No. 715.
Mr. Stallo to Mr. Bayard.

[Extract.]
No. 223.]

Sir: I have the honor herewith to transmit copies of the correspondence between this legation and the Italian foreign office in relation to the extradition of Salvatore Paladini, a fugitive from justice, who is under indictment in the United States court for the district of New Jersey on the charge of passing counterfeit money of the United States. This correspondence will become intelligible upon a brief review of the following facts:

I was instructed to demand the extradition of said Paladini by your letter No. 93, of April 26, 1888, which informed me that the President’s warrant to receive the fugitive had been issued to one Cono Casale. Casale presented himself at the office of this legation on the 17th day of May, 1888, bringing with him the papers relating to the case, including the warrant for the arrest of Paladini; and I at once, on the same day, dictated the letter to the foreign office which is herein marked inclosure No. 1, inclosing the papers and demanding the extradition of Paladini.

It being obviously important to secure the arrest of the fugitive without delay, I delivered the letter with its inclosures to Mr. Crispi on the afternoon of that day in person, and called his attention to the urgency of the matter, and to the danger that Paladini might be informed of the [Page 1038]presence of Casale in Italy, and of the measures about to be taken for his arrest. Mr. Crispi opened the letter, requested me to translate it for him, which I did, and then observed that the matter would have to be referred to the ministry of grace and justice, but that he would send it there at once, and that measures for the arrest of the fugitive would be taken forthwith. Although the name of Salvatore Paladini must have suggested to him that the fugitive was an Italian, Mr. Crispi asked me no questions as to Paladin’s citizenship. Before I left I informed Mr. Crispi that Paladini was supposed to be in Sicily, and that Mr. Cono Casale was at the service of the Italian authorities for the purpose of aiding in his discovery and identification.

Five days elapsed after this interview, and I had no communication from the foreign office in regard to the matter. Casale, meanwhile, was at the office of the legation every day, and became very impatient; so 1 proceeded to the foreign office, in order to inquire what had been done.

When I arrived there I found that Mr. Crispi was then, and for several days had been, confined to his house with illness; but I was assured by one of his secretaries that the papers had long since been sent to the ministry of grace and justice, and that the ministry of foreign affairs was in momentary expectation of the report.

Nearly another week elapsed; and Crispi having meanwhile been taken to Castelamare by reason of his illness, I requested Mr. Dougherty, the secretary of legation, to inquire at the foreign office as to the state of the matter. The information given him by one of the under secretaries was that Mr. Casale had been there in person the day before; that they were fully aware of the urgency of the matter; and that I would hear from them very soon. Accordingly, on the second or third day thereafter, to wit, on the 2d day of June, 1888, I received a letter (marked inclosure 2), in which I was informed that my application for the extradition of Paladini had been communicated to the ministry of grace and justice “without the least delay,” but that it was important to know of what country Paladini was a native, what was his paternity, and what was his citizenship.

It will be observed that this inquiry was addressed to me for the first time when nearly two weeks had elapsed since the date of my application. I answered this note immediately (inclosure No. 3), informing the ministry that Paladini was a Sicilian and an Italian subject, a native of Messina, in Sicily, and was then supposed to be at that place, adding, again, that Mr. Cono Casale, the agent appointed by the United States Government, knew him personally, and, as I had informed Mr. Crispi, was at the disposition of the Italian authorities for the purpose of identifying and arresting the fugitive.

To this note no reply was made for more than three weeks, during all of which time Mr. Crispi was prevented, first by illness and then by his occupation in the Chamber of Deputies, from receiving the foreign ministers. In the interval Casale had become so impatient that he had proceeded first to Naples, and then to Messina, in order to be near or on the spot whenever the attempt should be made to effect Paladini’s arrest. On the 25th of June I addressed a note (inclosure 4) to the Italian foreign office, to which I received the reply marked inclosure 5 on the 2d of July, 1888. Seven days thereafter, on the 9th of July, the foreign office sent me a further note (inclosure 6) dated July 7, 1888, in which I was informed that the royal prefecture in Messina, by order of the ministry of the interior, had attempted to trace up and secure Paladini at Messina without success, and that the fugitive was believed to have [Page 1039]returned to New York. This note of the foreign office contained the remark that the Italian ministry of the interior “does not find itself in a position to avail itself of the services of the agent Casale, sent to Italy by the Government of the United States.” This remark, together with the circumstance that the Italian authorities had allowed nearly seven weeks to elapse before they acted in compliance with ray demand and their duty, accounts for the tone of the note which I addressed to the Italian foreign office on July 14, 1888 (marked inclosure 7). Up to this moment no question had been raised as to the duty of the Italian Government to extradite Italian subjects, as well as subjects or citizens of other states, upon the demand of our Government; but in reviewing the correspondence with the foreign office, and speculating on the probable causes of the otherwise inexplicable tardiness of the Italian authorities, I began to suspect that the Italian Government would eventually refuse to surrender Paladini on the ground that he was an Italian subject. This suspicion led me to write the concluding passage in my note of July 14–, 1888 (inclosure 7), and it was soon confirmed at my interview with Mr. Crispi on July 26, 1888, the first I had been able to secure since May 17. At this interview the Italian minister of foreign affairs took the ground that the extradition treaty between the United States and Italy did not require the surrender of Italian subjects, and that there was an express reservation in said treaty to the effect that its terms should not apply to the citizens or subjects of the asylum state. I informed him that I was quite fresh from the reading of the treaty of March 23, 1868, and that he was mistaken. Mr. Crispi, however, persisted in his assertion, and I left him with the observation that the further discussion of this subject had better be in writing. Mr. Crispi assented, and accordingly, on the 27th of July, I sent him the memorandum marked inclosure 8.

The reply to this memorandum (inclosure 9), though dated the 27th of July, was not sent to me until the 1st of August, the date at the head of the letter being probably a mistake.

In this reply it was said that the papers in the extradition case, which I had delivered to the ministry of foreign affairs on the 17th of May, were inclosed and returned to me.

Although by some inadvertence the papers were in fact not inclosed (as I informed the foreign office in the note as per inclosure 10), I inferred from the announcement of their return by the minister of foreign affairs that he had definitively abandoned all intention of continuing the pursuit of Paladini with a view of his surrender, and so informed Mr. Casale, who, in a letter received the day before, had announced his intention of returning to the United States on the steamer Olympia, which was to sail from Naples on the 1st or 2d instant. But suddenly, to my surprise, I was notified by a dispatch from Messina that Paladini had been arrested. I at once notified Casale not to leave for the United States, but to go to Messina, and 1 then proceeded to the foreign office to inform Mr. Crispi of the event by which the concluding sentences of his note of July 27 (exhibit 9) had lost their force. Mr. Crispi, after some reflection, said that in his judgment it was not necessary, after all, to determine at this moment whether it was or was not the duty of the Italian Government to surrender one of its own subjects upon the demand of the United States, inasmuch as that question, among others, would be decided by the court at Messina before which Paladini would have to be brought, in any event, before he was extradited or finally tried. He observed that his interpretation, as he called it, of the treaty of March 23, 1868, had been based upon the circumstance that the law of Italy prohibited the extradition of Italian [Page 1040]subjects to foreign jurisdictions, crimes committed by said subjects within such jurisdictions being justiceable by the Italian courts as much as if the crimes had been committed in Italy. I answered that I supposed that in Italy, as well as elsewhere, treaty obligations were a part of the law of the land; so that at last we were brought back to the question: What was the duty of Italy under the treaty with the United States? and that the United States, while conceding the right of the Italian tribunals to determine whether a demand for extradition had been made upon proper grounds and in proper form, could not admit their right to narrow the terms of the treaty itself. Mr. Crispi, thereupon, said that in any view of the case it would be time enough to continue the discussion of the matter in dispute between us after the decision by the court at Messina, and promised to do everything in his power to expedite the proceedings.

After this interview I received a formal notice (inclosure 11), through a note sent by Mr. Damiani, under secretary of state, of Paladini’s arrest.

My dispatch to Casale fortunately reached him before his departure, and he informed me by telegraph of his intention to go to Messina without delay.

It is, of course, impossible to predict what course will be taken by the Messina tribunals. Meanwhile I deem it important to call your attention to Article VI of the treaty of March 23, 1868, which provides that “the expenses of the arrest, detention, and transportation of the persons claimed shall be paid by the Government in whose name the requisition shall have been made.” Casale is, or claims to be, without means, so that several weeks ago I advanced to him at his request 125 francs, which he promised to return in a few days, but which he now says he can not return until after his arrival in the United States.

From a perusal of the papers sent me I infer that the President’s order of arrest and the demand for Paladini’s extradition were issued and made at the instance and in the interest of Paladini’s sureties, one of whom was Casale’s father. In view of Article VI, above referred to, it is important that the agent of the Government be provided with the necessary funds not only to pay the expenses of the arrest, detention, and transportation of Paladini, but also, in certain contingencies, to employ counsel to appear in behalf of our Government before the Messina courts.

I have, etc.,

John B. Stallo.
[Inclosure 1 in No. 223.]

Mr. Stallo to Mr. Crispi.

Your Excellency: On the 30th of March, 1888, the grand inquest of the United States of America within and for the district of New Jersey, in the third circuit, found an indictment against one Salvatore Paladini, charging him with feloniously passing, uttering, publishing, and selling a false, forged, and counterfeited coin in the resemblance and similitude of a silver dollar coined at the mint of the United State, on the 1st day of September, 1887, at Newark, in the said district of New Jersey, he, the said Salvatore Paladini, at the time knowing said coin to be so forged and counterfeited contrary to the act of Congress in such case made and provided, and against the peace of the said United States, the Government and dignity of the same.

Said warrant having been reported to the district court of the United States of America within and for the district of New Jersey, in the third circuit, of the term of January, 1888, a warrant was thereupon issued by said court, in the name of the President of the United States, to the marshal of said district of New Jersey, commanding [Page 1041]said marshal to apprehend the said Salvatore Paladini, and bring him before said court at the United States court-house in the city of Trenton, to answer the indictment aforesaid; which warrant was thereupon, on the 30th of March, 1888, returned by said marshal, who reported that said defendant, Salvatore Paladini, was not found in his district.

It now appears that said Salvatore Paladini, so indicted and ordered to be arrested as aforesaid, is a fugitive from the justice of the United States in the Kingdom of Italy.

In consideration and by reason of the premises, the President of the United States of America has appointed Cono Casale, a citizen of the United States, as the agent of the Government of the United States, authorizing and empowering him, in compliance with existing treaty stipulations between the United States of America and the Kingdom of Italy, to receive the said Salvatore Paladini and bring him back to the United States for trial.

I take the liberty, therefore, herewith to transmit to your excellency the papers evidencing the facts above stated, with the request to cause the necessary warrant to be issued for the arrest of the said Salvatore Paladini, and for his delivery into the custody of the said Cono Casale; and also, after the issuance of said warrant, to return to him, through me, the papers herewith transmitted.

I avail, etc.,

J. B. Stallo.
[Inclosure 2 in No. 223.—Translation.]

Mr. Damiani to Mr. Stallo.

Mr. Minister: I communicated without the least delay to my colleague the minister of grace and justice the application for the extradition, conveyed in your note of the 17th of May last, of Salvatore Paladini, charged with having counterfeited and placed in circulation dollars of the United States of America.

His excellency the minister of grace and justice has now replied to me that in the documents accompanying your esteemed note it was not indicated of what country the aforesaid Salvatore Paladini is a native, neither his paternity, and not even his citizenship.

This information is most necessary to ascertain the identity of the person, especially as the family and baptismal names of Salvatore Paladini are very common in Italy.

The minister of grace and justice also remarks to me that from an examination of the documents communicated by your legation it appears that a certain Vincenzo Casale has deposed that “Paladini is a freeholder of three pieces of land in Peshine, city of Newark, and that the same owns a house there.” Such deposition would make one suppose that Salvatore Paladini, becoming a property holder in the United States of America, had obtained American citizenship.

Therefore, at the request of the minister of grace and justice, I beg you to furnish me with the the information above indicated, with which it will be easy to establish the identity and the citizenship of Paladini and to search for him in the Kingdom.

Be pleased, etc.,

A. Damiani.
[Inclosure 3 in No. 223.]

Mr. Stallo to Mr. Crispi.

Your Excellency: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the communication addressed to me by the ministry of foreign affairs on the 1st instant in regard to the extradition of Salvatore Paladini, and in answer thereto I have the honor to state that the said Salvatore Paladini is a native of Messina, in Sicily and has never been naturalized as a citizen of the United States, having been in the United States only a few months before committing the crime imputed to him.

The supposition of his excellency the minister of grace and justice that the said Paladini is a property-holder in Peshine, city of Newark, probably rests upon a misapprehension. Upon examination of the papers it will be found, I think, that Vincenzo [Page 1042]Casale declared, not that Paladini was a property holder, but that he, Vincenzo Casale, who offered himself as surety for Paladini, was a property-holder in Peshine, city of Newark. I may add that the said Salvatore Paladini is believed to be in Messina, Sicily, at this moment, and that Mr. Cono Casale, the agent appointed by the United States to bring the said Paladini back within the jurisdiction of the district court of New Jersey, knows him personally very well and is in possession of two photographs of him. Mr. Casale will, of course, place himself at the disposition of the officers of the Government of His Majesty the King of Italy in assisting to identify and arrest him. The names of the parents of Salvatore Paladini are unknown to me.

I avail, etc.,

J. B. Stallo.
[Inclosure 4 in dispatch No. 223.]

Mr. Stallo to Mr. Crispi.

Your excellency: On the 17th day of May, 1888, I had the honor to address to your excellency a note transmitting the papers relating to the indictment by the grand inquest of the United States of America within and for the district of New Jersey, in the third circuit, of one Salvatore Paladini, on the charge of feloniously passing, uttering, publishing, and selling counterfeit coin in the similitude of silver dollars of the United States of America, said crime being the one mentioned in paragraph 6 of Article II of the convention now in force between the United States and the King of Italy for the surrender of criminals.

In pursuance of this convention, I had the honor to request the issuance, by the proper authorities of the Kingdom of Italy, of the necessary warrant for the arrest of the said Salvatore Paladini and of his eventual delivery to Cono Casale, a citizen of the United States, appointed by the President as the agent of the Government of the United States, to receive the said Salvatore Paladini and bring him back to the United States for trial.

In answer to this note I received on the 2d of June, 1888, a communication from the ministry of foreign affairs of the Kingdom of Italy, requesting certain information relating to the identity of said Salvatore Paladini, which information I had the honor to furnish in another note addressed to your excellency on the same day. Since that time I have received no advice as to whether the warrant prayed for in my note of May 17 has been issued or whether any steps have been taken for the arrest of the said Salvatore Paladini. I take the liberty, therefore, to state to your excellency that according to my latest information the said Salvatore Paladini, in the early part of last week, was still at Messina, Sicily, and that Mr. Cono Casale, the agent of my Government, is also at this moment at Messina, where he may be found at the office of the consul of the United States of America, and where he is entirely at the service of the Italian authorities for the purpose of identifying the person sought to be arrested.

I avail, etc.,

J. B. Stallo.
[Inclosure 5 in No. 223.—Translation.]

Mr. Damiani to Mr. Stallo.

Mr. Minister: I hastened to communicate to my colleague, the minister of grace and justice, the information furnished me in your note dated June 25 last.

My said colleague communicated the notice to the royal ministry of the interior, which has certainly already taken the necessary steps to establish the identity of the person named Salvatore Paladini, charged with having counterfeited silver dollars of the United States of America.

The ministry of the interior has also been advised of the fact that Mr. Cono Casale, special agent of the Federal Government, holds himself at the disposition of the authorities of public safety of Messina to aid, if needed, in identifying the individual sought for, who is at the present time in that province.

Holding myself ready to communicate, in continuation, whatever other information may reach me in the matter,

I renew, etc.,

Damiani,
Under Secretary of State
[Page 1043]
[Inclosure 6 in No. 223.—Translation.]

Mr. Damiani to Mr. Stallo.

Mr. Minister: In continuation of my note of the 2d instant I hasten to communicate to you the following information sent me by the ministry of the interior regarding the search for and capture of Salvatore Paladini, from Messina:

“The royal prefecture in Messina, to which was intrusted the charge of making, in all urgency, the tracing up of the person named Salvatore Paladini has made known that the latter returned from America in October of last year and was employed as a clerk in the office of the usher Pugliese, of Messina.

“The said royal prefecture believes, however, that Paladini has really returned to New York, where he has a mother and sister. In any case the efforts for his apprehension will continue to be made.

“In the actual state of affairs the ministry of the interior does not find itself in a position to avail itself of the services of the agent Casale, sent to Italy by the Government of the United States of America.”

I hasten to communicate to you the foregoing in order that you may be able to give notice of it to the Federal Government, which will certainly make search for Paladini in New York, or will furnish us with further information as to the place where the above-named implicated has taken refuge.

Accept, etc.,

Damiani,
Under Secretary of State.
[Inclosure 7 in No. 223.]

Mr. Stallo to Mr. Crispi.

Your Excellency: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the communication addressed to me by his excellency the under secretary of state on the 7th instant, informing me of the measures taken by the Italian Government in compliance with my letter of May 17, 1888, relating to the extradition of Salvatore Paladini, and my two subsequent letters of June 2 and June 25.

In accordance with the suggestions of his excellency the under secretary of state contained in his letter of the 7th instant, just referred to, I shall at once report its contents, together with the correspondence preceding it, to my Government, and to this end I take the liberty to request your excellency, if it be not inconsistent with the rules and traditions observed by the Italian Government in similar cases, to return to me the papers accompanying my letter of May 17, or at least that part of them which authorizes Mr. Cono Casale to receive Salvatore Paladini in case of his arrest and extradition.

Meanwhile I thank your excellency for the measures taken by His Majesty’s Government in the attempt to secure the arrest and extradition of the person incriminated, at the same time regretting that the Italian authorities have not deemed it expedient to avail themselves of the services of Mr. Cono Casale in the discovery and identification of the said Salvatore Paladini during his sojourn in Messina, which, according to a report just made to me by the said Casale, extended at least to the 20th of June.

It may not be improper to observe that in my original letter of May 17, 1888, and the documents accompanying it, there was no reference to the question whether or not Salvatore Paladini was an Italian or American citizen, or whether or not he was a property-holder in the United States, for the sole and simple reason that I was and am still unaware that in the treaty of March 23, 1868, there was any distinction between fugitives from justice who were citizens of the United States and those who were not, or between such fugitives as did and those who did not hold property in the United States.

I avail, etc.,

J. B. Stallo.
[Inclosure 8 in No. 223.]

Mr. Stallo to Mr. Crispi.

Your Excellency: The questions relating to the extradition of Salvatore Paladini (an Italian subject charged with the crime of counterfeiting in the United States), which were the subject of discussion during my interview with your excellency on [Page 1044]yesterday at the consulta, appear to me to be so important that I beg leave to submit the following memorandum:

The position taken by your excellency, as I understood it, was that the Italian Government could not extradite Paladini because he was an Italian subject, though the crime with which he stands charged was committed in the United States. And your excellency was under the impression that the treaty between Italy and the United States relating to the extradition of criminals (treaty of March 23,1868) contained a provision to the effect that its terms should not apply to citizens or subjects of the state upon which the demand of extradition is made. As I had the honor to observe yesterday, my recollection differed from that of your excellency, it being my strong belief that the treaty referred to contained no exception in favor of the citizens or subjects of either state.

I have now again carefully examined the treaty of extradition concluded between Italy and the United States on March 23, 1868, and am able to state with entire confidence that its stipulations require a surrender of all persons convicted of or charged with crime in the demanding state, irrespective of the question of their citizenship or allegiance to the asylum state.

As I understand it, your excellency agrees with me that international rights and duties concerning the extradition of fugitives from justice are now purely the results of treaty convention. I am aware that in former times it was the policy of many European states (among which were Great Britain and France) never to deliver up their subjects to a foreign state, but to assume jurisdiction to try them for crime wherever committed. But this policy is no longer universal, and in Great Britain and France at least (as well as in Switzerland and many other states) it has been definitively abandoned. On the 9th day of August, 1842, a treaty was concluded between Great Britain and the United States providing for the “giving up” (i. e., extradition) “of criminals fugitive from justice in certain cases,” in which there was no exception as to citizens or subjects of the state in which the criminal had sought refuge; and ever since that time Great Britain has always surrendered fugitives from justice upon the demand of the Government of the United States without inquiring whether or not the fugitive was a British subject; and later, in 1877, a commission appointed by the British Government on extradition reported as follows:

“On the whole the commission unanimously were of opinion that it is inexpedient that the state should make any distinction in this respect between its own subjects and foreigners; and stipulations to the contrary should be omitted from all treaties.”. (Cf. Wharton, Conflict of Laws, § 841, note.)

Similar observations apply to the treaty of extradition concluded between France and the United States on November 9, 1843, whose terms are almost identical with those of the treaty with Italy.

So far as I am aware the French Government has never refused to extradite fugitives from justice on the ground that they were French citizens or subjects. And it is my strong impression that up to this time the Government of His Majesty the King of Italy has never taken the ground which is now taken in the case of Paladini. Moreover, I think that your excellency will find, upon proper inquiry, that the Italian Government has repeatedly demanded the extradition, at the hands of my Government, of American citizens charged with crime committed in Italy.

But the case is still stronger. I venture to say that since the middle of the present century no state has asserted the right to refuse the extradition of its own subjects charged with the commission of crime abroad unless the treaty under which the extradition was demanded contained a clause justifying such refusal: Accordingly in all treaties between the United States and European states which deemed it proper to reserve the right to try their own subjects on charges of crime committed abroad there is a distinct article making the reservation. Thus, in the treaty between Austria and the United States, concluded July 3, 1856 (twelve years before the conclusion of the treaty with Italy), the second article provides:

“Neither of the contracting parties shall be bound to deliver up its own citizens or subjects under the stipulations of this convention.”

Precisely the same express reservation is made in Article IV of the treaty with Belgium (March 19, 1874), in Article IV of the treaty with Sweden and Norway (March 21, 1860), and in Article III of the old treaty with Prussia (June 16, 1852), and in Article VI of the treaty with Mexico (December 11, 1861). But no such reservation is contained in the treaty with Italy; and I should very much regret if the case of Salvatore Paladini (who by this time has probably made his escape pede claudo both from the jurisdiction of Italy and that of the United States) should establish a precedent which would constrain the Government of the United States to revise all its traditional rules for the interpretation of international treaties.

I avail, etc.,

J. B. Stallo.
[Page 1045]
[Inclosure 9 in No. 223.—Translation.]

Mr. Crispi to Mr. Stallo.

Mr. Minister: As soon as your esteemed note of the. 14th of this month, relative to the arrest and extradition of Salvatore Paladini, was received, I hastened to ask the ministry of grace and justice to inform me clearly upon the three observations made by you.

As to the first, viz, if it be comformable to the rules and customs practiced in Italy in similar cases to return in all or part the documents communicated in support of a request for extradition, that ministry has remarked that, conformably to what is practiced with all other Governments, it believed it well to retain those acts necessary in case the arrest should be made. However, you requesting them, I have the honor to return them herewith.

As to the second observation, to the effect that the Government of the King had not esteemed it useful to avail itself of the aid of Mr. Cono Casale for the discovery and identification of the person sought for, the ministry of the interior, which, according to the existing rules upon the extradition of criminals, relating to the search and capture of Paladini, communicates to me that the said individual not having been found, it could not have recourse to the work of Mr. Casale to identify and recognize him.

Finally, as to the third remark, viz, as to whether one’s own citizens be or not exempt from the liability to being surrendered according to the convention cited, the ministry of grace and justice remarks that in the present state of things it can not be further treated (non si possa piú trattara), for this reason: According to the rules which govern extradition among us, it is necessary to hear case by case—

(1)
The opinion of the crimes section of the court of appeals in whose district takes place the arrest of the malefactor asked for. (Articles 853 and 854 of the code of penal procedure.)
(2)
That of the council of state (article 8, No. 2, of the law of March 20, 1865; of No. 2248, Annex D) on the demand of extradition; that is, whether or not it is conformable to the compacts of the convention.

Now, Paladini not being under arrest, a decision simply theoretical can not be invoked.

If, then, you desire that the first article of the convention cited for future extraditable crimes be interpreted in accord between the two Governments, my colleague informs me that in case of being formally asked he will not fail to set forth the views of the Royal Government.

For the rest, if the ministry pursues the matter, it is simply by way of argument, in response to the argument contained in your note. Considering that the active researches made in order to trace up Salvatore Paladini have remained fruitless, it seems proper to conclude that that individual is not at present in Italy.

Be pleased, etc.,

F. Crispi.
[Inclosure 10 in No. 223.]

Mr. Stallo to Mr. Crispi.

Your Excellency: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your excellency’s communication of the 27th instant (which has reached me this moment), in which your excellency announces the return of the papers in the case relating to the extradition of Salvatore Paladini. But by some inadvertence the papers are not actually returned to me, and I take the liberty therefore to repeat my request that they be sent to me.

As to the further contents of your excellency’s note, I must content myself for the present with saying that I shall at once communicate them to my Government and report to your excellency its reply as soon as it is received.

I seize, etc.,

J. B. Stallo
[Page 1046]
[Inclosure 11 in No. 223.—Translation]

Mr. Damiani to Mr. Stallo.

Mr. Minister: The documents concerning Salvatore Paladini, which should have been inclosed in the note of July 27 last, were, by an inadvertence, forgotten. But while I was about to send them to you, I have been obliged to return them to the ministry of grace and justice, inasmuch as, by a telegram dated yesterday informing me that Paladini has been arrested, they have been again requested of me.

Be pleased, etc.,

Damiani,
Under Secretary of State.