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List of Papers

[Unless otherwise specified, the correspondence is from or to officials in the Department of State.]

GENERAL

Relations of the United States with the Conference of Ambassadors, the Reparation Commission, and the Supreme Council

Date and number Subject Page
1920 Dec. 15 (1703) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Request for views as to best procedure for discontinuing U. S. participation in meetings of Council of Ambassadors.
1
Dec. 15 (1704) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For Boyden: Request for views as to best procedure for withdrawing from Reparation Commission and other commissions in Europe.
1
Dec. 17 (2021) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Recommendations for procedure to be followed in withdrawing from Conference of Ambassadors.
1
Dec. 18 (2026) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
From Boyden: Inadvisability of withdrawing U. S. representation on Reparation Commission; method of procedure, if decision to withdraw is finally made.
2
1921 Jan. 8 (19) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For Boyden also: Instructions to inform president of Council of Ambassadors and colleagues of U. S. decision to withdraw from representation on Council. Retention of Boyden on Reparation Commission temporarily.
3
Jan. 12 To Diplomatic Representatives in Certain Countries (tel.)
Announcement regarding discontinuance of U. S. representation on Council of Ambassadors and retention of representation on Reparation Commission.
(Footnote: Sent to Austria, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, and Yugoslavia.)
4
Jan. 28 (62) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Desire that Ambassador continue to obtain minutes of meetings of Conference of Ambassadors.
5
Feb. 10 (77) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For Boyden: Instructions to give notice to Reparations Commission of his retirement as unofficial representative (text printed). Explanation of step taken.
5
Feb. 11 (80) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For Boyden: Substitute announcement in lieu of one given in Department’s telegram no. 77 (text printed).
6
[Page XXXIV]Feb. 12 (104) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
From Boyden: Objections to wording of Department’s draft notification; draft of proposed notification to be sent instead (text printed). Embassy’s concurrence in Boyden’s recommendations.
7
Feb. 15 (89) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For Boyden: Further change in wording of proposed announcement (text printed) calling attention to anomalous position created by U. S. nonratification of treaty as reason for withdrawal.
8
Feb. 18 (117) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
From Boyden: Form of announcement (text printed) issued in withdrawing from Reparation Commission. Simultaneous withdrawal from Austrian section.
10
Feb. 19 (102) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For Boyden: Request for opinion regarding assignment of Col. Logan to Embassy at Paris to handle U. S. interests pending before Commission; inquiry as to disposition of Reparation Commission files, and date of sailing.
10
Feb. 23 (136) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
From Boyden: Approval of assignment of Logan to Embassy; recommendations as to disposal of files and dissolution of organization; his plan to assist by remaining abroad.
11
Mar. 9 (136) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For Boyden: Desire for Boyden to remain in Paris pending consideration of steps to be taken in U. S. interest in respect to activities of Reparation Commission.
11
Mar. 11 (144) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For Boyden: Instructions to maintain staff and organization, without giving publicity to fact, pending decision as to U. S. attitude toward Reparation Commission.
12
Mar. 14 (149) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For Boyden also: Request for Boyden to maintain his organization notwithstanding Logan’s appointment as liaison officer between Reparation Commission and Embassy.
12
Undated [Rec’d May 6] From the President of the Allied Conference
Unanimous request that the United States cooperate in settlement of international difficulties by representation at meetings of Allied Conference, Ambassadors’ Conference, and Reparation Commission.
12
May 6 To the President of the Allied Conference
Appointment of Ambassador in Great Britain to represent the President in Supreme Council, of Ambassador in France as unofficial observer on Conference of Ambassadors, and of Boyden in unofficial capacity on Reparation Commission.
13
May 7 (241) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For Boyden: Instructions to inform chairman of Reparation Commission of resumption of unofficial position on Commission.
14
May 7 (243) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Instructions to inform president of Conference of Ambassadors of resumption of place as unofficial observer on Conference.
14
[Page XXXV]May 11 (274) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to inform Allied Conference of appointment as the President’s representative to participate in Supreme Council’s deliberations. Limitations on participation in activities.
14
May 16 (407) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Inquiry as to advisability of attending meeting of Supreme Council for discussion of Silesia.
15
May 18 (288) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Authorization to attend deliberations of Supreme Council in order to inform Department, and to contribute, without violation of U. S. policy, to peaceful solution of boundary controversy.
16
July 27 (360) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Instructions, in restoring unofficial representation on Conference of Ambassadors, not to participate in deliberations of distinctly European concern, but only in those of world-wide importance, hence of U. S. interest.
16
Aug. 2 (437) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to take impartial attitude toward Silesian dispute and keep Department informed of questions discussed.
17
Aug. 4 (644) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Acceptance of invitation to attend meeting of Supreme Council at Paris. Request that General Allen be instructed to join him there.
17

Preliminary Arrangements for the Washington Conference on the Limitation of Armament

informal american proposal for a conference on the limitation of armament, july 8, 1921—acceptance of the british proposal to extend the discussions to pacific and far eastern questions—refusal of a british suggestion for a preliminary conference-discussions of-agenda—american invitation to great britain, france, Italy, and japan, august 11—invitation to china on august 11, and to belgium, portugal, and the netherlands on october 4, to participate in the discussion of pacific and far eastern questions

Date and number Subject Page
1921 July 8 (384) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain whether British Government will accept invitation to conference at Washington on limitation of armament.
(Sent, mutatis mutandis to diplomatic representatives in France, Italy, and Japan.)
18
July 8 (568) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
British proposal for conference on Pacific and Far Eastern questions; urgency of immediate response because of interpellation pending in House of Commons. Suggestion that President anticipate interpellation by announcement of expansion of scope of arms conference to include Far Eastern questions.
19
[Page XXXVI]July 9 To President Harding
Report of dispatch of informal inquiries to London, Rome, and Tokyo to ascertain attitude toward invitation to conference at Washington on limitation of armament. Inquiry as to restitution of conference to discussion of naval armament.
21
July 9 (569) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Official statement in newspapers (text printed) disclaiming British initiative in proposed conference.
22
July 9 (387) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Proposal, if British agree, to send supplemental cable to other Powers enlarging conference to include Pacific and Far Eastern questions, to which China will be invited.
23
July 9 (388) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Proposed statement by the President (text printed) for publication, if British approve, announcing preliminary discussions for conference on limitation of armament and on Pacific and Far Eastern questions.
24
July 10 (107) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to state that proposed conference should include all Far Eastern questions and that China should participate in discussions.
(Sent, mutatis mutandis, to diplomatic representatives in France and Italy.)
24
July 10 (191) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain whether agreeable to China to take part in discussion of Pacific and Far Eastern problems at proposed Washington conference on limitation of armament.
25
July 10 (573) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
British approval of the President’s statement regarding conference; its release to press.
25
July 11 (579) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Press commendation of the President’s statement. British suggestion of preliminary conference in London for settlement of Pacific and Far Eastern problems prior to Washington conference on limitation of armament.
25
July 12 Extract from the Act Making Appropriations for the Naval Service for the Fiscal Year Ending July 30, 1922, and for Other Purposes
Text of section 9, authorizing the President to invite Great Britain and Japan to conference for reduction of naval expenditures.
27
July 12 (439a) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
French reply that invitation to proposed conference will be welcomed.
27
July 12 (179) From the Chargé in Italy (tel.)
Italian reply that invitation to proposed conference will be welcomed.
27
July 13 (394) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Controlling considerations precluding preliminary conference in London.
28
[Page XXXVII]July 13 (259) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s doubt as to extent of invitation, but willingness to participate in conference either on armaments or Pacific problems.
29
July 13 (398) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Request for direct expression as to British intention regarding acceptance of proposed invitation to conference.
30
July 13 (25) From the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Belgium’s desire to be invited to conference.
30
July 13 (245) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Foreign Office memorandum (text printed) stating invitation to conference on limitation of armament will be welcomed, hesitating, however, as to discussion of Far Eastern problems and inquiring nature and scope of discussion.
31
July 13 (399) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Transmittal of text of Japanese memorandum on conference. Suggestions for agenda and inquiry as to what subjects, if any, have been suggested by British.
31
July 15 (585) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Suggested reply to Japan of deferred decision as to precise agenda. British objections to wide scope of U. S. proposed agenda as precluding attendance by Lloyd George and Curzon, insisting upon preliminary conference on Pacific matters.
32
July 15 (586) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
British confirmation of oral expression of desire for invitation to conference on armaments.
33
July 16 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Spanish desire to be invited to conference and Under Secretary’s reply that invitations were limited to four Principal Allied Powers.
34
July 18 (28) To the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Explanation that only five principal Associated Powers will attend conference for limitation of armament; possibility, however, of Belgian participation in discussion of Far Eastern questions.
34
July 18 (251) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Assurance of Japan’s acceptance of invitation to discuss Far Eastern affairs as well as armaments.
35
July 18 (264) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
China’s preference for one conference for both disarmament and Pacific problems, and desire for commitment by Great Britain on subject of Anglo-Japanese Alliance before conference.
35
July 19 (591) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
British proposal for limiting discussion of Pacific problems; reiteration of suggestion for preliminary conference or at least 1 informal consultations before Washington conference.
36
[Page XXXVIII]July 20 (415) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Strong opposition to preliminary conference, but acquiescence in consultations to facilitate preparation for conference; approval of British suggested agenda with addition of Siberian and Yap problems.
37
July 21 (114) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Reply to Japan’s request for agenda, affirming desirability of complete acceptance of invitation, leaving open to later determination the exact agenda.
39
July 22 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Request of Canton Government to be represented in conference at Washington.
40
July 22 (2145) From the Chargé in Sweden
Note from Representative in Sweden of the Russian Soviet Republic, July 21 (text printed) enclosing protest of his Government, July 19, to the United States, China, France, Great Britain, Italy, and Japan (text printed) against intention to hold conference without Russian participation.
40
July 23 (253) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Japan’s probable willingness to accept invitation to participate in Far Eastern conference with agenda patterned along lines of conversations previously held and to be held.
43
July 26 (255) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Memorandum sent to Foreign Office July 23 (text printed) confirming oral reply regarding agenda; Japan’s acceptance of invitation (text printed) with understanding that nature and scope of agenda will be adjusted prior to meeting of conference.
43
July 27 (118) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Release of statement to press concerning acceptance by all interested powers of proposals for conference, embodying memorandum of July 23 to Japan and Japanese reply on July 26.
45
Undated [Rec’d July 27] The British Foreign Office to the British Ambassador at Washington
Instructions to stress urgency of preliminary conversations between U. S., British, and Japanese representatives suggesting meeting somewhere in America.
45
July 27 (618) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Tentative British plan to meet Japanese and U. S. representatives at Bar Harbor for preparation of workable agenda for main conference at Washington.
46
July 28 (429) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to object to meeting of the three Powers at Bar Harbor, as partaking of nature of a preliminary conference called by the President.
47
Aug. 2 (436) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Abandonment by British of question of preliminary conference. Instructions to ascertain if November 11 is suitable opening date for Washington conference.
50
[Page XXXIX]Aug. 3 (641) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
British consent to any date desired, with understanding that date selected will be suggested to other Governments concerned.
51
Aug. 4 (643) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
British appropriation for larger navy after speech by Churchill in House of Commons (text printed) urging adequate naval strength preparatory to participating in Washington conference.
51
Aug. 6 (659) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
British press report of Japanese statement (text printed) summarizing public opinion on question of Washington conference and intimating some suspicion as to U. S. and British intentions in Pacific.
52
Aug. 7 (660) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Published summary of transactions of Prime Ministers and representatives of United Kingdom and Dominions (excerpt printed) explaining intention in urging preliminary conference and reason for its abandonment.
53
Aug. 9 (198) To the Minister in the Netherlands
Conversations with Netherland representatives regarding Netherlands desire to be represented on Washington conference by reason of its interests in the Pacific. Department’s noncommital attitude.
54
Aug. 11 (468) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Formal invitation to Great Britain (text printed) to attend conference at Washington, November 11, on limitation of armament and Pacific and Far Eastern problems.
(Sent, mutatis mutandis, to diplomatic representatives in France, Italy, and Japan.)
56
Aug. 11 (225) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Formal invitation to China (text printed) to participate in discussion of Pacific and Far Eastern questions in connection with Washington conference.
57
Aug. 13 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State
Communication from Chinese Foreign Office to Chinese Minister at Washington (excerpt printed) inquiring as to accuracy of Japanese allegations of understanding among United States, Great Britain, and Japan concerning Chinese questions on conference agenda. U. S. denial of such understanding.
58
Aug. 17 From the Chinese Minister
Chinese note (text printed) accepting invitation to Washington conference.
59
Aug. 23 (497) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Suggestions and inquiries as to number of delegates, exclusion or inclusion of Army and Navy representatives, and appointment of associate or expert advisory delegation.
60
Aug. 23 (279) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Foreign Office note (text printed) accepting invitation to conference and expressing hope that agenda will be drawn up with free exchange of views prior to assembly of conference.
61
[Page XL]Aug. 26 (705) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Suggestion that method of procedure in meetings of conference be patterned after that of Supreme Council and that number of delegates be limited.
63
Aug. 29 (511) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Approval of Supreme Council procedure for conference; importance of having delegation large enough to make practical representation of British dominions; suggestion of minimum number of delegates.
65
Sept. 2 (721) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Assurance that British will acquiesce in U. S. arrangements.
65
Sept. 3 (523) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Inquiry as to British suggestions regarding agenda in view of Japan’s desire to be informed by September 15.
66
Sept. 3 To the Diplomatic Representatives in France, Great Britain, Italy, and Japan
Instructions to ascertain whether Government to which accredited will consent to Belgian and Netherland participation in discussion of Pacific and Far Eastern problems at conference.
66
Sept. 10 (531) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
U. S. tentative suggestions as to agenda for conference.
(Instructions to repeat to Paris and Rome. Sent also to Tokyo.)
67
Sept. 10 (254) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Transmittal of U. S. tentative suggestions as to agenda for Pacific and Far Eastern questions.
68
Sept. 12 (293) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Japan’s inquiry as to meaning of agenda topic “status of existing commitments.”
68
Sept. 12 (152) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Explanation of topic “status of existing commitments.”
68
Sept. 16 From the French Chargé
Inquiry as to meaning of agenda topic “rules for control of new agencies of warfare and as to significance and scope of paragraph on status of existing commitments.”
69
Sept. 17 (545) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Press announcement (text printed) regarding denial of request of Far Eastern Republic to be represented at Washington conference; assurances that Russian rights will not be violated.
(Instructions to repeat to Paris, Constantinople, and Riga.)
69
Sept. 20 To the French Chargé (tel.)
Elucidation of two phrases in agenda memorandum relative to rules for control of new agencies of warfare and status of existing commitments.
70
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the British Ambassador, September 20, 1921
Inability of Lloyd George to attend conference. Discussion of size of delegations, procedure, and agenda of conference with view to mutual understanding and accord.
71
[Page XLI]Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Portuguese Minister, September 22, 1921
Possible representation of Portugal at conference for discussion of Pacific and Far Eastern questions.
74
Sept. 27 To the Diplomatic Representatives in France, Great Britain, Italy, and Japan (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain whether Government to which accredited will consent to Portuguese participation in discussion of Pacific and Far Eastern problems at conference.
75
Sept. 28 (566) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Suggestion of adding to agenda subject of electrical communications in mandated islands in the Pacific.
(Instructions to repeat to Rome and Paris. Sent also, mutatis mutandis, to Tokyo to be repeated to Peking.)
75
Oct. 4 (55) To the Minister in the Netherlands (tel.)
Note for Foreign Minister (text printed) inviting Netherland representation at Washington conference to participate in discussion of Pacific and Far Eastern problems; proposed agenda.
(Instructions to repeat, mutatis mutandis, to Brussels and Lisbon.)
76
Oct. 14 (347) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Conversations with Kato and others of Japanese delegation regarding conference and its agenda.
77
Oct. 17 From the Japanese Embassy
Japan’s acceptance in principle of proposed agenda and intimation of possible suggestion of new questions touching situation in Pacific and Far East.
78
Oct. 18 To the Japanese Embassy
Assumption that notice will be given in advance, in event of introduction of new questions, in order that delegations may make adequate preparation for discussion thereof in conference.
78
Oct. 19 The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs to the Chinese Legation at Washington
Chinese suggestions of revised and tentative agenda regarding Pacific and Far Eastern questions.
79
Oct. 21 (354) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Views and characteristics of Japanese delegates; Kato’s leadership in urging limitation of armament.
79
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Italian Ambassador and the Counselor of the Italian Embassy, November 3, 1921
Italy’s intention to support American views and policy in the conference.
81
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Chinese Minister, November 5, 1921
Chinese proposal of including tariff autonomy and Anglo-Japanese Alliance in agenda and suggestion that no distinction be made with respect to powers invited; the Secretary’s explanations of U.S. point of view.
82
[Page XLII]Nov. 9 (377) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Statement by Hara and Uchida of Japan’s policy in Far East, disclaiming territorial ambition or desire for a weak China.
84
Nov. 9 (543) From the High Commissioner at Constantinople
Note from People’s Commissar for Foreign Affairs of the Russian Socialist Federated Soviet Republic to the Governments of the United States, France, Great Britain, Italy, and Japan, November 2 (text printed) repeating protest against Soviet nonrepresentation at Conference for Limitation of Armament.
85

Correspondence with the League of Nations Regarding Mandates

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Feb. 17 (116) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Information that terms and provisions of A and B mandates will come before Council of League of Nations on February 21. Proposed submission of U. S. claims to joint and equal rights with four Allied Powers in mandate matters and protests against award of Yap to Japan in contravention of U. S. wishes.
87
Feb. 20 (103) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Instructions to notify President and Council of League of U. S. desire to submit views regarding mandates and to request that no action be taken pending receipt thereof.
88
Feb. 21 (107) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Note for League Council (text printed) transmitting copy of U. S. note to Curzon which set forth U. S. views regarding nature and responsibilities of mandatory powers, and claiming U. S. approval essential to validity of any mandate decisions reached and protesting against allocation of Yap to Japan.
89
Mar. 3 (2205) From the Ambassador in France
Note of League Council, February 22 (text printed) consenting to postpone final decisions on A and B mandates as requested but calling attention to fact that C mandates have already been definitely settled.
92
Mar. 3 (2209) From the Ambassador in France
League Council’s note, March 1 (text printed) inviting U. S. participation in discussions of A and B mandates in forthcoming meeting, and, concerning protests regarding C mandates, affirming that allocation thereof is function of Supreme Council.
93
June 17 (392) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Note from League Council to Prime Ministers of Principal Allied Powers, June 15 (substance printed) requesting that agreement with the United States be established regarding principles of mandates before next Assembly meeting.
96
[Page XLIII]

Draft Mandates and Other Documents Relating to Territories under Mandate

Date and number Subject Page
1920 Oct. 15 (3599) From the Chargé in Great Britain
Transmittal of documents published by League of Nations, including communication from President of Council of League to Prime Ministers of France, Great Britain, Italy, and Japan, August 5 (text printed) inquiring as to mandatories appointed, boundaries of mandated territories, and recommended terms and conditions of mandates.
96
1921 Jan. 7 (2017) From the Ambassador in France
Note of December 1, 1920, from Chief of French Section of League to Secretary General of League submitting draft mandate for Syria and the Lebanon (texts printed).
98
Jan. 14 (2040) From the Ambassador in France
Note of December 6, 1920, from Chief of British Delegation, Council of League, to Secretary General of the League enclosing draft mandates for Mesopotamia and Palestine for submission to League Council (texts printed).
104
Feb. 17 The Secretary General of the League of Nations to President Harding
Transmittal of copies of certain C mandates including that allocating to Great Britain the German Possessions in Pacific situated south of Equator, other than German Samoa and Nauru (text printed).
118
Mar. 4 (2211) From the Ambassador in France
Copy of League document no. 135 (excerpt printed) regarding B mandates, including draft of British mandates for East Africa and part of Togoland and the Cameroons, French mandate for part of Togoland and the Cameroons, Belgian mandate for East Africa, also joint recommendations of British and French as to future of Togoland and Cameroons.
121
Apr. 1 (4426) From the Chargé in Great Britain
Official White Paper (Cmd. 1195) embodying Franco- British Convention of December 23, 1920 (text printed) on certain points connected with mandates for Syria and the Lebanon, Palestine, and Mesopotamia.
137

Federation of the Central American Republics

signing of the pact of union, january 19, 1921, by costa rica, guatemala, honduras, and salvador; refusal by costa rica to ratify—adoption of the constitution, september 9—request for recognition of the federation by the united states—revolution in guatemala, and danger of the federation’s disruption—representations by the united states to guatemala, honduras, and salvador, deprecating an armed conflict

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 10 (3) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Nicaragua’s purpose to adhere strictly to Bryan-Chamorro Treaty, to which other Central American States must accede, before Nicaragua will subscribe to Union Pact.
143
Jan. 13 (3) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Nicaragua’s refusal to adhere to conference resolution; Guatemalan proposal of amendments to pact which will respect Nicaragua’s treaty obligations but reserve to other countries independent action.
143
[Page XLIV]Jan. 14 (4) From the Chargé in Costa Rica
Final drafting of Pact of Union with expectation of immediate signature as result of Guatemalan motion based on alleged declaration of U. S. Senate that Bryan-Chamorro Treaty will not affect existing rights of Costa Rica, Salvador, and Honduras.
144
Jan. 16 (7) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information that Nicaragua will not sign pact and will withdraw from conference; Costa Rican assurance that pact will be signed by remaining delegates.
144
Jan. 19 (9) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Formal signing of Pact of Union by Guatemala, Salvador, Honduras, and Costa Rica.
145
Feb. 1 From the Costa Rican Minister
Pact of Union of the Central American Republics (text printed), signed at San José Costa Rica, January 19.
145
Feb. 15 (70) From the Chargé in Honduras
Approval of Covenant of Central American Federation by Honduran President and its ratification by National Congress.
153
Feb. 23 (9) From the Minister in Salvador (tel.)
Ratification of Pact of Union by Salvadoran National Congress.
154
Apr. 8 From the Guatemalan Minister
Ratification of Pact of Union by National Legislative Assembly of Guatemala, making pact effective on date of ratification by third State.
154
June 3 (55) From the Chargé in Salvador
Foreign Minister’s transmittal of Pact of Union to League of Nations for formal registration, so that it may receive international endorsement.
154
June 16 From the Honduran Minister of Foreign Affairs
Notice of ratification of Pact of Union by three States; installation of Central American Provisional Federal Council at Tegucigalpa; decision to convoke National Constituent Assembly for signing Federal Constitution.
155
June 22 (102) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information regarding failure of Costa Rica to ratify Pact of Union.
156
June 25 To the Honduran Minister of Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Expression of appreciation for notification of organization of Central American Provisional Federal Council and calling of Constitutional Assembly.
156
July 21 (169) From the Chargé in Honduras
Official inauguration of National Constituent Assembly of Federation of Central America following election of officers.
157
Sept. 12 From the Honduran Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Notification that National Constituent Assembly has signed political constitution of new republic.
157
Sept. 14 To the Honduran Minister of Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Message of felicitations to Provisional Federal Council over signing of political constitution of Republic of Central America.
157
[Page XLV]Sept. 14 (46) From the Minister in Salvador (tel.)
Salvador’s opinion that international status of three States should remain unchanged until meeting of Federal Council in February when recognition of Union will be requested.
158
Sept. 30 (37) To the Chargé in Honduras (tel.)
Inquiry whether U. S. interpretation of Monroe Doctrine, as communicated to Salvador February 1920, has been inserted in Central American constitution.
158
Oct. 1 (117) From the Chargé in Honduras (tel.)
Information that U. S. interpretation of Monroe Doctrine is not incorporated in Central American constitution.
158
Oct. 6 From the Secretary of the Provisional Federal Council of the Republic of Central America
Notification of appointment of representatives to seek U. S. official recognition of the Republic of Central America.
159
Oct. 7 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Nicaraguan Minister’s inquiry as to U. S. attitude toward Nicaraguan entrance into Union and as to U. S. recognition; Under Secretary’s reply advising that the Secretary be consulted on the subject.
159
Dec. 9 (131) From the Chargé in Honduras (tel.)
Information from Provisional Federal Council that Guatemalan revolution was undertaken by Liberal Party which desires to support Federation, that Honduras and Salvador are ready to obey instructions of Council, but that action will be delayed until U. S. attitude toward Guatemala is defined.
160
Dec. 14 The Acting Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs, Department of State, to the Under Secretary of State
Urgency of U. S. representations to Central American countries which look to the United States to prevent general Central American war.
160
Dec. 14 (43) To the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Representations (text printed) regarding any attempt of one Central American country to interfere in internal affairs of another or to impose a federation by force.
(Sent also to Honduras and Salvador.)
161
Dec. 14 (54) To the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Note for members of Provisional Government (text printed) making representations regarding any attempt of one Central American country to interfere in internal affairs of another or to impose a federation by force.
162
Dec. 15 The Acting Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs, Department of State, to the Under Secretary of State
Solicitation by Central American delegates for immediate U. S. recognition; advisability of refraining from expression of U. S. policy because of Guatemalan revolution.
162
Dec. 16 (68) From the Minister in Salvador (tel.)
Salvadoran President’s assurances of support to policy of noninterference in Guatemala and of nonimposition of Union by force.
162
Dec. 16 (132) From the Chargé in Honduras (tel.)
President’s assurances that Honduras will not interfere in internal affairs of Guatemala; pressure upon Federal Council and Honduras by Unionists to invade Guatemala.
163
[Page XLVI]Dec. 23 The Acting Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs, Department of State, to the Under Secretary of State
Memorandum of Central American delegates (text printed) urging U. S. recognition as effective means of securing Union, enclosing copy of telegram from Tegucigalpa to that effect. Department’s refusal to reopen discussion of recognition until situation clears.
163
Dec. 30 (135) From the Chargé in Honduras (tel.)
Issue of decrees by Provisional Federal Council convoking Federal deputies from three States and senators from Honduras and Salvador for preparatory session.
164

Denunciations of the Trade-Marks Convention of August 20, 1910

efforts to persuade guatemala and nicaragua to withdraw their denunciations—denunciation by costa rica

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Feb. 16 (158) From the Minister in Guatemala
Guatemala’s willingness to join other nations in renewing its adherence to the Trade-Marks Convention, notwithstanding decision to denounce it as unilateral and unprofitable.
164
Aug. 29 (486) To the Minister in Guatemala
Instructions to stress desirability of Guatemala’s formally withdrawing its intention of denunciation of Trade-Marks Convention.
(Similar instruction to Managua.)
165
Oct. 29 (399) To the Chargé in Nicaragua
Instructions to stress desirability of Nicaragua’s withdrawing its intention of denunciation of Trade-Marks Convention.
166
1922 Jan. 7 (1) From the Argentine Ambassador
Note from Argentine Minister of Foreign Affairs and Worship, November 19, 1921 (text printed) giving notice that Trade-Marks Convention has been denounced by Costa Rica.
167

Convention between the United States and Other Powers, October 6, 1921, Amending the Convention of May 20, 1875, Relating to Weights and Measures

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Sept. 12 (53) To the Ambassador in France
Instructions to announce designation of Dr. S. W. Stratton and Mr. Sheldon Whitehouse as first and second delegates, respectively, to Sixth General Conference of Weights and Measures meeting at Paris for purpose of modifying convention of 1875.
168
Oct. 6 (673) Convention between the United States of America and Other Powers
International convention for the amendment of convention of 1875 to insure unification and improvement of metric system.
169
[Page XLVII]

Boundary Disputes

costa rica and panama: acceptance of the good offices of the united states; recommendations by the united states of a settlement on the basis of the awards of president loubet, 1900, and of chief justice white, 1914; objections by panama; advice by the united states to panama to give effect to the loubet and white awards

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Feb. 28 (15) To the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Recommendation that Panama and Costa Rica avoid hostile activities and come to agreement on basis of awards of President Loubet and Chief Justice White, regarding boundary dispute.
(Substance sent to Legation in Costa Rica.)
175
Mar. 1 (41) From the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Panama’s willingness to halt further hostile action, to discuss boundary question diplomatically, and to hold plebiscite in disputed area.
176
Mar. 2 (31) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s assurances that orders will be given to avoid further hostilities when not incompatible with national dignity, claiming invasions in region of Almirante Bay as justifiable reprisals.
176
Mar. 3 (18) To the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Instructions to urge inadmissibility of war over boundaries, and necessity of withdrawing troops to Cerro Pando–Punta Burica line pending U. S. efforts to find solution acceptable to both Governments.
177
Mar. 3 (13) To the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Instructions to urge inadmissibility of war over boundaries, and necessity of arresting advance of troops to Cerro Pando- Punta Burica line pending U. S. efforts to find solution acceptable to both Governments.
178
Mar. 4 (51) From the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Memorandum of agreement for conditional withdrawal of Panaman troops from disputed area to permit solution of boundary difficulty with U. S. aid (text printed).
180
Mar. 4 (52) From the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s note (excerpt printed) protesting against Costa Rican invasion of territory adjudged to belong to Panama, and calling for declaration of U. S. viewpoint toward obligation in respect to Panaman independence.
180
Mar. 5 (14) To the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Instructions to convey to President substance of message (text printed) urging immediate withdrawal of troops to north bank of Sixaola River pending settlement of controversy in accordance with terms of White award. Dispatch of U. S. ships to protect Americans.
181
Mar. 5 (20) To the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Gratification at Panama’s willingness to withdraw troops; efforts to get Costa Rica to do likewise; representations against further hostilities, urging settlement according to White award.
182
[Page XLVIII]Mar. 7 (23) To the Minister in Panama (tel.)
U. S. expectation that Panaman troops will withdraw to Cerro Pando–Punta Burica line in view of Costa Rican intention to withdraw to Sixaola River on Atlantic side and to advance no farther in Pacific region.
183
Mar. 8 (62) From the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s note (excerpt printed) affirming intention to withdraw troops from Coto but to retain civil and police authorities in region, Panama having refused since 1914 to accept White award.
183
Mar. 15 (28) To the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Note to President (text printed) affirming U. S. guaranty of independence conditional upon Panaman observance of its international obligations; insistence that Panama abide by White award, which it agreed in advance to accept.
184
Mar. 19 From the Secretary to President Harding
Cablegram from President of Panama, March 18 (text printed) appealing to President Harding against observance of White award on ground that arbitrator exceeded his jurisdiction. Reply of President Harding (text printed) upholding decision as unalterable position of U. S. Government.
188
Apr. 12 (2940) From the Minister in Panama
Foreign Minister’s note, March 18 (text printed) presenting arguments to support contention of injustice of White award and indivisible character of obligation which Loubet award imposed on the two countries; suggestion of plebiscite for reaching agreement.
190
Apr. 27 (38) To the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Note for President (text printed) insisting that Panama within 60 days give effect to Loubet and White awards by withdrawing jurisdiction from territory awarded to Costa Rica and by proceeding with demarcation of boundary line.
207
May 12 (45) To the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Refusal of request for extension of time beyond 60–day period if Panaman intention is to endeavor to reach agreement on basis other than that indicated by Department.
213
July 1 From the Panaman Minister of Foreign Affairs on Special Mission
Request for verification of his understanding that extension of time will be granted for purpose of reaching direct settlement with Costa Rica.
213
July 2 To the Panaman Minister of Foreign Affairs on Special Mission
Misapprehension on part of Foreign Minister to suppose that extension of time was granted for Costa Rica and Panama to reach adjustment on any basis other than that of White award.
214
July 29 To the Panaman Minister of Foreign Affairs on Special Mission
Costa Rica’s refusal to submit boundary question to arbitration of Permanent Court of The Hague; denial of contention that the United States has replaced Costa Rica in dispute; reasons for U. S. intervention and expectation that necessary steps be taken for compliance with award.
216
[Page XLIX]Aug. 1 (61) To the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Costa Rican request to Panama (text printed) to transfer jurisdiction over territory awarded to Costa Rica now occupied by civil authorities of Panama, and to appoint engineer for demarcation of boundary.
218
Aug. 6 (130) From the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s reply (text printed) refusing to accede to demands for transfer of jurisdiction to Costa Rica and to cooperate in boundary demarcation until question is adjusted by sovereign will of interested nations.
219
Aug. 8 From the Panaman Minister of Foreign Affairs on Special Mission
Note to Chief Justice of U. S. Supreme Court (text printed) protesting against improper request of Costa Rica for appointment of boundary commissioners in view of Panaman rejection of award.
220
Aug. 13 To the Panaman Minister of Foreign Affairs on Special Mission
Costa Rican refusal to consent to Panaman suggestion to submit to League of Nations questions concerning boundary (excerpts printed).
223
Aug. 18 (64) To the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Note for Government (text printed) giving notice that there is no valid reason for delay in execution of Loubet award and that Costa Rica will be advised to assume jurisdiction over territory in question.
224
Aug. 22 (65) To the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Memorandum for Government (text printed) denying U. S. intention to step aside and permit a renewal of hostilities by Panama against Costa Rica by reason of the latter’s taking peaceful possession of award.
225
Aug. 23 (134) From the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Panaman intention to recall officials from Coto and to offer no further resistance to Costa Rica’s taking possession.
226
Aug. 25 (66) To the Minister in Panama (tel.)
Instructions to give notice of Costa Rican intention to assume jurisdiction on September 5 over that portion of territory in region of Pacific awarded to Costa Rica and hitherto occupied by Panama.
226
Sept. 3 (40) To the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Instructions to inform Foreign Minister that Panaman authorities in Coto area have left and Costa Rican occupation will encounter no resistance. Presence of U. S. war vessel in vicinity to insure orderly procedure.
227
Sept. 7 (125) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Peaceable occupation of Coto region by Costa Rican forces September 5.
227
Nov. 18 To the Costa Rican Minister
Appointment by Chief Justice of Prof. 0. M. Leland and Prof. J. F. Hayford as commissioners to delimit boundary between Costa Rica and Panama.
(Sent, mutatis mutandis, to Panaman Chargé.)
227
[Page L]

the dominican republic and haiti: amendments proposed by haiti in the draft protocol of arbitration

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Apr. 13 (394) To the Minister in Haiti
Instructions to call attention to danger of delay in settlement of boundary controversy and U. S. desire for speedy and final agreement regarding arbitration of case.
228
June 2 (498) From the Minister in Haiti
Authorization for Haitian Minister at Santo Domingo to sign protocol of agreement with addition of articles identic with arts. 8 and 9 of treaties of 1895 regarding arbitration of boundary line.
229
Aug. 2 (706) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Foreign Minister’s statement of inactivity in boundary negotiations following Haitian insistence upon insertion of arts. 8 and 9 in protocol of arbitration. Inquiry whether Department agrees with protocol proposed by Dominican Republic.
230
Dec. 28 (430) To the Chargé in the Dominican Republic
In opportuneness of present time for a U. S. decision as to merits of protocol proposed by Dominican Republic and amendments thereto proposed by Haiti.
230

guatemala and honduras: withdrawal from washington of the guatemalan and honduran special missions

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 3 From the Chief of the Guatemalan Special Mission
Notification of termination of Guatemalan mission for settlement of boundary dispute with Honduras.
231
Mar. 24 From the Chief of the Honduran Special Mission
Notification of resignation from office as Chief of Special Mission, further business having been left in hands of Legation at Washington.
231
Mar. 30 (11) From the Guatemalan Minister
Guatemalan desire for continuation of mediation by United States, but willingness to arbitrate under certain conditions if mediation is ended.
232
May 30 (28) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Appointment by Guatemala and Honduras of commissioners for joint consideration of boundary dispute.
234

honduras and nicaragua: proposal by the united states to submit the dispute to the chief justice of the united states supreme court for decision

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Sept. 29 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs, Department of State
Decision of Honduran and Nicaraguan officials to recommend to their Governments the submission of award of King of Spain to Chief Justice of U. S. Supreme Court for determination of its validity, and if invalid, to entrust to U. S. Chief Justice the determination of boundary.
234
[Page LI]Oct. 27 To the Honduran Minister
U. S. proposal to Honduras of boundary solution identic with that recommended by conference of Honduran and Nicaraguan officials.
(Sent, mutatis mutandis, to Nicaraguan Minister.)
235
Oct. 29 (C–32) From the Nicaraguan Minister
Nicaraguan acceptance of U. S. proposal.
236

The Tacna–Arica Question

declarations by the united states of its impartial attitude—chilean proposal to peru to hold a plebiscite in the disputed territories; peruvian counter-proposal to arbitrate the dispute

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 18 (6) To the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Instructions to assure Peruvian President of U. S. attitude of impartiality in Tacna-Arica dispute and of willingness, if requested, to render services as mediator without necessity for calling in powers outside Western Hemisphere.
237
Jan. 26 (16) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
U. S. alleged statement to Chilean Ambassador (text printed), press account of statement made by Secretary Colby while in South America, and press statement by Ambassador Shea (text printed), all giving assurances of U. S. impartiality and noninterference in Tacna-Arica dispute unless invited by both parties.
238
Feb. 2 (13) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Explanations as to alleged statements found in Ambassador’s telegram no. 16 regarding U. S. intervention in Tacna- Arica dispute; instructions to submit all future statements for Department’s prior approval.
239
Aug. 26 From the Peruvian Ambassador
Inquiry whether U. S. attitude has changed from position taken by former Secretary Blaine against participation by European powers in settlement of American affairs. Peru’s desire to act in harmony with U. S. views on subject.
239
Sept. 15 From the Peruvian Ambassador
Urgent request for U. S. views regarding proposed mandate from League of Nations, by which the United States would cooperate with France and Brazil to determine Tacna-Arica controversy.
240
Sept. 17 To the Peruvian Ambassador
Explanation that Blaine doctrine is not applicable to Tacna- Arica question; U. S. refusal to approve proposals to join with Brazil and Argentina in representations to Peru and Chile, or to unite with France and Brazil in securing mandate of League of Nations to determine controversy.
241
Sept. 21 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Chilean intention to propose carrying out Treaty of Ancon by holding plebiscite in 1933 on bases provided for in Huneeus- Valera Protocol (text printed).
243
[Page LII]Sept. 28 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Conference with Chilean Ambassador and Special Counselor who propose U. S. mediation to settle Tacna-Arica question by plebiscite according to Treaty of Ancon.
244
Undated [Rec’d Oct. 12] From the Chilean Ambassador
Chile’s intention to invite Peru to agree to plebiscite on bases acceptable to both Governments or to be determined by the United States alone or with other American Governments.
245
Oct. 13 To the Chilean Ambassador
Aide-mémoire expressing U. S. willingness to facilitate adjustment of Tacna-Arica controversy and aid in settlement in any manner acceptable to both Governments.
246
Dec. 13 (920) From the Chilean Ambassador
Chilean cablegram (text printed) announcing dispatch to Peru of invitation for plebiscite with view to settlement of Tacna-Arica question.
247
Dec. 13 (82) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Peru’s intention to reject Chile’s invitation on ground that Chilean persecutions and deportations from Tacna and Arica preclude fair plebiscite; demand for revision of Treaty of Ancon and arbitration under U. S. auspices.
248
Dec. 14 (86) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s request that word of Chilean friendly feeling and good intentions be conveyed to Peru; Chilean willingness to accept reasonable modifications in arrangements for plebiscite.
248
Dec. 15 From the Chilean Ambassador
Note from Foreign Minister (text printed) quoting Chilean invitation to Peru to hold plebiscite, expressing willingness to consent to reasonable suggestions by Peru.
249
Dec. 15 (84) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Peru’s repudiation of Chilean invitation, declaring Chile’s broken faith, deportations, and changed conditions allow but one course—arbitration.
251
Dec. 17 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Interview with Peruvian Ambassador in which he questions good faith of Chile, reaffirms Peru’s preference for arbitration instead of plebiscite, and states, however, that he has recommended to his Government further negotiations.
252
Dec. 17 (59) To the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Instructions to preserve strict neutrality regarding negotiations between Peru and Chile.
(Similar instructions sent to Embassy in Chile.)
253
Dec. 20 From the Peruvian Ambassador
Telegram from Peruvian Foreign Minister (text printed) quoting Peru’s rejection of Chilean invitation for plebiscite and Peru’s willingness to submit question to U. S. arbitration.
254
[Page LIII]Dec. 22 (89) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Absence of actual repudiation of arbitration in Chilean rejoinder to Peru and hope for further negotiations; Bolivia’s desire to be included in discussions.
256
Dec. 27 (91) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Chilean offer to appoint commission to meet with Peruvian commission in Washington to adopt bases for arbitration; Peruvian counter-proposal to have United States arrange for arbitration.
257

AFGHANISTAN

Exchange of Letters between President Harding and Amir Amanullah Khan of Afghanistan

Date and number Subject Page
1921 July 18 To President Harding
Information concerning Mission from Afghanistan and Department’s intention to receive them. Recommendation that the President do likewise.
258
July 21 To President Harding
Desire of Afghanistan to establish diplomatic relations; Department’s intention to take matter under careful consideration. Lack of opportunity for trade in Afghanistan.
259
July 22 From the Secretary to President Harding
Arrangements for the President to receive the mission from Afghanistan.
260
Undated Amir Amanullah Khan of Afghanistan to President Harding
Desire to establish permanent friendly relation between Afghanistan and the United States.
260
July 29 President Harding to Amir Amanullah Khan of Afghanistan
Expressions of friendly interest and promise of further consideration of question of establishment of diplomatic representation in Afghanistan.
261
Aug. 21 (46) From the Chargé in Persia (tel.)
His informal, personal relations with Legation of Afghanistan in view of possibility of U. S. petroleum exploitation in that country. Request for opinion as to advisability of attitude taken.
261
Aug. 25 (24) To the Chargé in Persia (tel.)
Approval of Chargé’s course; account of reception by the President of Afghanistan Mission.
262
[Page LIV]

ARGENTINA

Confirmation to the All America Cables, Incorporated of the Concession of 1885 for a Direct Cable from Buenos Aires to Brazil

Date and number Subject Page
1921 May 5 (639) To the Chargé in Argentina
Memorandum by All America Cables (substance printed) of facts in connection with efforts of Central and South America Telegraph Co. to connect Argentina directly with Brazil. Instructions to assist All America Cables in efforts to cause Argentina to recognize as valid concession of 1885 granted former company.
263
Dec. 29 (1796) From the Chargé in Argentina
Draft Executive decree of Nov. 16, 1921 (text printed) recognizing validity of decree of June 22, 1885, for laying of cable direct from Brazil to Buenos Aires.
(Footnote: Signature of decree on Jan. 12, 1922.)
264

AUSTRALIA

Acquiescence by the United States in the Expatriation after July 2, 1921, of American Citizens Naturalized in Foreign Countries During the War

Date and number Subject Page
1920 Dec. 16 (433) From the Consul General at Melbourne
Note sent to Secretary of Australian Department for Home and Territories (text printed) calling attention to U. S. statute which does not allow U. S. citizen to expatriate himself when this country is at war. Information that naturalization of U. S. citizens continues under Commonwealth laws.
266
1921 July 22 To the Consul General at Melbourne
Assertion that municipal law of this country has no weight in a foreign country, and Americans who have taken oath of allegiance to foreign country since July 2. 1921, have expatriated themselves.
267
Nov. 7 (772) From the Vice Consul in Chargé at Melbourne
Request for information whether rights arising out of peace are retroactive and whether U. S. citizens who may have become naturalized in foreign country during war are deemed to be expatriated.
268
Dec. 28 To the Consul General at Melbourne
Explanation that U. S. citizens who may have been naturalized in Australia during war are deemed to be expatriated as of July 2, 1921.
268

AUSTRIA

Treaty between the United States and Austria Establishing Friendly Relations, Signed August 24, 1921

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Aug. 5 (291) To the Commissioner at Vienna (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain whether Austria is willing, prior to making treaty for resumption of diplomatic relations, to enter into protocol to confirm U. S. rights and privileges, including participation in Reparation and other commissions, as stipulated in Treaty of St. Germain.
270
[Page LV]Aug. 12 (148) From the Commissioner at Vienna (tel.)
Note from Federal Chancellor (text printed) promising to consider U. S. rights, etc., derived from Treaty of St. Germain, and also welcoming U. S. participation in Reparation and other commissions.
271
Aug. 16 (359) To the Commissioner at Vienna
Transmittal of draft treaty with Austria and the President’s full power to sign, the draft treaty also being telegraphed.
271
Sept. 6 (306) From the Commissioner at Vienna
Details concerning signing of peace treaty with Austria.
271
Sept. 6 (309) From the Commissioner at Vienna
Transmittal of corrected copy of treaty of peace dated Aug. 24, 1921, and signed by Austrian Federal Chancellor and U. S. Commissioner.
272
Oct. 24 (398) To the Commissioner at Vienna
Transmittal of the President’s instruments of ratification of treaty for exchange for corresponding instruments on part of Austria. Instructions and explanations regarding Senate resolution advising and consenting to ratification.
273
Nov. 8 (391) From the Commissioner at Vienna
Compliance with instructions in Department’s instruction no. 398. Transmittal of Austrian instrument of ratification and protocol attesting exchange of ratifications duly signed.
274
Aug. 24 (659) Treaty between the United States and Austria
Establishing friendly relations, and ratification, October 21, by the President containing U. S. Senate reservations.
274
Nov. 8 (205) From the Commissioner at Vienna (tel.)
Austrian desire to appoint Edgar Prochnik as Chargé d’Affaires ad interim as soon as treaty comes into effect.
(Footnote: Presentation of credentials on December 27, there being no objection.)
278
Nov. 19 (365) To the Commissioner at Vienna (tel.):
Instructions to request provisional recognition as Chargé d’Affaires pending arrival of letters of credence. Directions regarding recognition of staff and consular officers.
279
Nov. 30 (215) From the Chargé in Austria (tel.)
Recognition by Austria of U. S. Chargé d’Affaires.
279

BOLIVIA

Recognition of the Saavedra Government by the United States

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 25 (12) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Election of Saavedra as President by Republican majority; walkout by minority Republicans and others. Strike by labor organizations, troops preventing its spread
281
Jan. 27 (3) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Request for opinion as to advisability of according formal recognition after inauguration of Saavedra. Inquiry whether convention will continue to function as a congress for constitutional period.
281
[Page LVI]Jan. 28 (13) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Suggestion that recognition be postponed for few days.’ Consideration by convention of question of constituting itself the congress. End of strike.
(Footnote: Decision of convention, June 17, to constitute itself the congress.)
282
Jan. 31 (13) To the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
U. S. intention to recognize existing Bolivian Government. Instructions to inquire whether Argentina will proceed simultaneously with the United States in extending formal recognition.
(The same, mutatis mutandis, to the Ambassador in Brazil.)
282
Jan. 31 (5) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Decision to extend U. S. recognition when tranquillity in local situation warrants it. Expectation that Brazil and Argentina will also extend recognition simultaneously. Instructions to cable when suitable time for recognition has arrived.
283
Feb. 1 (15) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Recommendations that recognition be extended next week, situation being tranquil.
283
Feb. 2 (29) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Argentine concurrence in U. S. decision to recognize Bolivian Government; suggestion of February 5 as date for recognition.
284
Feb. 4 (15) To the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Expression of gratification at Argentine accord with U. S. decision to recognize Bolivian Government. Counter-suggestion of February 9 as day for recognition, because of rumors of unrest in Bolivia.
284
Feb. 4 (6) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Instructions to give notice on February 9 of U. S. recognition of Bolivian Government. Understanding that Argentina and Brazil will extend recognition on same day.
285
Feb. 4 (18) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Instructions to give notice that U. S. recognition will be accorded Bolivian Government on February 9; desire that Brazil will take like action on that date.
285
Feb. 5 (7) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Chile’s instructions for formal recognition of Bolivian Government on February 9 with understanding that latter will observe all treaty engagements entered into by former Government.
285
Feb. 5 (3) To the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Invitation to Uruguay to extend recognition to Bolivian Government simultaneously with the United States and other countries.
286
Feb. 6 (31) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Information that Argentina intends to follow the United States in recognizing the Bolivian Government on February 9.
286
Feb. 6 (12) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Notification that Brazil will recognize new Bolivian Government conjointly with the United States on February 9.
287
[Page LVII]Feb. 9 (6) From the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Information that Chargé d’Affaires has been appointed to proceed to Bolivia immediately and will give notification of Uruguayan recognition upon arrival.
287
Feb. 9 (17) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Simultaneous recognition of Bolivian Government by the United States, Argentina, Chile, and Brazil.
287

CANADA

Continued Delay in International Arrangements for the Regulation of Fisheries

termination of port privileges granted by the united states to canadian fishing vessels—withdrawal from the consideration of the senate of the convention for the protection of salmon, signed may 25, 1920

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Mar. 9 From the Secretary of Commerce
Memorandum by Commissioner of Navigation (text printed) regarding question of continuance of war arrangement for reciprocal fishing privileges with Canada without any authority in law.
288
July 11 (90082–N) From the Secretary of Commerce
Instructions of Department of Commerce to Collectors of Customs, July 6 (text printed) terminating on July 15 certain privileges in U. S. ports allowed to fishing vessels of nations associated with the United States in war.
289
July 14 From the British Embassy
Legal objections to U. S. proposal of direct settlement of fishery questions between Washington State and British Columbia, latter having no jurisdiction in the matter. Recommendations for solution of question by ratification of Sockeye Salmon Treaty.
290
Aug. 15 From President Harding
The President’s intention to request the Senate to return convention relating to protection of salmon fisheries.
291
Aug. 27 To the British Ambassador
Withdrawal of fisheries treaty from U. S. Senate for further consideration since it could not receive approval in its present form.
291
Sept. 22 (715) From the British Ambassador
Inquiry as to nature of modifications of treaty considered necessary, in view of grave concern of Canada over further delay in settling matter.
292
Oct. 3 (741) From the British Ambassador
Representations regarding cancelation of fishing privileges in U. S. ports and desire for their restoration pending outcome of negotiations for a treaty; possibility of withdrawal of privileges by Canada in reprisal.
292
[Page LVIII]Oct. 17 To the British Ambassador
Inability to suggest any modifications to fisheries treaty; existence of very strong opposition in the West to treaty.
294
Nov. 15 To the British Ambassador
Citation of section 4311 of U. S. Revised Statutes (text printed) as being in full effect since joint resolution of Congress of Mar. 3, 1921, terminated all war legislation, proclamations, and orders including fishing privileges to Canadian ships. Determination to continue negotiations for fishing agreement.
295

Supplementary Convention between the United States and Great Britain, October 21, 1921, Providing for the Accession of Canada to the Property Convention of March 2, 1899

Date and number Subject Page
1920 Mar. 12 To the British Chargé
Inquiry whether convention can be concluded so that convention of March 2, 1899, regarding tenure and disposition of real and personal property, will be extended and made applicable to Canada.
296
Aug. 16 To the British Ambassador
Inquiry whether any decision has been reached regarding proposed extension of convention of 1899 to apply to Canada.
296
1921 Mar. 1 (174) From the British Ambassador
Desire of Canada to adhere to convention of 1899 regarding tenure and disposition of personal property; suggestion that draft supplementary convention to that effect be prepared for signature.
297
Apr. 28 To the British Ambassador
Transmittal of draft supplementary convention providing for adherence of Canada to convention of 1899.
297
Oct. 21 (663) Supplementary Convention between the United States and Great Britain
Providing for accession of Dominion of Canada to real and personal property convention of March 2, 1899.
298

Efforts to Secure the Removal of Restrictions upon the Exportation of pulpwood from Canada

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Aug. 16 (476) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Inquiry as to British attitude toward proposed commission to negotiate with Canada to bring about cancelation of restrictions upon export of pulpwood to the United States.
299
Oct. 12 (815) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
British desire that question of restrictions on pulpwood exports be handled direct with Dominion Government through British Embassy, Washington.
299
[Page LIX]Oct. 22 To the British Ambassador
Senate Joint Resolution No. 36 of 67th Congress (text printed) authorizing appointment of commission to negotiate with Canada regarding pulpwood exports. Request for appointment of place and time for commencing negotiations.
300
Nov. 10 (848) From the British Ambassador
Canadian willingness to hear U. S. representations, but adherence to memorandum by Canadian Department of External Affairs, May 27, 1920 (text printed) on situation as regards export of pulpwood, disclaiming discrimination against the United States but rather pursuance of a policy opposed to forest depletion.
301
Nov. 28 From President Harding
Lack of any grounds for insisting upon conference between proposed U. S. commission and Government of Canada regarding pulpwood exports.
311

CHINA

Instability of the Chinese Government at Peking

decline in the authority of the government—intervention of chang tso-lin at peking—the cabinet crisis in December

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Mar. 25 (129) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Increase of Monarchial agitation; meeting of adherents of Chang Tso-lin at Mukden to discuss matter.
313
Apr. 6 (144) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Seeming abandonment by Chang Tso-lin of intention to force monarchial restoration at Peking, due to adverse criticism.
313
July 24 (254) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
From Peking: Imminence of attacks upon Peking; dubious allegiance of all Yangtze Provinces.
313
Sept. 3 (310) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Successes of Wu Pei-fu financed by Tsao Kun; Wu’s plan for national convention independent of Peking or Canton.
314
Nov. 1 (128) From the Minister in China
Press reports that Chang Tso-lin is establishing special bureau of foreign affairs in northern provinces to act independently of Peking.
314
Dec. 3 (429) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report on political situation in China, for consideration in connection with Disarmament Conference, calling attention to development of patriotism and sense of nationality, although handicapped by rivalry of military bosses. Need for centralized self-goyernment, disbandment of troops and railway improvement.
315
[Page LX]Dec. 18 (451) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Arrival of Chang Tso-lin at Peking.and resignation of Cabinet; plan of former for unification of China and rehabilitation of finances with Liang Shih-yi as premier. Uncertainty as to attitude of other military leaders.
321
Dec. 21 (457) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Interview with Chang Tso-lin regarding new administration and conditions. His advocacy of strong, honest central government.
322
Dec. 27 (468) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Assumption of office by new cabinet; its personnel.
323

Election of Dr. Sun Yat-sen at Canton as “President of the Republic of China”

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 11 (209) From the Vice Consul in Chargé at Canton
Personnel of Southern Military Government, a de facto government; integrity of members and reforms instituted by them.
323
Feb. 28 (874) From the Minister in China
Mission of Admiral Si Ho in Canton to arrange reconciliation of opposing political factions; report regarding rivalry between Sun Yat-sen and Ch’en Ch’iung-ming.
325
Apr. 6 (248) From the Vice Consul in Chargé at Canton
Development of political crisis, with three-cornered struggle over election of President, faction headed by Sun Yat-sen favoring election by remnant of 1915 Parliament; prospect of hostilities between Kwangsi and Kwangtung Provinces.
326
Apr. 20 (251) From the Vice Consul in Chargé at Canton
Election by old Parliament, in extraordinary session, of Sun Yat-sen as President of Republic of China, considered as best approximation of constitutionality to be obtained. Conjectures as to Cabinet.
328
May 2 (255) From the Vice Consul in Chargé at Canton
Plans for Dr. Sun’s inauguration; discussion of constitution of Cabinet. Seriousness of financial situation, made acute by necessity of repelling invasion of Kwangtung by Kwangsi.
330
May 7 (258) From the Vice Consul in Chargé at Canton
Inauguration of Sun Yat-sen as President with friendly demonstration by common people; appointment of Cabinet. Enclosure of manifesto and sealed letter for President Harding.
332
May 14 From the Personal Representative of Dr. Sun Yat-sen
Cantonese Foreign Minister’s note enclosing manifesto to foreign powers issued by Sun Yat-sen, May 5, 1921 (texts printed) regarding futility of Peking Government, and trend toward foreign domination; purpose of Republic of South to develop and unite whole country. Request for recognition.
335
[Page LXI]June 16 The Personal Representative of Dr. Sun Yat-sen to President Harding
Letter from Sun Yat-sen, May 5 (text printed) describing state of affairs in China and appealing to the United States in particular for help in resisting twenty-one demands of Japan and other measures in violation of Hay doctrine.
337
June 22 (227) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
From Canton: Report on commencement of hostilities between Kwangtung and Kwangsi.
339
June 25 To the Consul General at Canton
Return of sealed letter, presumably from Sun Yat-sen, addressed to President Harding, with instructions to deliver it to sender with expression of regret at inability to forward it.
339
June 29 (235) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
From Canton: Kwangtung successes in west and capture of Wuchow. Removal of Americans to Hongkong.
340
July 28 (272) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Further success over eastern towns of Kwangsi, which is practically under control of Kwangtung.
340
Aug. 17 (300) From the Consul General at Canton
Impropriety of returning to Sun Yat-sen letter which had been opened. Suggestion that matter be dropped.
341

Admonition by the Department of State to Residents in the Legation Quarter at Peking against Granting Asylum to Chinese Fugitives

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Mar. 10 (142) To the Minister in China
Instructions to Legation and through it to American residents in Legation Quarter admonishing them against granting of asylum to Chinese refugees.
342
June 1 (1243) From the Minister in China
Submission of draft circular letter (text printed) admonishing U. S. residents in Quarter against harboring Chinese, also quoting Minister’s letter of June 28, 1920, to same and Department’s instructions to diplomatic officers regarding asylum. Suggestion that letter of July 28 stand without commentary.
343
Aug. 31 (286) To the Chargé in China
Desire that U. S. residents in Legation Quarter in Peking be informed along lines of draft circular letter submitted in despatch no. 1243.
345
[Page LXII]

Financial Embarrassments of the Chinese Government

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Oct. 22 (367) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Consideration by consortium representatives of China’s desperate financial situation. Statement regarding foreign and internal debts. Suggestion of increased tariff and effective control over proceeds by trust composed of Minister of Finance, Inspector General of Customs, and Chinese Bankers’ Association.
346
Oct. 26 (371) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Conditions necessary to save central government, namely, more revenues, retrenchment of expenditures, and unification of country. Inspector General’s suggestion of emergency bond issue based on customs surtax administered by trust.
348
Oct. 27 (288) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry as to who suggested control of proceeds of increased customs duties by Minister of Finance, Inspector General of Customs, and Bankers’ Association.
350
Oct. 29 (377) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that suggestion came from Inspector General of Customs.
350
Oct. 31 (378) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Failure to submit Inspector General’s scheme to Cabinet although approved by President, Premier, and other officials.
350
Nov. 11 (391) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Approaching crisis in financial situation, threatened strikes in government departments, resignations in Cabinet, and manifest uneasiness among bankers.
351
Nov. 16 (403) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Runs on banks; efforts to release accumulated customs reserves to tide over crisis; consideration of Inspector General’s scheme of 50,000,000 customs loan. Request for instructions as to U. S. attitude.
351
Nov. 17 From the Chinese Legation
Text of telegram from Foreign Minister regarding Government’s proposal to sustain market with six million Shanghai taels from surplus of maritime customs receipts.
352
Nov. 17 (407) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Memorandum of Inspector General (text printed) giving reasons why Government aid of banks by withdrawal of sinking fund of maritime customs cannot be permitted.
353
Nov. 18 (300) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Refusal to give or withhold sanction for draft on sinking fund.
354
Nov. 19 (408) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Summary of reply of Diplomatic Corps to Foreign Minister (text printed) refusing to acquiesce in transfer of customs surplus from sinking fund to other purposes.
354
Nov. 19 (409) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Description of panic as severest on record with bank payments stopped and business at a standstill.
355
Nov. 23 (414) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Relaxation of crisis, arrival of funds and assistance from Chinese Bankers’ Association.
355
[Page LXIII]

Organization of a New International Financial Consortium

tentative definition by the american group of the scope of the consortium’s activities—formation of an advisory council of the consortium—suggestion by the department of state that the american group dissociate itself from any proposal for the administration of the chinese land tax—canadian project for an extra-consortium loan—negotiations relating to the admission of an italian group

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 9 (15) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for information regarding scope, attitude toward bond issues, and size of undertakings contemplated by Consortium.
355
Jan. 17 From the American Group
Message for transmission to Legation and Stevens (text printed) giving tentative definition as to proposed activities of Consortium.
356
Feb. 1 From the American Group
Additional paragraph (text printed) for insertion in message of January 17, expressing purpose to develop things basically in China and to determine questions of policy as they present themselves.
358
Mar. 10 From the American Group
Brief summary of background and aims of Consortium, with inquiry as to whether new administration is in accord therewith.
358
Mar. 11 From Mr. Thomas W. Lamont
Defense of Consortium against misrepresentation in China and United States; Consortium’s reluctance to handle investment on merits but willingness to do so as matter of public service.
360
Mar. 23 To the American Group
Approval of principles of Consortium.
361
Mar. 29 (133) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Necessity for protection of U. S. interests that Legation be informed of Consortium scope especially as to loans to existing railways. Citation of unrestricted foreign loans which may extend control of railways indefinitely.
361
Apr. 5 (143) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for precise definition as to scope of Consortium activities. British inquiry whether U. S. principle of open door will dispossess established foreign interests in China, thus depriving pioneering enterprises of initial advantages.
362
Apr. 29 To the American Group
Suggestion that American group dissociate itself from proposed administration by Consortium of Chinese land tax, in view of intimate relationship existing between administration of land tax and internal affairs of China.
363
May 2 (130) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from Lamont (text printed) describing British accord with his views that loans to existing railways fall within scope of Consortium when they involve issue of public loan, and hence include certain railway projects. Impossibility of rendering absolute definition as to scope of Consortium.
363
[Page LXIV]May 14 (332) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
From Lamont for American group also: Suggestion by British and French groups of formation of an advisory council of the Consortium without executive powers.
365
May 18 From the American Group
Transmittal of copy of telegram sent to Lamont indicating approval of formation of council to consider Consortium matters.
366
May 23 (149) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Warning against construing Consortium agreement as invalidating provisions of contracts which are not within its scope; instructions to insist upon rights of U. S. manufacturers to equality of treatment and opportunity for competition.
366
June 7 To the American Group
Inquiry whether all groups have approved formation of advisory council.
367
June 21 To the American Group
Renewal of suggestion that American group take steps to dissociate itself from any proposal for Consortium administration of Chinese land tax.
367
June 23 From the American Group
Counter-suggestion that American group endeavor to persuade other three groups through Consortium council to rescind all references to Chinese land tax.
368
June 29 To the American Group
Approval of counter-suggestion.
369
July 27 From the American Group
Approval of all groups of formation of a Consortium council. Delegates who will comprise council.
369
Oct. 19 (560) From the Ambassador in Great Britain
Foreign Office note, October 18 (text printed) setting forth project for extra-consortium loan to China by Royal Financial Corp. of Canada, contrary to principles of Consortium. Request for U. S. cooperation to prevent above loan, since participation by U. S. firm is contemplated.
370
Nov. 22 From the Italian Embassy
Request for U. S. support for application for admission of Italian Banks to Financial Consortium for China.
371
Nov. 30 To the Italian Embassy
Reply that question of Italian participation will have to be considered by American group and other governments.
372
Dec. 9 (278) To the Ambassador in Great Britain
Instructions to give assurance that no encouragement will be given flotation in the United States of Chinese loan outside Consortium but that the Government is without legal power to prevent it.
372
Dec. 13 From the American Group
Lack of information concerning loan arranged with China by Royal Financial Corporation of Vancouver; denial by Park Union Bank of N. Y. of alleged interest in transaction.
373
[Page LXV]Dec. 13 (322) To the Minister in China (tel.)
From American group for Stevens also: Memorandum as to organization and aims of Chinese Consortium with summary of Consortium principles.
373

Defaults by the Chinese Government on Loans from American Banking Houses

continental and commercial trust and savings bank

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 19 From the Vice President of the Continental and Commercial Trust and Savings Bank
Appeal for diplomatic support in securing from China semiannual interest due November 1, 1920, on Republic of China 6 percent two-year secured gold loan Treasury notes of 1919, payment of which had been promised early in January from surplus of salt revenues.
374
Jan. 27 (42) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to remind Minister of Finance of interest due Continental and Commercial Trust and Savings Bank of Chicago and to urge payment.
375
Apr. 21 (124) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to urge China to meet May installment of interest on loan in order that Chinese credit will not be impaired in this country.
376
June 3 From the Vice President of the Continental and Commercial Trust and Savings Bank
History of loans made to China by bank and by Pacific Development Corporation; disposition to effect new loan to cover obligations to both corporations provided U. S. support is assured; reminder that default on maturing loan will interfere with functioning of Consortium.
376
June 11 (165) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that May interest has been paid but interest for November 1920 still due. Instructions to urge payment.
378
June 15 (221) To the Minister in China
Instructions to cooperate with Vice President of Continental and Commercial Trust and Savings Bank of Chicago, who will visit China in connection with renewal of 1919 loan.
379
Sept. 10 (322) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Probability of effecting loan agreement with China providing for placing administration of wine and tobacco taxes under joint supervision of an American. Inquiry as to value of such control.
379
Sept. 15 (257) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Advantage of control of administration of wine and tobacco tax by U. S. financial interests.
380
[Page LXVI]Oct. 31 From the Continental and Commercial Trust and Savings Bank (tel.)
Information that Chinese Minister of Finance has resigned and that China will default in payment of both principal and interest of notes due November 1. Appeal for immediate action by Department.
380
Oct. 31 (291) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to state that only by immediate promise to remedy default at once will it be possible for China to preserve any degree of credit in U.S. markets and not prejudice its position at forthcoming arms conference.
381
Nov. 4 (383) From the Minister in China (tel.)
China’s expressions of regret at default and of hope that U. S. assistance at conference will not be diminished thereby. Willingness to negotiate further.
382
Nov. 6 (385) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Chinese objections to certain proposals made in loan negotiations. Assurances of Minister of Finance (text printed) regarding efforts to refund loan.
382
Nov. 13 (393) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Foreign Office note, November 12 (text printed) expressing hope that Department will urge leniency on part of Chicago bank in order to facilitate completion of negotiations for new contract.
383
Nov. 17 (297) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to urge early completion of negotiations and to call attention to fact that Pacific Development Corporation loan soon matures and that another default at this time would be disastrous to China’s credit.
384
Nov. 22 From the Chinese Legation
Text of telegram from Ministries of Foreign Affairs and of Finance agreeing to terms of Chicago bank except as to Hukuang bonds, coupons of which will be paid as soon as account against Germany can be settled.
384
Nov. 23 To the American Group
Prospects of remedying default since China has agreed to terms for refunding of Chicago bank loan if groups will accede to China’s proposal concerning German issue of Hukuang bonds.
385
Dec. 22 (337) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions again to call attention to continuing default on Chicago bank loan and to insist upon immediate remedial measures, suggesting payment of past due interest pending arrangements to pay principal.
385
Dec. 30 (473) From the Minister in China (tel.)
China’s promise to resume refunding loan negotiations and request for U. S. support of proposal to increase customs tariff to 7½ percent pending tariff revision.
386
[Page LXVII]

pacific development corporation

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Feb. 18 From the American Group
Decision of American group not to take up option given it by Pacific Development Corporation on its position under its contract with Chinese Government.
386
Apr. 9 From Messrs. Sullivan & Cromwell
Request for Department’s aid in securing proper authority over revenues for Williams, appointed Associate Inspector General of Wine and Tobacco Administration, so that loan to China can be refunded and advance by American group repaid.
387
Apr. 30 To the Secretary of Commerce
Favorable consideration of application of Pacific Development Corporation in financing orders for machinery, etc., for China, using Chinese 1919 Treasury notes held by corporation as security.
380
May 3 (173) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that Williams, though installed as Associate Inspector General of Wine and Tobacco Administration, has no authority, and has been furnished no data regarding revenues.
390
May 23 From Messrs. Sullivan & Cromwell
Request that Department, in view of approaching maturity of bonds, seek to have Williams given authority provided in loan contract, and that Department concur in attitude that option under loan contract does not begin to run until such authority is conferred.
391
June 18 (173) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Instructions again to make representations to China concerning failure to comply with terms of loan contract as regards Williams.
392
Sept. 13 From the American Group
Recital of facts with respect to relations of Pacific Development Corporation with Consortium group regarding loans to China, to be used by Department in reply to inquiries from Japan. Consortium opinion that contract does not furnish workable basis for loans and should be revised.
393
Nov. 17 (406) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry as to action to be taken regarding request by counsel of Pacific Development Corporation to warn China of approaching maturity of loan and urgency of payment.
396
Nov. 18 (299) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Department’s views on necessity of prompt payment by China, as previously telegraphed by Department and Chinese Minister.
396
Nov. 30 (426) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Three months’ extension of Pacific Development Corporation’s loan and payment of interest to date.
396
[Page LXVIII]Dec. 2 From the American Group
Group’s approval of six months’ extension of Pacific Development Corporation’s note.
396
Dec. 28 (18) To the Ambassador in Japan
Opinion that option granted Pacific Development Corporation by Chinese Government is still in force because of failure of latter to comply with terms of contract.
397

Proposal to Remit Further Payments on the Boxer Indemnity

Date and number Subject Page
1921 May 25 From Senator Henry Cabot Lodge
Summary of Boxer indemnity transactions and proposal to remit remainder of debt as friendly move toward China. Offer to introduce resolution in Senate if draft is supplied by State Department.
398
June 1 From the Assistant Secretary of the Treasury
Statement of payments of Chinese indemnity, claims allowed and paid, and balance in Treasury after payment of all claims.
399
July 19 To Senator Henry Cabot Lodge
Accord with proposal to put an end to further payments of Boxer indemnity by China. Transmittal of draft resolution for presentation to Congress.
402

The Federal Telegraph Company’s Contract with the Chinese Government

british, Japanese, and danish protests to the chinese government on the ground of prior contracts—support given to the federal telegraph company by the american government in defense of american treaty rights and of the principle of the open door

Date and number Subject Page
1920 Nov. 29 (414) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Negotiations between Federal Telegraph Co. and China for wireless overseas communication from Shanghai and secondary stations. Request for instructions as to Legation’s cooperation. Similar negotiations between British Marconi Co. and China.
404
Dec. 3 (354) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Approval of Legation’s cooperation with Federal Telegraph Co. in negotiations unless course seems doubtful.
404
Dec. 8 (428) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Possible conflict between proposed Federal Telegraph Co.’s contract and Marconi, Mitsui, and other monopolistic cable agreements; necessity for U. S. support if effectiveness of contract is to be assured.
405
[Page LXIX]Dec. 16 (443) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Terms of proposed contract for joint partnership between Chinese Government and Federal Telegraph Co. Indication that Consortium bankers are financing company. Inquiry whether U. S. support shall be given. British Legation’s support of Marconi negotiations.
405
Dec. 21 (384) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Assent to prospective agreement on condition that it entails no foreign public bond issue, no infringement of sphere of Consortium’s operations, no monopoly, and no curtailment of equal opportunity.
406
Dec. 22 (458) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Presentation to Prime Minister of Federal Telegraph Co.’s application for contract and Minister’s indorsement of company’s standing. French offer to construct wireless station.
407
Dec. 28 (467) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Assurance of no evidence of objectionable features in Federal Telegraph Co.’s contract.
407
1921 Jan. 8 (14) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Signing of contract, to become effective upon ratification by company.
408
Jan. 20 (41) From the Minister in China (tel.)
British protest to China against contract on ground of prior rights of Marconi Co. for sale of wireless materials to China.
408
Jan. 26 (60) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Japanese representations to Foreign Office against contract on basis of Mitsui contract.
409
Feb. 2 (49) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to contest Marconi claim to monopoly and make representations against attempt to abridge equal opportunity in China in violation of treaties of 1844 and 1858.
409
Feb. 5 (80) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Danish and Japanese protests and British attempt to have Federal Telegraph Co. contract annulled. Suggestion of arranging agreement between U. S. and other governments concerned; request for instructions.
410
Feb. 6 (81) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Premier’s disposition to cancel Federal Telegraph Co. contract, due to strong pressure of British Government.
410
Feb. 8 (56) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to state that cancelation of Federal Telegraph Co. contract for monopoly in supplies or operation would be regarded as unfriendly act. Arrangements for discussion between Federal Telegraph Co. and American group.
410
[Page LXX]Feb. 11 (85) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to make representations against monopolistic character of Marconi contract to supply wireless equipment in China, which, if persisted in, would cause reconsideration of U. S. refusal to support prior claims of Western Electric Co. Compatibility of contract with Consortium policy.
411
Feb. 15 (5) To the Minister in Denmark (tel.)
Instructions to inquire whether protest against Federal Telegraph Co. contract has been made with approval of Government and, if so, by virtue of what rights.
(The same, mutatis mutandis, to the Chargé in Japan.)
413
Feb. 17 (17) From the Minister in Denmark (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s reply (excerpt printed) stating Federal Telegraph Co. contract is in conflict with China’s agreement of 1913 with Great Northern Telegraph Co., Ltd., and Eastern Extension Australasia and China Telegraph Co., Ltd. (text printed).
414
Feb. 18 (92) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Japan’s demand for cancelation of Federal Telegraph Co. contract on ground of exclusive privileges set forth in supplementary letter, March 5, 1918, of Mitsui contract (excerpt printed).
416
Feb. 21 (7) To the Minister in Denmark (tel.)
Instructions to state that China is precluded by treaty of 1858 (excerpt printed) from establishing monopolies and that Danish wireless monopoly in China is in opposition to treaty rights and open-door principle.
416
Feb. 23 (34) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Note to Foreign Office (substance printed) asserting incompetence of China, in view of existing treaties, to create in favor of third parties such rights as wireless monopoly which would exclude U. S. citizens from participation therein.
(Instructions to repeat to Peking.)
417
Feb. 24 (77) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Characterization of communications monopoly as being repugnant to treaty rights and to principle of open door. Instructions to read to Foreign Minister paraphrase of this telegram and certain others.
418
Feb. 25 To the President of the Federal Telegraph Company
Federal Telegraph Co. proposal to offer to American group the financing of contract with China according to Consortium terms; U. S. willingness to support financing of contract outside Consortium in case of its rejection by Consortium, provided terms are not detrimental to China’s credit.
419
Mar. 2 (83) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to inform Foreign Office that Federal Telegraph Co. ratified contract March 1.
420
Mar. 28 From Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Company (tel.)
Information that U. S., British, French, and Japanese groups are not interested in financing Federal Telegraph Co. contract.
420
[Page LXXI]Mar. 28 From the Federal Telegraph Company
Request, in view of British, Danish, and Japanese protests, that Department signify its approval of the company’s immediately proceeding to carry out conditions of contract.
421
Mar. 29 To the President of the Federal Telegraph Company
Full approval and support to Federal Telegraph Co.’s project of construction of wireless stations in China in view of Consortium’s refusal to finance project.
421
Mar. 29 To the President of the Federal Telegraph Company
Information that no objection is seen to carrying out conditions of contract with China notwithstanding exceptions taken by Great Britain, Japan, and Denmark.
422
Mar. 31 (207) From the Minister in Denmark
Danish note, March 29 (text printed) denying that Danish contract is monopoly as generally understood, asserting that open-door principle and most-favored-nation treaties do not apply, and presenting other arguments to support Danish position.
422
Mar. 31 (996) From the Minister in China
Chinese reply to Danish protest, arguing that Danish contract could not include any means of communication other than cable. Supposition that controversy on subject is closed.
426
Apr. 11 (132) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Japanese reply, April 9 (text printed) defending the exclusive nature of the Mitsui contract, citing analogous concessions, and holding the contract to fall outside the open-door and most-favored-nation principles.
426
Apr. 19 (4511) From the Chargé in Great Britain
British reply, April 14 (text printed) terming Marconi contract preferential rather than monopolistic, denying injurious effect on said contract of Chinese agreement with China (Western) Electric Co., and reaffirming protest against Federal Telegraph Co. contract.
429
Apr. 25 (1071) From the Minister in China
Japanese interest in China Electric Co.; expectation of Japanese support in financing prospective sale of wireless telephones to Chinese Government if capital cannot be secured in United States.
437
May 9 (161) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
From Peking: Publication by Japanese Legation of exchange of notes between Japanese and U. S. Governments regarding Federal Telegraph Co. contract.
438
June 9 From the Chinese Minister
Inquiry whether it is U. S. intention to maintain in face of protests its position that claims of protesting Governments contravene U. S. treaty rights in China and principle of open door.
438
July 1 To the Chinese Minister
Assurance of support of rights accruing to Federal Telegraph Co. under contract of January 8, 1921, and of refusal to participate in any monopolistic arrangements in China contrary to open-door policy.
439
[Page LXXII]July 1 (102) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to reply to Japan’s protest by note (text printed) discrediting Japan’s claim as based upon secret letter whose legal validity is questionable and whose purport is inconsistent with Japan’s assurances regarding open-door policy. U. S. desire to pursue matter no further.
440
July 1 (31) To the Minister in Denmark (tel.)
Instructions to present note (text printed) disclaiming U. S. intention to seek retroactive annulment of Danish contractual rights, but reiterating U. S. policy of refusing to acquiesce in any arrangement for exclusive privileges. U. S. desire to terminate discussion of case.
442
July 1 (370) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to present note (text printed) continuing protest against Marconi monopoly and insisting on equality of opportunity in China. Definition of scope of Western Electric Co. contract and restatement of U. S. policy of the open door.
443
Aug. 18 (290) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Postponement by Chinese officials of signature to Federal Telegraph Co. bond issue because of protests. Suggestion that Department send strong communication to China.
446
Aug. 26 (239) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Authorization to express orally to Chinese Government U. S. surprise that fulfillment of Federal Telegraph Co. contract should be impeded and expectation that it will be concluded without delay.
447
Aug. 26 (302) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Apparent intimidation of Chinese Government by British and Japanese representations. Foreign Minister’s suggestion of compromise in attitude of three friendly nations.
447
Aug. 29 (242) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
U. S. refusal to compromise its attitude regarding open-door policy in China. Request that China take a categorical stand in matter.
448
Sept. 2 (308) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Reluctance of Peking Government to face consequences of active espousal of open-door policy, in view of British and Japanese pressure. Inquiry as to lengths the United States will go to support it.
449
Sept. 3 (919) From the Chargé in Japan
Japanese intention, though technically not party to Mitsui contract as reported by Peking Legation, to back contract to fullest extent.
449
Sept. 7 (315) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Further hesitation on part of China to agree to execution of Federal Telegraph Co. contract.
450
Sept. 27 (37) From the Minister in China
Signature of supplementary articles in connection with execution of wireless contract of Federal Telegraph Co., creating satisfaction in China notwithstanding protests against its execution and serious apprehension of Cabinet.
450
[Page LXXIII]Oct. 12 (380) From the Minister in Denmark
Danish note, October 10 (text printed) giving notice of maintenance of protest lodged with China against Federal Telegraph Co. contract, and challenging U. S. interpretation of provision concerning monopolies in treaty with China.
452
Nov. 14 (396) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for Department’s good offices to assist in securing funds for financing Federal Telegraph Co. contract, rendered difficult because of recent Chinese default on loan.
454
Nov. 29 (307) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Information for use in diplomatic discussion, if needed, regarding postponement of operations by Federal Telegraph Co. pending Chinese action to restore credit after default on loan.
455
Dec. 2 (428) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Renewal of protest by Great Britain against Federal Telegraph Co. contract as Chinese breach of faith; Yen’s repeated expression of hope for U. S. solution of matter.
455
Dec. 5 (432) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Suggestion that Federal Telegraph Co. procure financial aid from War Finance Corp. in view of fact that China has been assured of complete financial success of project without recourse to public bond issue.
455
Dec. 7 (437) From the Minister in China (tel.)
British protest to China, November 30 (excerpt printed) claiming Chinese infringement of two agreements and breach of faith toward Great Britain by consummating agreement with Federal Telegraph Co. without awaiting outcome of British discussion with United States.
456
Dec. 16 (330) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to withhold action on Department’s telegram no. 307 pending conference in Washington with Federal Telegraph Co.’s president.
456

Postponement of Further Revision of the Chinese Customs Schedule

Date and number Subject Page
1921 July 12 (256) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Request for authorization to assent, if other powers agree, to second revision of customs schedule to effective 5 percent.
457
July 30 (214) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Authorization to join representatives of other treaty powers in conference for revision of tariff schedules. Necessity for submission of any convention to Senate for ratification.
457
Nov. 22 (412) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Government proposal of temporary surcharge of 25 percent of present tariff to make up deficiency and to serve as security for loan.
457
[Page LXXIV]Nov. 25 (302) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Inadvisability of consideration of surtax in China at present, since committee of Disarmament Conference is considering Chinese revenues, especially customs tariff.
458

Tariff Treaty between the United States and China, October 20, 1920, Confirming a Five Percent Ad Valorem Duty on Goods Imported into China by Citizens of the United States

Date and number Subject Page
1920 Oct. 13 (279) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Desire that Chinese Minister sign tariff convention before his departure. Inquiry whether full powers previously given Chargé will suffice for signing by Minister.
458
Oct. 15 From the Chinese Minister
Notice of receipt of instructions authorizing his signature of convention giving effect to import tariff as revised by Commission composed of delegates from China, the United States, and other powers having treaties with China.
459
Oct. 20 (657) Treaty between the United States and the Republic of China
Confirming a 5 percent ad valorem duty on goods imported into China by U. S. citizens.
459

Refusal by the Diplomatic Corps to Recognize the Claims of the Canton Government upon the Accumulated Customs Surplus

Date and number Subject Page
1918 Sept. 5 From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Instructions sent to Canton (text printed) to call attention to U. S. legal claims upon revenues of maritime customs as security for obligations of Chinese Government, and objection to sequestration by Canton Government of any portion of such revenues.
491
1920 Dec. 7 (594) From the Minister in China
Circular of dean of diplomatic corps, December 3, enclosing Foreign Minister’s note, December 2 (texts printed) proposing that further deductions from surplus revenues for use of southwestern provinces be canceled. Divided opinion of diplomatic corps.
492
Dec. 27 (464) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Argument in favor of placing entire customs surplus in hands of Peking Government. Request for instructions before proposed discussion of question by diplomatic corps.
494
[Page LXXV]1921 Jan. 5 (3) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to take position that allocation of customs balances available, after satisfaction of Boxer indemnity and service of pre-Boxer loans, should be a matter for decision of Peking Government.
494
Jan. 20 (42) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Threat of Canton Government to seize maritime customs revenue unless southern portion of surplus is released. British proposed retaliatory measures. Request for instructions.
495
Jan. 21 From the Vice Consul in Chargé at Canton (tel.)
Announcement by Canton Government that it will assume administration of customs within its territory on February 1 and meet its quota of foreign obligations.
495
Jan. 23 (53) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from Foreign Minister Wu of Canton Government (summary printed) announcing plan for control of customs service in southern provinces by Canton Government.
496
Jan. 26 (58) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Inadvisability of acquiescence in seizure of customs by Canton; intention to join action by other Legations to safeguard customs revenues from embroilment in politics.
496
Jan. 26 (59) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from diplomatic corps to senior consul at Canton (text printed) requesting notification that no interference with administration of customs will be tolerated; approval by corps of allocation of customs surplus for constructive work in south.
497
Jan. 27 (44) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to call attention of colleagues to Department’s telegram no. 3; to be guided by Legation’s telegram of Sept. 5, 1918, and to instruct Canton accordingly.
498
Jan. 29 (67) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that attention of consul at Canton has been called to Department’s general attitude, but not for further individual action pending additional instructions.
498
Feb. 1 From the Chinese Legation
Refusal of Peking Government to recognize action of Canton to control maritime customs, which is under administration of Inspectorate General for entire country.
498
Feb. 2 (72) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Suggestion that diplomatic body seek understanding with Chinese Government whereby entire customs revenue be earmarked for national purposes, thus insuring Southern participation in benefits and eliminating territorial question.
499
Feb. 3 (75) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Minister Wu’s decision to postpone action regarding seizure of customs; his request for last year’s surplus. Legation’s recommendation for immediate allocation of entire amount to South for nonpolitical purposes.
500
[Page LXXVI]Feb. 4 (54) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to refrain from pressing for allocation of customs surplus.
500
Feb. 8 (60) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Disapproval of withholding balances of customs surplus now in hands of Bankers’ Commission as trustee for Chinese Government. Instructions to explain above and Department’s telegram no. 3 to colleagues.
(Instructions to repeat to consul general at Canton and to Minister Wu.)
500
Feb. 8 (81) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Varied views of consuls at Canton as to disposition of Southern share of customs surplus. Request for instructions prior to consideration of question by diplomatic corps.
502
Feb. 15 (89) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Fulfillment of instructions in Department’s telegram no. 60. Forebodings of Inspector General of Customs in view of possible bankruptcy of Central Government.
502
Feb. 18 (93) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Canton Government’s assertion that withdrawal by Peking of accumulated Southern customs surplus allocated with Peking government’s consent is retroactive and ultra vires; similar nature of rejection by diplomatic corps of Peking’s request for these funds.
503
Mar. 1 (103) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Identic notes from Foreign Office to Legations asking for release of full accumulated amount, proposing itself to set aside portion for Canton conservancy work and other sums for national obligations. Request for instructions.
503
Mar. 2 (82) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Finality of instructions given in Department’s telegrams no. 3 and no. 60.
504
Mar. 10 From the Vice Consul in Chargé at Canton (tel.)
Minister Wu’s note (text printed) objecting to diplomatic corps’ interference with customs administration and to continued recognition of Peking Government. Request that customs surplus be released to Inspector General of Customs.
504
Mar. 12 (112) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Acceptance by all Legations, except French, of Foreign Office plan outlined in Legation’s telegram no. 103 for disposal of accumulated customs surplus.
505
Mar. 27 (130) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Acceptance of plan by French. Chinese Government’s gratitude to the United States.
505
[Page LXXVII]

The Question of the Abolition of Extraterritoriality

chinese presidential mandate creating a “commission for the consideration of jurisdiction”—attitude of the department of state toward the abolition of extraterritoriality

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Feb. 24 (881) From the Minister in China
Mandate issued by President Hsu Shih-ch’ang, November 6, 1920, creating commission for consideration of jurisdiction with view to abolition of extraterritoriality (text printed).
505
July 20 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State
Chinese overtures to France and Great Britain regarding relinquishment of extraterritoriality; U. S. view that China has not yet made sufficient progress to justify such relinquishment.
508

Disorders at Ichang and the Consequent Demand by the Powers That the Chinese Military Authorities Be Held Personally Responsible for Injury to Foreign Interests in China

Date and number Subject Page
1921 June 24 (230) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Proposed establishment of foreign settlement area at Ichang and military neutralization of Hankow and other treaty ports for safety of foreigners, in view of recent lootings and mutinies in vicinity. Request for instructions.
509
June 29 (184) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Opposition to principle of military neutralization and view that establishment of international settlement would not assure safety of Ichang.
509
July 5 (247) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Vote by all members of diplomatic corps except U. S. Chargé to make representations to China for establishing foreign settlement and military neutralization. Arguments in favor thereof.
510
July 6 (248) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Report of mass meeting of Chinese at Ichang resulting in resolutions in favor of establishing international settlement there.
510
July 12 (193) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Opinion that international settlement would precipitate troubles. Inquiry whether situation in Ichang area is considered critical enough to warrant warning Americans to leave, as at Urga.
511
July 15 (198) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Suggestion as alternative measure of joint note from diplomatic body to Chinese Government warning against further mutiny, holding military authorities responsible therefor, denying them asylum, and claiming right to damages for injuries.
511
July 15 (262) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Information that Ichang situation is not deemed so critical as Urga; restraining influence of foreign gunboats.
511
[Page LXXVIII]July 21 (268) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Futility of efforts to adopt suggestions in Department’s telegram no. 198 because of lack of unanimity in diplomatic corps regarding asylum. Inquiry whether Department would accept corps’ proposal if limited to term of years.
512
July 30 (216) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain whether British Legation will support U. S. proposal; refusal to accept proposal of diplomatic corps. Inquiry as to report that Ichang lootings were without indication of antiforeign feeling.
512
Aug. 5 (279) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
British disposition to support U. S. suggestions but anticipation of failure for asylum proposal; suggestion for foreign investigating commission.
513
Aug. 6 From the Secretary of the British Embassy
Request for reconsideration of Department’s decision regarding international settlement at Ichang in view of possible acquiescence by China and approval by other powers concerned.
513
Aug. 9 (222) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Hopes of early consent of diplomatic body to action suggested in Department’s telegram no. 198 in view of urgency of situation.
514
Aug. 9 (283) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Inquiry whether denial of asylum is to follow proscription of offender by Chinese Government, or is to be denied by diplomatic body or nationality concerned.
514
Aug. 9 (284) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Lack of evidence of antiforeign feeling or particular consideration for foreigners in Ichang lootings.
515
Aug. 12 (226) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
View that denial of asylum should be left to diplomatic body and nationality concerned.
515
Aug. 16 (288) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Chargé’s assent to desire of diplomatic corps to give warning against future mutinies in general.
515
Aug. 23 (295) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Acceptance by diplomatic body of Department’s proposals with proviso that they apply retroactively to Ichang and Wuchang, and that entire diplomatic body support each claim. Inquiry as to approval of delaying note to Foreign Office.
515
Aug. 26 (238) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Approval of arrangement, with reservation of right to refuse support to any claim deemed unjust.
516
Sept. 29 (45) From the Minister in China
Note from dean of diplomatic corps to Chinese Foreign Minister, August 30 (text printed) protesting against looting and making reservations in sense of U. S. suggestion; and Foreign Minister’s reply, September 23 (text printed) stating that remedial measures have been taken.
516
[Page LXXIX]

Consideration of Measures for the Protection of American Commerce on the Yangtze

Date and number Subject Page
1918 Mar. 4 (765) To the Minister in China
Authorized use of U. S. flag over American warehouses in China and on small boats owned by Americans but not on Chinese boats carrying U. S. citizens or U. S. owned goods.
519
1921 Jan. 28 (479) From the Consul in Chargé at Shanghai
Recommendations for strengthening U. S. naval forces on Yangtze for protection of U. S. missionaries and business interests in view of increasing irresponsibility of Government.
520
Feb. 3 (811) From the Minister in China
Lack of adequate protection for Americans in interior of China and necessity for U. S. Government to take steps to supply such protection.
522
Mar. 28 To the Secretary of the Navy
Transmittal of despatch no. 479 from the consul in charge at Shanghai and inquiry as to feasibility of increasing naval forces in Yangtze Valley.
522
Apr. 5 (6320–278:21) From the Secretary of the Navy
Lack of suitable vessels for increasing patrol of Yangtze at present, although recommendations to Congress have been made. Consideration of detailing flag officer on suitable vessel to administer Yangtze patrol force.
523
May 26 From the Vice Consul in Chargé at Canton (tel.)
Request by U. S. companies, operating Chinese-owned vessels under charter, for permission to fly U. S. flag together with Chinese flag.
523
May 31 To the Vice Consul in Chargé at Canton (tel.)
Permission for American charterers to fly U. S. flag at masthead of Chinese-owned vessels.
524
July 27 (27403–340:1) From the Secretary of the Navy
Report from Commander in Chief of U. S. Asiatic Fleet, at Shanghai, June 7 (text printed) disapproving of practice of sending armed guards on board Chinese junks for protection of American goods.
524
Aug. 6 From the Secretary of the British Embassy
British opinion that concerted naval action should be planned to provide for contingencies in China. Inquiry as to U. S. intentions.
525
Aug. 22 To the Secretary of the Navy
Transmittal of despatch from Hankow recommending that naval convoys be provided for protection of American-chartered junks in danger zones of Yangtze. Inquiry whether plan is possible.
526
Aug. 24 (6320–312) From the Secretary of the Navy
Adequacy from U. S. Navy standpoint of patrol measures providing for cooperation with principal powers in contingencies in Yangtze Valley;
527
[Page LXXX]Sept. 2 (27403–40:5) From the Secretary of the Navy
Inquiry as to legitimacy of providing convoys for protection of U. S. chartered junks. Report, July 2, from Commander in Chief of U. S. Asiatic Fleet regarding policy followed in conduct of naval operations in Yangtze River and enclosing statement of general policy regarding protection afforded by river gunboats (texts printed).
528
Oct. 18 To the Secretary of the Navy
U. S. right under treaty to protect American commerce in Chinese waters open to foreign trade; willingness to leave to discretion of Commander in Chief question as to when and to what extent escorts should be furnished foreign vessels carrying U. S. goods.
530
Oct. 25 (27403–340:5) From the Acting Secretary of the Navy
Notification of Commander in Chief relative to State Department’s decision in letter of October 18, 1921, with instructions to be governed by spirit thereof.
531
Nov. 2 (169) From the Vice Consul in Chargé at Chungking
Report on situation in Yangtze area. Vice consul’s protest against firing on U. S. vessels, and assurance by authorities of measures for their protection.
532
Nov. 8 (152) From the Minister in China
Unwillingness of Chinese officials to sanction use of U. S. flag on Chinese-owned junks chartered by American firms. Request for instructions.
533

Efforts to Prevent Relaxation of the Agreement among the Powers to Prohibit the Exportation of Arms to China

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 3 From the British Embassy
Japanese note verbale to British Embassy in Tokyo regarding apparent disregard of arms agreement by Great Britain, Italy, and the United States.
534
Jan. 5 (262) From the Ambas ador in Italy
Note from Japanese Embassy in Italy, December 30, 1920 (text printed) summarizing verbal representations made by Japanese Ambassador to Foreign Minister against disregard of arms agreement and requesting assurances that embargo will be observed.
535
Jan. 7 (9) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to affirm U. S. observance of restrictions upon export of war material to China, imposed under war powers which may be withdrawn by Congress at any time.
536
Jan. 18 To the British Chargé
Memorandum (text printed) tracing U. S. policy of banning export of airplanes to China, and removing said ban on strictly commercial planes one year after British approval of Vickers contract for similar aircraft.
537
[Page LXXXI]Jan. 20 (43) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Foreign Office request, November 22, 1920 (text printed) that machinery for manufacture of cartridges and guns ordered from U. S. firm be denied delivery to Kwangtung. British and Japanese representations against Woudrichem shipments for completion of arsenal by U. S. workmen. Request for instructions.
539
Jan. 21 (48) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s note, January 20 (text printed) again urging that arsenal machinery stored in Kwangtung be withheld from authorities in that province.
540
Jan. 22 (50) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Status of arsenal machinery in Kwangtung. Further representations by Premier against release of machinery to Kwangtung; promise that Central Government will purchase equipment upon lifting of arms embargo.
541
Jan. 25 (279) From the Ambassador in Italy
Foreign Office note verbale, January 22 (text printed) stating that provision of arms to China was made pursuant to contracts made prior to arms embargo agreement and for which reservation was made when signing agreement.
541
Jan. 27 (4130) From the Ambassador in Great Britain
British note, January 22 (text printed) claiming that export to China of airplanes by Vickers Co. constitutes no violation of arms embargo but, in view of Consortium agreement, holding inexpedient further Chinese purchases of aircraft. Consequent cancelation of contract of another British firm.
542
Jan. 28 (46) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that Woudrichem carried general cargo including machinery apparently for commercial use and hence allowed to be exported under license.
544
Feb. 2 Memorandum by Mr. Nelson T. Johnson, Division of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State
Conference with British Secretary of Embassy on subject of Handley-Page airplane contract; British disapproval on ground that contract contravenes paragraph 2 of Consortium agreement and U. S. allegation of British inconsistency in view of approval of Vickers and Marconi contracts.
545
Feb. 23 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State
Further discussions with Secretary of British Embassy regarding cooperation of the two nations in seeking to prevent relaxation of the arms embargo and in opposing contracts such as Handley-Page as violating the spirit of the Consortium.
546
Mar. 1 From the Secretary of the British Embassy
Statements to demonstrate that Vickers’ contract does not violate arms embargo and that rejection of Handley-Page contract was based on ground of Consortium rather than embargo.
548
[Page LXXXII]Mar. 14 (218) From the British Ambassador
Pressure by Japanese merchants on their Government for carrying out existing contracts with China because of U. S. and British alleged violations of embargo. Suggestions of joint U. S. and British action in Tokyo with view of preventing contemplated relaxation of embargo.
550
Mar. 14 To the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
Renewal of Lansing’s request that Pub. Res. No. 22 of Mar. 14, 1912, be amended to permit U. S. cooperation with other powers in restricting arms exports to China, in view of repeal of certain sections of Espionage Act that permitted establishment of embargo.
551
Mar. 19 (49) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to present notification of termination of legal basis for U. S. participation in arms embargo and of U. S. intention to obtain substitute legislation so that embargo may continue. Denial of knowledge that machinery shipment to Canton violated embargo and counter-charge of alleged violations by Japanese munitions factory at Liutaokou.
552
Mar. 24 To the British Embassy
Explanations regarding machinery sent to Canton and refusal to support transfer of Handley-Page contract to Americans after British approval of contract was refused.
553
Mar. 30 (249) From the British Embassy
Inquiry whether U. S. representative in Tokyo will be instructed to make representations separately or conjointly with British colleague to prevent relaxation of embargo by Japan.
554
Apr. 18 To the British Embassy
Inadvisability of further U. S. formal action at Tokyo pending renewal by Congress of necessary legal authority to control shipments of arms to China.
555
Apr. 26 (145) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Japanese representations, April 25 (text printed) regarding U. S. violations of embargo by machinery shipments to Canton and explanation as to innocent nature of Japanese factory for explosives in China.
556
June 14 (857) From the Chargé in Japan
Foreign Office note, May 25 (text printed) giving details concerning alleged U. S. violations of embargo in China.
557
Aug. 12 To the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
Request for information as to likelihood that Pub. Res. No. 22 will be amended to furnish authority to continue arms embargo to China.
559
Sept. 12 To the Secretary of War
Request that Acting Governor General of Philippines be informed of Department’s attitude in regard to Chinese arms embargo and its desire that no encouragement be given shipments of munitions to China.
560
Dec. 8 (917) From the British Ambassador
Information that large supplies of machinery for Canton arsenal are being received from Manila; hope that effort will be made to enforce embargo.
561
[Page LXXXIII]Dec. 9 (440) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Identic telegram from U. S., French, British, and Japanese Ministers to their Governments (text printed) asking that attention of Washington Conference be called to delivery to Military Governor of Chihli of arms which had been stored in Italian barracks at Shanhaikwan.
562
Dec. 13 (258) From the. Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Japanese Chargé’s proposal that U. S. Ambassador protest to Italy against delivery of arms and ammunition to Chinese at Shanhaikwan. Request for instructions.
562
Dec. 17 (261) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Instructions from Great Britain and France to their representatives to join in protest to Italy; delay pending similar authorization from United States.
563
Dec. 23 (203) To the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Authorization, separately but simultaneously with British, French, and Japanese colleagues, to make representations as suggested in Ambassador’s telegram no. 258.
563
Dec. 31 To the British Ambassador
Statement of U. S. consul general at Canton that there is no foundation for report that further large supplies of machinery are being received from Manila for Canton arsenal.
564

Operation of the Chinese Eastern Railway

proposal by the united states to amend the allied agreement of january 1919–failure of certain powers to discharge their obligations to the railway—american and british opposition to a chinese proposal for a bond issue—rejection by japan of the american proposal for a revised plan of operation

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 13 Department Memorandum
Proposed amendments to Inter-Allied Agreement of January 1919 for operation of Chinese Eastern Railway, replacing the Inter-Allied Committee by a Technical Board with enlarged powers. Confidence in ability of railway to succeed if prompt payment of military transport bills is made by various nations and normal industrial conditions return.
(Substance telegraphed to Great Britain with instructions to repeat to France, and to Japan with instructions to repeat to China.)
564
Jan. 29 From the Acting President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Financial difficulties of railway despite increased earnings. Failure of Japan to make payment on transportation bills. Flotation of short-time notes to meet fuel payments not including Fushun coal indebtedness to Japan. Tense situation between Chita and Japanese.
567
Feb. 18 (97) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to call attention to possibility of seizure of control of Chinese Eastern by military forces in Manchuria in financial crisis, and to report whether British Ambassador is authorized to discuss proposals to solve issue by more effective Inter-Allied control.
(Sent, mutatis mutandis, to the Ambassador in France.)
567
[Page LXXXIV]Feb. 19 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State
Conversation of Feb. 18 with Secretary of Japanese Embassy regarding financial condition of Chinese Eastern in which representations were made regarding Japan’s failure to pay its debts to railway; statement of amounts due from various nations and of U. S. payments made.
568
Feb. 21 (133) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that Foreign Office will send instructions to Ambassador Geddes to discuss proposals regarding reorganized operation of Chinese Eastern.
570
Feb. 23 From the Acting President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Payment of current expenses of railway made possible by Board’s restriction in disbursements and by payment of half million yen by Japan; pressure from other creditors.
571
Feb. 24 (143) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Foreign Office assurance that French Ambassador will be instructed to consider proposals regarding operation of Chinese Eastern.
571
Mar. 3 From the Acting President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Projected request by Far Eastern Republic that activities of Railway Committee and Technical Board be extended to include all Far Eastern Republic railways.
571
Mar. 4 From the Acting President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Opening of Manchuria Station frontier, presaging some improvement in earnings but not sufficient to cover overdue liabilities.
572
Mar. 14 From the Acting President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Insistence of Chinese directors on inexpedient disbursements; intrigues and unimproved conditions despite increased earnings; efforts to secure loan with possibility of approaching Japanese banks. Appeal for aid in intolerable situation.
572
Mar. 18 To the Consul at Harbin (tel.)
For Johnson: Inopportuneness of extending activities of Railway Committee and Technical Board to railways of Far Eastern Republic.
572
Mar. 24 To the British Ambassador
Transmittal of Department memorandum of January 13 for comments and suggestions to facilitate understanding between the two Governments as to course to be pursued in connection with Chinese Eastern.
573
Mar. 24 To the Consul at Harbin (tel.)
Stevens to Johnson: Efforts by Department to amend Allied agreement; necessity of holding situation despite intrigues.
573
Apr. 4 (141) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Railway Board intention to urge payment of amount due railway for evacuation of Czecho-Slovak troops, understood to be inter-Allied obligation. Request for instructions since charge may be made against established U. S. Government credits.
574
[Page LXXXV]Apr. 5 From the Acting President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Impracticability of plan for U. S. Government to take over Czecho-Slovak obligation to Chinese Eastern.
574
Apr. 9 From the Acting President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Increase in movement of goods via Vladivostok following rate reductions; interference by Japanese with return movement of cars, and Board’s protest through Peking Legations to Japanese and Chinese authorities.
575
Apr. 12 (152) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Receipt of instructions by British Legation to consult U. S. Minister regarding reorganization of railway; inquiry as to other governments approached on subject and authority to discuss proposal.
575
Apr. 13 (114) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to impress upon British Minister importance of British cooperation in proposal, which as yet has been communicated only to his Government.
575
Apr. 13 (154) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry as to attitude toward protest to Chinese and Japanese authorities regarding return movement of cars.
576
Apr. 13 (115) To the Minister in China (tel.)
For Johnson also: U. S. negotiations with Prague and Paris to secure payment of Czech transportation bill to Chinese Eastern: refusal to consider furnishing funds by United States pending satisfactory adjustment of question of railway control.
576
Apr. 18 From the Acting President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Renewed demands by Chinese railway directors for improper payments to Chinese; Technical Board’s refusal.
577
Apr. 25 To the British Ambassador
Inquiry as to British disposition toward reorganization of railway control; advantage of an understanding between the two Governments before presenting to other interested nations the plan which would secure Stevens’ position as head of Technical Board.
577
Apr. 27 (241) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Review of negotiations with British regarding reorganization of international control of railway. Instructions to inquire as to British reply and to express hope for cooperation in efforts for stabilization of situation in Far East.
578
Apr. 30 To the Consul at Harbin (tel.)
Stevens to Johnson: Necessity for instructions to railway management to make no payments except those authorized by Technical Board.
579
May 4 From the Acting President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Enumeration of specific acts of aggression on part of Chinese military causing interference with operation of Chinese Eastern.
580
May 14 (370) From the British Chargé
British favorable attitude toward reorganization plan but conviction that Japan and China would oppose any increase in international control of railway. Recommendation that these and other interested countries be consulted in matter.
580
[Page LXXXVI]May 16 (844) To the Ambassador in France
Transmittal of Department memorandum of January 13 and recapitulation of negotiations with Great Britain regarding railway reorganization, for information.
(Sent, mutatis mutandis, to the Chargé in Japan and Minister in China. Memorandum only sent to Chargé in Great Britain.)
581
May 17 (147) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to make representations against interference with Technical Board’s authority by Chinese military forces in view of Chinese assurances that supplementary agreement of October 2, 1920, would not affect Board’s control. Decision not to make representations to Japan.
583
May 20 To the Counselor of the British Embassy
Expression of regret at British viewpoint which seems to doom cooperation in proposals for reorganizing system of international control of Chinese Eastern.
584
May 21 (173) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
From Peking: Concurrence in British view as to Chinese and Japanese opposition to proposals, with added information that evidence is shown of increasing independence of Chinese regarding railroad matters.
584
May 26 (203) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Appointment of Wang as Director of Railroad Bureau; his possible approval of international control of railway if based on a new international agreement.
585
May 27 (406) From the British Ambassador
Further exposition of British attitude toward U. S. proposals denying unwillingness to cooperate and reiterating recommendation to sound out various governments concerned.
585
June 3 To the Consul at Vladivostok (tel.)
Instructions to assume duties of U. S. representative on Inter-Allied Committee in addition to duties as consul.
586
June 4 (209) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Chinese readiness to cooperate with Technical Board, pleading need for military precaution against menace of Russian reactionary forces.
586
June 21 (481) From the British Ambassador
British opposition to Japanese loan to Chinese Eastern negotiated through Russian manager. Japanese disavowal of government participation. Japanese intimation of possibility of Consortium loan to China.
587
June 24 (215) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
From Stevens: Discussion of railway proposals with Japanese officials, who concur in principle with U. S. policies. Recommendation that subject be taken up direct with Japanese Government.
588
June 27 (232) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Discussions between Chinese and Russo-Asiatic Bank regarding issuance by Railway Board of Directors of bonds to cover debt of railway to China, also for bonds for sale on open market as occasion requires.
589
[Page LXXXVII]June 28 To the British Embassy
Concurrence in British stand in opposing Japanese loan to Chinese Eastern. Gratification at knowledge of Japanese attitude toward Consortium loan.
589
June 28 (181) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Instructions to inquire as to correctness of report regarding loan conversations between Chinese and Russo-Asiatic Bank and whether China proposes to cooperate with Technical Board in matter.
590
July 6 From the President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Technical Board’s stand that Russian manager has no right to negotiate loan without its consent; confirmation of report of railway indebtedness to South Manchuria for coal, and need for payment of bills for transportation due railway; approval of inter-Allied loan if expended by Board.
590
July 9 (238) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
From Peking: Approval by Board of Directors of bond issue of 25 million taels, 13 million of which to go to Chinese Government; refusal of latter to assure full cooperation with Technical Board without more detailed information.
591
July 11 (192) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Instructions to impress upon Chinese Government inadvisability of authorizing any financial commitments which would alter status of rights and interests in Chinese Eastern.
591
July 13 (258) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
China’s hesitation to accept Stevens’ views as to Government cooperation regarding finance. Inquiry as to what Technical Board or governments concerned have to offer in place of proposed bond issue.
592
July 14 To the Chinese Legation
Representations against proposed bond issue by Board of Directors as preparing way for alteration of status of railway, thus complicating interests of China. Willingness to consider Technical Board’s recommendation or to cooperate with other interested nations regarding loan.
592
July 15 (405) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Transmittal of substance of memorandum of July 14, 1921, sent to Chinese Legation, with instructions to inform Foreign Office and suggest similar British representations to China.
(Instructions to repeat to Embassy at Paris.)
594
July 15 (111) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Transmittal of memorandum of July 14, 1921, sent to Chinese Legation; instructions to inform British colleague.
(Instructions to repeat to Peking and Stevens.)
594
July 16 (248) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
From Peking: Chinese promise of cooperation and abandonment of bond issue at present.
594
July 25 (611) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
British instructions to British Minister at Peking to support U. S. views regarding bond issue if question is raised.
595
[Page LXXXVIII]Aug. 2 From Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Company
Refusal of American group of Chinese Consortium to offer in the United States a loan on Chinese Eastern until railway establishes better financial position and sounder operation.
595
Aug. 2 (122) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Instructions informally to present plan for reorganization of supervision of Chinese Eastern as set forth in Department memorandum of January 13.
(Instructions to repeat to Peking and Stevens for information.)
596
Aug. 2 (438) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that Japan has been approached informally regarding reorganization of Chinese railway supervision; hope for British indication to Japanese of support for proposal.
(Instructions to repeat to Paris for information.)
596
Aug. 3 (123) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
For Stevens and Peking also: Chinese memorandum (substance printed) stating that China proposes to abide by Inter-Allied Agreement regarding Chinese Eastern and to cooperate with Technical Board, adding that no bond issue is needed at present. Inquiry as to Stevens’ views and recommendations on subject.
597
Aug. 6 (280) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Chinese apprehension with regard to U. S. ideas of future of Chinese Eastern and request for written statement on subject.
598
Aug. 8 To Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Company
Regret at decision of American group to refuse loan to Chinese Eastern, in view of its international importance and potentialities in connection with open-door policy.
598
Aug. 9 From the President of the Technical Board (tel.)
China’s aim to control railway regardless of Russian rights. Recommendations that Technical Board pass resolution promising Allied loan under restrictions, and that Powers bring pressure to force Chinese acquiescence.
599
Aug. 10 From the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State
Suggestion of personal interview with Chinese Minister to explain that U. S. ideas regarding future of Chinese Eastern are preservation of Chinese and Russian rights and its efficient operation.
(Footnote: Conveyance of above views in interview between Secretary of State and Chinese Minister.)
599
Aug. 11 (272) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
From Stevens: Necessity for financial aid to railway by bond issue or otherwise; suggestions as to terms for such issue.
600
Aug. 11 From the President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Need for control by Technical Board over all receipts and expenditures and railway personnel in connection with proposed loan.
601
Aug. 16 From the President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Disapproval of renewed efforts by Japan to change gauge of Changchun-Harbin Railway.
601
[Page LXXXIX]Aug. 17 To the Consul at Harbin (tel.)
For Stevens: Approval of attitude toward change of railway gauge and instructions to report any similar attempts to make change.
602
Aug. 23 From Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Company
Conclusion that investing public would not be interested in Chinese Eastern bond issue, in view of railway’s financial condition, unless surplus revenues of all Chinese railways were pledged as security.
602
Aug. 24 (400) From the Ambassador in Great Britain
British note, August 16 (text printed) stating that British Ambassador in Tokyo has been instructed to associate himself with U. S. colleague in advocating reorganization of Chinese Eastern. Inquiry whether China has also been consulted.
603
Sept. 21 (310) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
From Vladivostok: Report that Japanese are offering local authorities loan of $5,000,000 provided Ussuri Railway is pledged as security.
604
Sept. 21 (158) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to suggest that no change in financial status of Ussuri Railway should be approved as operation of this and Chinese Eastern must be coordinated under plan for Allied supervision.
604
Sept. 24 From the President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Confirmation of report that Japanese are negotiating for purchase or lease of Ussuri Railway through South Manchuria Railway. Urgency of preventing such arrangement.
605
Sept. 24 (315) From the Ambassador in Japan
Japanese Government’s disavowal of any connection with reported negotiations with Vladivostok regarding loan.
605
Sept. 27 (165) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to make representations regarding negotiations by South Manchuria Railway for purchase or lease of Ussuri Railway by Japanese, as reported by Stevens.
605
Sept. 28 (171) To the Ambassador in Great Britain
Statement that subject of railway reorganization will be taken up with China after Japanese attitude is known.
606
Sept. 30 From the President of the Technical Board (tel.)
Statement of amounts owed by various nations to Chinese Eastern for military transportation.
606
Oct. 1 (325) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Disavowal by Japanese Government of any connections with negotiations for purchase or lease of Ussuri Railway.
607
Oct. 6 (178) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to announce Stevens’ intention to attend Disarmament Conference and U. S. approval of appointment of Col. Johnson as president pro tempore of Technical Board.
607
Oct. 22 To Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Company
Information that Stevens is en route to Washington with data regarding Chinese Eastern and that, upon his arrival, consideration of possible Consortium loan can again be taken up.
607
[Page XC]Oct. 24 (355) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Assertion to Foreign Office that Johnson will serve as Stevens’ personal representative during latter’s absence and not as president of Board.
608
Oct. 29 (363) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Foreign Office memorandum (text printed) rejecting U. S. reorganization plan and making counter-proposal strengthening Railway Board at expense of Technical Board.
608
Nov. 2 (93) To the Ambassador in France
Instructions to make inquiry as to reorganization and present legal and financial status of Russo-Asiatic Bank in view of Stevens’ report that France desires this bank to continue as financial agent of Chinese Eastern.
(Similar instructions sent also to the representatives in Great Britain, Italy, Japan, and China for their information.)
610
Nov. 29 (205) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
For Caldwell and for information of Peking: Instructions, in view of threatened seizure of Chinese Eastern by Chita Government, to assure authorities that any plan of international control will conserve legal status of railway with view to its ultimate return unimpaired to those interested.
611
Dec. 5 From the Acting President of the Technical Board (tel.)
For Stevens: Chita decision to resume negotiations at Peking regarding commercial relations, and recommendation to postpone Chinese Eastern question pending Washington Conference.
611
Dec. 6 (410) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
From Caldwell: Statement by Foreign Minister of Far Eastern Republic denying any intention of seizing Chinese Eastern, affirming negotiations for joint operation with China.
612
Dec. 9 (413) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
From Caldwell: Written statement from Foreign Minister confirming verbal statement that only Soviet Russia and China and to some extent Far Eastern Republic have right to arrange international control of Chinese Eastern.
612
Dec. 16 (986) From the Ambassador in France
Uncertain status of Russo-Asiatic Bank notwithstanding its reorganization and possession of fair amount of funds.

Japanese Proposals for a Settlement of the Shantung Question—Their Rejection by China

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Japanese Ambassador, July 21, 1921
Discussion of the Ambassador’s proposal that the United States suggest to China direct negotiations with Japan regarding settlement of Shantung question to take place prior to Disarmament Conference.
613
[Page XCI]Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Chinese Minister, August 11, 1921
Discussion of advantage of settling Shantung question prior to Disarmament Conference; Minister’s objections to direct negotiation with Japan except through U. S. mediation; Secretary’s consent to inquire regarding Japan’s proposals.
615
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation with the Japanese Ambassador, August 18, 1921
Discussion of U. S. desire for full statement of Japanese intentions before making any suggestions to China as to direct negotiations.
616
Sept. 8 From the Japanese Ambassador
Outline of terms proposed by Japan for settlement of Shantung question.
617
Sept. 16 From the Japanese Ambassador
Published statement (text printed) announcing submission of Japanese terms to China on September 7 with request that China enter into negotiations.
618
Sept. 19 (263) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Conversations with Japanese Ambassador in which objectionable features of Japan’s terms are pointed out. Advice to China through its Minister to make public counter-proposals for consideration at Washington collaterally, and not as part of conference, in view of Japan’s claim to treaty rights in matter.
(Instructions to repeat to Tokyo.)
619
Undated [Rec’d Oct. 7] From the Chinese Minister
Text of Chinese note of October 5 to Japan pointing out objections to Japan’s terms, chiefly the lease-hold of Kiaochow, joint operation of Shantung Railway, administration of customhouse, retaining of public property, military operations.
622
Oct. 22 From the Japanese Ambassador
Japanese reply, October 15 (text printed) taking up seriatim objections in Chinese note of October 5 with view to justification of Japanese position.
624
Oct. 29 (289) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Discussion with Chinese Minister of Japanese comments of October 15, in which advisability of China’s negotiating directly with Japan was suggested, rather than having question presented for decision of Disarmament Conference where majority of nations taking part is committed to peace treaty.
628
Nov. 5 (159) From the Minister in China
Chinese statement, October 29 (text printed) making public 8 points regarding China’s claim for settlement of Shantung question, as drafted by Commission for Discussion of Versailles Peace Treaty for submission to Council of League of Nations.
629
Nov. 10 (155) From the Minister in China
China’s second note to Japan, November 3 (text printed) refuting various Japanese arguments on Shantung question.
631
[Page XCII]

Cancelation of the Sino-Japanese Military Pact of March 1918

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Feb. 1 (775) From the Minister in China
Notes exchanged between Chinese and Japanese authorities January 28, 1921 (texts printed) canceling the Sino-Japanese Military Pact.
636

COLOMBIA

Ratification Advised by the United States Senate of the Treaty of April 6, 1914, between the United States and Colombia

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Apr. 15 (798) To the Minister in Panama
Statement by Panaman special representative at Washington that boundary clause in proposed Colombian treaty will be acceptable to Panama, and that direct understanding between his country and Colombia is advisable.
638
Apr. 21 (17) To the Chargé in Colombia (tel.)
Instructions to state that advice and consent of Senate has been given for ratification of modified treaty of April 6, 1914, as amended by agreement with Colombia.
638
Apr. 27 (19) To the Chargé in Colombia (tel.)
Instructions to present notification of Senate reservation (excerpt printed) denying to Colombia free passage through the Canal of its troops, ships, etc., in event of war between Colombia and any other country.
639
Sept. 27 (5402) From the Colombian Minister
Request for interpretation of Senate reservation as denying Colombia any concession in exemption dues as stipulated in art. I of treaty, and not as debarring Colombian troops in time of war from Canal privileges granted other belligerents.
639
Oct. 3 To the Colombian Minister
Interpretation of Senate reservation as debarring Colombia in time of war from passage, free of tolls, for troops, etc., thus placing that nation on equal footing with other nations.
(Footnote: Instructions, October 4, to U. S. Minister in Colombia to inform Government of this interpretation.)
640
Oct. 5 Message of President Sudrez to the Colombian National Congress
Advantages to be derived from acceptance of modified treaty of April 6, 1914, chief purposes of which are determination of boundary, improvement of relations with the United States, immunities in interoceanic transportation, and indemnities.
641
Dec. 24 (64) From the Minister in Colombia (tel.)
Signature by Executive and Foreign Minister of law accepting U. S. modifications in treaty of April 6, 1914.
644
[Page XCIII]

COSTA RICA

British Claims against Costa Rica

refusal by the american government to support the british government in demanding arbitration on the validity of the amory concession—decision by costa rica to accept arbitration of the claims of john m. amory and son and the royal bank of canada

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Feb. 14 (12) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
British–Costa Rican agreement to submit Amory petroleum concession matter to arbitration of Spanish Minister.
646
Feb. 24 (20) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
British threat to boycott Costa Rican goods if Congress repudiated agreement for arbitration.
646
Feb. 25 (22) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Anticipated repudiation of agreement by Congress; desire for U. S. support in matter; Costa Rican charge that Amory concession was obtained fraudulently.
647
Feb. 26 Memorandum by Mr. Stewart Johnson, Division of Latin American Affairs, Department of State
Interview with Costa Rican Minister on arbitration of Amory concession and Royal Bank cases; indications that former contract not executed in good faith as alleged, Amorys having misrepresented nationality of interests backing them.
647
Mar. 7 (42) From the Consul at San José
Rejection by Congress of Amory concession protocol.
648
Mar. 23 (233) From the British Ambassador
British desire for U. S. cooperation in demanding arbitration of validity of Amory concession in view of somewhat similar case involving the Anglo-American Oil Co. of Abyssinia.
649
Apr. 5 (4445) From the Chargé in Great Britain
Report of consul general at London, April 4 (excerpt printed) discrediting British statement that Anglo-American Oil Co. has requested British support in Abyssinia and citing British employment of obstructive tactics against company.
649
Apr. 15 (216) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Note for Foreign Office (substance printed) citing publication of U. S. policy of nonsupport of U. S. citizens in transactions with Ttnoco administration before British interests in Amory concession were made known; concealment of British interests in contract until after its cancelation by Costa Rican Congress.
651
Apr. 15 To President Harding
Data and information available relating to Amory oil concession and Pinto-Greulich concession, for transmittal to the Senate, as requested in Senate Resolution of February 14, 1921.
652
May 9 (356) From the British Ambassador
Desire for U. S. support in demand for arbitration of Amory concession; opinion that case would not receive impartial hearing by Supreme Court of Costa Rica because of presence of justices appointed by same body which voided concession.
661
[Page XCIV]May 24 To the British Ambassador
Constitutionality of Costa Rican courts as at present set up, in which Amory dispute may be subject of appropriate judicial determination. Approval of arbitration if desired by Costa Rica.
662
July 15 (108) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
British note regarding settlement of pending claims in Costa Rica demanding right of exemption from cancelation of Tinoco contracts and intimating understanding with Washington giving British carte blanche with respect to Amory negotiations.
663
July 19 (36) To the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Instructions to state that U. S. assertions to Great Britain cannot be construed as granting carte blanche in negotiaitons regarding Amory concession and that the United States refuses to be bound by any arbitral award.
664
July 21 (111) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Submission to Congress of British demands concerning Amory concession and request for opinion.
665
Aug. 12 (114) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Congressional reaffirmation of validity of law 41 canceling concessions; suggestion of arbitrating question of excepting Amory contract from law 41; decision that Royal Bank of Canada matter must be submitted to the courts.
665
Aug. 18 (118) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
British Minister’s insistence on special session of Congress for reconsideration of Royal Bank decision, demanding arbitration. President’s proposal of Chief Justice Taft as arbitrator of this and Amory claims.
665
Oct. 24 (129) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
President’s statement that Royal Bank of Canada volunteers to advance loan to Costa Rica and to undertake consolidation of foreign and internal debts.
666
Nov. 6 (130) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Convocation of Congress in extra session to deal with proposed loan from Royal Bank of Canada.
666
Nov. 15 (131) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
British ultimatum demanding that Royal Bank claim be settled by direct action or that both claims be submitted to arbitration, approving of Chief Justice Taft as arbitrator.
666
Nov. 26 (136) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Congressional rejection of Royal Bank loan.
667
Dec. 14 (139) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Approval by Congress of arbitration of Amory petroleum and Royal Bank claims.
667
1922 Jan. 13 (144) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
British-Costa Rican agreement to submit Amory and Royal Bank claims to arbitration of Chief Justice Taft.
667
[Page XCV]

Demand by Costa Rica for Arbitration of Its Dispute with the Costa Rica Oil Corporation

Date and number Subject Page
1921 May 28 (94) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Government’s insistence upon immediate arbitration of differences with Costa Rica Oil Corp. regarding company’s status and its payment for privilege of exploration.
668
Dec. 24 (141) From the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Government’s demand that dispute be arbitrated. President’s alleged intention to declare forfeiture of corporation, claiming assurances of Department of State that such action will not be opposed.
668
Dec. 31 (50) To the Chargé in Costa Rica (tel.)
Disavowal of giving any assurances regarding forfeiture of concession; possibility of filing of international claim by United States if concession is canceled.
669

CUBA

Election of President Zayas

arrival of general enoch h. crowder in cuba—supplemental partial elections of march 15 and 26, 1921; decision by the liberal party not to participate—statement by the united states government accepting the results of the partial elections—drafting of a program of administration by president zayas—invitation to general menocal to call at the department when passing through the united states after his retirement

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 3 (1) From the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Liberals’ interpretation of Crowder’s visit as victory for them, and reflection on President Menocal; Foreign Minister’s view that announcement of friendly purpose of visit would have made it possible for President to receive Crowder.
670
Jan. 3 (2) From the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
President Menocal’s suggestion of exchange of notes, probably for publication, stating reasons for Crowder’s visit to Cuba, thus enabling President to receive him.
670
Jan. 4 (3) From the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Changé in attitude of President in regard to receiving Crowder.
671
Jan. 4 (3) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
White House statement, January 3 (text printed) affirming purpose of Crowder’s mission to confer with President Menocal as to best means of remedying difficult situation. Instructions to inform President that he is expected to receive Crowder.
671
Jan. 4 (5) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Instructions to remind President Menocal of previous unannounced Cuban missions to the United States.
672
Jan. 5 (5) From the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Modification of Cuban Government’s attitude upon further assurance that Crowder mission is not to investigate President’s acts. Proposed statements to press, in order to allay public agitation.-
673
[Page XCVI]Jan. 6 (6) From the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
From Crowder: Cordial reception by President; plan to bring contested election cases to prompt and fair settlement.
673
Jan. 9 (1) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Conversations with Presidential candidates. Proposed rules of procedure for governing courts in hearings of election cases and consideration of congested dock situation and financial matters.
674
Jan. 21 (8) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Indication of necessity for special elections on scale which will place choice of President in doubt.
674
Jan. 27 From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Intimation of U. S. intervention under Piatt Amendment unless prompt action is taken in contested election cases and necessary amendments made in electoral code, to expedite partial elections.
674
Feb. 16 (30) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Liberals’ suggestion of compromise candidate by voluntary retirement from Presidential race by both G6mez and Zayas, leaving their respective electors unpledged; Liberal Party threat to withdraw from special elections otherwise. Objections to above suggestion.
675
Feb. 21 (55) To the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Refusal to express opinion regarding any plans for elections; U. S. concern that elections be honestly conducted in accordance with laws duly enacted by Cuban people.
676
Feb. 22 (31) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Steps to secure joint meeting of committees of Liberals and Conservatives for conciliation with view to fair partial elections. Crowder’s efforts to expedite the unaccountably slow action of Cuban Supreme Court.
677
Feb. 22 (56) To the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Recommendation that Department’s telegram no. 55 be published in Cuba, if deemed advisable.
678
Feb. 26 (32) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Abandonment of plan to withdraw candidates, hence no necessity for publication of Department’s telegram no. 55. Failure of first meeting of conciliation committee because of disputes between factions; possibility of efforts to delay decisions of Supreme Court in order to force intervention.
678
Feb. 28 (34) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Resolutions adopted by executive committees of two parties agreeing as to procedure in elections, including use of armed forces and policing, in interest of public order and fair elections.
680
Mar. 5 (63) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Request that Crowder continue duties in Cuba as President Harding’s personal representative.
680
[Page XCVII]Mar. 12 (37) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Inspection of Provinces of Matanzas, Santa Clara, and Camaguey; report of satisfactory conditions with no organized intimidation; investigation of disturbances at Colon and Cruces; withdrawal of Liberals from participation in elections.
680
Mar. 13 (38) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Refusal of G6mez to reconsider withdrawal from race, urging postponement of elections and substitution of new elections for those already held. Ability of Government to cope with disorders.
682
Mar. 16 (43) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Opinion that results of elections may be ratified as having been carried out under Cuban laws duly enacted and as construed by Cuban courts.
683
Mar. 27 (51) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Report of quiet elections in Oriente and Cienfuegos, Liberals participating in many places; failure of Liberals to testify in support of cases submitted to court. Fixing of date for election of President and Vice President.
683
Mar. 28 (52) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Failure of Liberals to testify, resulting in rejection of Liher is appeal from Pinar del Rio and Santa Clara; assertion that both parties have had access to courts upon every question of law and fact involved in November 1920 and March 1921 elections.
684
Apr. 1 (55) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Efforts of G6mez to prevent proclamation of Zayas as President and to bring about new elections under U. S. supervision. Recommendation that G6mez be received by President and Department when he arrives in Washington.
685
Apr. 16 (97) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
U. S. statement for publication (text printed) approving conduct and results of November and March elections.
686
Apr. 16 (98) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Appeal of G6mez to U. S. Government, claiming that elections did not represent will of majority of Cuban people. Submission to U. S. decision that Zayas has been legally elected President.
688
Apr. 18 (69) From the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Publication of U. S. statement in Department’s telegram no. 97; Gómez’s message to his party recommending acceptance of defeat to prevent intervention.
689
Apr. 21 (20) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Instructions to impress upon Zayas obligations under treaty of 1903 for honest and efficient government and for appointment to Cabinet positions of men of highest ability and unquestioned honesty. Request for data on prospective Cabinet members.
690
[Page XCVIII]Apr. 27 (65) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Tentative Cabinet appointees and comments on their qualifications.
691
Apr. 28 (66) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Zayas’ program of administrative policies and reforms.
692
Apr. 29 From the Cuban Minister
Inquiry as to correctness of statement given to press by G6mez regarding his recent conversations in Washington. Request for comment from Department for publication in Cuba.
693
May 2 From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba
Ex-President Menocal’s desire for invitation to visit Washington; his intention to discuss financial situation in Cuba and its remedy, and also Sugar Sales Commission decree.
693
May 3 To the Cuban Minister
Characterization of press statement of conversation with G6mez in Washington as inaccurate and misleading.
694
May 12 (107) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Information that Menocal will be received in Department with pleasure.
695
May 20 (82) From the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Assumption of office by Zayas.
695
June 17 (121) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Instructions to express to President Zayas satisfaction over program of administration and to urge necessity for utilizing services of Crowder in solving financial and other problems.
695
June 20 From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba
Transmittal of paraphrase of Department’s telegram no. 121 as delivered to President Zayas.
696

Project for a Loan

proposal by president zayas for an internal and an external loan insistence by the united states government upon limitation of the cuban budget; project for a loan of $50,000,000 from j. p. morgan & company; stipulation by the united states government that a surplus of cuban revenues over expenditures be maintained; disagreement with president zayas over the observance of his commitments; sanction of the loan withheld by the united states government

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Feb. 11 (39) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Instructions to make representations against large increase in budget, and to join Crowder in preventing enactment of such a budget and in securing the continuance of the budget of 1918–19.
697
Feb. 18 (753) From the Minister in Cuba
President’s assurance that Government will function for coming fiscal year under 1918–19 budget.
697
[Page XCIX]June 1 (114) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Disposition of New York bankers to make a loan up to 50 million dollars to Cuba, if desired.
698
June 4 (72) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Recommendations that Government be not approached on subject of loan until necessary, in view of President’s efforts to economize. Possible need for loan as outlined by Rathbone.
698
June 20 (78) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Receipt of incomplete statement of national finances from President, which will be completed by U. S. expert accountant. President’s view that loan is not yet necessary.
699
June 25 (81) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Report of U. S. accountant showing possible deficit of 46 millions. President’s suggestion of new foreign loan of 70 millions, creation of new revenues, and drastic economies.
699
June 29 (126) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Request for views regarding New York bankers’ maximum loan of 50 millions to Cuba, with a commission acceptable to U. S. Government and bankers to administer proceeds and control portion of revenues to meet bond service. U. S. approval of a Cuban delegation to negotiate loan.
700
June 30 (84) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
President’s plan for interior loan for extinguishing national deficit, and for foreign loan for extension of credits to sugar purchasers. His proposal of committee of Senate and House to draft revision of budgetary and revenue laws.
702
July 1 (86) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
President’s submission of interior loan plan for U. S. consideration. His acceptance, in principle, of U. S. bankers’ plan for foreign loan, with powers of administrative commission to parallel those of U. S. War Finance Corp.
703
July 8 (89) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Appointment of joint Congressional committee by Executive decree with invitation to Crowder to sit in advisory capacity. Call of extra session of Congress.
704
July 9 To Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Company
Statement that no reply regarding proposals for loan to Cuba can be made until ordinary Cuban revenues are sufficient to meet service of such debt.
705
July 13 From Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Company
Necessity for some effective control over Cuban finances in case of projected loan; suggestion of appointment of Cuban officials on nomination of lending company, and with U. S. approval.
705
July 15 (131) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Instructions to state that although loan cannot be effected until budget is revised downward and revenues upward, matters can be expedited by sending Cuban delegation to the United States to discuss terms with bankers.
706
[Page C]July 21 From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba
President’s plan to submit to Congress first the question of an internal loan and later that of an external loan; admission that both types of loans require U. S. approval under Piatt Amendment. Anticipated early formation of delegation to negotiate loan in United States.
707
July 27 (94) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Arrangements for dispatch of Cuban delegation to Washington to discuss tariff and loan.
709
Aug. 1 To the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba
Memorandum (text printed) reporting substance of conversations between U. S. officials, Cubans, and bankers: conclusion that instead of interior loan an external loan of 50 millions is essential to meet deficit and relieve sugar situation, that revenues must be sufficient to service loan, and that Cuban delegation should proceed forthwith to the United States to begin negotiations.
709
Aug. 6 To the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba
Instructions to request of Director General of Cuban Posts remittance of million dollars owed to the U. S. Post Office Department on account of money orders.
715
Aug. 11 (100) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Unexpected presentation to Congress of internal and external loan statutes; provisions of the latter, including portion looking to an increase in revenue.
716
Aug. 17 (104) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Consideration in House of pending budget bill as passed in Senate. Failure of Congressional committee to consult Crowder; latter’s view that provisions of proposed budget and of piecemeal tax laws in external loan statute will prove inadequate.
718
Aug. 17 (145) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Instructions to inform President that interior loan is deemed inadvisable and that partial revision of taxes will be inadequate, and to request that action on these bills be deferred pending conference in Washington with Cubandelegation.
719
Aug. 18 (105) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Presentation of Department’s telegram no. 145. Consignment of budget bill to conference between House and Senate. House consideration of external loan statute.
720
Aug. 18 (146) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Instructions to inform President that budget bill as passed by Cuban Congress does not meet U. S. approval.
720
Aug. 19 (106) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
President’s consent to defer further action on loan legislation and request that U. S. demand for veto of budget bill be deferred, claiming power under terms of bill to limit expenditures and promising amendment appropriating excess tax receipts to liquidation of floating indebtedness.
721
[Page CI]Aug. 20 (107) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Conclusion that President has power to limit amount of budget, that budget will be revised downward and revenues upward when U. S. demand is made, and that surplus will be used for floating debt.
722
Aug. 25 (148) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Instructions to inform President of conclusions and recommendations outlined in Crowder’s telegram no. 107. Request for details as to further cut in budget in view of Cuban Mission’s request for 64 millions. Desirability of revision of Cuban tariff.
723
Aug. 30 From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba
Discussion with President as to whether special laws and outstanding contracts are included in budget figures of 65 millions claimed as necessary. Note of August 27 to President (text printed) enumerating measures recommended by Crowder’s telegram no. 107 and approved by Department’s telegram no. 148.
724
Sept. 7 From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba
Efforts to secure comprehensive rather than piecemeal revision of internal taxes; necessity for firm attitude in Washington if budget is to be trimmed below extravagant figure of 65 millions.
726
Sept. 11 (112) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Recommendation that under terms of Piatt Amendment U. S. approval be withheld from projected budget bill of 65 millions and that drastic cuts be insisted upon.
729
Sept. 15 (152) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Information that Cuban commission has been requested to supply detailed statement of government expenditures to justify proposed 65–million budget. Instructions to press for smaller budget unless need for large one is clearly shown.
731
Sept. 24 From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba
Official statement of monthly revenues of Cuban Treasury, May 1 to September 22, 1921 (text printed) indicating that, unless revenues are increased or the budget reduced, there will be no surplus for meeting additional debt or floating indebtedness.
732
Sept. 24 (155) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Summary of memorandum by Norman Davis and Dwight Morrow (text printed) expressing willingness to consider short-time loan of 5 millions to Cuba if Cuba will promptly and substantially revise budget. Willingness to send Morgan partner to Cuba to negotiate. Request for views.
733
Sept. 25 (119) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Indication that total receipts for present fiscal year will barely exceed expenditures. Recommendation that Morgan representative be sent to convince Government of grave character of financial problem and of conditions upon which aid can be obtained.
734
[Page CII]Sept. 28 (158) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Mission of Dwight Morrow and Norman Davis to Cuba to confer with Crowder and Government.
735
Sept. 30 (161) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Requirement that President give definite commitment in writing that he will either limit budget to 50 millions or prove that Government cannot operate efficiently on less than 65 millions. U. S. inability to authorize new loan until assured of sufficient surplus revenues to extinguish national deficit and to meet service of new loan.
735
Sept. 30 (162) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Desire that payment by Cuban Government to U. S. Post Office Department for postal money orders be specifically provided for in 5-million loan contract, if effected.
737
Oct. 9 (123) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Morgan proposition to Cuba for 5–million loan (text printed), proceeds to be applied to current obligations, to be retired by 50-million loan which will also liquidate floating debt and care for public works. President’s failure to commit himself regarding budget reduction and revenue increase.
737
Oct. 11 From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba
Note of October 10 to Cuban President (text printed) defining present crisis, indicating essential steps that must be taken to establish solvency of nation, and stressing measures to secure safe margin of receipts over expenditures before any loan can be authorized.
739
Oct. 13 (124) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Return of Morgan representatives with understanding that correspondence between them and President constitutes agreement for advance loan. Complaints and possible protests of other banks.
748
Oct. 20 From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba
President’s reply, October 16 (text printed) enumerating steps which he proposes to take in following program requisite for new loan and for reorganization of Cuba, by maintaining a margin of receipts over expenditures.
749
Oct. 20 (165) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Availability of 5–million loan to Cuba with U. S. sanction, with understanding that all conditions will be carried out and certain fixed margin of receipts over expenses be maintained.
754
Oct. 26 (129) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Advance loan statute and President’s letter of transmittal (excerpts printed). President’s request for U. S. approval of advance loan as part of program of economic reconstruction and step toward larger loan. Crowder’s recommendation that Department reserve freedom of action in case of permanent loan.
755
Nov. 10 From the Cuban Minister
Formal application for sanction for advance loan of 5 millions, proper security to be deposited in National Treasury as collateral until a foreign loan of 50 millions can be obtained from which smaller loan will be liquidated.
757
[Page CIII]Nov. 16 (135) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
President’s provisional budget for current fiscal year and next fiscal year, which greatly exceed revenues that may be collected. Recommendation that sanction for advance loan be withheld.
757
Nov. 19 (179) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Instructions to call President’s attention to fact that budgets far exceed maximum to which President promised to adhere and that they exceed revenues likely to be collected. U. S. refusal to sanction loan until these objections are met.
759
Nov. 22 (180) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: U. S. disposition to sanction advance loan provided Cuban President give assurances, preferably in writing, that further reductions in budget will be effected, and indicate branches of Government in which such economies will take place and their probable extent.
761
Nov. 23 (138) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Recommendation for acceptance of President’s assurances for revision of budget for fiscal year 1922–23; necessity for greater cut in budget for current fiscal year to prevent large deficit and to enable approval of loan.
763
Nov. 27 (143) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
President’s reply (text printed) promising further reductions in budget for current fiscal year, offering figures in support thereof. Statement showing that President’s estimates do not accord with his previous commitments, there being no clear promise of substantial reductions; facts which indicate that new loan should not be sanctioned.
764
Nov. 30 (183) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Instructions to impress upon President, as condition for U. S. approval of loan, necessity for limiting budget to 50 millions plus such additional sum as he may demonstrate to be required, and to give written statement of this proof and proposed economies.
767
Dec. 10 (149) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Conference with President and Secretaries of State and War regarding budget question and possible economies. Failure of Cuban officials to appreciate seriousness of situation.
768
Dec. 20 (186) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Instructions to make final request for definite answer in regard to budget reduction and to come to Washington for conference.
769
Dec. 21 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Representations to Cuban Minister to effect that absolute prerequisite of sanction of both large and small loan is effective budget reduction. Minister’s consent to urge his Government to agree to budget reductions recommended by Crowder.
770
Dec. 23 (153) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
President’s intention to promulgate decree effecting further economies, principally in Departments of War and Marine, Treasury, and Interior, to bring budget to 60 millions, this being lowest that can be expected.
771
[Page CIV]Dec. 24 (189) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Desirability of securing promulgation of decree for further economies before departure for Washington.
771
Dec. 25 (156) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Notification to President of delayed departure until decree has been signed and promulgated.
772
Dec. 28 To President Harding
Secretary Hoover’s recommendation (text printed) for immediate settlement of loan contract between Cuba and J. P. Morgan & Co. Summary of loan negotiations with Cuba and prospect of their early approval after issuance of Presidential decree on budget.
772

Measures to Restore the Credit of Cuban Banks

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 4 (4) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Desire that Government check concerted press attacks being made by persons interested in insolvent Cuban banks against Cuban branches of National City Bank and Royal Bank of Canada.
773
Jan. 20 (697) From the Minister in Cuba
President’s prompt action to terminate campaign conducted against branch banks.
774
Mar. 12 From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba
Final report on financial affairs of Cuba, recounting the panic of October 9, 1920, Executive effort to arrest it and emergency legislative relief, Executive effort to stabilize sugar values and the need for bank reform.
775
Apr. 13 (65) From the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
President’s press interview explaining impropriety of newspaper articles derogatory to banks which were aiding sugar producers; discoi tinuance of hostile campaign.
789

Interpretation of the Treaty of Commercial Reciprocity of 1902 between the United States and Cuba

Date and number Subject Page
1921 July 27 (1007) From the Chargé in Cuba
Message of President Zayas to the extraordinary session of Congress (text printed) regarding canceling effect which Fordney Tariff Bill, now pending in U. S. Congress, would have on art. VIII of existing Treaty of Commercial Reciprocity of 1902 between Cuba and the United States.
789
July 29 (138) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Inability of Senate Finance Committee to accord hearing on tariff relations to Cuban delegation. Department’s willingness to convey to Senate Committee any memoranda desired.
791
Sept. 8 (442) To the Chargé in Cuba
Interpretation of Treaty of Commercial Reciprocity of 1902 in relation to Fordney Bill, in sense that preferential duty for Cuban sugar will continue.
792
[Page CV]

Establishment of a Commission of Planters and Bankers to Regulate the Marketing of Sugar

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Feb. 7 (22) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Plan of representatives of bankers, mill owners, and planters for stabilizing Cuban sugar values and for extension of credits to planters.
793
Feb. 9 (25) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Proposed Executive decree (text printed) for creation of Sugar Finance Commission to stabilize prices of Cuban sugar for year 1920–21. Recommendation for approval of plan as means of orderly marketing of crop at reasonable prices.
794
Feb. 10 (36) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: U. S. approval of Executive decree on condition that proper safeguards to consumer are provided, that maximum price be between 6 and 6½ cents, and that composition of commission be changed to give less representation to larger producers and bankers. Reservation of rights to oppose continuance of commission if it permits price of sugar to be maintained at artificial figure.
795
Feb. 11 (26) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Issuance of decree carrying all U. S. amendments; maximum price and U. S. reservations omitted from decree but presented in a note to be accepted by commission by formal resolution. President’s assurance that he will revoke decree if sugar advances to between 5½ and 6 cents.
797
Feb. 11 (38) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder also: Warning against use of commission’s powers to raise artificially the price of sugar; opposition, in principle, to fixing prices, exception being made in present emergency.
797
Feb. 12 (28) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Assurances that views of Department concerning any artificial increase in cost of sugar are understood and concurred in by the President.
798
Feb. 14 (43) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Instructions to express gratification over President’s assurances against artificial rise in price of sugar.
799
Mar. 31 (56) From the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Report of attempt to boycott Sugar Sales Commission by Arbuckle and other firms; rumors of sudden termination of commission and reduction in price of sugar, causing slump in volume of sales; recommendations for investigation of boycott and conference with bankers and commission representative.
799
Apr. 6 (83) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder also: Information that conference with bankers and commission representative was held; message of assurance for President and commission (text printed); instructions to take steps to quiet adverse rumors.
801
Aug. 23 From the Cuban Minister
Germany’s desire to buy raw sugar in Cuba to be refined in Germany and delivered to France on reparations account. Cuban Sugar Finance Committee’s letter to its Government (text printed) suggesting that U. S. good offices be requested with France in above plan.
801
[Page CVI]Sept. 3 To the Cuban Minister
Information that note of August 23 has been transmitted to France and to U. S. unofficial representative on Reparation Commission, and that Ambassador in France has been instructed to express U. S. interest in measures for marketing Cuban sugar crop.
803
Sept. 17 (153) To the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
For Crowder: Request for views as to constitutionality and economic advantages of Cuba Sugar Finance Commission, in view of growing opposition.
803
Sept. 19 (116) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Contemplated public statement by President (text printed) asserting that Sugar Finance Commission will not be abolished but will continue in full control.
804
Nov. 12 From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba
Failure of commission and bankers to agree as to plan for sale of sugar; present opinion of latter that commission should be discontinued; efforts to secure opinions of owners of unsold crop on subject.
804
Nov. 23 (822) From the Ambassador in France
French reply, November 19 (text printed) stating objection to receiving Cuban sugar refined in Germany since French refineries suffer from lack of occupation.
805
Nov. 27 (142) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
President’s proposal to abolish Sugar Finance Commission at once.
806
Nov. 30 To the Cuban Minister
Improbability of Germany’s being required to import raw materials in order to deliver goods on reparation account. France’s sugar requirement; such part as cannot be obtained on reparation account is being obtained from Cuba.
807
Dec. 22 (152) From the Representative on Special Mission in Cuba (tel.)
Decree under terms of which Sugar Finance Commission ceases to function on January 1, 1922, except to liquidate outstanding business.
807
1922 Feb. 6 To the Cuban Minister
Transmittal of copy of French note to U. S. Ambassador stating objection to receiving Cuban sugar refined in Germany and offered on reparation account.
808

Permission Granted to All America Cables, Incorporated, to Land and Operate Cables at Guantanamo

Date and number Subject Page
1920 Dec. 21 (639) From the Minister in Cuba
Necessity for modification of art. 3 of the lease agreement of July 2, 1903, between Cuba and United States so that All America Cables may be authorized to land and operate cables at Guantanamo.
808
[Page CVII]1921 Jan. 31 (29) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Note to Foreign Office (text printed) proposing modification of art. 3 of agreement of July 2, 1903, in order that All America Cables may land and operate cables at Guantanamo, modification to be consummated by exchange of notes.
809
Feb. 5 (282) To the Minister in Cuba
Transmittal of permit signed by the President authorizing All America Cables to land and operate proposed cables on condition that agreement with Cuba is reached.
810
Mar. 21 Executive Decree No. 387
Granting permission to All America Cables, Incorporated, to land and operate cables at Guantanamo.
811
Apr. 8 (828) From the Minister in Cuba
Cuban note, April 5 (text printed) accepting proposals for modification of lease of 1903 and agreeing to landing and operating of cables at Guantanamo.
813

Suspension of the Western Union Telegraph Company’s Permit to Land a Cable in Cuba

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 7 (7) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Instructions to send copy of decree suspending cable permit of Western Union Telegraph Co.
815
Jan. 11 (8) From the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Report that official decree suspending Western Union permit has not been published because company will claim indemnity and because the United States has made no official request for suspension.
815
Jan. 14 (16) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
U. S. refusal to interfere with Cuban sovereign rights in granting permits; reservation of right, however, to protest if, contrary to contract, landing of cable at Cojimar by Western Union is found to be subterfuge for transmitting through messages from Key West to Barbados and thence to Brazil, where monopolistic system prevails.
816
Jan. 25 (274) To the Minister in Cuba
U. S. policy of preventing foreign cable companies having monopolistic grants from landing on U. S. shores unless reciprocal privileges are granted. Citation of precedents including former attempt to land cable connecting Brazil with U. S. shores; letter from Secretary of State to Attorney General, May 24, 1898 (text printed).
817
Jan. 29 (28) To the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Instructions to inform Government of U. S. refusal to support any Western Union claim for indemnity based on suspension of landing permit.
822
Undated [Rec’d Feb. 4] (28) From the Minister in Cuba (tel.)
Publication of suspension of Western Union permit. Suspension due to noncompliance by company with provisions of permission granted.
822
[Page CVIII]Feb. 18 (295) To the Minister in Cuba
Appreciation of Cuban act in suspending landing permit of Western Union; approval of Minister’s action in refraining from making representations to Cuban Government in matter.
822
Feb. 19 (102) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For F. J. Brown: Request for cooperation in arranging some plan whereby cables from Brazil to Florida waters may be made use of by Western Union and Western Telegraph Co. Suggested sale of Barbados-Para line to Western Union or permit for latter to lay its own line.
824
Feb. 21 (107) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For F. J. Brown: Suggestion for permanent working relationship between Western Union and Western Telegraph Co., namely, ownership by Western Union and All America Co. of certain cables to South America and mutual agreement by all three companies not to seek new monopoly or extension of existing monopolies against each other.
825
Feb. 26 (152) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Foreign Office message (text printed) stating that any proposals for modification of agreement between Western Union and Western Telegraph Co. should be taken up direct between two companies.
826
Mar. 2 (118) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For F. J. Brown: Indications that no further progress can be made for agreement between Western Union and Western Telegraph Co., since British Government seems no longer interested and situation requires agreement between the two Governments on policy involved.
826

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Appointment of a Commission to Draw up Recommendations for a Revision of the Constitution and Laws

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 6 (1) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Reply of five Dominicans to invitation to membership on commission containing certain reservations (text printed); refusal of the five to accept membership on commission when Military Governor answered that he could not accept conditions.
828
Jan. 8 (3) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Disapproval of Military Governor’s action; suggested concessions as to reservations; list of steps deemed necessary to restore self-government to Dominicans; instructions to request reconsideration on part of five commissioners.
829
Jan. 14 (3) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Promise of five commissioners to reconsider their decision. Recommendation for seven members on commission.
832
[Page CIX]Jan. 23 (4) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Willingness of four members of former Advisory Council and President of Supreme Court to accept membership on commission.
833
Jan. 25 (5) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Consent to limit membership of commission to seven.
833
Feb. 3 (8) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Delay in selecting other two members of commission; necessity for immediate appointment of technical adviser.
(Footnote: Information sent Legation that Military Governor has been instructed to appoint technical adviser.)
833
Feb. 12 To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Authorization to appoint two additional commissioners as named and to publish fact that commission has been appointed.
834
Feb. 16 (11) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Meeting of seven members of commission and technical adviser and organization for business.
834

Announcement of Preparatory Measures for Withdrawal of the American Forces

proclamation of june 14, 1921, by the military governor; dominican opposition to the terms of the proclamation—proclamation of july 27, declaring the intention of the united states to persevere in the announced program of evacuation

Date and number Subject Page
1921 June 7 To the Secretary of the Navy
Draft proclamation (text printed) to be issued by Military Governor of Santo Domingo outlining steps for early withdrawal of U. S. forces from Dominican Republic, and stipulating bond issue of $2,500,000.
834
June 8 From the Secretary of the Navy
Information that Military Governor has been instructed to promulgate proclamation and that necessary steps have been taken to secure bond issue as outlined.
838
June 14 (20) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Publication of proclamation followed by protests from press advising people not to accept it and not to take part in elections.
838
June 15 To the Diplomatic Representatives in Certain Latin American Countries (tel.)
Transmittal of substance of proclamation of June 14 addressed to Dominican people; instructions to publish summary in all leading newspapers.
838
June 28 (14) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Explanations as to provisions of proclamation of June 14 (text printed) with instructions to give it widest publicity as official statement of Legation.
839
[Page CX]July 3 (16) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Department’s wish to have statement of June 28 issued by Military Governor by direction of U. S. Government.
(Footnote: Proclamation by Military Governor, July 6, of substance of Department’s statement.)
840
July 20 To the Secretary of the Navy
Request that instructions be issued Military Governor to issue proclamation announcing the intention of the U.S. Government to adhere to the terms of the proclamation of June 14 and postponing the elections.
840
July 21 To the Secretary of the Navy
Inconsequential differences in text of proclamation of June 14 as sent in mail despatch and in code despatch, former to be regarded as official.
841
July 28 (704) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Proclamation of July 27 by Military Governor (text printed) postponing elections indefinitely and announcing U. S. intention to adhere to terms of the proclamation of June 14.
842
Aug. 25 (P. D. 159–7) From the Secretary of the Navy
Report of the Military Governor, August 3 (text printed) on conferences with political leaders in effort to secure their participation in elections; and his recommendation of continued U. S. adherence to terms and principles of proclamation of June 14.
843
Nov. 5 (722) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Quarterly report of Military Governor for period July 1 to September 30 (text printed) indicating a slightly changing attitude on part of responsible citizens toward terms of proclamation of June 14 and renewing his recommendations as to U. S. adherence to said proclamation.
849

Financial Difficulties of the Military Government

approval by the united states of a loan of $2,500,000 for public works—refusal to approve a further loan of $7,500,000—approval of the issue of $500,000 of certificates of indebtedness

Date and number Subject Page
1920 Dec. 21 (Op–13 16870–315:11) From the Secretary of the Navy
Military Governor’s request for consent to increase public debt of Dominican Republic by 10 million dollars in order to continue public works.
854
1921 Jan. 7 To the Secretary of the Navy
U. S. inability to consent to increase of Dominican public debt by 10 millions; suggestion of placing before commission, soon to meet at Santo Domingo, question of 5–million bond issue for completion of public works already begun.
854
Jan. 9 (650) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Report of serious financial crisis which has caused closing of public works under way with attendant unemployment, etc.; public opposition to floating of new loan; tendency of agitators to place blame on Military Government.
856
[Page CXI]Jan. 28 To the Secretary of the Navy
Approval of issuance by Military Government of certificates of indebtedness not to exceed $1,200,000, as temporary measure, upon understanding that these certificates are to be redeemed and interest met from ordinary revenue.
857
Mar. 28 The Military Governor of Santo Domingo to the Secretary of the Navy
For Department of State: Renewed request for U. S. consent to 5–million loan; inadvisability of laying question before consulting commission for political reasons. Statement that proposed loan would be paid from current revenues and not interfere with funding of existing loans; submission of figures in proof thereof. Reasons for urging loan.
858
May 9 (682) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Seriousness of financial crisis and measures for retrenchment; statement of receipts for 1920 and 4 months in 1921; public criticism of administration.
864
June 1 To the Secretary of the Navy
U. S. agreement to bond issue of $2,500,000 for completion of essential public works.
865
Dec. 23 (429) To the Chargé in the Dominican Republic
Transmittal of copies of Department’s letter of December 17 to Secretary of Navy (text printed) refusing to approve loan of $7,500,000 to Dominican Republic, sent for Legation files and for information of Dominican Government.
866
Dec. 29 To the Secretary of the Navy
Authorization for issue of $500,000 of six-months’ certificates of indebtedness; sanction of bond issue sufficient to retire these certificates at maturity if necessary, with understanding that funds will be used for current expenses and continuance of public works and that no further borrowing is contemplated.
870

ECUADOR

Protests by the United States against the Retroactive Application of Decrees Fixing the Rate of Exchange between the United States and Ecuador

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Oct. 14 (15) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to investigate and to protest against default of municipality of Guayaquil on payment to Amsinck & Co. of sight drafts drawn in dollars for purchase in the United States of road-making machinery. Claims by municipality of difficulty to buy dollar exchange to liquidate indebtedness because of law subsequent to default, purchase legal only at rate of 2.60.
871
Oct. 19 (291) To the Minister in Ecuador
Instructions to protest against injuries to U. S. interests by Ecuador in compelling acceptance of sucres at less than market price in discharge of dollar obligations in claims of Brown Shoe Co. of St. Louis and others.
872
[Page CXII]Nov. 15 (34) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Suggestion that Amsinck & Co. receive payment in sucres at such rate as may be agreed upon, same to be deposited in bank in Ecuador until such time as U. S. drafts can be obtained.
872
Nov. 17 (752) From the Minister in Ecuador
Foreign Minister’s confirmation of retroactive nature of decree. Note of protest sent to Foreign Minister November 16 (text printed).
873
Nov. 30 (22) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Amsinck & Co.’s desire for confirmation of understanding that debt is acknowledged by municipality, that decree fixing rate of exchange is not applicable in this case, and that sufficient deposits have been made, before starting negotiations regarding exchange.
875
Dec. 1 (761) From the Minister in Ecuador
Foreign Minister’s reply, November 30 (text printed) confirming former opinion as to legality of fixing rate of exchange and of its retroactive nature, controversies to be decided by judicial powers in particular cases. New decree fixing rate of exchange at 3.60.
875
Dec. 13 (37) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
President’s suggestion to Guayaquil of necessity for complying with Amsinck & Co.’s desire. His inability to intervene by reason of autonomy of municipality.
876
Dec. 13 (24) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to express U. S. expectation that Government will protect foreign creditors in rights acquired prior to decree, and to call attention to effect such ruling would have abroad upon Ecuador’s credit.
877
Dec. 24 (25) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to call attention to fact that U. S. claimants are numerous and that banks might not be inclined to favor any further financial transactions with Ecuador until retroactive application of decree has been satisfactorily adjusted; also to refer to transfer of Guayaquil and Quito Railway bond funds to representative of bondholders.
877
Dec. 29 (772) From the Minister in Ecuador
Interview with President regarding loan to Ecuador, transfer of bond interest funds of Guayaquil and Quito Railway, claim of Amsinck & Co., rate of exchange and its retroactive application. Memorandum of December 27 addressed to President Tamayo (text printed) making representations regarding above subjects.
878
[Page CXIII]

Maintenance of the Credit of the Guayaquil and Quito Railway

further delays by the ecuadoran government in meeting the interest on the railway bonds—project for a loan to the government from the railway

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Jan. 4 (632) From the Minister in Ecuador
President’s assurance that daily deposits on account of service of Guayaquil and Quito Railway bonds will be continued.
881
Jan. 5 (634) From the Minister in Ecuador
Foreign Minister’s note, December 29, 1920 (text printed) conveying President’s surprise at U. S. objections to his advocacy of proposed foreclosure action by British bondholders of Guayaquil and Quito Railway.
882
Feb. 3 (5) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Suspension of daily deposits on account of bond interest and salt certificates. President’s wish to pay total amount of deposits to bondholders at rate lower than present rate on London exchange.
883
Feb. 14 (2) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to inquire regarding suspension of daily deposits; disapproval of policy of defaulting on obligations because of unfavorable exchange rates, and of President’s proposal to pay total deposits to bondholders at artificially low rate of exchange.
884
Feb. 18 (7) From the Minister in Ecudaor (tel.)
Resumption of daily deposits and efforts to solve critical financial problems; purpose to remit as soon as British exchange can be bought at reasonable figure.
884
Mar. 31 From the Ecuadoran Minister
Desire of Ecuador to remit monies now on deposit, for service of railway bonds. Request for U. S. advice as to best means for transfer in view of high cost of bills of exchange.
885
Apr. 4 (668) From the Minister in Ecuador
Ecuador’s request for U. S. aid in inducing bondholders to accept cacao in lieu of money.
886
June 28 (6) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to inquire whether Government is willing to transfer railway funds to account of bondholders, whether it has formulated any plan for paying past-due interest, and whether any measures are contemplated for financial reorganization by increase of revenues or decrease in expenditures.
886
July 3 (21) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Request for authorization to defer action on Department’s telegram no. 6 in view of negotiations now in progress between railway company and President relating to identical matters contained therein.
887
[Page CXIV]July 9 (7) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Permission to defer action on Department’s telegram no. 6 until it can be presented effectively.
888
July 28 (701) From the Minister in Ecuador
Conference of Government and railway officials, in which it was agreed to increase tariff rates of company in consideration of yearly contribution by company toward sinking fund of first mortgage bonds and prior lien bonds.
888
Aug. 18 (706) From the Minister in Ecuador
Withdrawal by Minister of Hacienda, without knowledge of President, of certain sum from amounts deposited by Government for account of interest on railway bonds.
889
Aug. 18 (10) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Opinion of railway officials that substance of Department’s telegram no. 6 should be brought to attention of Government without delay.
889
Aug. 19 (15) From the Ecuadoran Minister
Ecuador’s desire for arbitration of questions pending with railway company according to art. 27 of contract. Enactment of legislation November 7, 1920, which provides means for facilitating this end.
890
Aug. 20 (707) From the Minister in Ecuador
Submission to Foreign Minister of substance of Department’s telegram no. 6.
891
Aug. 31 (709) From the Minister in Ecuador
Foreign Office reply, August 30 (text printed) regarding reasons for nonpayment and steps taken to place funds to account of bondholders when power of attorney is obtainable, and regarding authorization from Congress to obtain loan.
891
Sept. 22 (12) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Information that Ecuadoran Minister has requested that railway problem be submitted to arbitration. Instructions to cable statement of situation with recommendations
893
Sept. 27 (28) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
No desire on part of President and railway management for arbitration because of belief that present negotiations will be successful.
893
Oct. 27 (17) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to make representations against the withdrawal of railway-bond funds.
894
Nov. 16 (35) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Ecuadoran statement that funds were withdrawn to meet emergency and will, it is hoped, soon be replaced.
894
Nov. 21 (11) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to watch developments and report whether or not funds are replaced.
894
Dec. 6 (273) To the Ambassador in Great Britain
Instructions to inform Council of Foreign Bondholders, London, that arrangements are being made in Ecuador to return money withdrawn and to transfer funds to Commercial Bank of Spanish America.
895
[Page CXV]

Efforts to Liquidate the Debts of the Cacao Growers Association

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Mar. 15 (659) From the Minister in Ecuador
Arrival in Quito of representative of Brown Bros., bankers, for purpose of negotiating with Government for conversion of external debt of Ecuador. Unfavorable outlook for adjustment of cacao problem, with which he has been occupied on behalf of Mercantile Bank.
896
June 13 (5) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Instructions to inquire regarding report that Ecuadoran Congress will make no provision for payment of debts of Cacao Growers Association beyond those to local banks and vale holders.
896
June 16 (18) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
President’s plan to submit bill to Congress providing for extension of 3-sucre tax on cacao exports, from proceeds of which payment of debts of Cacao Growers Association will be made.
897
Oct. 6 From the Mercantile Bank of the Americas, Inc. (tel.)
Note sent to representative in Ecuador (text printed) containing a new proposal to be made to Ecuador relative to solution of Cacao Growers Association difficulties.
897
Oct. 7 (14) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Information that Mercantile Bank has cabled to representative new proposal to be made to Ecuador relative to solution of difficulties of association. Instructions to lend all assistance for arriving at equitable solution.
898
Oct. 13 (722) From the Minister in Ecuador
Bill passed by Congress extending 3-sucre tax on cacao, 66 percent of proceeds to go to vale holders and to local banks, 34 percent for administration of association. President’s veto of bill, which was then amended to include Mercantile Bank as one of creditors among whom 66 percent of tax would be divided.
899
Nov. 16 (21) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Opinion that distribution should have been prorated among 3 groups of creditor banks according to aggregate amount of claims of each. Instructions to urge distribution upon equtable basis.
900
Nov. 19 (753) From the Minister in Ecuador
Report that representations have been made to Government regarding unfair distribution of proceeds from cacao tax.
900
Dec. 5 (296) To the Minister in Ecuador
Letter from Mercantile Bank, November 29 (text printed) containing provisions of an understanding reached with President of Ecuador. Instructions to verify statements of letter.
901
1922 Feb. 9 (787) From the Minister in Ecuador
Transmittal of President’s confirmation of understanding reached with Mercantile Bank regarding payment of debt owed by association.
902
[Page CXVI]

EGYPT

British Proposals for a Modification of the Capitulatory Rights of American Citizens in Egypt

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Feb. 25 (10896) From the Consul General at London
Excerpt from report of British Special Mission to Egypt (text printed) outlining bases for changes in Egyptian Government and modification of privileges and immunities of capitulatory powers to accord with British mandate.
903
July 8 (60) To the Ambassador in Great Britain
Note to Foreign Secretary (text printed) offering considerations and objections regarding proposed modification of rights of U. S. citizens in Egypt, urging necessity for full information regarding proposed reorganization of Government, and reserving right to equal privileges enjoyed by most-favored nations.
907
Dec. 20 (799) From the Ambassador in Great Britain
Note of Foreign Secretary, December 14 (text printed) enclosing draft convention between the United States and Great Britain regarding rights of U. S. nationals in Egypt, with changes in text to meet U. S. objections, and comments thereon.
910

Nomination of an American Judge to the Mixed Court of Appeal

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Mar. 16 (199) From the British Ambassador
Request for nominations from which Egypt may appoint American judge to fill vacancy in Court of Appeal, understanding being that Crabites is no longer under consideration.
913
Mar. 24 (238) From the British Ambassador
Transmittal of letters from Judicial Adviser in Egypt to Justices Holmes, Brandeis, etc., inviting suggestions as to appointment of U. S. judge to Egyptian Court of Appeal.
914
May 10 To the British Ambassador
Desire that objections to Crabites be withdrawn; however, consent would be given to designation of Ellery Cory Stowell. Return of letters addressed to Justice Holmes, etc., as unnecessary.
914
Sept. 20 To the British Ambassador
Expression of regret that neither of U. S. nominations has met with approval; objections to British choice; designation of Jasper Yeates Brinton as U. S. final nomination. Possibility of U. S. refusal to consent to renewal of existing arrangement with regard to Mixed Court in Egypt, if these nominations not acceptable.
915
Oct. 26 (32) From the Agent and Consul General at Cairo (tel.)
Acceptance of Brinton for American vacancy. Foreign Minister’s request for U. S. consent to prolongation of Mixed Courts according to arrangement proposed by Egypt.
916

Adherence by the United States to an Indefinite Prorogation of the Mixed Courts

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Oct. 12 (31) From the Agent and Consul General at Cairo (tel.)
Government’s request for U. S. adherence to prolongation of courts for indefinite period from November 1, 1921, under Egyptian reservation of right to end them with year’s notice.
916
[Page CXVII]Oct. 18 (20) To the Agent and Consul General at Cairo (tel.)
Information for British Embassy that U. S. position regarding Mixed Court arrangement is contingent upon action on U. S. nominations for Appellate Court.
916
Oct. 27 (21) To the Agent and Consul General at Cairo (tel.)
Instructions to state that the United States consents to prolongation of Mixed Court arrangement for indefinite period from November 1 next, subject to right to withdraw adherence at any time after one year.
917
Nov. 25 (189) From the Chargé at Cairo
Foreign Office note, November 17 (text printed) requesting interpretation of phraseology of U. S. reservations.
917
1922 Feb. 24 (4) To the Agent and Consul General at Cairo
Instructions to state that in consenting to prolongation of Mixed Court arrangement, right is reserved to withdraw adherence at any time without notice after expiration of one year from November 1, 1921.
919

FRANCE

Negotiations to Ensure Recognition of the Rights of the United States in Territories under Mandate

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Aug. 7 (377) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Memorandum of U. S. views (text printed) relative to draft A and B mandates for certain enemy territory and claim of right to participation in measures for disposition thereof, submitting certain modifications in text.
(Sent also to the Ambassador in Italy and the Chargé in Japan; substance to Ambassador in Great Britain.)
922
Dec. 29 (1094) From the Ambassador in France
Foreign Office note, December 22 (text printed) offering guaranty to U. S. citizens of same rights and privileges in mandated territories enjoyed by League members, and offering to consult U. S. Government before modifying mandates.
925

Maintenance of the Capitulatory Rights of American Citizens in Syria

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Mar. 3 (251) From the Consul in Chargé at Beirut
Negotiations with French High Commissioner to secure discontinuance of new taxes levied on foreigners contrary to capitulatory exemptions; promised discontinuance, pending submission of a new schedule of taxes to capitulatory powers for their approval.
929
July 6 (334) From the Consul in Chargé at Beirut
Instructions of French High Commissioner to counselors in administrative zones, May 7 (text printed) ordering suspension of collection of taxes on foreigners and requesting list of taxes for presentation to consular corps for approval.
930
[Page CXVIII]Oct. 13 (57) From the Consul in Chargé at Damascus
Verbal agreement of Damascus authorities with U. S. interpretation of art. IV of the treaty of 1830 that U. S. citizens accused of crime should be turned over to consular jurisdiction. Case of Nejib Meshaka.
932
Nov. 2 (437) From the Consul in Chargé at Beirut
Submission of new schedule of taxes to consular corps and their decision to draw up joint resolution on subject for submission to their respective Governments.
933
Dec. 27 (103) From the Consul in Chargé at Damascus
Note from French High Commissioner to French Delegate at Damascus, December 19 (text printed) upholding U. S. interpretation of art. IV of treaty of 1830. Consul’s treatment of Haddad case.
934
1922 Jan. 21 From the Consul in Chargé at Beirut (tel.)
Report on completion of deliberations of consular corps on schedule of taxes; discussion of proposed judicial reforms, submitted for U. S. consideration.
936

French Regulations Applicable to American Citizens of French Origin Regarded by France as Deserters or Defaulters During the World War

Date and number Subject Page
1919 Nov. 22 (283) To the Ambassador in France
Instructions to request assurances that U. S. citizens of French origin will be free from molestation for failure to comply with French military regulations upon return to France for temporary sojourn, provided they present official evidence of compliance with U. S. military service regulations.
937
1920 Jan. 15 (729) From the Ambassador in France
French reply, January 5 (text printed) refusing assurances requested.
938
Mar. 31 (408) To the Ambassador in France
Instructions to use good offices in endeavor to render assistance to U. S. citizens coming under French requirements and to reserve right to make further representations. Request for report on cases pending and on allowance made by France for military services rendered in U. S. Army.
940
June 4 (1261) From the Ambassador in France
Note from Foreign Minister to French Ambassador at Washington (text printed) regarding benefit extended to Frenchmen passed over or considered as defaulters who have taken service in U. S. Army on French front.
941
June 18 (1295) From the Ambassador in France
Foreign Minister’s note, June 7 (text printed) defining status of deserters and several classes of defaulters, who, having acquired U. S. nationality, take up residence on French territory.
943
[Page CXIX]Aug. 30 (589) To the Ambassador in France
Instructions to request amplification of third classification of despatch no. 1295 regarding defaulters; U. S. interpretation that deduction is to be allowed for service in U. S. Army whether or not on French front.
945
1921 Feb. 15 (87) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Request that French consuls in New York and elsewhere be instructed to desist from insistence upon U. S. citizens of French origin renouncing allegiance to the United States when applying for passport visas. Suggestion for negotiation of a naturalization treaty.
946
Mar. 31 (2300) From the Ambassador in France
Circular, March 10, by French Minister of War to various French military authorities (text printed) promulgating regulations applicable to U. S. citizens of French origin regarded by France as deserters or defaulters during the war, conceding equivalence in service in U. S. Army, and not necessarily in France.
947
Apr. 1 (2297) From the Ambassador in France
French reply, March 24 (text printed) stating it is duty of French agents to inform applicants for visas of conditions of admission to French territory and outlining special difficulties in way of concluding naturalization treaty.
950

Failure to Agree upon the Reciprocal Use of the Annapolis and Lafayette Radio Stations for Transmitting Official Messages

Date and number Subject Page
1920 Nov. 24 (1833) From the Ambassador in France
French note, November 22 (text printed) in reply to U. S. representations that France should authorize delegates to Preliminary Communications Conference to discuss reciprocal use of Annapolis and Lafayette radio stations for official messages. French objections to such arrangement.
957
Dec. 20 (DNC 12479–1072: 43) From the Secretary of the Navy
Draft of proposed agreement between Navy Department and French Department of Posts and Telegraphs (text printed) providing for official reciprocal use without charge of Lafayette and Annapolis radio stations, to be submitted for French ratification.
959
1921 Feb. 15 To the Secretary of the Navy
French acceptance of arts. 1, 3, and 4 of proposed agreement but objections to art. 2 on ground that use of Lafayette station for broadcasting official messages to navies of two Governments would interfere with commercial traffic.
960
Feb. 18 (Op–20–A) From the Secretary of the Navy
Desirability of Lafayette station for radiograms to naval vessels owing to greater range and better service than can be obtained by Lyons station, advocated by French. Request for good offices.
961
[Page CXX]Nov. 7 (711) From the Ambassador in France
French note, November 4 (text printed) declining to acquiesce in U. S. desire for use of Lafayette station for transmission of messages to U. S. vessels.
961

Mission of M. René Viviani to the United States

Date and number Subject Page
1921 Mar. 11 (2218) From the Ambassador in France
French press statement (text printed) regarding ex-Premier Viviani’s visit to the United States immediately after inauguration of President Harding, bringing message of congratulations, gratitude, and good will of France.
962
Undated Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Interview of Mar. 30 between Viviani, Jusserand, Secretary of State, and Under Secretary on French debt to the United States, German reparations, U. S. opposition to Treaty of Versailles, separate peace, and League of Nations.
964