with slightly more than 50 percent of all votes cast. Comment that this has made possible a Gleich-schaltung of the Free State of Danzig with the Reich.
450

MONETARY AND ECONOMIC CONFERENCE, LONDON, JUNE 12–JULY 27, 1933

I. Multilateral and Bilateral Preparations, January 14–April 12

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Jan. 14 (57) To the American Representatives on the Preparatory Committee of Experts for the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
U. S. desire that subject of discriminatory and harmful effects of bilateral compensation and clearing agreements be discussed at meetings of Experts Committee and, if possible, placed on Conference agenda; tentative suggestion for an agreement by leading trading countries looking toward eventual elimination of such arrangements.
(Footnote: Information that Preparatory Committee of Experts was meeting at Geneva.)
452
[Page XLII]Jan. 19 (58) To the American Representatives on the Preparatory Committee of Experts (tel.)
Request for immediate report on the progress of Preparatory Committee discussions and the main points of policy likely to be presented.
453
Jan. 19 (9) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
From Day and Williams (American representatives on the Preparatory Committee): Adjournment of the Preparatory Committee, January 19; list of subjects to be included in the Conference program.
453
Jan. 20 (10) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
From Sackett: Information that the Organizing Committee of the Monetary and Economic Conference will meet January 25; request for Department’s views concerning the date to be set for the London Conference and the advisability of attaching a reservation to the U. S. formal agreement on the date in view of possible British and French interpretation that such agreement implies approval of a general conference for debt settlement.
(Footnote: Information that Frederic M. Sackett and Norman Davis are the American representatives on the Organizing Committee.)
454
Jan. 20 (11) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Information concerning four points outlined in the report of the Preparatory Committee of Experts as essential to the success of the Conference and on which there should be preliminary negotiations by participating governments.
456
Jan. 20 From the Consul at Cherbourg (tel.)
From Day and Williams: Clarification of two of the points reported in telegram No. 11, January 20.
457
Jan. 22 (13) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
From Sackett: British suggestion that the Organizing Committee at its meeting on January 25 issue a declaration concerning the inadvisability of calling the London Conference earlier than 3 months from the present date because of the time needed by the delegates for the preparation of the questions involved.
457
[Jan. 23] Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Record of a telephone conversation between Secretary of State Stimson and President-elect Roosevelt on certain aspects of U. S. policy with regard to the Conference.
458
Jan. 23 To the American Representatives on the Organizing Committee for the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Sackett: Instructions to support the British suggestion for a declaration concerning the date of the Conference; further instructions to make a statement (text printed) at a meeting of the Organizing Committee to the effect that the views of the American members of the Preparatory Committee of Experts do not necessarily reflect the official views of the U. S. Government.
460
[Page XLIII]Jan. 25 (19) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
From Sackett: Report of the meeting of the Organizing Committee on January 25. Information that J. Ramsay MacDonald was unanimously designated President of the Conference.
461
Feb. 24 From the American Representatives on the Preparatory Committee of Experts
Interpretation of the salient features of the draft annotated agenda of the Conference in terms of the key countries and their possible contributions to the common program.
462
Feb. From the British Embassy
Memorandum outlining British policy on economic problems, with final comment that any hope of bettering conditions is dependent upon a satisfactory settlement of the war debts question.
(Footnote: Information that this memorandum was handed to Secretary Hull by the British Ambassador just before March 4.)
465
Mar. 17 (53) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to report the significance, if any, of the conference between French Finance Minister Bonnet and the British Cabinet.
471
Mar. 17 (46) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Information from the French Ambassador that Bonnet had arrived in London on March 16 to discuss questions arising from the agenda of the London Conference and other matters.
471
Mar. 24 To the British Embassy
U. S. reply to the British memorandum on economic problems, enumerating questions of mutual interest which might be profitably explored. Further information that the U. S. Government is prepared to discuss the debt question simultaneously with, but separately from, the questions on the tentative draft agenda.
472
Mar. 30 (60) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Davis from Phillips: Information that although several exploratory conversations have been held with the British Ambassador, no reply to the U. S. memorandum of March 24 has been received to date.
474
Mar. 30 (60) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Résumé” of conversations with Prime Minister MacDonald and Foreign Minister Simon on the procedure and date for the Monetary and Economic Conference.
(Footnote: Schedule of conversations held by Mr. Davis between March 30 and April 10 with various officials in London, Paris, and Berlin.)
474
Mar. 31 (63) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Request for Department’s views concerning the British suggestion that the Organizing Committee meet on April 10 and then establish June 1 as the date for convoking the Conference.
476
[Page XLIV]Mar. 31 (64) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For the President from Davis: Conversation with MacDonald and Simon concerning the question of MacDonald’s proposed visit to the United States for a personal exchange of views with the President.
477
Apr. 1 (62) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Davis: President Roosevelt’s suggestions as to best time for proposed visit of Prime Minister MacDonald; instructions to advise the Prime Minister of President’s interest in the visit, even though no official invitation is being sent at this time.
479
Apr. 2 (68) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Request for reply to telegram No. 63 of March 31.
479
Apr. 3 (69) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Further discussion with MacDonald concerning the date for his visit to the United States. Reiteration of MacDonald’s opinion that, irrespective of the debt question, a frank discussion of the major problems confronting the two countries would be advisable.
480
Apr. 3 (65) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Davis: U. S. preference to withhold final decision concerning the date of the Conference; suggestion that the Organizing Committee meet not earlier than April 15, when it is hoped a decision can be reached in the matter.
482
Apr. 3 (71) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Intention to arrange with Simon to have a meeting of the Organizing Committee after April 16, to consider the feasibility of attempting to convene the Conference prior to June 15; request for Department’s views on two alternative plans concerning the Conference, one of which entails the scheduling of preliminary economic conversations in Washington.
482
Apr. 4 (73) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Conversation with MacDonald and his colleagues concerning the preoccupation of the Cabinet with the debt question and its relation to the Prime Minister’s proposed trip to the United States.
483
Apr. 4 (65) To the Chargé in France (tel.)
For Davis: Information that discussions now under way are pointing toward agreement on the second alternative mentioned in telegram No. 71 of April 3, from the Chargé in Great Britain, the initiation of preliminary conversations in Washington.
485
Apr. 5 (136) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Conversations with Prime Minister Daladier and Foreign Minister Paul-Boncour, who said that they strongly favored preliminary conversations in Washington; opinion that the French will seek an opportunity to raise the debt question in connection with the Conference work.
485
[Page XLV]Apr. 6 (137) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Information that plans have been completed for MacDonald’s visit to the United States; suggestion that arrangement be made with the British Embassy in Washington for an official invitation.
486
Apr. 11 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Information that the British Ambassador presented a telegram from his Government in regard to the U. S. memorandum of March 24, and agreed to submit either a copy or a synopsis (text infra) of the telegram for further consideration.
487
Apr. 12 From the British Ambassador
Oral communication (text printed) of contents of a telegram expressing the British Government’s views on the relation of the war debt question to the Economic Conference.
487

II. Preliminary Conversations at Washington, April 7–June 3

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Apr. 7 (72) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Advice that the President has invited the Governments of France, Italy, Germany, Japan, China, Argentina, Brazil, and Chile to participate in preliminary economic conversations in Washington preparatory to the London Conference.
(Footnote: Information that a similar invitation was extended, April 8, to the Governments of Canada and Mexico.)
489

a. exchanges of views between president roosevelt and foreign representatives

Great Britain

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Apr. 22 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the British Prime Minister
Announcement of a preliminary review of the main problems of the London Economic Conference.
490
Apr. 23 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the British Prime Minister
Announcement of further exploration of the monetary aspect of the Conference agenda.
491
Apr. 24 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the British Prime Minister
Declaration that the present discussions were designed to explore subjects to be covered at the London Conference and not to conclude definite agreements with respect to any particular problem.
491
[Page XLVI]Apr. 26 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the British Prime Minister
Announcement that the proposals examined during the past week will be discussed in Washington with other governments with a view to securing the fullest possible understanding before the convening of the London Conference.
492
May 6 (862) From the Chargé in Great Britain
Report of the Prime Minister’s radio address, May 5, in which he summarized his Washington conversations.
493

France

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Apr. 13 From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Disarmament Conference
Information that Edouard Herriot will be the chief French representative at the Washington conversations; observations concerning French views on the debt and tariff questions.
494
Apr. 28 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State of a Conversation Between President Roosevelt and the French Representative, Thursday Afternoon, April 27, 1933
Exchange of views on the subject of intergovernmental debts, and on the question of establishing a tariff truce during the life of the Conference.
497
Apr. 28 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the French Representative
Announcement of exchange of views on several subjects of international importance, and particularly the problem of intergovernmental debts.
499

Canada

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Apr. 13 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Conversation with the Canadian Minister as to the desirability of scheduling the visit of the Canadian Prime Minister, Richard Bennett, to the United States to overlap that of Prime Minister MacDonald of England.
501
May 6 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the Canadian Prime Minister
Report of conversations with reference to the principal problems of the London Conference, and to problems peculiar to the United States and Canada.
502
[Page XLVII]

Argentina

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 6 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the Argentine Ambassador to France
Announcement of conversations held in Washington preparatory to the London Conference, with particular emphasis upon questions of trade policy and the stabilization of monetary conditions.
503

Italy

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 6 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the Italian Minister of Finance
Announcement of Washington conversations resulting in declaration of common objectives in approaching the problems of the London Conference, especially the adjustment of financial and economic conditions with a view toward stimulating international trade.
504

Germany

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 12 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the German Representative
Announcement of conversations in Washington resulting in the recognition of the need for economic as well as military disarmament, and intention to promote the aims of the London Conference through international cooperation.
505

China

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 19 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the Vice President of the Executive Yuan and Minister of Finance of the Republic of China
Announcement of common accord at the Washington conversations on the question of enhancing and stabilizing the price of silver in connection with efforts to improve international trade; determination to approach the problems of the London Conference and the Disarmament Conference with equal interest and effort.
505
[Page XLVIII]

Mexico

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 18 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the Mexican Minister of Finance
Announcement of satisfactory results of conversations in Washington centered on agreement as to the need of concerted international effort toward restoration of economic equilibrium in the world; and specifically, consideration of a project for stabilization of the price of silver.
506

Brazil

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 25 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the Brazilian Representative
Announcement of conversations in Washington resulting in mutual agreement as to the importance of a tariff truce and stabilization of currencies in reviving international trade; exchange of views concerning the conditions of international payments in connection with U. S.-Brazilian trade.
507

Japan

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 27 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the Japanese Privy Counselor and the Vice Governor of the Bank of Japan
Declaration, as the result of Washington conversations, of intention to contribute maximum efforts toward the success of the London Conference and the Disarmament Conference, and concurrence in the view that both economic and military disarmament are essentials to a sound basis for peace.
507

Chile

Date and number Subject Page
1933 June 3 Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and the Chilean Representative
Announcement of conversations in Washington which revealed complete agreement between the United States and Chile as to the necessity for international action at the London Conference looking toward an improvement of the world price level, stabilization of currencies, and the removal of obstacles to international trade.
508
[Page XLIX]

b. exchanges of views with the department of state

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Apr. 11 To the Albanian Minister
Official invitation (text printed) suggesting an exchange of views, through diplomatic channels, on any of the items of the London Conference agenda.
(Footnote: Information that substantially the same invitation was extended to the majority of the foreign diplomatic missions in Washington.)
509

Australia

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 15 (171) From the British Ambassador
Memorandum (text printed), transmitted at request of Prime Minister of Australia, presenting Australian views on certain points of the Conference agenda.
510
May 24 To the British Ambassador
Memorandum (text printed) in reply to the Australian observations on the draft annotated agenda for the Conference.
513

Brazil

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 22 Memorandum by Mr. William R. Manning, of the Division of Latin American Affairs, of a Conversation Between American and Brazilian Representatives
Discussion of questions before the London Conference, in particular, U. S. desire for Brazilian support of the tariff truce proposal, and two Brazilian questions in connection with coffee.
514

Canada and Mexico

Date and number Subject Page
1933 [May 16?] Memorandum of a Conversation Between American Representatives and Canadian and Mexican Representatives
Discussion of the background of the world silver situation; outline of points of agreement between U. S. and Mexican representatives in regard to stabilization of silver values and the restoration of its purchasing powers, the Canadian representatives lacking authority to make any commitments.
516
[Page L]

Chile

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 27 Memorandum by Mr. Stuart E. Grummon, of the Division of Latin American Affairs, of a Conversation Between American Representatives and the Chilean Representative
Résumé of matters previously discussed with other foreign representatives preparatory to the London Conference; Chilean representative’s position that, although Chile was in agreement with the general international objectives listed in the Conference agenda, his Government, due to present internal difficulties, would be unable to take an active part in the Conference.
517

China

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 10 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation Between American and Chinese Representatives
Exchange of views with regard to monetary problems, in particular, the question of stabilizing silver; comments on the possibility of effecting an agreement between the silver-producing and the silver-using countries.
521
May 11 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation Between American and Chinese Representatives
Further discussions concerning the stabilization of silver and the possible role of Indian silver in future exchange relations; Senator Pittman’s expression of confidence that the silver question can be satisfactorily settled at the London Conference.
523

Czechoslovakia

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 18 Memorandum of a Conversation Between American Representatives and the Czechoslovak Minister
Discussion of the monetary and economic phases of the problems to be taken up at the London Conference, especially the stabilization of currencies, the problem of exchange restrictions, and tariff reduction.
527
May 18 From the Czechoslovak Legation
Czechoslovak agreement in principle with the objectives of the Conference agenda; views on exchange restrictions, the tariff question, the debt question, and the ill effects of U. S. abandonment of the gold standard.
529
[Page LI]

Germany

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 4 (73) From the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Opinion that Hjalmar Schacht, president of the German Reichsbank, no longer occupies the role of an independent adviser to Hitler, but is becoming increasingly subject to Nazi pressure.
531
May 11 Memorandum by the Economic Adviser of a Conversation Between American and German Representatives
Dr. Schacht’s observations on the question of Germany’s external indebtedness and exchange difficulties, and his intimation that the German Government may declare a complete transfer moratorium; indication by American representatives as to inevitable adverse reaction in the United States toward such a move and suggestions for possible remedial measures.
532
May 20 (55) To the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Advice concerning substance of the recent conversations with the German representatives.
534

Japan

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 17 (101) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Information concerning lack of authority of the Japanese delegation; résumé of probable Japanese policy on political and economic matters to be considered at the Washington conversations and the London Conference.
534
May 25 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation Between American and Japanese Representatives
Discussion of monetary policies, including the questions of stabilization of currency and the return to the gold standard.
537
May 26 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation Between American and Japanese Representatives
Further exchange of views with regard to bilateral trade agreements, the most-favored-nation clause, and the proposed tariff truce.
542

Mexico

Date and number Subject Page
1933 [May 11?] Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Mexican Affairs of a Conversation Between American and Mexican Representatives
Concurrence in general views exchanged with respect to tariff and monetary questions.
548
[Page LII][May 12] Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Mexican Affairs of a Conversation Between American and Mexican Representatives
Further exchange of views concerning tariff questions; suggestion that the Canadian, Mexican, and U. S. representatives hold an informal discussion on the silver problem with a view to concluding an agreement at the London Conference.
(Footnote: Reference to memorandum of conversation on silver question, May 16, ante, p. 516.)
549
[May 17?] Memorandum of a Conversation Between American and Mexican Representatives
Agreement on draft of joint statement for the press concerning the results of the informal conversations in Washington.
550

Norway

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 18 Memorandum by Mr. Richard W. Morin, of the Division of Western European Affairs, of a Conversation Between American Representatives and the Norwegian Minister
Discussion of currency stabilization and exchange of views with respect to bilateral treaties within the framework of the unconditional most-favored-nation clause.
551

Poland

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 15 Memorandum by Mr. Landreth M. Harrison, of the Division of Eastern European Affairs, of a Conversation Between American and Polish Representatives
Presentation of the tentative program worked out by the United States in previous conversations with special missions of other Governments preparatory to the London Conference; Polish observations on various aspects of the program outlined.
553

Rumania

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 19 Memorandum by Mr. Henry L. Deimel, Jr., of the Division of Near Eastern Affairs, of a Conversation Between American Representatives and the Rumanian Minister
Exchange of views concerning the general scope of the Washington conversations, with particular reference to bilateral commercial treaties and the question of preferential grain arrangements.
562
[Page LIII]

Sweden

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 17 Memorandum by Mr. Richard W. Morin, of the Division of Western European Affairs, of a Conversation Between American and Swedish Representatives
Swedish Minister’s views on the range of previous conversations between U. S. and other foreign representatives; his interest in U. S. position with respect to the most-favored-nation clause, and the views of other governments on currency stabilization.
566

Turkey

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Apr. 20 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Record of a conversation between the Secretary of State and the Turkish Ambassador, who submitted an aide-mémoire (text printed), setting forth the Turkish views on the Conference agenda.
(Footnote: Information concerning U. S. reply, May 25.)
567

Yugoslavia

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 18 Memorandum by Mr. Henry L. Deimel, Jr., of the Division of Near Eastern Affairs, of a Conversation Between American Representatives and the Yugoslav Minister
Indication of Yugoslav position with respect to certain items on the Conference agenda, especially the tariff truce proposal and the question of war debts.
572

III. Further Multilateral Discussions Upon Pre-Conference and Other Issues, April 17–May 29

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Apr. 17 Memorandum by the Economic Adviser
Conversation with British Financial Adviser Bewley concerning a British proposal for the creation of an international fund for the purpose of reducing barriers to international trade.
574
Apr. 17 (166) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Telegram from Drummond, Secretary General of the League of Nations (text printed), suggesting that the Organizing Committee for the London Conference defer its meeting of April 25 for a maximum period of 3 weeks.
(Footnote: Nonobjection to the proposed postponement.)
575
Apr. 21 (175) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Conversation with Prime Minister Daladier with respect to the financial problem created by U. S. abandonment of the gold standard.
576
[Page LIV]Apr. 21 (177) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: MacDonald’s insistence upon calling the meeting of the Organizing Committee on April 27, or April 29; request for instructions.
576
Apr. 21 (99) To the Chargé in France (tel.)
For Davis: Consent to calling of meeting of the Organizing Committee on April 29.
577
Apr. 22 (178) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Suggestion that the French Government be consulted before any publicity is given as to the date for the Organizing Committee.
577
Apr. 22 (103) To the Chargé in France (tel.)
For Davis: Information for Sir John Simon, Chairman, concerning date of meeting of Organizing Committee and desirability of consultation with French and other Governments.
577
Apr. 22 (182) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Suggestion that principles of the Convention on the Abolition of Import and Export Prohibitions and Restrictions (1927) might serve as a useful point of departure in dealing with prohibitions and quotas.
578
Apr. 28 (83) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Davis: Instructions to present at meeting of Organizing Committee two proposals relating to contemplated U. S. tariff truce motion at Conference, one notifying the invited Governments of U. S. intention, the other proposing the adoption by the Organizing Committee of a resolution (text printed) for a voluntary tariff truce during the preliminary period before the Conference.
578
Apr. 29 (91) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Report of favorable action by Organizing Committee on first proposal, and intention of members of Committee to request authorization from their respective Governments for adoption of resolution for preliminary tariff truce; suggestion by Stoppani, Chief of League of Nations Economic Section, that a rephrased resolution (text printed) would have a better chance of adoption.
581
Apr. 30 (84) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Davis: Instructions to avoid discussion of any alternative weaker text of the tariff truce resolution if possible, but if it appears unlikely that the members of the Organizing Committee will receive authorization within a few days to discuss the original resolution, to present a statement (text printed) embodying U. S. views concerning an alternative text.
584
May 1 (92) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Information that in case adoption of the proposed resolution seems unlikely, it may be necessary to seek some other means of acquainting the Organizing Committee with the Department’s views.
584
[Page LV]May 3 (97) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Report of opposition to MacDonald on economic program discussed during the Washington preliminary conversations; intention of Davis to remain in London to consult with MacDonald on the tariff truce proposal and the disarmament question.
586
Undated Memorandum of Trans-Atlantic Telephone Conversation
Between Under Secretary of State Phillips and Norman Davis, in London, May 6 [5?]: Discussion of problems connected with the tariff truce resolution and difficulties encountered by Davis in obtaining British acceptance without sacrificing the strength of the original text.
587
May 5 (92) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Davis: Authorization to agree to any feasible wording of the intermediary tariff truce proposal as long as it does not result in a weakened text; further instructions concerning general truce to be proposed at the Conference.
591
May 5 (101) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: British Government’s approval in principle of tariff truce but reluctance to commit itself with respect to the interim period. Intention to endeavor to reach an agreement, although it may require modification of the text of the resolution to meet British opposition.
592
May 6 (97) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to inform MacDonald that the U. S. intermediary tariff truce proposal is not intended to prejudge the basis of future negotiations but to curb action, from now through July, which might imperil the friendly spirit of the Conference.
593
May 8 (106) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Opinion that British agreement on the tariff truce is becoming definitely linked with some assurance or action on the debt question.
594
May 8 (109) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Discussion with Runciman, President of the British Board of Trade, of modified draft tariff truce resolution (text printed), which he agreed to circulate for immediate consideration by the principal members of the Cabinet; request for examination of the draft with respect to any changes that may be required under the new U. S. farm bill.
594
May 9 (112) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: British general concurrence with draft resolution with amended second and third paragraphs (text printed); request for immediate reply concerning acceptance of revised wording.
596
May 9 (113) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Opinion that British desire for settlement of war debt issue and present policy of preferential trade agreements are inconsistent with the aims of the London Conference; suggestions for securing a more cooperative British attitude.
597
[Page LVI]May 9 (101) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Davis: Approval of the revised tariff truce resolution; instructions, however, to make clear the U. S. position with regard to changes under the British reservation.
600
May 10 (116) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Report of circulation of approved draft resolution to the six other Organizing Committee representatives, and of difficulties encountered due to the inclusion of the British reservation referring to the annotated agenda; suggestion that the Washington representatives of these Governments be advised of the importance the U. S. Government attaches to prompt acceptance of the resolution.
601
May 12 (121) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Approval of tariff truce formula reported in telegram No. 112, May 9, by Germany, Belgium, United States, United Kingdom, France, Italy, Japan, and Norway; advice that reference to annotated agenda was removed from text and added as a footnote.
601
May 12 (108) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Davis: Congratulations upon successful completion of negotiations with respect to the tariff truce resolution.
602
May 12 (122) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Account of the formal meeting of the Organizing Committee, May 12, after informal discussion leading to agreement to accept the text of the tariff truce resolution, and to include the various reservations and explanations in the procès-verbal.
602
Undated Resolution
Text of the resolution recommending the adoption of a tariff truce at the beginning of the Conference.
605
May 13 (126) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Davis: Information that the procès-verbal containing the explanations and reservations with respect to the tariff truce will probably not be drawn up until the Italian comments have been received; transmittal of German reservations (text printed) and substance of French reservations.
605
May 15 (221) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
French viewpoint that establishment of a monetary truce is a prerequisite to the success of the Conference, and suggestion that conversations between United States, Great Britain, and France be initiated toward that end.
606
May 16 (114) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Communication from President Roosevelt for Prime Minister MacDonald (text printed) clarifying a reference in a radio address by the President, May 16, as to the desirability of an early conclusion of the Conference.
607
May 16 (222) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
From Davis: Information concerning modification of French reservation.
608
[Page LVII]May 16 From the French Embassy
Willingness of French Government and Bank of France to enter into conversations with the U. S. and British Governments and the central banks of those countries to discuss the question of establishing a tripartite monetary cooperation.
608
May 19 (136) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Communication from Prime Minister MacDonald for President Roosevelt (text printed), expressing opinion that a period of 8 weeks is too optimistic an estimate for the accomplishment of the work of the London Conference.
609
May 22 (106) To the American Member on the Organizing Committee for the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
Instructions to inform Organizing Committee officials of Agriculture Department’s proposed plans for administration of the farm bill, and to make clear that this action is not a violation of the tariff truce.
610
May 23 (121) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Communication from President Roosevelt for Prime Minister MacDonald (text printed), reiterating the view that by intensive effort on the part of the delegates, the work of the Conference could be accomplished within 2 months.
611
May 23 From the American Member on the Organizing Committee for the Monetary and Economic Conference
Final form of the revised French reservation (text printed) to the tariff truce declaration. Information that the U. S. comments on the final French text have been confined to questions of form, and a full reservation of rights made in the event that any of the measures prove discriminatory to American interests.
612
May 24 (135) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Information that the League of Nations Council has adopted a resolution appealing to all governments invited to the London Conference to adhere to the tariff truce.
614
May 24 (186) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Disarmament Conference (tel.)
Advice that no reference to the pending U. S. agricultural legislation appears in the procès-verbal of the Organizing Committee meeting of April 29, as discussion concerning U. S. plans occurred in the private meeting preceding the formal meeting; opinion that proposed U. S. action may be defended either under the reference to the annotated agenda or on the basis that it does not constitute a new initiative.
614
May 24 (602 Pol.) From the Consul at Geneva
Transmittal of an aide-mémoire (extract printed) relative to the attitude of agricultural countries of Central and Eastern Europe at the World Monetary and Economic Conference, to be used as a basis for discussion at the conference of those states to be held at Bucharest June 4.
616
[Page LVIII]May 27 To the French Ambassador
Advice that American representatives will be glad to join in conversations at London, apart from the Conference program, to consider stabilization of the monetary situation with the French and British Governments and central banks.
619

IV. Tripartite Conversations Upon Monetary Stabilization: Impact Upon the Conference, May 30–July 5

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 30 From President Roosevelt
Appointment of Secretary of State Hull as Chairman of the American delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference at London; memoranda (texts printed) of instructions concerning organization of the American delegation, and outline of American policy to be followed at the Conference.
(Footnote: Membership of American delegation.)
620
May 31 (136) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to advise Foreign Office that Oliver Sprague and George Harrison, representatives, respectively, of the U. S. Government and the New York Federal Reserve Bank, will be available in London June 9 for discussions with British and French Governments and bank representatives.
(Footnote: Repeated to the Ambassador in France.)
627
May 31 To Mr. James P. Warburg
Approval of designation as liaison officer between the American delegation to the London Conference and the U. S. representatives participating in the monetary stabilization conversations.
(Footnote: Identification of Warburg as Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors, Bank of the Manhattan Co.; Financial Adviser of the American delegation.)
628
June 8 (13) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For the President and Acting Secretary Phillips: Request for authorization for Warburg to participate fully in the monetary discussions in London.
628
June 8 (12) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
President Roosevelt’s approval of Warburg’s participation in the monetary discussions.
629
June 9 (14) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Discussion with Prime Minister MacDonald of details of the Conference program; reiteration of U. S. view with respect to early adjournment of the Conference, and further extension of the tariff truce.
629
June 9 (265) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Information that French bank officials are en route to London to enter into the tripartite conversations on monetary stabilization,
631
[Page LIX]June 10 (17) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Communication from President Roosevelt (text printed) suggesting that a motion be made for conclusion of the Conference by August 12.
631
June 11 (19) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Request for clarification of press reports concerning two amendments to the industrial control bill conferring extraordinary tariff powers on the President inasmuch as they may constitute obstacles to the introduction of the tariff truce resolution at the Conference.
631
June 11 (20) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information that action has been taken with respect to amendment to the industrial control bill; that the President sees no obstacle to the introduction of the tariff truce resolution.
632
June 11 (21) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
MacDonald’s acquiescence in U. S. requests concerning organization of the Conference, 10-minute limitation of preliminary speeches, and adjournment by August 12. Advice that United States has been offered a choice between the chairmanships of the two great commissions—Monetary and Economic; opinion that chairmanship of the Monetary Commission appears to be the more desirable.
632
June 11 (la) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Request for refutation of reports that the President and the administration are no longer supporting desire of the Chairman and American delegation to reduce tariffs and remove obstacles to international trade.
633
June 11 (22) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
From the President: Assurance that no alteration of policy has occurred.
634
June 12 (1082) From the Minister in Rumania
Report of the meeting in Bucharest, June 4–6, of the Eastern and Central European agrarian countries.
634
June 13 (28) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Final draft of Chairman’s address (text printed) to be delivered at the Conference.
636
June 14 (30) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President and Acting Secretary Phillips: Report of a misunderstanding with the British and French over chairmanship of the Monetary Commission.
640
June 15 (32) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President and Phillips: Advice that Bonnet will nominate Cox of the U. S. delegation as Chairman of the Monetary Commission.
641
June 15 (34) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information that Cox was elected Chairman of the Monetary Commission, and that Hendryk Colijn, President of the Netherlands Council of Ministers, was elected President of the Economic Commission.
641
[Page LX]June 15 (37) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For Secretary of State Hull, Cox, and Sprague: Transmittal of a message from President Roosevelt that any proposal concerning stabilization must be forwarded to Washington for consideration by the Treasury Department and the President.
641
June 16 (35) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For Secretary of the Treasury Woodin from Sprague: Report of U. S., British, and French monetary conversations resulting in a general statement (text printed) and an agreement between the banks of issue concerning an arrangement limited to the period of the Conference and designed to eliminate wide fluctuations in the three exchanges.
642
June 16 (37) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President from Warburg: Endorsement of Sprague’s report, and recommendation that the President approve the plan as a whole and an additional statement (text printed) respecting U. S. and British intention ultimately to stabilize their currencies on a gold basis.
644
June 17 (42) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For Hull for guidance of Cox and information of Harrison and Sprague: President Roosevelt’s statement of policy on stabilization (text printed), rejecting the tripartite declaration and general statement.
645
June 18 (41) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President from Warburg: Advice that no U. S. resolutions have been introduced at the Conference to date due to preoccupation with organization of the Monetary Commission, and to nonreceipt of the President’s views on report concerning proposed plans for temporary stabilization.
646
June 18 (40) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President from Cox, Sprague, and Warburg: Clarification of several points of stabilization plan to which President Roosevelt objected. Opinion that the President’s position will be interpreted by other nations as indicating reversal of U. S. plans, or lack of authority by American representatives.
647
June 18 (42) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Denial of press reports that American delegation has made a proposal of 10 percent all around tariff cut.
648
June 19 (1) From President Roosevelt (tel.)
Reiteration of reluctance to consider temporary stabilization; but inquiry as to advisability of suggestion of U. S. willingness during Conference to keep pound from going above 4.25.
649
June 20 (46) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Report of proposal before the Economic Committee, introduced by the French and supported by the British, advocating international control of the production and exchange of various important commodities; advice that the delegation will follow developments with a view toward protection of American interests, and request for the President’s further suggestions.
649
[Page LXI]June 20 (48) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Communication from President Roosevelt (text printed), reiterating his views on monetary stabilization as expressed in Department’s telegram No. 42, June 17.
650
June 20 (47) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President from Warburg: Report of unanimous acceptance by the Monetary Commission’s second committee of American resolution concerning an international monetary standard; advice that remainder of the resolution has been referred to subcommittees for development of technical details.
650
June 21 (52) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Communication from Early, Secretary to President Roosevelt (text printed), expressing President Roosevelt’s gratification at acceptance of American resolution; also, his approval in principle of proposal reported in delegation’s telegram No. 46, June 20, concerning control of commodities.
651
June 21 (53) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President and Phillips: Advice that the delegation will proceed in accordance with views expressed in telegram No. 48, June 20, with a single view toward permanent and universal stabilization.
651
June 22 (56) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President from Warburg: Statement for the press (text printed) issued by the American delegation, clarifying the American position on temporary stabilization.
652
June 22 (57) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President from Warburg: Request for the President’s views as to the feasibility of authorizing the Federal Reserve banks to take such action as may from time to time be practicable to limit fluctuations, in view of the possible development of another crisis at the Conference should violent fluctuations occur in the dollar rate.
653
June 22 (58) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President from Cox: Supplement to Warburg’s reports, indicating necessity for distinction between the operations of the delegation and financial units of the American representation, as set forth in the press statement reported in delegation’s telegram No. 56, June 22.
653
June 23 (61) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel).
To the President from Warburg: Report of the progress through the Drafting Committee of U. S. resolutions introduced in accordance with the President’s memorandum of May 30 on American policy.
654
June 24 (10) From President Roosevelt (tel.)
Advice that the President’s suggestion for action to limit fluctuation of the pound may be discussed with Baruch and Woodin if considered necessary. Communication for Hull and Cox (text printed) expressing congratulations upon their successful activities.
655
[Page LXII]June 25 From the Assistant Secretary of State to the Acting Secretary of State (tel.)
Request for approval of Assistant Secretary of State Moley’s proposed statement to the press (text printed) upon his arrival in London, June 28, explaining his mission as liaison officer between President Roosevelt and the American delegation.
(Footnote: Repeated to President Roosevelt, aboard U. S. S. Ellis, June 26; paraphrase sent to the American delegation at the London Conference.)
656
June 26 (13) From President Roosevelt (tel.)
Approval of Moley’s statement for the press, and advice that no further statements should be issued by either Moley or his associate, Herbert Swope, while in London, since they are not members of the delegation.
657
June 26 (71) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Letter from General Counsel of the National Recovery Administration, June 24 (text printed), interpreting the provisions of Section 3 (e) of Title I of the National Industrial Recovery Act as applying to the silver mining industry, and advising that the exercise of authority conferred upon the President is discretionary.
657
June 27 (4a) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Information concerning a meeting of the entire American and British delegations called by MacDonald, June 27, to discuss the imminent abandonment of the gold standard by Holland, France, Switzerland, and Belgium.
658
June 28 (79) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For Sprague from Acheson: Request for views as to whether immediate U. S. action is desirable in the light of the acute monetary situation of the gold standard countries; further request that the Treasury be informed daily by cable concerning developments.
659
June 28 (75) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Report of Cuban proposal, under consideration in the Economic Commission, for an agreement between the sugar producing and consuming countries, and of Cuban desire for American support; request for instructions as to the position the delegation should take.
659
June 28 (15) From President Roosevelt (tel.)
Instruction for the delegation (text printed) concerning the gold situation and the necessity for maintaining a distinction between government action at the Conference and private action by central banks; request that instruction be discussed with Baruch and Acheson prior to its transmittal to London.
(Footnote: Information that instruction was withheld pending receipt of telegrams from London.)
660
June 28 (27) To President Roosevelt (tel.)
From Acheson: Statement prepared by Baruch (text printed) concerning threatened devaluation of gold currencies by several European countries, and recommending two possible courses of action by the United States to prevent further decline of the dollar.
661
[Page LXIII]June 28 (16) From President Roosevelt (tel.)
For Acheson: Request that Acheson, Phillips, and Baruch discuss the President’s telegram No. 15, June 28; suggestion for the establishment of a modus vivendi by Harrison (Governor of Federal Reserve Bank of New York) and the central banks.
663
June 29 (29) To President Roosevelt (tel.)
From Acheson: Advice that proposed message to the delegation, contained in President’s telegram No. 15 of June 28, has been discussed with Phillips and Baruch, but that the instruction has been withheld pending receipt of messages from Sprague and Moley, who are working on a proposal in accordance with the President’s views on stabilization.
663
June 30 (79) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
From Sprague for Woodin and Baruch: Report on the gold situation in reply to telegram No. 79, June 28. Information that a U. S.-British proposal has been drafted containing the general statement of ultimate monetary policy made 2 weeks ago, and also calling for concerted action by all countries toward restriction of speculative foreign exchange operations; that the matter has been discussed with Moley, who is sending a separate telegram (infra).
664
June 30 (80) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
From Moley for Woodin and Baruch: Tentative agreement by Sprague and Moley with British representatives for a statement (text printed), to be approved by the President and to be made by the United States and Great Britain in conjunction with the gold standard countries; French desire for rewording of certain portions of the text.
665
June 30 (30) To President Roosevelt (tel.)
Transmittal of Moley’s communication, supra. Advice that Acheson, who is in New York in conference with Woodin and Baruch, has been informed of contents of telegrams Nos. 79 and 80, June 30, from the Chairman of the American delegation.
666
June 30 (32) To President Roosevelt (tel.)
American delegation’s suggested revision (text printed) of the proposed joint declaration.
667
June 30 (33) To President Roosevelt (tel.)
For the President from Woodin, Baruch, and Acheson: Recommendation of approval of the draft, with certain additional suggestions, inasmuch as its adoption is considered important to the continuance of the Conference.
667
June 30 (90) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that the President has requested that the delegation refrain from any action or comment pending his reply to telegrams Nos. 79 and 80, June 30.
668
July 1 (18) From President Roosevelt (tel.)
For Hull and notification of Woodin and Baruch: Objections to the suggested joint declaration.
669
[Page LXIV]July 1 (84) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President from Moley: Final draft of the proposed joint declaration (text printed).
670
July 1 (85) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President from Moley: Comments on the final draft of the proposed joint declaration, and reiteration of opinion that continuance of the Conference depends upon U. S. support of the declaration.
671
July 1 (86) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For Baruch and Woodin from Swope: Suggestions as to background to accompany press statement concerning the President’s approval, if forthcoming, of the joint declaration.
671
July 1 (87) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President and Phillips from Moley: Advice that Secretary of State Hull is issuing a brief announcement concerning the President’s rejection of the declaration, and that he intends to issue a statement of American policy on July 3.
672
July 2 (19) From President Roosevelt (tel.)
For Hull: Message (text printed) for use in connection with proposed statement of American policy. Advice that if it is considered inexpedient to make the announcement in London it will be released in Washington as a White House statement.
673
July 2 (88) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For Phillips: Statement for the press (text printed) to be issued July 3; request that it be withheld in Washington pending establishment of hour of release in London.
(Footnote: Information that statement was not released.)
674
July 2 (20) From President Roosevelt (tel.)
For Hull: Approval of statement for the press.
674
July 2 (90) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Request for instructions as to position the American delegation should take in connection with Cuban sugar proposal reported in telegram No. 75, June 28.
675
July 2 (91) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Discussion with Moley, Feis, and Day concerning the economic section of the Conference work; request for instructions and indication of American attitude with respect to certain resolutions now in committees, which apparently are not in accord with proposed domestic recovery measures in Washington.
676
July 3 (38) To President Roosevelt (tel.)
Advice that the message contained in the President’s telegram No. 19, July 2, was released in London, July 3, instead of Secretary Hull’s proposed statement transmitted in delegation’s telegram No. 88, July 2.
678
[Page LXV]July 3 (95) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Advice that the subject matter of the President’s statement has been highly praised except for divergence of opinion as to meaning of the language used in reference to the dollar and ultimate gold standard; further advice that the only general criticism charges harshness and untimeliness of language.
679
July 3 (22) From President Roosevelt (tel.)
Request for more detailed information concerning question of conflict between instructions to American delegation and general policy with respect to recovery legislation.
(Footnote: Telegram transmitted to the Chairman of the American delegation.)
679
July 4 (202) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
From Moley to President Roosevelt: Outline of topics to be discussed between Moley and the President by telephone, July 4.
(Footnote: Information that no record of this telephone conversation was found in Department files.)
680
July 4 (23) From President Roosevelt (tel.)
For Hull and delegates: Comments on the criticism reported in delegation’s telegram No. 95, July 4, concerning the President’s statement of July 3; opinion that the two constructions of language in reference to the dollar are not incompatible.
680
July 4 (99) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Summary (text printed) of opinions expressed by representatives of the five gold countries and by MacDonald that the continuance of the Conference is futile in view of the inconsistency between President Roosevelt’s statement of July 3 and the general aims of the Conference. Advice that American delegation will endeavor, first, to prevent adjournment, or, secondly, to secure a recess; request for comment.
681
July 4 (24) From President Roosevelt (tel.)
For Hull and delegation: Suggestion that the delegation stress U. S. bilateral trade agreement policy and also discussions toward extension of the tariff truce in order to dispel the defeatist attitude at the Conference brought about by failure to achieve temporary gold stabilization.
683
July 4 (100) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Request for the President’s judgment as to whether the delegation should oppose adjournment or agree to a recess of the Conference in view of the general attitude of the delegations favoring adjournment.
684
July 4 (101) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Information concerning the Chairman’s successful effort at the Steering Committee in delaying action on resolution of adjournment as favored by the gold standard countries and certain others; advice that friendly delegations feel that the U. S. Government may be able to avoid further friction by agreeing to a recess and the appointment of certain committees with MacDonald and the Steering Committee in charge.
685
[Page LXVI]July 4 (102) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For Hull from President Roosevelt: Instructions, as requested in telegram No. 91, July 2, for use of the delegation in discussion of work before the Economic Commission.
685
July 4 (104) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For Hull and delegation from President Roosevelt: Opinion that, if unable to prevent some form of recess, the delegation’s position should be for a recess limited to 10 days for the purpose of allowing the committees to work.
688
Undated Memorandum of Trans-Atlantic Telephone Conversation
Between Roosevelt, Hull, and Moley, July 5: Consideration of questions before the Economic Commission, and further discussion of U. S. position on recess of the Conference.
688
July 5 From the American Delegation to the Secretary General of the Monetary and Economic Conference
Analysis of the President’s position on temporary stabilization, and reassertion of the delegation’s interest in approaching the larger aspects of permanent stabilization.
692

V. Efforts of the American Delegation To Achieve Its Objectives, July 5–27

Date and number Subject Page
1933 July 5 (104) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For the President: Advice that dissatisfaction at the Conference is somewhat allayed, but that the delegation is placed in an awkward position due to lack of definite instructions on certain vital questions and the possibility of a long recess.
694
July 5 (106) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
From the President: Instructions to press for the shortest possible recess if continuation of the Conference cannot be obtained; further instructions to proceed according to delegation’s original instructions, together with the President’s despatches of July 3 and 4, and to request any further information by telephone on July 6.
694
July 6 (105) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Request for outline of plans and status of present negotiations in Washington envisaging allocation of the American sugar market.
(Footnote: Copy transmitted to President Roosevelt.)
695
July 6 (106) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Request for clarification of questions which the delegates on the Economic Commission anticipate encountering in the attempt to execute the general ideas outlined in Department’s telegram No. 102 of July 4 concerning U. S. commercial policy.
696
[Page LXVII]July 6 (107) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information that majority of the delegates supported the American proposal at the Bureau meeting, urging that the Conference continue in session and complete its work; reiteration of request for concrete proposals to present to both the Economic and Monetary Commissions since previous instructions have been almost entirely general in nature.
697
July 6 (111) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For Hull from the President: Congratulations upon gaining support in urging continuation of the Conference; advice that fuller instructions, as requested, are in preparation.
698
July 7 (110) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President from Pittman: Request for approval of and any suggested changes in a proposed interpretative statement (text printed) to accompany U. S. monetary resolution, now ready to go before the full Monetary Commission.
698
July 7 (112) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Transmittal of a resolution (text printed) adopted by the Steering Committee, July 6, concerning arrangements for the further business of the Conference.
700
July 7 (114) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Authorization by the President to support in principle the Cuban sugar proposal; Tariff Commissioner Coulter’s opinion that the proposal is not in conflict with the general purposes underlying present sugar negotiations in Washington, but that a safeguard clause should be included for the protection of possible future agreements between the United States and Cuba.
701
July 7 (117) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Résumé of agreements arrived at to date at the General Conference of the Sugar Industry in Washington.
701
July 7 (120) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that the President sees no objection to the adoption of the monetary resolution in its modified form, and that the Pittman interpretative statement, transmitted in delegation’s telegram No. 110 of July 7, is considered unnecessary.
2
July 7 (121) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Numbered comments in reply to specific questions raised in Chairman’s telegram No. 106, July 6, concerning U. S. commercial policy in connection with work before the Economic Commission.
703
July 8 (117) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Advice that, despite persistent attempts of the French bloc to disrupt the Conference, the American delegation is urging that the session continue for 3 or 4 weeks, in the hope of forestalling a recess.
704
July 10 (125) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Further report concerning sugar negotiations in Washington, and the President’s views on certain other topics scheduled for discussion in the Economic Commission.
705
[Page LXVIII]July 11 (121) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Request for the President’s views on an outline of a resolution (text printed) considered by the delegation to embody domestic economic policy and to form the basis for a solution to check international economic strife; opinion that the delegation’s ability to put forward a positive program may be a decisive factor in the question of continuing the operation of the Economic Commission.
706
July 11 (133) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Views of the Federal Reserve Board (text printed), rejecting a resolution on central bank policy. Advice that President Roosevelt concurs in these views.
710
July 11 (123) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Information that the attitude of the Conference has changed for the better, and opinion that substantial progress can be expected before the recess.
711
July 12 (134) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that the President approves introduction of the resolution transmitted in delegation’s telegram No. 121 of July 11, as a basis for immediate conversations but not as a final plan; advice that the Department will transmit specific suggestions promptly.
711
July 12 (124) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Information that, in view of the Federal Reserve Board’s comments transmitted in Department’s telegram No. 133, July 11, the delegation has suggested that no action be taken on the monetary resolution at present; request for immediate advice as to further desired action since the matter will probably come up again in the Bureau on July 12.
712
July 13 (126) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Opinion that it would be inadvisable to introduce the economic proposal outlined in delegation’s telegram No. 121 of July 11 until instructions concerning all desired amendments have been received.
712
July 13 (138) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Letter from the Federal Reserve Board to the Treasury Department (text printed) advising that after a review of the question, the Board retains its position as reported in Department’s telegram No. 133, July 11.
713
July 13 (139) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Comments and suggestions concerning the economic resolution as outlined in delegation’s telegram No. 121, July 11; information that the suggestions transmitted are the result of a study by State, Treasury, Commerce, and Tariff Commission experts.
713
July 13 (130) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Summary of Cuban draft resolution concerning limitation of sugar production, and enumeration of specific questions that would arise for the Department’s decision.
716
[Page LXIX]July 14 (133) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President from Pittman: Résumé of three resolutions on central bank functions passed by subdivision 2 of the Monetary Commission, and account of the work to be considered by the Commission, including the U. S. resolution on gold and silver, before the plenary session and adjournment of the Conference on July 27.
717
July 16 (140) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information that unless otherwise instructed the delegation will introduce a proposal (text printed) for action looking toward an international agreement for the regulation of copper production and marketing, following somewhat an idea previously suggested by the President.
(Footnote: President Roosevelt’s approval of the resolution, July 17.)
719
July 16 (141) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Draft resolution (text printed) before the monetary subcommittee concerning service of external debts, and summary of points raised by the British, French, and Greek delegations, which may result in amendments. Request for the Department’s observations and suggestions as to the position that the American delegation should assume.
720
July 16 (142) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Submission of draft resolution (text printed) envisaging the stimulation of economic activity through adjustment of price levels, and inquiry as to whether the Department would be disposed to authorize its introduction.
(Footnote: Information that approval was granted on July 17.)
721
July 17 (151) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Observations on the points raised in delegation’s telegram No. 141, July 16, in connection with the draft resolution on service of external debts; advice that there are no objections to the text.
722
July 17 (152) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information that since the Disarmament Conference is scheduled to meet October 16, the point has been raised as to the awkward situation which would occur should the London Conference reconvene October 1, necessitating simultaneous sessions of two international conferences.
722
July 17 (155) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Observations concerning questions raised in connection with Cuban draft resolution on limitation of sugar production; the President’s opinion that, in view of the simultaneous discussions now progressing in Washington and London, the outcome of the Washington conference should be awaited before accepting any proposal drawn up in London.
723
July 18 (148) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information that the U. S. resolution envisaging an international copper agreement was adopted with a minor amendment, July 18; advice that formulation of the proposal to be submitted as a basis for discussion should be begun in Washington at once.
723
[Page LXX]July 19 (149) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information that the sugar discussions are progressing satisfactorily and that the U. S. position, as outlined in Department’s telegram No. 155 of July 17, has been explained to the Economic subcommittee; request for the Department’s views concerning the Cuban delegation’s desire that a formal statement (text printed) embodying the American position, be made, in the hope of expediting action on the project before recess of the Conference.
724
July 19 (160) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that the President authorizes the issuance of the proposed formal statement on sugar.
725
July 20 (155) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Request for the President’s views on certain sections (text printed) of the delegation’s proposal on commercial policy.
725
July 20 (166) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Query concerning one phrase of the draft resolution on commercial policy. Information that the President has seen the correspondence on the subject.
726
July 21 From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Chairman of the Economic Commission
Submission of a document (text printed) embodying U. S. proposals for further development during recess and later stages of the Conference of a program on commercial policy.
727
July 21 To the Administrator of the National Recovery Administration
Reply to question concerning possible conflict between the delegation’s proposed tariff truce and Section 3 (e) of the Industrial Recovery Act, advising that the Department has been informed by the experts of the Tariff Commission that no conflict would occur.
731
July 23 (160) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Opinion that the U. S. tariff and commercial proposal should afford a good basis for the Conference program during the recess and the following session; information that the Chairman, in his adjournment address to the Conference, will urge the continuance of sessions, with recesses if necessary, until the basic problems have been solved.
732
July 26 (167) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Recommendation that the Department of Agriculture reexamine its position on indirectly competing fibers, in view of the ill effect that the present contemplated action will have upon the tariff truce.
733
July 26 (175) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For Hull from the President: Appreciation of the Chairman’s diligent work at the Conference, and invitation to visit the President at Hyde Park en route to Washington.
734
July 26 (176) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For Hull from the President: Message (text printed) for transmittal to Prime Minister MacDonald, expressing appreciation of his role as President of the Conference, and opinion that the Conference has not been a failure.
734
[Page LXXI]July 27 (169) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
For the President: Information concerning the appropriateness of the President’s message to MacDonald; acceptance of the invitation to Hyde Park.
735
Aug. 5 From the Chairman of the American Delegation to President Roosevelt
Report of the American delegation (text printed) summarizing the work of the London Conference.
736
Aug. 5 From the British Prime Minister to President Roosevelt
Appreciation of the President’s message on the eve of adjournment of the Conference.
747

VI. Conference Aftermath, September 14–December 16

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Sept. 19 (270) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
From Atherton: Résumé of a conversation with MacDonald concerning future plans for the Conference; MacDonald’s intention to have a survey of the work of the Conference prepared by the League Secretariat, and his further intention to call a Bureau meeting in December to report the conclusions of the survey.
748
Sept. 22 (259) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Approval of MacDonald’s plan to have a survey prepared for a December meeting of the Bureau, and assurance of American cooperation in the undertaking.
751
Sept. 25 (276) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Advice that Leith-Ross, Chief Economic Adviser to the British Government, will visit the United States with full authority to enter into an exchange of views on all subjects with the President and the Secretary of State.
752
Oct. 19 (700 Pol.) From the Consul at Geneva
Report on the outcome of certain informal exchanges of views between Mr. Colijn, President of the Economic Commission of the London Conference, and various League members, concerning the continuation of the work of the Conference.
752
Nov. 18 From the Acting Secretary of State to the Secretary of State
Memorandum (text printed) concerning the denunciation of the tariff truce by the principal powers, and reasons for requests by various sections of the U. S. Government for similar action on the part of the United States; suggestion that the United States, while withdrawing from the general truce, might propose a restricted Pan American truce.
(Footnote: Information that the Secretary was en route to the Pan American Conference at Montevideo.)
758
[Page LXXII]Dec. 16 (387) From the Chargé in Great Britain
Report of a conversation with MacDonald, who advised that the results of the economic survey were so general as to be valueless; his intention to call upon various governments, including the United States, for suggestions or surveys in an endeavor to find a solution to the economic ills of the world.
760

MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT ON SILVER BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CERTAIN OTHER POWERS, SIGNED AT LONDON, JULY 22, 24, AND 26, 1933

Date and number Subject Page
1933 July 22, 24, and 26 Memorandum of Agreement Between the United States of America, Australia, Canada, China, India, Mexico, Peru, and Spain, With Supplementary Undertakings, Signed at London
Text of agreement and supplementary undertakings.
(Footnote: Data on ratifications by the various countries.)
763
1934 Jan. 16 From the Chief of the Treaty Division to the Acting Secretary of State
Record of a conversation with Assistant Secretary of State Moore and Senator Key Pittman. Suggestion that the President be asked to “O. K.” the pertinent paragraph of a letter from Senator Pittman to him of January 9, and that this could be taken as authority to regard his proclamation of December 21, 1933, as ratification of the silver agreement.
772
Jan. 17 From the Acting Secretary of State to the Chief of the Treaty Division
Information that the President has initialed his O. K. as requested, indicating that the proclamation constitutes ratification.
774
Jan. 24 To the Minister in China (cir. tel.)
Instructions to notify the Government of China of (1) U. S. ratification of the silver agreement by proclamation of the President, December 21, 1933, and (2) Australian ratification and intention to make first quarterly deposit of silver about March 31, 1934.
(Footnote: The same or similar telegrams to the other signatory countries.)
774

ATTITUDE OF THE UNITED STATES TOWARD NEGOTIATION OF AN INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENT ON COPPER PRODUCTION

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Sept. 14 (87) To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Instructions to consult Stoppani, Chief of the League of Nations Economic Section, concerning the possibility of proceeding in regard to an international copper agreement.
775
[Page LXXIII]

COPPER AGREEMENT

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Sept. 28 (202) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Information from Stoppani that Colijn, who was authorized by the Bureau of the World Economic Conference to handle questions of production, etc., has called a small group meeting for September 30 to explore the possibility of proceeding with the copper question.
776
Sept. 29 (95) To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Instructions to attend the meeting called by Colijn and to make it clear that United States is prepared to support the general idea of an international agreement on copper.
776
Sept. 30 (207) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Attendance at the meeting, which developed three possible courses of procedure: (1) A meeting of producers; (2) a meeting of representatives of interested Governments; (3) a combined meeting of both.
777
Oct. 4 (213) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Colijn’s desire for U. S. views on the alternatives set forth in telegram No. 207, September 30.
778
Oct. 5 (96) To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
U. S. preference for a meeting of representatives of the interested Governments.
779
Oct. 6 (218) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Advice that Great Britain, Canada, and Belgium consider that the initiative should be left entirely to the producers.
779
Oct. 9 (103) To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether Great Britain and the others have in mind nominating producers’ representatives or leaving such nomination to the League.
779
Oct. 12 (105) To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Instructions to call attention, at the next informal discussion, to the importance of reclaimed copper as an element in the future copper situation that will face producers throughout the world.
780
Oct. 13 (252) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Observation that it appears that actually all the Governments involved are either somewhat opposed or indifferent to any form of copper conversations; that the crux of the situation at Geneva seems to lie between the United States and Great Britain.
780
Nov. 15 (296) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Indication that the United States is regarded as the only country favoring conversations of the type originally envisaged.
781
Dec. 14 From the Administrator of the National Recovery Administration
Comment that, due to the complexity of problems of international control and production, it would probably be necessary to secure agreement from the independent companies themselves before any control could be exercised.
782
[Page LXXIV]

WITHDRAWAL OF THE UNITED STATES FROM THE INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE ABOLITION OF IMPORT AND EXPORT PROHIBITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS

Date and number Subject Page
1933 June 14 (214 C. 67) From the British Ambassador
Advice that British Government has notified the League of Nations of its withdrawal from the Convention for the Abolition of Import and Export Prohibitions and Restrictions, signed in 1927, as provided for in article 6 of the Protocol signed in 1929.
783
June 19 (44) To the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
Request for views as to possible U. S. action with respect to the 1927 Convention, in the light of the British withdrawal and certain provisions of the new Recovery Act.
784
June 23 (64) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
Opinion, in view of various considerations, that it is advisable for the U. S. Government to withdraw from the Convention, and that a note of explanation (substance printed) should accompany the notification to the League.
784
June 27 (73) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Instruction to be repeated to the Legation at Berne (text printed) containing note to the Secretary General of the League giving notification of U. S. decision.
785
June 28 (74) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Advice that the instruction has been transmitted to Berne.
786
July 3 (22) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
League’s inquiry as to whether the U. S. withdrawal applies also to the supplementary agreement and protocol signed July 11, 1928.
786
July 7 (34) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Instructions to advise the League that the withdrawal does apply to supplementary agreement and protocol of July 11, 1928.
786

AGREEMENT AMONG WHEAT EXPORTING AND IMPORTING COUNTRIES, SIGNED AT LONDON, AUGUST 25, 1933

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Mar. 31 Memorandum by the Economic Adviser
Record of a meeting on March 29 of U. S. and British officials at which the idea of an international agreement dealing with wheat was considered and it was recognized that the problem concerned chiefly the four largest wheat exporting countries, Canada, Australia, Argentina, and the United States, although the Balkans and Russia should also be considered.
787
Apr. 12 (100) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Inquiry from Stoppani, Chief of the League of Nations Economic Section, whether the wheat question will be considered in connection with conversations in Washington preliminary to the World Economic Conference.
788
[Page LXXV]

WHEAT AGREEMENT

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Apr. 20 (40) To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Instructions to inform Stoppani that the United States is agreeable to the idea of arranging for a meeting of experts of the four or more exporting countries at Geneva or elsewhere to study the wheat question.
789
Apr. 25 (105) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Stoppani’s outline of a plan to invite experts from the four countries to hold conversations about May 10, this meeting, if fruitful, to be followed by conversations between all important importing and exporting countries in order to formulate proposals for presentation to the World Economic Conference.
789
Apr. 26 (42) To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Acceptance of Stoppani’s plan and the proposed date.
791
May 1 (106) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Indications that Australia and Argentina will accept invitation to participate in the May 10 conversations, but nonreceipt of word from Canada as yet”
791
May 2 (44) To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Designation of Henry Morgenthau, Sr., to serve as U. S. expert at the May 10 meeting; advice that he will be accompanied by George C. Haas of the Farm Board.
791
May 12 (52) To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
For Morgenthau: Indication of two technical questions to be kept in mind in the discussions with wheat experts.
792
May 13 (119) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
From Morgenthau: Information that the inclination of all delegates is to recommend reduction of acreage, leaving methods of doing so to each country.
793
May 13 (54) To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
For Morgenthau: Instructions to work toward some compromise formula as regards the question of reduction of acreage or reduction of exports.
793
May 15 (121) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
From Morgenthau: Request for approval to send Haas to Washington to make detailed report of the complicated conditions at Geneva and have him return to London by June 5.
794
May 17 From the Head of the American Delegation
Explanation of some of the conditions at Geneva, and advice that Haas will bring to Washington a full statement of what occurred during the conversations of the wheat experts.
795
May 27 (70) To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
For Morgenthau: Instructions from the Secretary of Agriculture as to certain bases on which to proceed to negotiate an agreement between the four exporting countries.
796
May 30 (134) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Morgenthau from Wallace (Secretary of Agriculture): Further details on U. S. position relative to acreage reduction, in amplification of telegram No. 70, May 27, to Geneva,
797
[Page LXXVI]June 2 (166) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Willingness of other delegates to agree to a uniform acreage reduction conditional upon a certain limitation of exports by United States, and their inquiry as to possible U. S. procedure to control exports.
797
June 3 (147) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Morgenthau from Wallace: Approval of plan outlined in telegram No. 166, June 2, details on methods of controlling exports to follow later.
798
June 6 (151) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Morgenthau from Wallace: Advice that exports can probably be controlled sufficiently under section 8, subsection 2 of the Farm Act.
798
June 16 (39) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Report on discussions at full meeting of the experts.
798
June 16 (161) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Morgenthau from Wallace: Details of U. S. wheat program as announced June 16, and advice that amount of acreage reduction to be required will not be determined until the experts’ negotiations are completed.
799
June 22 (54) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Report of deadlock in negotiations with Bennett of Canada, Bruce of Australia, and Le Breton of Argentina, owing to lack of authority of Bruce and Le Breton to commit their Governments on the principle of acreage reduction.
800
June 27 (71) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Information that Bruce’s instructions restrict him from entering into any arrangement except one subject to assured European cooperation; decision of the experts to canvass unofficially the European countries as to their inclinations while awaiting the outcome of a cable from MacDonald to the Australian Prime Minister apprising him of the seriousness of the present stalemate in negotiations.
801
June 28 (80) To the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Morgenthau from Tug well (Assistant Secretary of Agriculture): Instructions to continue unofficial canvass of the European countries and to report their attitudes to Washington; also to urge concerted action toward establishment of the principle of adjustment within a long-range program.
802
June 29 (78) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Request for 1933 and 1934 lowest export limitations acceptable to the United States, in view of Bruce’s recent instructions to agree in principle to reduction in production and fixing of export maxima conditional upon satisfactory subsequent arrangement with European importing countries.
803
[Page LXXVII]June 29 (81) To the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Morgenthau from Tugwell: U. S. views on acreage reduction and estimation of lowest acceptable export figures.
804
June 30 (82) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Outline of proposal (text printed) which served as a basis for further discussion, June 30, among the experts of the four principal exporting countries; information that U. S. views transmitted in telegram No. 81, June 29, were presented, but that no definite agreement was reached.
804
July 1 (93) To the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Morgenthau from Wallace: Approval of the general outline of proposal set forth in telegram No. 82, June 30, contingent upon unconditional agreement as to reduction in crop acreages planted in 1933 and 1934; advice that detailed suggestions on certain figures will follow.
807
July 5 (103) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Report of adjournment of the meeting, subject to call, due to stalemate in negotiations on the question of whether to make the entire wheat agreement contingent upon European cooperation.
808
July 6 (107) To the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Morgenthau from Wallace: Request for opinion on a proposed statement (text printed) to be released July 6 setting forth U. S. views concerning the present status of the wheat situation.
809
July 7 (112) To the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Morgenthau from Wallace: Suggestion for a possible compromise on acreage reduction to be used, if needed, to help bring Australia into the reduction agreement.
809
July 7 (111) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Advice that in view of the possibility of continuing the general Conference, it now seems inadvisable to make the statement suggested in telegram No. 107, July 6; but that the other three representatives will be informed of the proposal by letter.
810
July 7 (113) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Inquiry whether the Department of Agriculture would be inclined to permit Australia, in lieu of agreement on acreage reduction, to substitute agreement on export maximum with provision that no stocks will be accumulated intact.
811
[Page LXXVIII]July 7 (118) To the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Morgenthau from Wallace: Approval of the Australian proposal provided that the other three countries agree to acreage reduction; suggested modifications of plan outlined in telegram No. 82, June 30.
811
July 8 (115) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Information that it would appear inadvisable to use suggestion set forth in telegram No. 112, July 7, in view of indication that Australia will go along with the acreage reduction agreement.
812
July 15 (135) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Information concerning maximum export quota acceptable to the Danubian States and recommendation that the proposal be approved.
812
July 17 (147) To the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Morgenthau from Wallace: Approval of the Danubian proposal, and suggestions concerning the possible participation of Russia in the agreement.
813
July 19 (153) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Advice that agreement has been reached with the Danubian countries, but that the question of preferential treatment for Danubian wheat in European markets may necessitate more conclusive instructions concerning the U. S. position. Further information concerning discussions with Russia and with the importing countries on general arrangement.
814
July 20 (164) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
For Morgenthau from Wallace: Instructions and suggestions concerning arrangements reported in telegram No. 153, July 19.
815
July 27 (209) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Morgenthau from Wallace: Outline of plan for domestic wheat program to be announced soon, since the prospect of securing a definite international wheat agreement appears to be on the wane; request for status of present negotiations and opinion of the domestic plan.
815
July 28 (226) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Recommendation that, in view of the imminent breakdown in the wheat negotiations and announced recess until August 21 at London, the U. S. domestic plan be announced immediately.
816
July 28 (228) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Wallace from Morgenthau: Enumeration of principles agreed upon by overseas and Danubian exporters and European importers through daily discussions since July 18; information that it was impossible to complete discussions before Conference adjournment but that the majority of the representatives expressed willingness to continue negotiations later.
816
[Page LXXIX]Aug. 16 (181) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Information concerning invitation of League of Nation’s Secretary General, August 12, to 27 European countries to participate in a conference on wheat beginning August 21.
817
Aug. 17 (218) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Murphy (adviser to Morgenthau) from Wallace: Press statement released August 15 (text printed), setting forth U. S. position on the international wheat situation and intention of announcing the U. S. domestic wheat program on August 24.
818
Aug. 17 (244) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Wallace from Murphy: Information that preliminary discussions with Canadian and Australian representatives indicate that the plan outlined in telegram No. 82, June 30, will require considerable modification because of crop changes; draft agreement (text printed) recommended by exporters after discussion with certain importers.
818
Aug. 21 (246) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether the U. S. Government could sign and fulfill an agreement such as indicated in telegram No. 82, June 30, without ratification by Congress; request for further instructions as to the desired form of any such proposed agreement, and clarification of authority to initial.
820
Aug. 21 (219) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Murphy from Wallace: Approval of draft agreement for importing countries as outlined in telegram No. 244, August 20, and enumeration of provisions desired for acceptance of agreement for exporting countries.
821
Aug. 21 (247) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Wallace from Murphy: Report of opening meeting with 31 countries represented; suggestion that, in view of the possibility of reaching an agreement by August 26, it would be advisable to withhold the announcement scheduled for August 24, as set forth in telegram No. 218, August 17.
821
Aug. 21 (220) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Murphy from Wallace: Advice that Murphy is authorized to initial the wheat agreement for the United States upon approval of the full text by Wallace; further advice that only as a last resort to save the wheat agreement would the Department of Agriculture delay the announcement of the domestic wheat program.
822
Aug. 22 (248) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Wallace from Murphy: Information concerning the impracticality of certain provisions set forth in telegram No. 219, August 21.
822
Aug. 23 (221) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
From Wallace to Murphy: Advice that due to the complexities involved in providing price differentials for the various important classes and grades of wheat, it would appear inadvisable to engage in efforts toward establishment of a minimum export price.
822
[Page LXXX]Undated [Rec’d Aug. 26] (252) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Wallace from Murphy: Draft of latest proposed exporters agreement (text printed) supplementing draft transmitted in telegram No. 82, June 30; opinion that it is the best that can be hoped for.
823
Aug. 28 (224) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Murphy from Wallace: Advice that domestic acreage reduction program was announced August 28, but that no announcement concerning U. S. exports will be made until the wheat negotiations are completed.
824
Aug. 29 (227) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Murphy from Wallace: Reminder that authorization to enter into final commitment for the United States is confined to drafts previously approved by the Department of Agriculture.
824
Aug. 30 (256) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Wallace from Murphy: Report of completion of exporters agreement with U. S. figures unchanged.
825
Aug. 30 (231) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Murphy from Wallace: Congratulations upon successful completion of the wheat agreement.
825

NEGOTIATIONS WITH REGARD TO CERTAIN INTERGOVERNMENTAL DEBTS DUE THE UNITED STATES

Great Britain

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Jan. 19 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the British Ambassador on the debt situation, with indication that some progress has been made toward bridging the gap between the Hoover and Roosevelt administrations in regard to this matter.
826
Jan. 20 Press Release Issued by the White House
Statement (text printed) agreed upon at a conference between President Hoover and President-elect Roosevelt indicating that the new administration will be glad to receive a British representative early in March for discussion of debts.
827
Jan. 20 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Memorandum handed to the British Ambassador (text printed) inviting Great Britain to send a representative or representatives to discuss debts and requesting that they also send representatives at the same time to discuss world economic problems.
828
[Jan. 23] Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Substance of a telephone conversation between Secretary of State Stimson and President-elect Roosevelt on arrangements for possible debt discussions with certain countries in addition to Great Britain.
829
Jan. 23 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Discussion with the British Ambassador of several details relative to the forthcoming debt negotiations.
830
[Page LXXXI]Jan. 24 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Telephone Conversation
Information given to Roosevelt at Warm Springs, Ga., concerning the countries which have thus far made requests for a discussion of debts.
831
Jan. 25 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the British Ambassador, who brought his Government’s acceptance (infra) of the U. S. invitation for a discussion of the debt question and an exchange of views on the world economic situation.
832
Jan. 25 From the British Embassy
Acceptance of U. S. invitation of January 20.
832
Jan. 25 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Telephone Conversation
Further discussion with Roosevelt at Warm Springs, Ga., concerning arrangements for debt discussions with various countries.
833
Jan. 26 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With Mr. Raymond Moley
Discussion of a possible answer to the British note of January 25.
834
Feb. 23 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the British Ambassador; Secretary’s expression of opinion that debt settlements are only a small part of the adjustments required by the world economic situation.
835
Mar. 20 From the Under Secretary of State to the Secretary of State
Account of discussion with the British Ambassador concerning the possibility of a visit by Prime Minister MacDonald to the United States.
836
Undated Joint Statement by President Roosevelt and Prime Minister MacDonald
Announcement that the President and Prime Minister have discussed debt problems, but only in a preliminary exploratory way.
(Footnotes: Information that MacDonald was in Washington April 21–26 for conversations preliminary to the World Economic Conference; that this statement was issued by the White House as a press release on April 25.)
837
May 18 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Inquiries by the British Ambassador concerning debt conversations; reply that such conversations had been conducted by the President and Assistant Secretary Moley.
837
June 9 To the British Ambassador
Notification of $75,950,000 interest due and payable on June 15.
838
June 13 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Information from the British Ambassador that his Government is willing to make a $10,000,000 payment on June 15, pending a final settlement of the debt question.
838
[Page LXXXII]June 13 From the British Ambassador
Review of the debt situation and its relation to the problems of the World Economic Conference; payment of $10,000,000 as an acknowledgment of the debt, and request for formal negotiations for a final settlement of the entire question.
839
June 13 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
British Ambassador’s desire to give publicity to U. S. British exchange of notes and agreed statement; President Roosevelt’s refusal to approve issuance of statement in advance of exchange of notes, and indication that U. S. reply to the British note of June 13 cannot be sent before June 14.
841
June 14 To the British Ambassador
Reply to British note of June 13, suggesting that British Government provide for the further representations desired by them on the entire debt question to be made in Washington as soon as convenient.
842
Oct. 4 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the British Ambassador on arrangements for the first meeting between U. S. and British representatives for discussion of the debt question.
842
Nov. 6 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Call of the British Ambassador for the purpose of a formal exchange of communications (texts infra) on the debt negotiations.
843
Nov. 6 (391) From the British Ambassador
British Government’s disappointment that an agreement for final settlement of the debt question could not be reached in recent negotiations; readiness, however, to resume negotiations when feasible, and to make a further payment on December 15 as acknowledgment of the debt.
844
Nov. 6 To the British Ambassador
Acknowledgment of British note of November 6.
844
Nov. 7 Press Release Issued by the White House
Text of statement by President Roosevelt (agreed upon by the U. S. and British representatives) released simultaneously in London and Washington, announcing decision to adjourn the negotiations until certain factors in the world situation become more clarified. Address to be made by the Chancelor of the Exchequer to the House of Commons (excerpt printed).
845
Nov. 8 To the British Ambassador
Advice that the value of the silver bullion received from the British Government as the June 15 payment has been fixed at $10,000,518.42 and credited as a payment on account of the interest due June 15.
846
[Page LXXXIII]

Belgium

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Jan. 23 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Information, in reply to an inquiry by the Belgian Ambassador, that no plans have been made for debt discussions with those nations which have not made the December 1932 payment.
847
June 9 To the Belgian Ambassador
Notification of amounts due on the Belgian debt and payable on June 15.
848
June 14 (1893) From the Belgian Ambassador
Belgian Government’s reiteration of its inability to resume the payments suspended by the agreement of July 1931; renewed assurances, however, of desire to seek a satisfactory settlement.
849
June 17 To the Belgian Ambassador
Acknowledgement of Belgian note of June 14, calling attention to the problems raised by the Belgian failure to meet payments due.
849
June 19 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Information to the Belgian Ambassador that there is no plan as yet to discuss debts with those countries which have not paid anything on the installments due.
849
Nov. 28 To the Belgian Ambassador
Statement of amounts due from the Belgian Government on December 15.
850
Dec. 12 From the Belgian Embassy
Belgian Government’s assertion that it is unable to make the December 15 payment; that the reasons for inability to pay are the same as set forth in December 1932.
851

Czechoslovakia

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Jan. 18 (904) From the Chargé in Czechoslovakia
Memorandum of conversation with the Foreign Minister on January 16 (text printed) concerning the circumstances of Czechoslovakia’s payment of the December 15, 1932, installment of its war debt.
852
Jan. 24 To the Czechoslovak Minister
Information that President-elect Roosevelt will be glad to receive a Czechoslovak representative to discuss the debt problem after completion of the proposed discussions with the British Government.
853
Jan. 30 From the Czechoslovak Minister
Acceptance of U. S. invitation for debt discussions whenever such negotiations will be deemed advisable.
854
May 5 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Advice from the Czechoslovak Minister that no provision has been made in the Czechoslovak budget for payment of the June 15 debt installment.
854
[Page LXXXIV]June 9 To the Czechoslovak Minister
Notification of $1,500,000 principal due and payable on June 15.
855
June 12 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Inquiry by the Czechoslovak Minister as to payment of the installment in silver, and reply that silver will be accepted at 50 cents an ounce.
855
June 15 From the Czechoslovak Minister
Decision of Czechoslovak Government to pay $180,000 as acknowledgment of the debt, and renewal of request for negotiations as soon as possible.
855
July 17 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Conversation with the Czechoslovak Minister on the probability of beginning negotiations in August or September.
856
Oct. 19 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Czechoslovak Minister’s assertion that he is ready to enter upon debt negotiations; Secretary’s assurance that he will advise him further as to definite steps to be taken.
857
Nov. 29 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Conversation with the Czechoslovak Minister concerning the amount to be paid on the debt installment due December 15; Secretary’s opinion that it should equal the payment of June 15, which amounted to $180,000.
857
Dec. 6 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Information from the Czechoslovak Minister that his Government, for domestic political reasons, could not pay more than $150,000 on December 15.
858
Dec. 9 From the Czechoslovak Minister
Payment of $150,000 on the December 15 installment as an acknowledgment of existing obligations pending a final settlement of the debt problem.
858

Estonia

Date and number Subject Page
1933 June 9 To the Estonian Acting Consul General at New York
Notification of amounts due and payable on June 15 on the Estonian debt to the United States.
859
June 13 From the Estonian Acting Consul General at New York
Estonian Government’s inability to meet the June 15 payment, and request for a friendly exchange of views as to the possibility of a reconsideration of the debt agreement of 1925.
860
Nov. 28 To the Estonian Acting Consul General at New York
Notification of amounts due on the Estonian debt December 15.
860
[Page LXXXV]Nov. 16 (12–R) From the Estonian Minister for Foreign Affairs
Information that since the economic and financial conditions in Estonia have not improved, the Government will be unable to make the December 15 payment.
(Footnote: Transmitted as enclosure to Consul General’s communication of November 29.)
861

Finland

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Jan. 25 To the Finnish Minister
Information that President-elect Roosevelt will be glad to receive a representative of Finland to discuss the debt question after completion of the proposed discussions with Great Britain.
862
June 9 To the Finnish Minister
Notification of interest due and payable on June 15.
862
June 14 From the Finnish Minister
Advice that the interest payment will be made in full on June 15, and that it is desired to make the payment in silver.
863
Nov. 7 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Conversation with the Finnish Minister regarding a suggestion by President Roosevelt for a conference at the White House with the Minister, the Secretary of State, and the Acting Secretary of the Treasury.
863
Nov. 13 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Record of conference at the White House, at which the President expressed his appreciation of Finland’s attitude in carrying out its obligations, and his desire to show it by proposing to reduce the interest to a purely nominal one and to apply the payments on account of interest to payments on account of principal.
864
Dec. 1 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Advice to the Finnish Minister, upon inquiry from him, that it will be best for Finland to make the December 15 payment according to the old agreement, as the terms of the new agreement are still being considered.
865
Dec. 4 To the Finnish Minister
Reply to a Finnish inquiry concerning payment of the December 15 installment in obligations of the U. S. Government.
865
Dec. 9 To the Assistant Economic Adviser
Advice that the usual notification of payment due on December 15 has not been sent to Finnish Minister, since he has already indicated his Government’s desire to make the payment.
866
[Page LXXXVI]

France

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Jan. 5 (8) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Report on a conversation with Laval, former Prime Minister, who felt that it would be very difficult to obtain Parliament’s consent to payment of the December 15, 1932, instalment on the French debt.
866
Jan. 22 To President-elect Roosevelt
Suggestion of a draft statement (text printed) to be made to the French Government by the U. S. Ambassador, in an effort to secure payment of the December 15 installment.
867
Jan. 23 (19) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Outline of events of the past few days, covering plans for inviting various governments to begin negotiations for settlement of debt problems; request for opinion as to what effect the U. S.-British discussions have had in France and how they may affect French action as regards the debt.
869
Jan. 25 (33) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Conversation with the Prime Minister, who frequently referred to the undesirability of excluding France from the debt discussions because of its failure to pay the December 15 installment.
870
Jan. 27 From President-elect Roosevelt (tel.)
Opinion that an informal oral suggestion to France with regard to its failure to pay would be more effective than other methods.
871
Jan. 30 To President-elect Roosevelt
Understanding that, in view of the informal suggestions already made, no further communication to the French is considered advisable.
871
Mar. 15 (93) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
Information that efforts to induce the Chamber of Deputies to reverse its decision on the December 15 payment are continuing.
871
May 27 (241) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
Report on debate in the Chamber of Deputies which indicated no change in sentiment since December, when it voted against payment of the war debt.
872
May 31 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Explanation to the French Ambassador that if France should now make her December payment, the President would be glad to regard France in the same category as Great Britain.
873
June 7 From the French Ambassador
Review of the French point of view that the settlement of interallied debts should be made in relation to the reparations settlement.
873
June 9 To the French Ambassador
Notification of amounts due and payable on June 15.
878
[Page LXXXVII]June 15 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
French Ambassador’s desire that the President be informed of the genuine efforts which he had made with his Government to elicit part payment.
878
June 15 From the French Ambassador
Note from the French Government (text printed) asserting the necessity to postpone the payment due on June 15, but willingness to cooperate in seeking a satisfactory solution of the debt question.
879
June 17 To the French Ambassador
Acknowledgment of the French Government’s note of June 15.
880
June 19 (286) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Prime Minister’s feeling that now is the time to undertake discussions of the nonpayment of the December and June installments in the hope of preventing another refusal by the Parliament to make payments.
880
June 19 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Conversation with the French Ambassador, who suggested the possibility of his making another effort, on his own volition, to get his Government to make a part payment.
881
Nov. 28 To the French Ambassador
Statement of the amounts due and payable on December 15.
881
Dec. 15 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Information from the French Ambassador that his Government had advised him that his representations for a “token payment” had been considered but found impossible to act upon due to the hostile attitude of the Parliament.
882
Dec. 15 From the French Ambassador
Note from the French Government (text printed) stating that it is obliged to postpone the payments due December 15.
883

Hungary

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 29 (296/Res) From the Hungarian Chargé
Advice that the Hungarian Government will be unable to meet its interest payment due on June 15, but will deposit a Hungarian Treasury Certificate to the Foreign Creditors’ Account at the Hungarian National Bank.
884
Oct. 2 (491/Res) From the Hungarian Chargé
Advice that the depositing of the Treasury Certificates serves solely as a means of giving security and has no bearing on the rights of the creditors in regard to the amount of their claim.
884
Nov. 28 To the Hungarian Chargé
Statement of the amounts due and payable on December 15.
885
[Page LXXXVIII]Dec. 12 (617/R) From the Hungarian Chargé
Hungarian Government’s inability to make the payment due, but intention to deposit a Hungarian Treasury Certificate as previously done.
886
Dec. 28 To the Hungarian Chargé
Communication from the Treasury Department (text printed) calling Hungarian Government’s attention to the fact that the issuance and deposit of the Hungarian Treasury Certificates cannot in any way alter the provisions of its debt funding agreement with United States.
886

Italy

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Jan. 23 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the Italian Ambassador regarding U. S. plans for debt discussions with those nations which had paid their December 1932 installments.
888
Jan. 24 To the Italian Ambassador
Advice that President-elect Roosevelt will be glad to receive an Italian representative to discuss the debt question after completion of the proposed discussions with the British.
888
Mar. 10 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Information from the Italian Ambassador that he is ready to take up the question of debt negotiations whenever the U. S. Government is inclined to do so.
889
June 9 To the Italian Ambassador
Notification of amounts due and payable on June 15.
889
June 13 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Advice from the Italian Ambassador that the Fascist Great Council has passed a resolution to make a payment of $1,000,000 as an expression of good will. President Roosevelt’s opinion that such a payment seemed poor psychology, and Secretary’s attitude that it would be an “unsatisfactory expression of good will.”
890
June 14 From the Italian Ambassador
Reference to the June 13 resolution of the Fascist Great Council (text printed), and advice that Italian Government intends to make a $1,000,000 payment on June 15 pending a final settlement of the debt question.
891
June 17 To the Italian Ambassador
Acknowledgment of the payment made, and expression of opinion that a payment of $1,000,000 on an amount due of over $13,000,000 may be regarded in the United States as unsubstantial.
891
June 22 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Italian Ambassador’s explanation of the decision for the figure $1,000,000, and his assertion that he would be glad to discuss the entire debt question whenever convenient.
892
[Page LXXXIX]Dec. 7 From the Italian Ambassador
Italian Government’s intention to make a further payment of $1,000,000 on December 15.
892
Dec. 12 To the Italian Ambassador
Acknowledgment of communication of December 7.
893

Latvia

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Jan. 26 To the Latvian Consul General at New York
Advice that President-elect Roosevelt will be glad to receive a Latvian representative to discuss the debt problem after completion of the proposed discussions with the British.
893
June 9 To the Latvian Consul General at New York
Notification of amounts due and payable on June 15.
894
June 15 From the Latvian Consul General at New York
Decision of the Latvian Government to pay $6,000, which is approximately 5 percent of the interest payment due on June 15, as an acknowledgment of the debt, pending proposed negotiations on the debt question.
894
June 21 To the Latvian Consul General at New York
Acknowledgment of the payment of $6,000.
896
Nov. 22 From the Latvian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the American Chargé in Latvia
Latvian proposal to make a “token payment” of $8,500 in connection with the payment due on December 15.
896
Dec. 13 From the Latvian Consul General at New York
Advice that the sum of $8,500 has been transferred to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, for the account of the United States Treasury.
897

Lithuania

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Jan. 24 To the Lithuanian Minister
Advice that President-elect Roosevelt will be glad to receive a Lithuanian representative to discuss the debt problem after completion of the proposed discussions with the British.
898
June 20 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Lithuanian Minister’s inquiry, in view of his previous misunderstanding with regard to the acceptability of partial payments, whether a payment within a day or two would prevent his Government from being in default.
898
June 23 From the Lithuanian Minister
Explanation that following clarification of the situation as to partial payments, the Lithuanian Government wishes to pay $10,000 on the June 15 installment as proof of its good faith and desires an opportunity for discussion of the debt problem as soon as possible.
899
[Page XC]June 26 To the Lithuanian Minister
Acknowledgment of note of June 23 and of the payment of $10,000 on account.
900
Nov. 28 To the Lithuanian Minister
Statement of the amounts due and payable on December 15.
901
Dec. 14 (1293) From the Lithuanian Minister
Review of the chain of events leading up to the present situation on the Lithuanian debt; advice that a payment of $7,000 will be made on December 15.
902
Dec. 20 To the Lithuanian Minister
Reply to the note of December 14, and acknowledgment of the $7,000 payment.
905

Poland

Date and number Subject Page
1933 June 14 From the Polish Embassy
Polish Government’s inability to meet its debt payment due on June 15; request for postponement, and for a reconsideration of the entire debt question.
905
June 17 To the Polish Ambassador
Acknowledgment of the Polish note of June 14, calling attention to the problems already raised by Poland’s failure to meet her December 1932 payment.
906
June 24 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Polish Ambassador’s delivery of his Government’s note of June 24 (infra), which contained a paragraph apparently indicating that Poland might include in the budget a provision for a debt payment.
906
June 24 From the Polish Embassy
Expression of regret that the U.S. Government, in its note of June 17, did not take into account Poland’s indication of readiness to negotiate regarding the entire debt question.
907
Nov. 28 To the Polish Chargé
Statement of amounts due and payable on December 15.
907
Dec. 14 From the Polish Chargé
Request for deferment of the December 15 installment, and confirmation of readiness to negotiate the debt problem.
908

Rumania

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Jan. 26 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Visit from the Rumanian Minister, who stated that his Government was not in default (having no installment due in December), but now wished to request a readjustment of its debt.
909
[Page XCI]Feb. 8 To the Rumanian Minister
Advice that President-elect Roosevelt will be glad to receive a Rumanian representative to discuss the debt problem after completion of the proposed discussions with the British.
909
Feb. 23 From the Rumanian Legation
Rumanian Government’s readiness to make the necessary arrangements for debt discussions whenever convenient.
910
May 31 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Conversation with the Rumanian Minister, who was told that Rumania, not being in default, is presumed to be in the same category as Great Britain, which has been informed that United States will receive any proposition it may care to make.
910
June 9 To the Rumanian Minister
Notification of $1,000,000 due and payable on June 15.
911
June 15 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Near Eastern Affairs
Call from the Counselor of the Rumanian Legation, who said his Government had reversed its earlier decision to default on the June 15 payment and now intends to make a token payment.
911
June 15 From the Rumanian Minister
Reference to a note addressed to United States June 15 (excerpt printed) indicating reasons for Rumania’s inability to pay the June 15 installment; Rumania’s desire, however, to make a 3 percent interest payment as a token of good will.
912
June 19 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Near Eastern Affairs
Information from the Rumanian Minister that he had already purchased the necessary amount of silver to make the 3 percent interest payment.
913
June 21 To the Rumanian Minister
Acknowledgment of note of June 15, and assurance that Rumanian representations on the entire debt question will be heard at a date to be agreed upon.
913
Nov. 28 To the Rumanian Chargé
Statement of amounts due and payable on December 15.
914
Dec. 2 Memorandum by the Assistant Economic Adviser of a Conversation With the Rumanian Chargé and the Financial Counselor
Rumanian explanation that the first payment under the Hoover moratium agreement of 1932 was due January 2, 1934, instead of December 15, 1933; discussion of the possibility of another token payment such as was made June 15.
914
Dec. 29 From the Rumanian Minister
Suggestion that the matter of a token payment be left open until further word can be received from the Rumanian Government.
916
[Page XCII]1934 Jan. 24 To the Rumanian Minister
Concurrence in the Minister’s suggestion of December 29.
917

Yugoslavia

Date and number Subject Page
1933 June 9 To the Yugoslav Minister
Notification of amounts due and payable on June 15.
917
June 15 From the Yugoslav Minister
Reasons for Yugoslav Government’s inability to make the payments due.
918
June 21 To the Yugoslav Minister
Acknowledgment of note of June 15, calling attention to the problems already raised by Yugoslavia’s failure to meet its payment of June 15, 1932.
919
Nov. 28 To the Yugoslav Minister
Statement of amounts due and payable on December 15.
919
Dec. 4 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Near Eastern Affairs
Explanation to the Yugoslav Minister, upon his inquiry, that no error had been made in sending the statement of November 28, that it was a reminder of the amounts overdue from Yugoslavia, even though no new payment would fall due on December 15.
920

INITIATION OF THE RECIPROCAL TRADE AGREEMENTS PROGRAM

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Mar. 6 To the Secretary of Commerce
Invitation to designate members of Commerce Department staff to serve on an Inter-Departmental Committee to forward the work of negotiating with other countries for reciprocal trade agreements.
(Footnote: The same letter sent on March 9 to Secretaries of Labor, Agriculture, and Treasury, and to Chairman of U. S. Tariff Commission.)
921
Mar. 6 From the Chairman of the Subgroup of the Interdepartmental Reciprocity Group
Submittal of draft legislation for possible presentation to Congress authorizing the President to enter into certain types of arrangements involving reductions in tariffs; desirability that such enabling legislation be enacted as soon as possible.
922
June 7 (10) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the World Monetary and Economic Conference (tel.)
Message for the President (text printed) expressing hope that reports are unfounded that Congress will not be asked for the enabling legislation at the present session.
923
[Page XCIII]

TRADE AGREEMENTS PROGRAM

Date and number Subject Page
1933 June 7 (9) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Message from the President (text printed) indicating that the tariff legislation is impossible of achievement at this session, but that general reciprocal commercial agreements may be negotiated in London for submission when Congress reassembles.
923
June 24 (65) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Request for advice as to the proposal at an early date of negotiations, within limits of the draft legislation, for reciprocal agreements with Sweden, Portugal, Brazil, Colombia, and perhaps Chile.
924
July 2 (92) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Approval of the proposal to institute negotiations as indicated, and opinion that the list of countries mentioned is a satisfactory one.
925
July 17 Press Release Issued by the Department of State
Announcement of a meeting held in the Department to organize the Board which is to undertake exploratory study of possible trade agreement negotiations; list of those attending the meeting.
925
Nov. 2 To President Roosevelt
Suggestion for a circular communication to Government Departments notifying them of plans for coordination of U. S. commercial policy and conduct of negotiations for trade agreements under one person who shall be chairman of an interdepartmental Executive Committee.
926
Nov. 11 From President Roosevelt
Decision to designate an officer of the State Department to supervise U. S. commercial policy; expectation that this officer as chairman of a coordinating Committee shall be the channel of communication with foreign governments on all policy matters affecting American trade.
(Footnote: The same letter sent to certain other Departments and organizations.)
927
Nov. 29 Memorandum by Mr. Ray Atherton of the Division of Western European Affairs
Summary of status of trade agreement negotiations or proposed negotiations with Colombia, Argentina, Brazil, Sweden, Portugal, and Cuba.
928
Dec. 12 (67) To the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Seventh International Conference of American States (tel.)
Information that the President has designated George N. Peek to head a temporary committee to recommend permanent machinery to coordinate Government relations to American foreign trade in the matter of agricultural production.
930
Dec. 15 From the Administrator of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration
Request for a summary of the activities and recommendations of the Executive Committee on Commercial Policy and the Interdepartmental Advisory Board on Reciprocity Treaties.
930
[Page XCIV]Dec. 18 To the Administrator of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration
Statement concerning the two Committees as requested in the Administrator’s letter of December 15.
931

ORGANIZING THE FOREIGN BONDHOLDERS PROTECTIVE COUNCIL

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Mar. 15 From the Economic Adviser to the Secretary of State
Decision of State, Treasury, and Commerce Departments that a body similar to the British Council of Foreign Bondholders should be formed to render assistance to American investors holding foreign securities which have entered into default, and steps taken toward bringing such a Council into existence.
934
May 17 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Brief record of discussion with the President concerning wisdom of appointing the personnel of the Council from outside associations rather than from the Government.
936
July 24 From Mr. Laurence Duggan of the Division of Latin American Affairs to the Assistant Secretary of State
Information that Title II of the Securities Act seems to indicate that existing bondholders’ committees will be absorbed, but carries no direct prohibition against the existence of other committees.
937
Dec. 18 From the Chairman of the Meeting for Organizing Foreign Bondholders Protective Council
Advice that a corporation has been set up under the laws of the State of Maryland known as the Foreign Bondholders Protective Council, Inc.; names of directors and officers, and other details on the organization.
937
1934 Jan. 3 (Diplo. 2386) To Diplomatic and Consular Officers
Transmittal of information concerning the organization of the Council, its functions and methods of conducting its affairs.
939

THIRD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PRIVATE AERIAL LAW, ROME, MAY 15–29, 1933

Date and number Subject Page
1932 July 12 (247) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Information that Clarence M. Young and John C. Cooper, designated to represent United States on International Technical Committee of Aerial Legal Experts, cannot attend Stockholm meetings beginning July 20; instructions therefore, to transmit to the Secretary General their suggestions (text printed) on the draft convention relative to precautionary attachment of aircraft to be considered at Stockholm.
(Footnote: Information that Edward S. Crocker, Second Secretary of Embassy in Sweden, attended the meetings at Stockholm as observer.)
940
[Page XCV]

CONFERENCE ON PRIVATE AERIAL LAW

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Aug. 3 (550) From the Chargé in Sweden
Attendance at sessions of the Technical Committee in Stockholm; transmittal of comments made by the Committee (text printed) on the suggestions of the American members concerning the draft convention on precautionary attachment of aircraft.
942
1933 May 1 To the Chairman of the American Delegation to the Third International Conference on Private Aerial Law
Instructions relative to the two draft conventions which are to be considered at the Rome Conference, convening May 15.
(Footnote: Membership of the American delegation.)
961
May 20 (38) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
From Cooper: Advice that drafting committee will present convention on precautionary attachment to the Conference for adoption very soon; request for authorization to sign with a declaration that convention applies only to continental limits of United States.
961
May 22 (27) To the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
For Cooper: Authorization to sign convention with the declaration indicated in telegram No. 38, May 20.
961
May 27 (48) From the Chargé in Italy (tel.)
From Cooper: Information that final draft of liability convention has been agreed upon, and will be signed for continental United States excluding Alaska.
962
May 29 Convention for the Unification of Certain Rules Relative to the Precautionary Attachment of Aircraft
Text of convention signed at Rome.
962
May 29 Convention for the Unification of Certain Rules Relating to Damages Caused by Aircraft to Third Parties on the Surface
Text of convention signed at Rome.
968

ACCEPTANCE OF RESERVATIONS BY THE UNITED STATES TO THE CONVENTION SIGNED AT ST. GERMAIN-EN-LA YE, SEPTEMBER 10, 1919, REVISING THE GENERAL ACTS OF BERLIN AND BRUSSELS

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Dec. 2 (689) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
Receipt of information from Foreign Office that the Japanese and Belgian Governments have signified that they have no objection to the U. S. reservation in its ratification to the St. Germain convention; indication, however, of an understanding by the Belgian Government, and of Japanese need to comply with certain legal formalities before giving formal consent. Advice that the only signatories not yet having reached a decision are Canada and India.
978
1933 Jan. 9 (1495) To the Ambassador in France
Advice that United States is in agreement with the understanding of Belgium.
978
[Page XCVI]

CONVENTION OF ST. GERMAIN

Date and number Subject Page
1933 Jan. 9 (167) To the Ambassador in Japan
Request that an effort be made, in an informal and unofficial way, to induce expedition of action by Japan with respect to whatever legal formalities are necessary.
979
May 22 (280) To the Ambassador in Japan
Opinion that it is not the duty of the French Government as depositary of the ratifications to make a formal request of the Japanese Government to accept the U. S. reservation. Instructions to inquire officially whether the Foreign Office cannot take whatever steps are necessary to accept the reservation.
980
Sept. 11 (358) To the Ambassador in Japan
Instructions to ascertain if possible what obstacle, if any, lies in the way of completing the procedure for notification of Japanese acceptance of U. S. reservation.
982
Oct. 5 (151) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Japanese willingness to send desired notification to the French Government provided United States asks in an official note that this be done.
(Footnote: Department’s instructions to make the official request.)
983
Nov. 10 (157) To the Chargé in France
Information from Tokyo of Japan’s notification to the French Government of nonobjection to U. S. reservation. Instructions to inquire if Foreign Office is now willing to accept deposit of U. S. ratification of the convention.
(Footnote: Deposit of ratification, October 29, 1934.)
983

REPRESENTATIONS BY FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS REGARDING CONGRESSIONAL BILLS FOR THE DEPORTATION OF CERTAIN ALIEN SEAMEN

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 9 From the Norwegian Legation
Norwegian objections to bill H. R. 3842 (similar to bills introduced in former sessions of Congress); opinion that serious consequences would result for Norwegian shipping if bill is enacted.
985
May 9 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Information, in reply to inquiry by the Swedish Minister, that no new note of protest on the subject of H. R. 3842 seems necessary, since Department is presenting views of foreign governments to the Immigration Committee of the House.
985
May 10 From the Italian Embassy
Reiteration of Italian representations regarding H. R. 3842, pointing out various objectionable features of the bill.
986
May 10 (1469) From the Netherlands Legation
Reassertion that important Netherlands interests would be endangered by the enactment of H. R. 3842.
988
[Page XCVII]

ALIEN SEAMEN

Date and number Subject Page
1933 May 10 From the French Ambassador
Reiteration that the adoption of H. R. 3842 may cause serious prejudice to French interests.
988
May 10 From the German Embassy
Reassertion of German protests against S. 868 and H. R. 3842, both similar to bills introduced in former Congresses.
989
May 10 From the British Ambassador
British opinion that the enactment of S. 868 and H. R. 3842 would be out of harmony with the spirit of the forthcoming World Economic Conference.
990
May 17 From the Danish Legation
Reiteration of Danish objections to S. 868 and H. R. 3842.
990