List of papers, with synopses of their contents

italy.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
714 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Stallo (No. 93). 1888. Apr. 26 Extradition of Salvatore Paladini, charged with passing counterfeit money, to be requested of the Italian Government; the President’s warrant to receive him issued to Cono Casale. 1037
715 Mr. Stallo to Mr. Bayard (No. 223). Aug. 4 Extradition of Salvatore Paladini, charged with passing counterfeit money; review of the extradition proceedings; the Italian Government denies its obligation to extradite Italian subjects; Paladini arrested and the decision of the court at Messina awaited; Casale in need of funds; the correspondence with the Italian foreign office in regard to the case inclosed. 1037
716 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Stallo (No. 111). Aug. 20 Extradition of Salvatore Paladini: The question of the obligation of Italy under treaty stipulations to extradite Italian subjects will demand immediate consideration if the decision of the court of Messina should bring it up; provision made for the expenses of Casale. 1046
717 Mr. Stallo to Mr. Bayard (No. 230). Aug. 21 Extradition of Salvatore Paladini: The procurator-general of the court of appeals at Messina has moved the discharge of Paladini on the ground that he is an Italian citizen; a copy of the United States treaties and convention requested. 1046
718 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Dougherty (No. 115). Sept. 10 Extradition of Salvatore Paladini: Dispatch announcing the motion to discharge Paladini on the ground that the Italian Government cannot extradite its own citizens received; no such limitations in the treaties; an edition of the treaties of the United States with foreign powers in press. 1047
719 Same to same (No. 116) Sept. 28 American pork: Admission into Italy of Austrian swine products; an instruction sent to Mr. Marsh in 1881 on the subject, inclosing the Department’s report on American pork, to which no reply was made; a copy of the report again sent; the state of the case to be reported, and the attention of the Italian Government to be called to the arguments of the Department and the right of the United States by treaties with Italy to the same treatment as the most favored nations; trichinosis due to eating raw pork; Mr. Wood’s No. 249 on the subject inclosed. 1047

correspondence with the legation of italy at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
720 Baron Fava to Mr. Bayard 1888. Feb. 14 Right of protection in Morocco: Requests to know whether the American delegates to the conference at Madrid have been instructed not to renounce the right of protection in Morocco. 1049
721 Mr. Bayard to Baron de Fava. Feb. 21 Right of protection in Morocco: The representatives of the United States merely instructed to ascertain whether the right of foreign protection is abusively exercised, and, if so, to recommend a remedy. 1049
722 Baron de Fava to Mr. Bayard. Mar. 18 Claim of Italy against Salvadore: Thanks of the Italian Government for the good offices of Mr. H. C. Hall in effecting an arrangement. 1050
[Page IV]723 Baron de Fava to Mr. Bayard. 1888. Apr. 11 Arrest and search, of Italians in Buffalo: Three hundred and twenty-five searched, and no weapons found; the action of the police in violation of the Constitution and international law; protest of the Italian consul at New York to Governor Hill; Governor Hill’s answer not satisfactory; the penal code of New York falsely interpreted to justify the search; the good offices of the Department requested that the police officers may be censured, and a recurrence of such proceedings prevented; the protest of the Italian consul at New York, and letter from the mayor of Buffalo transmitting the report of the superintendent of police, inclosed. 1050
724 Mr. Bayard to Baron de Fava. Apr. 16 Arrest and search of Italians at Buffalo, m consequence of repeated murders and affrays; the search attended with no violence; previous publication of the order may account for the few weapons found; the Department can not decide upon the legality of the action of the police; if it was without authority of law, an action lies against them. 1054
725 Baron de Fava to Mr. Bayard. Apr. 17 Arrest and search of Italians in Buffalo: Former note on this matter based on the complaint of Italians in Buffalo and report of the Italian consul, in order that a recurrence of such acts might be prevented through administrative channels, and the alarm of the Italians allayed; the Department’s good offices again requested. 1054
726 Mr. Bayard to Baron de Fava. Apr. 30 Arrest and search of Italians in Buffalo: The Department can not express an opinion upon the laws of the State of New York or request that the police of Buffalo be censured; if their action was illegal an action will lie against them in the courts. Baron de Fava’s letter will be communicated to the governor of New York. 1055
727 Baron de lava to Mr. Bayard. May 17 Convict immigration: Incorrect interpretation by the custom-house authorities at New York of the law relating to convict immigration; new instructions asked for them; report of the Italian consul at New York on the subject inclosed. 1056
728 Mr. Bayard to Baron de Fava. June 8 Convict immigration: The action of the collector of the port of New York, protested against by the Italian consul-general, in holding the term “convict” to apply to persons who have served out their sentences, is in accordance with the decision of the Treasury Department. 1057
729 Baron de Fava to Mr. Bayard Aug. 2 Protectorate over Zoula assumed by the Italian Government by request of the natives. An official confirmation of a pre-existing state of things. The first evidence of actual possession of any government. 1057
730 Mr. Bayard to Baron de Fava. Aug. 7 Italian protectorate over Zoula, Africa: The United States, not having acceded to the general act of the conference of Berlin, can not determine the proper weight to be given to the announcement of the protectorate. 1058

japan.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
731 Mr. Hubbard to Mr. Bayard (No. 394). 1887. Oct. 10 Trade of the United States with Japan: The value of the trade of the United States, Germany, and Great Britain wrongly stated in “The Australian and South American.” The trade of the United States for 1886 was 23, that of Great Britain 21, and Germany’s 3 millions of yen; the article from the above newspaper inclosed. 1059
732 Same to same (No. 409) Nov. 28 Trade with Japan: The increase of trade with Japan largely due to the Jiji Shimpoo; extract from that newspaper advocating further encouragement of imports from the United States 1061
733 Same to same (No. 419) Dec. 28 Political: Imperial rescript for the maintenance of public tranquillity and to prevent disturbances inclosed. 1063
[Page V]734 Mr. Hubbard to Mr. Bayard (No. 426). 1888. Jan. 13 Political: Greater freedom given the press; the imperial ordinance inclosed. 1064
735 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Hubbard (No. 206). April 16 Claim of the Monitor can not be consistently pressed; letter to Mr. Cowie inclosed. 1068
736 Mr. Hubbard to Mr. Bayard (No. 495). July 26 Eruption of Mount Bandai-san: Report by Mr. Mansfield; scientists sent to report upon the eruption by the Japanese Government; provision made for the sufferers by the Government and private contribution; Mr. Mansfield’s report inclosed. 1073
737 Same to same (No. 511) Oct. 6 Status of Mrs. Ratcliffe, Japanese wife of a British subject serving in the Navy of the United States: Marriage of a Japanese woman to a foreigner not recognized by the Japanese Government until certain formalities have been complied with; note written to the Japanese foreign office asking the status in Japan of a Japanese woman who had married a foreigner abroad according to laws of the foreign country; instruction desired as to the status of the wife in case the marriage is or is not recognized, and as to the status of the wife of a Japanese sailor serving in the U. S. Navy; Mr. Greathouse’s letter in regard to Mrs. Ratclifie inclosed. 1075
738 Same to same (No. 512) Oct. 26 Status of a Japanese woman married to a foreigner in a foreign country according to its laws: Such marriage not recognized in Japan unless with the sanction of the Japanese diplomatic or consular representative, which does not seem to have been obtained by Mrs. Ratcliffe; note from the Japanese minister for foreign affairs, covering the Japanese regulations in regard to such marriages, inclosed. 1076
739 Same to same (No. 513) Oct. 26 Religious liberty: Letter from Rev. Br. C. S. Eby on the freedom of religion in Japan, called forth by the complaint of native Christians that the Japanese Government has failed to officially recognize the Christian religion, inclosed. 1078
740 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Hubbard (No. 256). Nov. 10 Status of Mrs. Ratcliffe, Japanese wife of a British subject who has served as a sailor on an American vessel seven years: A foreigner serving as a sailor on an American vessel can only be protected when he has shipped in an American port, or declared his intention of becoming a citizen and has served three years afterwards; distinction between the right to exercise consular jurisdiction over a foreigner on shipboard and on land; Ratcliffe’s wife not entitled to protection. 1079

liberia.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
741 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Smith (No. 4). 1888. June 4 Intervention of the United States to punish the inhabitants of Half-Cavalla for an attack on American missionaries requested by the Liberian minister of state: Mr. Smith to familiarize himself with the case; indiscretion of the Liberian Government in provoking the disturbance by sending American citizens into the country; the discussion to be carried on from Washington; letter of Mr. Barclay to Mr. Bayard on the subject and Mr. Bayard’s reply inclosed. 1081
742 Mr. Rives to Mr. Smith (No. 6). June 26 Race prejudice in Liberia: Letter of Mary B. Merriam complaining of it; it is injurious to Liberia and contrary to the basis of its government. 1083
[Page VI]

correspondence with the minister of foreign affairs for liberia.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
743 Mr. Barclay to Mr. Bayard 1887. Oct. 4 Claim of France to Liberian territory: The French Government refuses to settle the matter with the minister of the United States.; desire of the Liberian chargé d’affaires to ignore American intervention; wish of the Liberian President that the question should be settled between France and the United States Government acting for that of Liberia; letter of Mr. Carrance, covering one to him from Mr. Flourens, inclosed. 1084
744 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Barclay Dec. 9 Claim of France to Liberian territory: The United States minister acts as intermediator, not as the representative of the Liberian Government, and the presence of a Liberian representative at Paris necessary; an opinion in regard to Mr. Carrance can not be given; Mr. Mc-Lane will always endeavor to maintain a good understanding between France and Liberia. 1086

mexico.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
745 Mr. Connery to Mr. Bayard (No. 239). Oct. 4 Murder of Leon Baldwin, an American superintendent of the Valencia mines near Ventanos: particulars of the murder; reported to be the last of a series of outrages by the outlaw Eraclio Bernal; the governor of Durango warned in every case, but no steps taken to protect the men. 1087
746 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Connery (No. 189). Oct. 14 Murder of Leon Baldwin: Proof showing a prima facie case necessary for diplomatic interference; circular prepared by the Department showing what is required; the first step of the Department is to call on the Mexican Government for an investigation; an affidavit necessary for this to be done; affidavits and proof of Mr. Baldwin’s United States citizenship to be sent to the Department; the circular inclosed. 1088
747 Mr. Connery to Mr. Bayard (No. 251). Oct. 19 Murder of Leon Baldwin: Reported letter of Mr. Morrow and the reply of the Secretary that authenticated information was awaited; conversation with Mr. Mariscal at an unofficial interview; all the assassins killed; if a claim for indemnity be made it should be proved that the Federal and State authorities of Durango had disregarded the warning given them. 1088
748 Same to same (No. 255) Oct. 26 Murder of Leon Baldwin: Affidavit of W.W. Carroll; advice given Mr. Turner in regard to the presentation of a claim and the proof of conflicting statements in Mr. Carroll’s affidavit and Mr. Mariscal’s explanation. 1090
749 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Connery (No. 203). Nov. 7 Discrimination in favor of the Spanish Central American line of steamers between San Francisco and Panama: Report that this agent will attempt to obtain a differential duty of 5 per cent.; attention called to Nos. 145 and 147, relating to the complaint against the Central American Republics on this subject; prospect of favorable action by them; remonstrance to be made against any discrimination against the commercial interests of the United States; Mr. Lane’s letter of October 31, 1887, inclosed. 1091
750 Same to same (No. 207) Nov. 9 Murder of Leon Baldwin: Mr. Connery’s course in not presenting the claim for indemnity approved; two notes from Mr. Romero, reporting the investigation by the Mexican Government, the killing of the assassins, and a newspaper account of the state of affairs in Durango, inclosed. 1092
751 Mr. Connery to Mr. Bayard (No. 270). Nov. 9 Discrimination in favor of the Spanish line of steamers: Copy of note from Mr. Mariscal, repeating former arguments and regretting that the United States Government should foster an unfounded claim, inclosed. 1092
752 Same to same (No. 276) Nov. 21 Discrimination in favor of the Spanish line of steamers: Interview with Mr. Mariscal; he will give no promise in the matter; the United States not a most favored nation by treaty; the exemption of the Spanish line in favor of a private company not of a national flag. 1094
[Page VII]753 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Connery (No. 215). 1887. Nov. 22 Quarantine of ninety days in Arizona against Mexican cattle: Refers to correspondence had with the legation; facts throwing light on the subject requested; correspondence with the Mexican legation inclosed. 1094
754 Same to same (No. 220) Dec. 3 Imprisonment of Henry Brudigam: His release reported by Consul Heimké after a year’s imprisonment for the alleged murder of Domingo Steiner; consideration of any claim Mr. Brudigam may make will be deferred untii its presentation to the Department; Mr. Heimké’s dispatch inclosed. 1095
755 Same to same (No. 224) Dec. 7 Quarantine against Mexican cattle raised, Owing to a doubt as to its constitutionality: Letter from acting Secretary of the Interior inclosed. 1095
756 Mr. Connery to Mr. Bayard (No. 284). Dec. 9 Murder of Walter Henry and seizure of his effects by Mexican customs officers: Mr. Mariscal repeats the statements in his note of November 13, 1886, and states that further investigation is impossible; translation of Mr. Mariscal’s note inclosed. 1097
757 Same to same (No. 288) Dec. 23 Colonization of Lower California by American companies: Report of the Department of Public Works, in reply to attacks of the opposition press, defending the action of the Mexican Government in granting colonizing concessions. 1098
758 Same to same (No. 295) 1888. Jan. 9 Quarantine against Mexican cattle: No cattle disease reported in Sonora; the quarantine to prevent diseased cattle from New Mexico being brought into Arizona. 1099
759 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Connery (No. 240). Jan. 16 Boundary between the United States and Mexico: Inquiry to be made as to what machinery exists in Mexico for determining questions arising under the convention of 1884: Copies of this correspondence sent to the Secretary of the Treasury; copy of correspondence with Mr. Grain upon the necessity of determining the boundary inclosed. 1699
760. Same to same (No. 243) Jan. 18 Discrimination in favor of the Spanish Central American line of steamers: Information whether a bill to grant the 2 per cent rebate, enjoyed by the Spanish line, to American steamers was introduced in the Mexican Congress, and copy thereof to be furnished the Department; copy of letter from Messrs. Alexander & Sons reporting its introduction inclosed. 1102
761 Same to same (No. 294) Jan. 19 Claim of Howard C. Walker against the Mexican Government for wrongful imprisonment and cruel treatment by the officials at Minatitlan: Case previously before the legation; statement of facts in the case; attempts made by Mr. Walker to obtain redress from the Mexican Government; the case to be presented to the Mexican Government; its consideration and a conference with the minister of foreign affairs as to reparation to be asked; copy of Mr. Morris’s letter of December 6, 1887 to Mr. Bayard and Mr. Walker’s petition with affidavits inclosed. 1103
762 Same to same (No. 250) Jan. 26 Boundary between Mexico and the United States: The Secretary of the Treasury concurs in the Department’s suggestion to appoint an international river commission to determine the boundary, where it coincides with the Rio Grande, under the rule prescribed by the convention of 1884; copy of the letter of the Secretary of the Treasury inclosed. 1109
763 Mr. Connery to Mr. Bayard (No. 301). Feb. 6 Boundary between the United States and Mexico: No record kept by the Mexican Government of changes in the channel of the Rio Grande, and no plan devised for deciding questions under the boundary convention; Mr. Mariscal states that the lines can be determined by maps and that the Roman principle, that a sudden diversion of the channel leaves the line in its former place, but that the line follows a gradual change of the river course, will govern. 1110
[Page VIII]764 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Connery (No. 258). 1888. Feb. 13 Wing-dams on the Mexican shore of the Rio Grande reported by the El Paso Development Board to threaten serious injury to that city: No desire to interfere with Mexican improvements; the case to be presented to the Mexican Government, and an explanation and steps, if necessary, to prevent the evil, to be asked; copy of letter from Mr. Langham covering a communication to him from the president of the El Paso Development Board inclosed. 1110
765 Same to same (No. 263) Feb. 15 Boundary between Mexico and the United States: Dispatch stating that the Mexican Government has no plan for determining questions arising under the convention of 1884 received; copy sent to Mr. Crain; copy letter of February 13, 1888, to Mr. Crain, covering draught of a joint resolution for the creation of an international commission for that purpose, inclosed. 1111
766 Mr. Connery to Mr. Bayard (No. 305). Feb. 18 Arrest of Oliver Woods, charged with complicity with the outlaw Bernal: Mr. Chess reports his life in danger; copies of note to Mr. Mariscal, asking that the State authorities be telegraphed to protect Woods, and of Mr. Mariscal’s reply, inclosed. 1112
767 Same to same (No. 306) Feb. 21 Claim of A. K. Cutting: Note of Mr. Mariscal not conciliatory; the real object of the discussion, the trouble likely to arise from Art. 186 of the Chihuahua penal code, overlooked; translation of Mr. Mariscal’s note, with the report and correspondence of the Mexican officials in regard to the case, and a clipping from the El Paso Times inclosed. 1113
768 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Connery (No. 269). Feb. 24 Arrest of Oliver Woods for alleged complicity with the outlaw Bernal: Text of telegram sent by Department; information will be communicated, and the Department to be informed of what is done touching the case. 1136
769 Mr. Connery to Mr. Bayard (No. 308). Feb. 25 Claim of Howard C. Walker: Presented to Mr. Mariscal, who promises to take the matter under advisement; copy of note to Mr. Mariscal and of his reply inclosed. 1137
770 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Connery (No. 270). Feb. 27 Arrest of Oliver Woods by Mexican troops for alleged complicity with Bernal, reported by a resident of Ventanas, and fears expressed that he will be put to death; copies of Mr. Laidlaw’s letter of the 24th instant, covering one from J. H. Bradley, which is accompanied by one from a resident of Ventanas, inclosed. 1138
771 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bragg (No. 4). Mar. 6 Imprisonment of Henry Brudigam: Previous correspondence; letter of Brudigam and Ficken stating that they had been rearrested and sentenced to capital punishment; impression produced by such proceedings; new and conclusive evidence necessary; an inquiry and request for stay of proceedings to be made; telegram to that effect sent; Mr. Heimké instructed to report. 1140
772 Mr. Bragg to Mr. Bayard (No. 5). Mar. 8 Imprisonment of Henry Brudigam: Explanation asked by Mr. Mariscal of the governor of Chihuahua; copy of note to Mr. Mariscal, and his reply, inclosed. 1142
773 Same to same (No. 6). Mar. 9 Arrest of Oliver Woods: Copy of note presenting the case to Mr. Mariscal inclosed. 1143
774 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bragg (No. 8). Mar. 15 Claim of Mrs. Baldwin for the murder of Leon Baldwin: Review of the facts; outrages by outlaws; protection not given by the Government, although requested; the case brought by Mr. Connery to the knowledge of Mr. Mariscal; prejudice shown against Americans; effort to prevent immigration and enterprise; the murder due to the negligence of the Government; the case to be brought to the attention of the Mexican Government and reparation asked; papers in the claim inclosed. 1144
775 Same to same (No. 15). Mar. 22 Attempted kidnapping of a deserter by Mexican soldiers at Eagle Pass: Review of the facts in the case; reparation, a disavowal, and indemnity to the sheriff to be asked; depositions of witnesses inclosed. 1176
[Page IX]776 Mr. Bragg to Mr. Bayard (No. 10). 1888. Mar. 23 Imprisonment of B. C. Work: Letter of Mr. Work, describing his position as perilous, and asking legation’s interposition; case presented to Mr. Mariscal; copy of Mr. Work’s letter and of note to Mr. Mariscal inclosed. 1182
777 Same to same (No. 11) Mar. 28 Arrest of Oliver Woods: He is released; translation of note from Mr. Mariscal inclosed. 1184
778 Same to same (No. 12) Mar. 28 Trespasses by Mexican troops on the United States frontier: Translation of a circular of the Mexican war department, calling the attention of Mexican officers to trespasses and enjoining greater care and vigilance, inclosed. 1184
779 Same to same (No. 13) Mar. 28 Imprisonment of B. C. Work: The governor of Tamaulipas charged to secure Work a fair trial; translation of note from Mr. Mariscal inclosed. 1185
780 Same to same (No. 20) Apr. 9 Attempt to kidnap a Mexican deserter, Atanacio Luis, by Mexican soldiers at Eagle Pass; the case presented to Mr. Mariscal; copy of note inclosed. 1185
781 Same to same (No. 23) Apr. 14 Attempted kidnapping of a deserter by Mexican soldiers at Eagle Pass: Translation of Mr. Mariscal’s reply to a note on the subject inclosed. 1186
782 Same to same (No. 28) Apr. 20 Attempted kidnapping by Mexican soldiers of a deserter at Eagle Pass; the trial of the officers implicated begun; translation from the Two Republics inclosed. 1187
781 Mr. Bragg to Mr. Bayard (No. 29). Apr. 24 Abduction by Mexican soldiers of prisoners in custody of American officials at Nogales, Ariz.: Death sentences of Colonel Arvizn and Lieutenant Gutierrez affirmed; findings of the court. 1187
784 Same to same (No. 30) Apr. 28 Abduction by Mexican soldiers of prisoners in custody of American officials in Arizona: Heath sentence of Colonel Arvizn and Lieutenant Gutierrez commuted to twenty years’ imprisonment; translation of Mr. Mariscal’s note of April 27, inclosed. 1188
785 Same to same (No. 42) May 4 Claim of A. K. Cutting: Regret that more attention has not been paid by the Mexican to the representations of this Government in regard to the claim of criminal jurisdiction by Mexico over United States territory to which the claim for compensation was subordinated; the international question not affected by Mr. Cutting’s merits; refutation of Mr. Mariscal’s position in regard to the extraterritoriality of penal laws; the laws of New York and Texas opposed to article 186 of Mexican law; modification of that article to be asked. 1189
786 Mr. Bragg to Mr. Bayard (No. 35). May 5 Imprisonment of B. C. Work: Mr. Work in the enjoyment of all the guaranties the law accords, and the court endeavoring to hasten the trial; note from Mr. Mariscal inclosed. 1191
787 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bragg (No. 46). May 7 Abduction by Mexican soldiers of prisoners in charge of American officers at Nogales: Death sentence of the Mexican officers commuted to twenty years’ imprisonment; gratification of this Government. 1191
788 Mr. Bragg to Mr. Bayard (No. 37). May 8 Treaty of amity, commerce, and navigation between France and Mexico, concluded on April 14, 1888, to remain in force until 1892; translation inclosed. 1192
788 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bragg (No. 48). May 10 Attack by Mexicans on visiting Papago Indians: The case and status of the Indians in Mexico to be investigated; copy of letter of Acting Secretary of the Interior transmitting letters from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and Indian agent at Pima, Ariz., inclosed. 1197
790 Mr. Bragg to Mr. Bayard (No. 48). May 30 Claim of A. K. Cutting: Copy of Mr. Bayard’s No. 42 on the subject transmitted to the Mexican minister for foreign affairs; Mr. Bragg’s note to the Mexican minister in inclosed. 1199
791 Same to same (No. 54) May 30 Papago Indians: The condition of affairs on the Sonora border between Mexican soldiers and the Papago Indians explained to Mr. Mariscal, and a note to him written on the subject at his request; the note inclosed. 1199
[Page X]792 Mr. Bragg to Mr. Bayard (No. 56). 1888. May 30 Wing dams at El Paso: The complaint of the citizens of El Paso of injury threatened to property by the wing dams on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande communicated to Mr. Mariscal; avoidance of reference to future effects in Mr. Mariscal’s reply; Mr. Bragg’s note to Mr. Mariscal and the reply inclosed. 1200
793 Same to same (No. 58) May 21 Claim of A. K. Cutting: Note from Mr. Mariscal stating that he had taken under advisement Mr. Bayard’s instruction in the case inclosed. 1201
794 Same to same (No. 64) June 5 Claim of Mrs. Baldwin for the murder of Leon M. Baldwin: Note transmitting to Mr. Mariscal the Department’s instruction, and Mr. Mariscal’s reply inclosed. 1202
795 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bragg (No. 64). June 7 Imprisonment of B.B. Glasier, charged with misappropriating funds of the International Huntingdon Railway Company; arbitrary interruption of the consul’s interview with him by the local judge; the right denied the prisoner one of international law and recognized by Mexican law; instructions to be asked of the Mexican Government that in future American consular or diplomatic representatives may have free access to Americans imprisoned in Mexico; Mr. Allen’s No. 71 and Mr. Sutton’s No. 496 inclosed. 1203
796 Mr. Bragg to Mr. Bayard (No. 75). June 18 Imprisonment of Henry Brudigam: Instruction asked in regard to the objection of Mr. Mariscal that declaration of intention to become a citizen of the United States does not give the United States right to interfere in the case; belief that it does give the right; Brudigam has not appealed to the legation of Germany, of which country he is a native; but his partner has; incorrectness of the record and insufficiency of the proof of guilt; copy of correspondence with Mr. Mariscal in regard to the case, and extracts from the testimony and findings, and sentence of the appellate court, inclosed. 1205
797 Same to same (No. 85) July 2 Imprisonment of B. B. Glazier: Copy of note calling Mr. Mariscal’s attention to the case and his reply inclosed. 1215
798 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bragg (No. 87). July 11 Extradition of Shields and Wilson, charged with murder: J. S. Van Riper authorized to receive the prisoners; papers in the case transmitted to the Attorney-General for Mr. Van Riper; necessary application to be made to the Mexican Government. 1216
799 Mr. Bragg to Mr. Bayard (No. 94). July 18 Re-election of President Diaz: Interview by appointment; congratulatory speech and reply; anniversary of the death of President Juarez; the legation’s flag at half-mast and a floral wreath contributed to the decorations. 1216
800 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bragg (No. 88). July 19 Claim of Mrs. Baldwin for the murder of Leon Baldwin: Mr. Clement reports the retaking of testimony which he fears may be prejudicial to his client; he suggests that the United States consul be instructed to take testimony; informed that the consul has no power to summon witnesses, but can take the depositions of all who appear before him, and that ex parte contradictions cannot affect well-known facts; copy of Mr. Clement’s letters of July 9 and 10, covering copy of testimony retaken in the case, inclosed. 1217
801 Mr. Bragg to Mr. Bayard (No. 97). July 23 Extradition of Shields and Wilson: Order for their arrest requested of Mr. Mariscal, pending application for their extradition. 1219
802 Same to same (No. 102) July 24 Extradition of Shields and Wilson: Reply of Mr. Mariscal, asking data to aid the Mexican officers in effecting their arrest, inclosed. 1220
802 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bragg (No. 92). July 31 | Congratulatory speech and floral gift to President Diaz on his re-election approved. 1220
803 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bragg (No. 110). Aug. 21 Extradition of Shields and Wilson: They are Seminole negro Indians supposed to be on the Seminole Reservation in the State of Coahuila, Mexico; a new warrant issued substituting Mr. J. T. Rankin in place of Mr. Van Riper; letter from Acting Attorney-General of August 20.1888, inclosed.
[Page XI]805 Same to same (No. 113) 1888. Aug. 24 Imprisonment of Henry Brudigam: Information as to his birth, place of residence, etc.; the Department does not recede from its position in regard to foreigners domicil d in the United States; failure to become naturalized tends to contradict the supposition of domicile; excepted cases; evidence tends to show that Brudigam is domiciled in Mexico and not entitled to the interposition of the Department in his favor. 1221
806 Mr. Bragg to Mr. Bayard (No. 122). Aug. 28 Papago Indians: The soldiers who attacked the Indians State militia; they will be held to account. 1223
807 Same to same (No. 123) Aug. 29 Imprisonment of B. C. Work at Tamaulipas on the charge of homicide: Note to Mr. Mariscal; letter from Mr. King and letter of Mr. Work inclosed. 1223
808 Same to same (No. 134) Sept. 1 Papago Indians: Mr. Marsical’s note transmitting the account of Governor Corral, of Sonora, whereby it appears that the Indians were wholly to blame for the troubles with the soldiery, inclosed. 1225
809 Same to same (No. 140) Sept. 8 Imprisonment of Henry Brudigam: The decision of the Department against the claim of American citizenship of Brudigam communicated to Mr. Mariscal and to the vice consul at Chihuahua: note to Mr. Mariscal inclosed. 1227
810 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bragg (No. 123). Sept. 12 Imprisonment of B. C. Work in Tamaulipas, charged with homicide: The presentation of the case to Mr. Mariscal approved; no opinion as to the motives of the arrest expressed; a speedy trial hoped for. 1228
811 Mr. Bragg to Mr. Bayard (No. 141). Sept. 14 Extradition of Shields and Wilson: The governor of Coahuila requested by Mr. Mariscal to arrest Shields and Wilson: Mr. Rankin telegraphed, as they can only be held seventy-two hours; Mr. Mariscal’s note giving information of his request inclosed. 1228
812 Same to same (No. 144) Sept. 19 Message of President Diaz: Omission of mention of invitation to participate in the convention of American Republics and the convention to revise marine cases; the message inclosed. 1229
813 Same to same (No. 163) Oct. 15 imprisonment of B. C. Work: Note of Mr. Mariscal covering Mr. Work’s statement before the court; former statements apparently untrue; Mr. Mariscal’s note and Mr. Work’s statement inclosed. 1234
814 Mr. Whitehouse to Mr. Bayard (No. 175). Oct. 29 Extradition of Shields and Wilson: Their arrest announced by Mr. Mariscal; the information telegraphed to the Department and to Mr. Rankin; difficulty possible about their extradition, as they can only legally be held seventy-two hours and were arrested on the 5th; another application, if necessary, will be made to Mr. Mariscal; probability that a requisition by the governor of Texas on the governor of Coahuila will result satisfactorily; Mr. Mariscal’s note inclosed. 1236
815 Mr. Rives to Mr. White-house (No. 153). Nov. 1 Extradition of Shields and Wilson: Their arrest reported to the Attorney-General. 1237
816 Mr. Whitehouse to Mr. Bayard (No. 178). Nov. 1 Extradition of Shields and Wilson: Telegram from United States marshal that he would proceed to Muzquiz in four days; reply of Mr. Mariscal to a request that their surrender be recommended to the governor of Coahuila, that a formal request had not been made, but that when it was, and proper extradition proceedings following their delivery would be ordered; the legation ignorant of necessary details Mr. Mariscal again refuses to recommend informally the surrender of the prisoners; possibility that the governor of Coahuila may surrender them by his own authority; if not, it will be necessary for the marshal to bring the papers to the legation and for a formal request to he made; Mr. Whitehouse to Mr. Mariscal, and Mr. Mariscal’s reply, inclosed. 1238
[Page XII]817 Mr. Adee to Mr. Whitehouse (No. 158). 1888. Nov. 6 Extradition of Shields and Wilson: Copy of legation’s No. 175 sent to the Attorney-General. 1239
818 Mr. Bayard to Mr. White-house (No. 160). Nov. 9 Imprisonment of B. C. Work: Previous representations to the Department so contradicted by Mr. Work’s affidavit as to make them inadmissible for grounds of further action; copy of Mr. Bragg’s dispatch forwarded to Mr. Sutton with the above information. 1239
819 Mr. Whitehouse to Mr. Bayard (No. 182). Nov. 12 Extradition of Shields and Wilson: A formal demand made to Mr. Mariscal with the statement that by the treaty of 1861 a requisition from the governor of Texas to the governor of Coahuila would be sufficient; promise of Mr. Mariscal to telegraph the governor of Coahuila to act according to treaty if an application was made to him; nothing heard about the case since dispatch No. 178; probability that any difficulty experienced by Mr. Rankin would have been communicated to the legation or the Mexican Government; ignorant as to cause of Department’s order for requisition; Mr. Whitehouse to Mr. Mariscal, inclosed. 1240
820 Mr. Bayard to Mr. White-house (No. 162). Nov. 13 Extradition of Shields and Wilson: Formal request for their extradition directed to be made by telegram of the 10th instant. 1241
821 Mr. Rives to Mr. White-house (No. 167). Nov. 15 Wing-dams on the Rio Grande: Telegram stating that a wing-dam opposite to and partly in El Paso was being constructed by the Mexican Government, that this was in violation of the convention of 1884, that the suspension of the work for investigation was reported, that a competent engineer would be sent, and that it be suggested that Mexico do the same, is confirmed; telegram stating willingness of Mexico to co-operate and that instructions had been sent Mr. Romero to confer on the subject received. 1241
822 Mr. Whitehouse to Mr. Bayard (No. 187). Nov. 15 Wing-dams on the Rio Grande: Interview with Mr. Mariscal; the Department’s telegram communicated to him; the work stopped with the consent of the Mexican Government; claim of Mr. Mariscal that no dam, but a breakwater, was being constructed; a statement of the Mexican side of the question promised; sending of engineers to examine the work agreed upon, and Mr. Romero telegraphed to confer on the subject. 1242
823 Same to same (No. 188) Nov. 16 Extradition of Shields and Wilson: No request made the governor of Coahuila for the surrender of the prisoners; Mr. Mariscal to Mr. Whitehouse inclosed. 1243
824 Same to same (No. 190) Nov. 16 Wing-dams on the Rio Grande: Copy of telegram to the Mexican Government from the Mexican consul at El Paso and note from Mr. Mariscal inclosed. 1244
825 Mr. Bayard to Mr. White-house (telegram). Nov. 17 Wing-dams on the Rio Grande: Maj. Oswald H. Ernst detailed to visit El Paso; will start Monday; gratification at Mexican co-operation to be expressed and facilities asked for Major Ernst. 1245
826 Mr. Whitehouse to Mr. Bayard (No. 194). Nov. 19 Wing-dams on the Rio Grande: Mr. Mariscal notified of Major Ernst’s appointment, and the appointment of an engineer by the Mexican Government, to co-operate, requested; note to Mr. Mariscal inclosed. 1245
827 Same to same (No. 195) Nov. 20 Wing-dams on the Rio Grande: Mr. Mariscal requests the department of public works to appoint an engineer to co-operate with Major Ernst, and to afford the latter necessary facilities; note of Mr. Mariscal and Mr. White-house’s reply inclosed. 1246
828 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bragg (No. 170). Nov. 22 Extradition of Shields and Wilson: Mr. Bragg’s course approved; the Department embarrassed in dealing with the case by the informality of the proceedings in this country; Marshal Rankin thought to have been in Mexico; the offense committed by the men being against Federal law their extradition can not be requested by the governor of Texas. 1247
[Page XIII]829 Mr. Bayard to Mr. White-house (telegram). 1888. Dec. 1 Re-election of President Diaz: Congratulations of the President to President Diaz. 1247
830 Mr. Whitehouse to Mr. Bayard (telegram). Dec. 8 Re-election of President Diaz: He returns thanks for the President’s congratulations. 1247

correspondence with the legation of mexico at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
831 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard 1887. Oct. 22 Quarantine of ninety days in Arizona Territory against Mexican cattle: Petition from inhabitants of Sonora; the quarantine considered a prohibition against Mexican cattle, as there is no disease among them and no foreign cattle are imported into Arizona. 1248
832 Same to same Oct. 29 Murder of Leon Baldwin: The newspaper report communicated to the Mexican Government; answer stating that an investigation by the judge at Ventanas had been ordered, but that the murderers had been killed by citizens. 1248
833 Same to same Nov. 1 Horses claimed by Colonel Cowart to belong to the United States delivered to him; personal bond given by the political chief of the canton of Paso del Norte to secure their delivery. 1249
834 Same to same Nov. 2 Murder of Leon Baldwin: Newspaper account of the insecurity which prevailed in Durango when infested by Beural’s band and of the killing of the outlaws, inclosed. 1250
835 Same to same Nov. 4 Murder of Leon Baldwin: Copy of report of the governor of Durango, showing that immediate measures were taken for the apprehension and punishment of the murderers, inclosed. 1259
836 Same to same Nov. 16 Quarantine against Mexican cattle may give rise to reprisals on the commerce of the United States, and is not in accordance with the Senate resolution for the passage of cattle across the frontier. 1252
837 Mr. Bayard to Señor Romero. Nov. 21 Quarantine against American cattle: Note in regard to retaliatory measures received; copy sent to the Secretary of Interior for report; objection based on Senate resolution of March 5, 1886; negotiations in accordance with that resolution proposed and favorably considered by Mr. Mariscal, but nothing done; the resolution in regard to strayed cattle, not commercial importations; copy inclosed. 1252
838 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard Nov. 26 Case of Manuel Mejia, imprisoned by the deputy sheriff at Phœnix, Ariz., without warrant and in disregard of the orders of the district attorney to release him, and ill-treated by the residents of the town; these persons acquitted in disregard of justice; instructed to know what has been done by the Department in accordance with its promise to consider the case. 1253
839 Same to same Nov. 28 Murder of Leon Baldwin: One of the murderers of Mr. Baldwin had been killed and the other was being closely pursued. 1254
840 Same to same Dec. 6 Drain-pipe at El Paso: Complaint by the municipal board of Paso del Norte that the drain-pipe is a menace to the health of that city; the pipe to pass through lands belonging to Mexican territory, though on the left bank of the river; the contention that the Rio Grande, being an international river, there is no right for the construction on one side of works which will be injurious to the health of the inhabitants of the other; danger feared from the filth emptied into the river from the drain-pipe; the prevention of the accomplishment of the plan requested. 1254
841 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Romero Dec. 7 Quarantine against Mexican cattle: Letter from Secretary of the Interior stating that the proclamation was issued in accordance with an act of the Territorial legislature, but there being a doubt as to its constitutionality the quarantine has been raised; the substance of the Arizona quarantine statutes reported by the governor. 1255
[Page XIV]842 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard 1887. Dec. 9 Imprisonment of James Burnett: The report sent this Department communicated to the Mexican Government and the governor of Chihuahua; correct statement from the governor of Chihuahua; no reply from the Mexican Government; exaggerated reports sent newspapers; letter of the governor of Chihuahua inclosed. 1256
843 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard Dec. 12 Imprisonment of James Burnett: Interview with Mr. Bayard telegraphed to Mr. Mariscal; Mr. Mariscal’s reply inclosed. 1257
844 Same to same 1888. Jan. 4 Imprisonment of James Burnett: Decisions of the circuit court of Chihuahua, sustaining the district judge in suspending proceedings against Burnett and releasing him unconditionally, inclosed. 1258
845 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Romero Jan. 6 Quarantine against Mexican cattle: Due to the absence of all sanitary restrictions against diseased cattle; quarantine also declared against State of Missouri; no discrimination; measures on the part of Mexico to prevent the importation of disease from abroad and eradicate it at home would be re-assuring; report of the chairman of the Arizona live-stock commission inclosed. 1259
846 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard Jan. 7 Case of the Monserrat: The Monserrat sentenced at San Diego to pay $1 per ton additional tonnage for want of papers; papers lost accidentally and orders given to have them duly replaced. 1261
847 Same to same Jan. 9 Quarantine against Mexican cattle: Mr. Bayard’s note inclosing report of Mr. Bruce, stating that the quarantine was to prevent the importation of diseased cattle through Mexico, communicated to the Mexican Government for necessary measures; Mexico not an importer of cattle, except for breeding and cattle free from disease. 1261
848 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Romero Jan. 11 Case of the Monserrat: Mr. Romero’s note in regard to the fine imposed on the Monserrat for a defect in her papers stated to have been duly authenticated, but lost, received, and copy sent to the Secretary of the Treasury. 1262
849 Same to same Jan. 23 Quarantine against Mexican cattle: The Mexican system of sanitary inspection of native and imported cattle requested; regulations in regard to cattle diseases under the State governments, and precautionary measures necessary to prevent their evasion by transit through Mexican territory. 1262
850 Same to same Jan. 23 Case of the Monserrat: The duty collected not a fine for failure to produce papers, but the same which is levied on the vessels of all foreign nations who have not acquired rights by treaty or law; no reason for exempting the Monserrat. 1263
851 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard Jan. 26 Case of the Monserrat: The collection of $1 a ton should be levied on all, if any foreign vessels in United States ports; it is a violation of the shipping act of 1884; the Secretary of the Treasury can return the amount illegally collected. 1263
852 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Romero Feb. 10 Drain-pipe at El Paso: The injury resulting from it to the residents of Paso del Norte not apparent; letter of Governor Ross and report of District Attorney Dean inclosed. 1264
853 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard Feb. 10 Free Zone: Belief in the United States that the establishment of the Free Zone was an act antagonistic to the United States, and to encourage smuggling; history of the Free Zone; its establishment an act of necessity; Mexico a worse sufferer than the United States from smuggling by the inhabitants of the Zone; American goods imported free of duty; Mr. Romero opposed to the existence of the Zone; legislation in regard to it; decree of the governor of Tamaulipas, establishing the Zone, law of the Federal Congress confirming the decree, regulations of the governor of Tamaulipas of 1860 and of the Federal Congress of 1878 inclosed. 1266
[Page XV]854 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard 1888. Feb. 11 Drain-pipe at El Paso: Note from this Department, inclosing the report of Mr. Dean on drainpipes, will be sent to Mr. Mariscal; Mr. Samaniego corrects the interview reporting him as not opposing the laving of the pipe. 1282
855 Same to same Feb. 14 Free Zone established in imitation of the United States to prevent smuggling of goods shipped in bond to the border United States towns; its continuance due to the prosperity of the zone consequent upon the civil war in the United States, but which was attributed to the Free Zone. 1282
856 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Romero. Feb. 21 Free Zone: Mr. Romero’s communications not considered an invitation to discuss the matter; an opportunity offered for making public his letters by a resolution of the Senate calling for unpublished correspondence in regard to the Free Zone; Mr. Romero’s wish as to their publication asked. 1283
857 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard Feb. 22 Free Zone: No diplomatic questions between the two countries in regard to it, and their writing voluntary, to remove any misconceptions in regard to the reason of the existence of the zone; no objection to the publication of the communications. 1284
858 Same to same Mar. 12 Duty on tobacco: The decision of the Treasury making the leaf the unit of taxation believed to be contrary to the tariff laws and detrimental to commerce between Mexico and the United States. 1285
859 Same to same Mar. 13 Case of the Monserrat: No higher tonnage dues levied in Mexican ports on vessels of the United States than on those of other nations, and no ground for the belief that there is any discrimination. 1286
860 Same to same Mar. 19 Crossing of cattle over the boundary: Mr. Barrera’s calves having strayed into United States territory to graze, seized and bond for import duties on them exacted; measures necessary to meet such cases; resolution introduced in the Senate to exempt from duty cattle that had strayed into Mexican territory; provision suggested that Mexican cattle straying into the United States be exempted also. 1286
861 Same to same Mar. 19 Arrest at Janos of three sheriffs of Arizona Territory and two Papago Indians, pursuing three American bandits who had taken refuge in Mexican territory, because they had no permit from the Mexican Government: Their subsequent release, their arms being taken from them by order of the President of Mexico; their arms will be delivered to any one appointed to receive them. 1287
862 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Romero. Mar. 20 Case of the Monserrat: The Secretary of the Treasury states the tonnage tax of $1 per ton to have been properly collected under sections 4219 and 4225 of the Revised Statutes of the United States; these sections not repealed by the act of June 26, 1884; the effect of that act. 1288
863 Same to same Mar. 23 Arrest of three United States sheriffs and two Indians at Janos: Señor Romero’s note stating that they had been released and their arms retained for delivery to the Government of the United States received; information previously received and report awaited; copies of the note will be sent to governor of Arizona and the Attorney-General. 1288
864 Same to same Mar. 24 Crossing of cattle over the boundary: Copy of note in regard to the calves of Señor Barrera sent to the Secretary of the Treasury, to show absence of intent to evade the law; a favorable decision would be facilitated by the assurances of reciprocal action on the part of Mexico; the recommendation that arrangements be made between the countries and modification of the bill in Congress to include strayed Mexican cattle; copy of note will be communicated to Committee on Finance; assurances of reciprocity desired; willing to compare views in regard to the Senate resolution of May 6, 1886; reciprocal agreement for the restoration of strays necessary, which may be in the form of a diplomatic understanding or formal protocol. 1289
[Page XVI]865 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard. 1888. Mar. 25 Crossing of cattle over the boundary: Approval of the suggestion in regard to restoration of strayed cattle by Mr. Bayard; cattle imported into Mexico not subject to duty and the difficulties complained of not liable to occur; views mutually in accord; Mr. Bayard’s note will be communicated to the Mexican Government with a request for instructions. 1290
866 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Romero Mar. 30 Case of the Monserrat: No higher charges on United States vessels than those of other nations in Mexico, and no discriminatory duties; the United States laws in regard to discriminatory duties apply to duties levied on national as well as foreign vessels, found in section 4225; its provisions; the proclamation in regard to Spanish vessels and cargoes the last under this act. 1291
867 Same to same Mar. 30 Duty on Mexican tobacco: The complaint that adopting the leaf instead of the “hand” unit increases illegally the duty on Mexican tobacco; decision of the Treasury Department that it is according to statute; no discrimination intended; tariff revision pending in Congress. 1292
868 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard Apr. 11 Arrest of United States sheriffs and posse at Janos: Their arms and horses will be delivered to the person appointed by the United States Government to receive them. 1293
869 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Romero Apr. 16 Claim of J. Escober y Armendariz to land in New Mexico: The grant acted upon by the surveyor-general of Mexico and his recommendation transmitted to Congress, where it now is; a survey under the circumstances improper; the report of the surveyor-general properly transmitted to Congress; report of acting Commissioner of the Land Office inclosed. 1294
870 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard Apr. 28 Crossing of cattle over the boundary: Authorized to submit to the United States Government a draught of an arrangement for the crossing of cattle over the boundary; the Department’s views requested; draught inclosed. 1296
871 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Romero May 18 Crossing of cattle over the boundary: No objection to the draught of a convention, unless to Article III, in regard grazing cattle across the frontier, and Article VI; Article III should require the value of the cattle to be assessed when imported and bond given for their exportation in six months; Article VI should require other satisfactory proof in addition to the certificate; a bill to restore strayed cattle on proofs of ownership approved by the Secretary of the Treasury, and amendment to that end suggested; his views concurred in by the Department. 1298
872 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard May 19 Crossing of cattle over the boundary: Will accept the additions proposed to the agreement regulating the crossing of cattle over the frontier and sign it; draught of agreement, with the changes suggested, inclosed. 1299
873 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Romero May 22 Arrest of sheriffs and posse at Janos: Mr. Lindberg appointed to receive the horses; requests that the Mexican authorities be telegraphed. 1300
874 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard May 23 Arrest of United States marshals and posse at Janos: Their arms and two horses will be delivered to Mr. Lindberg; the third horse having died, will be paid for if its death was due to neglect. 1300
875 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Romero May 28 Arrest of sheriffs and posse at Janos: Note stating that two horses would be delivered to Mr. Lindberg, and offering to pay for the third if it died from neglect, received; Mr. Lindberg informed; the horses to admitted free of duty. 1301
876 Same to same June 4 Arrest of Manual Mejia: Genning and Bryant acquitted of the charge; Governor Zulich’s assurance of justice and protection to all; the governor’s letter inclosed. 1301
877 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard July 3 Claim of J. Escobar y Armendariz to land in New Mexico: The petition of Armendariz shows that the grant was valid, asks confirmation and a resurvey; the validity of the grant acknowledged by Mr. Atkinson, denied by Mr. Julian, owing to a mistake in interpreting the “archives of Mexico” to mean those of the City of [Page XVII]Mexico; probability of the authorization of provincial authorities to grant title to land, in which case the records would be kept in the provinces; the records of the State of Chihuahua destroyed in 1846–47; the stipulation in regard to record proof to prevent fraudulent acquisition of land. The Garcia family in possession a century, and the grant confirmed by the Mexican Government; the claimant liable to be deprived of a hearing by the refusal of the Interior Department to lay the papers before Congress; requests the good offices of the Department of State; a resurvey not necessary at present; general reflections upon the titles to land in the United States by Mexican grants and the laws and treaties on the subject. 1303
878 Same to same July 19 Claim for sheep of Toribio Lozano and murder of Mexican shepherds: He established in Nueces County, Tex., a sheep ranch in 1861; his sheep dispersed and seven shepherds killed in 1873; complaint made but no action taken to punish the murderers by the authorities; claim for indemnity made in 1875; responsibility denied by the Secretary of State; correspondence on the subject; demand for indemnity renewed 1306
879 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Romero Aug. 13 Claim for sheep of T. Lozano and murder of Mexican shepherds: Claim presented in 1875 by the Mexican legation and refused by Mr. Fish; no further correspondence till the present; the position of the Department unchanged. 1308
880 Mr. Romero to Mr. Bayard Aug. 13 Extradition of Paulino Preciado: Instructed to complain of the action of the judge of Cameron County, Tex., and request Preciado’s extradition; statement of the case; the examination before the judge of Cameron County; allegation by Preciado that the proof was insufficient and the extradition documents irregular, as Mr. Sutton did not state that he was the principal consular officer of the United States; discharged on these grounds; provisions of the treaty in regard to extradition; these conditions complied with and proof sufficient; no higher United States consular officer than consul-general in Mexico, and that point of irregularity therefore not tenable; full and exclusive jurisdiction of the case in the Mexican courts, and no power in the judge of Cameron County to acquit Preciado of the crime. 1308
881 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Cayetano Romero. Aug. 29 Extradition of Paulino Preciado: Denial by Mr. Romero of the insufficiency of proof and irregularity of the certification, and of the right of the Texas judge to acquit Preciado of the charge; the duty of the judge merely to determine the question of proper surrender; a recommendation asked from the Department to the governor of Texas for Preciado’s surrender in 1887, and the inability of the Department, in view of the previous application to the State of Texas, to make this recommendation stated in reply; provisions of the treaty of 1861; the Department had no power to interfere in nor to review the proceedings; new application will receive attention. 1315

netherlands.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
882 Mr. Bell to Mr. Bayard (No. 262). 1887. Aug. 24 Enrollment of E. R. Connell for military service at Batavia: His permanent establishment there a question of fact; the matter referred to the Department; letter of the minister of foreign affairs for the Netherlands, covering the report upon the subject from the lieutenant-colonel commanding the “schuttery” at Batavia, inclosed. 1318
883 Same to same (No. 284) Dec. 13 Revised constitution adopted: Important modifications of the constitution of 1848. 1321
[Page XVIII]884 Mr. Bell to Mr. Bayard (No. 286). 1887. Dec. 16 Neutrality of the Suez Canal: Reply of the minister of foreign affairs to questions on the subject that there was no convention, but a project to insure the neutrality of the canal agreed upon by France and Germany, which had been submitted for the consideration of the powers, and was acceptable to the Dutch Government; provisions of the projected convention. 1322
885 Same to same (No. 288) Dec. 21 Law regulating the work of children proposed by the Dutch Government: Provisions of the law. 1323
886 Same to same (No. 289) Dec. 23 Naturalization can only be secured in the Netherlands by special law: Conditions requisite for obtaining it; how it is forfeited. 1323
887 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bell (No. 113). 1888. Feb. 3 Enrollment of E. R. Connell in the “schuttery” at Batavia: Mr. Bell’s No. 262 communicated to Mr. Connell for explanation of conflicting allegations; his answer; the question is whether the local Batavian law is according to international usage; the “schuttery” a corps in which all residents are compulsorily enrolled, and besides defending Batavia, obliged to serve in neighboring provinces; foreigners temporarily resident in a country not subject to its permanent military service by international law; police and defensive service may be exacted; such reasons not apparent in this case; residence of Americans abroad encouraged; expulsion of them by Dutch Government inhospitable; the position of Mr. Connell not exceptional; desire to protect Americans and encourage good understanding with the Netherlands; Mr. Pets to Governor Porter, Mr. Connell to Mr. Pets, extract from the London and China Express and Mr. Hatfield to Mr. Connell inclosed. 1324
888 Mr. Bell to Mr. Bayard (No. 300). Mar. 3 Enrollment of E. R. Connell for military services at Batavia: Refusal of the minister of the Netherlands to examine the law compelling Mr. Connell’s enrollment with a view to its modification, on the ground that it is not contrary to international law, as the services are merely of a police nature and not in the regular military service of the country; a similar law in the Netherlands; the “schuttery” system economical; illegical position of the Government of the Netherlands. 1329
889 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bell (No. 118). Mar. 26 Enrollment of E. R. Connell in the “schuttery” at Batavia: The anomaly of the position of the Dutch Government pointed out by Mr. Bell; willing to let the question rest, as the practical basis of complaint has been withdrawn, until revived by an actual case, without assenting to the Dutch position. 1330
890 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Roosevelt (No. 24). Sept. 28 Pork, prohibition of importation of: American pork to be secured the same facilities as that from other countries; Consul Eckstein’s No. 709 inclosed. 1330
891 Mr. Roosevelt to Mr. Bayard (No. 23). Sept. 28 Pork, American, refused admission, although certified to come from a place free from disease: The case communicated to the minister of foreign affairs; copies of letter of Mr. James Hector, the certificate accompanying the shipment, and Mr. Roosevelt’s note on the subject to the minister of foreign affairs inclosed. 1331
892 Same to same (No. 34) Oct. 6 Passports: Can diplomatic officers modify the forms of passports? Many American citizens left unprotected by the new forms. 1332
893 Mr. Rives to Mr. Roosevelt (No. 25). Oct. 9 Pork: Mr. Roosevelt’s action in bringing to the attention of the Government of the Netherlands the complaint of James Hector of the exclusion of American pork, certified to be from a place free from diseases; approved; further report awaited. 1333
894 Mr. Roosevelt to Mr. Bayard (No. 36). Oct. 11 Pork: Copy of Mr. Roosevelt’s notes to the minister of foreign affairs in regard to the exclusion of American pork from the Netherlands inclosed. 1333
895 Same to same (No. 37) Oct. 20 Pork: Reason to believe that the forms requisite had not been complied with in the case of the shipment of American pork which the railroads refused to carry, and Mr. Hector so informed; no further action taken. 1334
[Page XIX]896 Mr. Roosevelt to Mr. Bayard (No. 38). 1888. Oct. 20 Pork: Request for personal interview on exclusion of American pork will not be pressed; copies of the regulations of 1885 governing the importation of pork, and those lately adopted inclosed. 1334
897 Mr. Rives to Mr. Roosevelt (No. 30). Oct. 22 Passports: General instructions for the modification of forms of passports can not be given; slight changes may be made to suit particular cases, but no discretion can be used as to the fundamental requirements of law and fact; doubtful cases to be reported fully to the Department. 1336

correspondence with the legation of the netherlands at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
898 Mr. de Weckherlin to Mr. Bayard. 1887. Nov. 16 Emigration of Belgian soldiers: Soldiers on leave shipped on foreign vessels to avoid service; probability that the documents required by law governing emigration are not demanded by United States consuls; requests instructions to the consuls. 1337
899 Mr. Bayard to Mr. de Weckherlin. 1888. Feb. 6 Emigration of Belgian soldiers: The functions of consuls prescribed by statute; the instruction requested to be given United States consuls in Belgium would make them pro tanto quasi-judicial officers of the Belgian Government, and therefore can not be given. 1337
900 Mr. de Weckherlin to Mr. Bayard. Mar. 17 Citizenship of Alexander Menist: Requests to know his status under the laws of the United States. He was born in the United States, his father being a naturalized citizen, but returned to live in the Netherlands in 1878 and wishes to enter the Belgian militia; copy of register of his birth of the naturalization of his father under the name of Alexander, and affidavit of identity of Alexander and Menist inclosed. 1338
901 Mr. Bayard to Mr. de Weckherlin. Apr. 7 Citizenship of Alexander Menist: The Department can not decide in this particular case, but a naturalized citizen may renounce his allegiance by returning to his native country, animo manendi; his son born in the United States partakes of his father’s domicile, until he become sui juris, when he may elect to claim citizenship in his native country. 1341
902 Mr. de Weckherlin to Mr. Bayard. May 9 Tonnage dues levied on the Prins Mauritz, a steamer of a new regular line from the Netherlands to the United States via Guiana and the West Indies. claimed by Messrs. Kunhardt & Co. to be in violation of the proclamation of the President suspending such dues on vessels coming from Dutch ports, and return of the duty of 6 cents per ton collected requested. 1341
903 Same to same May 23 Tonnage dues levied on the Scheidam and Leerdam, of the Netherlands-American Steam Navigation Company running directly from the Netherlands to New York, because those vessels stopped at Plymouth to receive the cargo and passengers of the disabled steamer P. Caland; the return asked of the duty of 6 cents per ton collected. 1342
904 Mr. Bayard to Mr. de Weckherlin. June 6 Tonnage dues levied on the Prins Mauritz: Letter from the Secretary of the Treasury on the subject inclosed. 1343
905 Same to same June 18 Tonnage dues levied on the Scheidam and Leerdam will be returned; decision of the commissioner of navigation. 1344

correspondence with the legation of nicaragua at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
906 Mr. Guzman to Mr. Bayard 1888. Mar. 25 Boundary treaty between Nicaragua and Costa Rica: expresses the thanks of his Government to the President of the United States for acting as arbitrator. 1345
[Page XX]

paraguay.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page
907 Mr. Bacon to Mr. Bayard (No. 193). 1887. Oct. 19 Claim of the United States and Paraguayan Navigation Company: The protocol for its settlement rejected by the Paraguayan Congress; status of the claim; history of the case; copy of note of October 14, 1887, of Mr. Cañate inclosed. 1346
908 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bacon (No. 85). 1888. Mar. 2 Claim of the United States and Paraguayan Navigation Company: Demand for settlement to be renewed; interest since August 9, 1881, to be added to the sum asked. 1354
909 Mr. Bacon to Mr. Bayard (No.225). May 28 Claim of the United States and Paraguayan Navigation Company: Resignation of Mr. Decoud, minister for foreign affairs, owing to opposition to the claim, and its subsequent withdrawal; new protocol for a settlement signed; hostility of the press; copy of protocol inclosed. 1355
910 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bacon (No. 97). July 25 Claim of the United States and Paraguayan Navigation Company: Mr. Bacon’s action in regard to the claim and in denying the newspaper reports approved. 1356
911 Mr. Bacon to Mr. Bayard (No. 257). Oct, 17 "Chaco” limits, dispute in regard to the, has resulted in open rupture between Paraguay and Bolivia: Particulars of the disturbance; the papers of Paraguay consider its claim indisputable and expect no war; nature and value of the “Chaco.” 1357

persia.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
912 Mr. Pratt to Mr. Bayard (No. 170). 1888. Jan. 10 American enterprises desired in Persia: Interview with the minister of interior on the subject. 1359
913 Same to same (No. 185) Feb. 6 American engineers and geologists wanted in Persia. 1359
914 Same to same (No. 237) May 27 Imperial firman: guarantying life and property inclosed. 1360
915 Same to same (No. 252) June 23 Persian minister about to start for America: Honors requested to be paid him on his arrival. 1361
916 Same to same (No. 254) July 3 Persian minister to the United States Hodji Hossein Kouli Khan Motamed-el-Vésaré, appointed envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary; copies of the official announcement of his appointment and Mr. Pratt’s reply inclosed. 1361
917 Same to same (No. 275) Aug. 28 Massacre of Christians in Tiary and Tehoman threatened: Americans warned to avoid those neighborhoods; action of the British minister; copies telegrams from the British consul at Tabriz announcing the threatened trouble, and L. H. Drumond Wolf’s note covering it to Mr. Pratt inclosed. 1362
918 Same to same (No. 282) Sept. 12 Massacre of Christians: Letter from Rev. F. G. Cohn to Rev. I. H. Shedd, giving an account of the disturbance inclosed. 1363
919 Same to same (No. 291) Sept. 28 Railroads: A concession to be asked of the Shah to connect the cities of Koum, Teheran, and Cassine by a railroad, with the privilege of extending it to the Caspian Sea and Persian Gulf. 1364
920 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Pratt (No. 144). Oct. 4 Persian minister: His arrival and introduction to the President. 1365

peru.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
921 Mr. Buck to Mr. Bayard (No. 376). 1888. May 24 Claim of V. H. MacCord for outrages perpetrated against him by the Government of Peru in 1885: The papers presented for the first time; the reasons for the delay, i. e., to avoid injuring his business interests in Peru which continued [Page XXI]until the seizure of the railroads by the Peruvian Government; Mr. MacCord was at the time and is United States consular agent, but his resignation tendered before the cause of complaint occurred; letter from Mr. Gibbs to Mr. MacCord, from Mr. MacCord to Mr. Buck, and the protest of Mr. MacCord inclosed. 1366
922 Mr. Rives to Mr. Buck (No. 208). June 23 Claim of V. H. MacCord: Review of the facts in the case; Mr. MacCord’s explanation of the facts satisfactory, and an explanation to be asked of the Peruvian Government. 1369
923 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Buck (No. 224). Aug. 14 Claim of V. H. MacCord: Letter of S. N. Pettis in regard to MacCord’s complaint inclosed. 1370
924 Mr. Buck to Mr. Bayard (No. 418). Aug. 29 Claim of V. H. MacCord: Note from the Peruvian foreign office, stating the impossibility of ascertaining the facts after so long a time; that MacCord only made the complaint when removed from his position, and in the interval good relations had subsisted between him and San Roman; that this can not be made a diplomatic question after so long a silence; that this Government is not responsible, as it was the act of one in rebellion; the only recourse for MacCord through the courts; the information asked can not be given. 1370
925 Same to same (No. 420) Sept. 7 Claim of V. H. MacCord: Another note presenting the claim at length sent to the Peruvian foreign office; Minister Denegri interrogated in regard to this matter in the Senate; the notes of the Peruvian foreign office, Mr. Buck’s reply, and the interrogation of the Peruvian minister in the Senate inclosed. 1371
926 Mr. Rives to Mr. Buck (No. 232). Oct. 8 Claim of V. H. MacCord: Mr. Buck’s note generally approved by the Department, but its statements as to the liability of a government for the acts of insurgents and mobs should be qualified; a government not strictly accountable for the violence of mobs; the Chinese indemnity an act of generosity, not of obligation; the same position held relative to the attack on the Spanish consulate at New Orleans in 1850; contrariety in previous opinions of the Department as to liability for acts of insurgents; the United States denied its responsibility for the destruction of a Peruvian vessel in Chesapeake Bay in 1862, which Peru claimed; letter from Mr. Pettis, with accompanying papers, inclosed. 1377

portugal.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
927 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Lewis (No. 68). 1887. Dec. 7 Discrimination against the direct trade of the United States with the Cape Verde Islands in favor of that through Lisbon: Complaint of Messrs. Butman & Co. that greater duties are levied on the direct importations from foreign countries; no discrimination of flag presumed and goods imported in American vessels by way of a Portuguese port entitled to the reduction of 30 per cent, that Portuguese vessels are; analogy to the coastwise trade; re-exportation of goods on which duty has been paid and of goods in bond, or with drawback, very different; the case complained of a discrimination against our home port; the flag of importance in the second case; a report to be made; letter of Mr. Butman inclosed. 1381
928 Same to same (No. 78) 1888. June 4 Discrimination against the direct trade of the United States with the Cape Verde Islands in favor of that through Lisbon: The report called for in No. 68 desired as soon as possible. 1384
929 Mr. Lewis to Mr. Bayard July 7 Discrimination against American direct trade in the Cape Verde Islands: The same duties levied on the trade of all nations; contemplated reduction from 30 to 20 per cent. 1384
[Page XXII]930 Mr. Wilbur to Mr. Bayard 1888. July 12 Discrimination against American direct trade with the Cape Verde Islands: Mr. Lewis’s note to Sen. Barros Gomez and reply of Sen. Gomez, with the treaties and decrees alluded to therein, inclosed. 1385

correspondence with the legation of portugal at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
931 Viscount das Nogueiras to Mr. Bayard. 1887. Sept. 22 Supplies for war vessels: Desires to know whether provisions imported for foreign war vessels are free from duty, and whether by law or custom. 1388
932 Mr. Bayard to Viscount das Nogueiras. Oct 21 Supplies for war vessels of those countries which have reciprocal regulations admitted free. 1388
933 Viscount das Nogueiras to Mr. Bayard. 1888. Jan. 10 Protectorate over Dahomey: Object of the protectorate to increase European influence and stop human sacrifices; this purpose defeated by the refusal of the King of Dahomey to abide by the treaty, and the protectorate renounced. 1389
934 Mr. Bayard to Viscount das Nogueiras. Jan. 18 Protectorate over Dahomey: The announcement of the renunciation of it by Portugal received. 1390
935 Baron d’Almeirim to Mr. Bayard. Mar. 23 Industrial property convention: Copies of laws of the States and the act of 1881 relative to trademarks requested, also information whether articles 3 to 12 of the convention, and 1 to 4 of the final protocol are executed in the United States, and whether the same usage is accorded to foreigners as to American citizens. 1390
936 Same to same May 14 Extradition of Maria da Luz Baptista, alias Mrs. Botelho, requested: No extradition treaty between Portugal and the United States; but the request based upon the desire of the United States and reciprocal action of Italy. 1391
937 Mr. Bayard to Baron d’Almeirim. May 17 Industrial property convention: Letter from the Secretary of the Interior covering a report to the Commissioner of Patents in regard to the construction placed by the United States upon certain articles of the convention, as requested by Baron d’Almeirim inclosed. 1391
938 Same to Same June 4 Extradition of Maria d t Luz Baptista, alias Mrs. Botelho, can not be granted by the President as it is contrary to precedent where there is no extradition treaty; the act of Congress to prevent criminal immigration not a general extradition act. 1394
939 Baron d’Almeirim to Mr. Bayard. June 30 Blockade of Quissembo from the 12th instant declared. 1394
940 Mr. Bayard to Baron d’Almeirim July 3 Blockade of Quissembo by the Government of Portugal, information thereof received. 1395
941 Baron d’Almeirim to Mr. Bayard. Aug. 7 Blockade of Quissembo raised on account of the submission of the revolting tribes. 1395

roumania.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
942 Mr. Fearn to Mr. Bayard (No. 14). 1888. Oct. 4 Maneuvers of the Roumanian army at Ploesti to celebrate the anniversary of Plevna. 1396

russia.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
943 Mr. Lothrop to Mr. Bayard (No. 145). 1887. Oct. 6 Petroleum product of Russia: Probability that American petroleum will be expelled from European markets; copy of article from the Journal de St. Petersburg inclosed. 1397
944 Same to same Nov. 29 Expulsion of Adolph Lipszyc: Review of the case; sentenced to expulsion from Russia; not permitted to communicate with the legation after trial; his sentence mild but will probably work forfeiture of his inheritance. 1399
[Page XXIII]945 Mr. Lothrop to Mr. Bayard (No. 150). 1887. Nov. 29 Expulsion of Jews from Russia: The law strictly enforced; appeals from American Jews answered by the information that nothing could be done as long as there was no discrimination against Americans; the right to grant permission to remain is in certain of the ministry; application made to them in the case of Mr. Woldenberg; no answer received. 1399
946 Mr. Bayard to Mr Lothrop (No. 109). 1888. Feb. 4 Entry refused by Russian customs officers of American goods shipped by Mr. Linden, and described as surgical instruments and oil: Inquiries to be made. 1400
947 Mr. Lothrop to Mr. Bayard (No. 158). Feb. 10 Case of Isidore Albert: A petition to the Emperor for pardon sent to the legation; thinks Mr. Albert not a native American citizen, and that he took an oath of allegiance to Russia; no step will be taken without instructions; severity of the sentence; copy of Mr. Albert’s letter and the reply to it inclosed. 1401
948 Same to same (No. 160) Feb. 22 Exclusion of American medicines from Russia: Mr. Linden’s case; no pharmaceutical preparations allowed to enter Russia unless examined and approved by the medical board or counsel of the Empire. 1402
949 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Lothrop (No. 114). Mar. 1 Case of Isidore Albert: He is a naturalized American citizen born in Russia, to which country he returned, entering the military service; his American citizenship apparently renounced, and proof of the opposite intention necessary before the Department can intervene to ask his pardon. 1403
950 Mr. Lothrop to Mr. Bayard (No. 163). Mar. 7 Railways: Their extent, private and public; not remunerative; the Transcaspian Railway; few new roads, and their building not favored owing to the financial condition of the country. 1404
951 Same to same (No. 168) Mar. 31 Extradition of Hercules A. Proios: Extradited by the Russian Government at the request of that of Turkey, on the charge of having stolen money from the Turkish Government in January,1888; letter from Proios asking intervention, answered by request for information; telegram from Mr. Heenan; his demand for the release of Proios approved, but instructed to go no further and make a report; intervention can only go to the extent of seeing that proceedings are regular. 1405
952 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Lothrop (No. 120). Apr. 17 Extradition of H. A. Proios, who claims to be an American citizen, by the Russian Government to that of Turkey, on the charge of embezzlement while in the service of the Turkish Government: No ground for remonstrance appears from the facts known. 1406
953 Mr. Lothrop to Mr. Bayard (No. 176). May 31 Railways: Opening of the Transcaspian Railway to Samarcand; a road to the Pacific contemplated. 1406
954 Mr. Wurts to Mr. Bayard (No. 186). July 13 Railways: The railway to Samarcand; a road contemplated through Siberia to the Pacific Ocean; its military and commercial importance and assistance in colonizing Siberia; extract from the St. Petersburg Journal on the Samarcand road inclosed. 1407
955 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Wurts (No. 141). Sept. 12 Refusal to allow American whaling vessels to obtain supplies or repair in the Behring and Okotsk Seas except at Petropaulowski: The prevention of illicit liquor traffic assigned as the reason; whale fishing impossible under such a law, on account of the distance of Petropaulowski from the fishing grounds; the matter to be called to the attention of the Russian Government, with a view of securing American vessels protection when legitimately entering other harbors; letter of the Secretary of the Navy covering a notice of the above regulations inclosed. 1410
956 Same to same (No. 144) Sept. 25 Rev. Mr. Easton refused a visa of his passport, or permission to pass through Russian territory: The permission to be obtained for him. 1411
[Page XXIV]957 Mr. Wurts to Mr. Bayard (No. 201). 1888. Oct. 3 Refusal to allow American whaling vessels to land in Behring or Okotsk Seas for supplies and repairs: Substance of instructions No. 141 in regard to, communicated to the Russian Government; copy of note to Russian minister inclosed. 1413
958 Same to same (No. 206) Oct. 29 Novorossick: Opening of railway and harbor works; the report that the naval station at Sebastopol will be removed to Novorossick not credited; an exequatur refused to a United States consular agent; the exclusion of no importance to American commerce. 1414
959 Same to same (No. 213) Nov. 10 The refusal of the Russian Government to let Mr. Easton pass through Russian territory due to previous attempts by him to convert Russians to Protestantism; correspondence with the Russian foreign office on the subject inclosed. 1414

correspondence with the legation of russia at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
960 Baron Rosen to Mr. Bayard 1887. Nov. 7 International Prison Congress: Protocol of the Berne congress and regulations for the commission, with an act interpreting them, which have been approved by all the governments to which they have been submitted except Spain, inclosed for the information of the United States. 1416
961 Mr. Bayard to Mr. de Struve Dec. 23 International Prison Congress: The appointment of a delegate to the congress receiving the attention of congress and information of the preliminary work necessary will be communicated to them. 1416

correspondence with the minister of foreign affairs of salvador.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
962 Mr. Delgado to Mr. Bayard 1888. Apr. 25 Claim of Italy against Salvador: Expresses the thanks of his Government for the services rendered by Mr. Hall in effecting a compromise of the Italian claim. 1417

santo domingo.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
963 Mr. Thompson to Mr. Bayard (No. 19). 1888. Jan. 30 Claims of Mr. C. E. Frary and Mr. Arteaga: A personal visit to Santo Domingo necessary to insure action by that Government, instruction requested; Mr. Frary’s claim $25,000, Mr. Arteaga’s $26,000. 1418
964 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Thompson (No. 20). Mar. 19 Claim of C. E. Frary: Ten thousand dollars, parable in the foreign debt every sixty days, will be accepted in payment of Mr. Frary’s claim. 1418
965 Mr. Thompson to Mr. Bayard (No. 21). Mar. 30 Claims of Mr. C. E. Frary and Mr. Arteaga: Interview with the minister of San Domingo; Mr. Frary’s claim compromised for $10,000; negotiations in the case of Mr. Arteaga prevented by the reported death of President Salomon and disturbances in Hayti; return to Hayti; all quiet; note to Mr. Gautier inclosed. 1419
966 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Thompson (No. 23). May 2 Claims of Mr. C. E. Frary and Mr. Arteaga: Satisfaction of the Department at the conduct of the negotiations in the above cases; further information in Mr. Frary’s claim desired; instruction if needed will be sent in regard to Mr. Arteaga’s. 1422
967 Same to same (No. 26) July 6 Passport for Mr. Morris Myerston: The facts reviewed; too imperfectly stated to decide the question. 1422
[Page XXV]

servia.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
968 Mr. Fearn to Mr. Bayard (No. 6). 1887. Nov. 21. Railway system from Constantinople to Salonica in process of construction. 1424

siam.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
969 Mr. Child to Mr. Bayard (No. 43). 1887. Sept. 22 Trade-marks. A law to prevent the imitation of trade-marks much needed in Siam to protect American and other goods; objections to the proposed law advanced at a meeting of the consuls; a copy of the law and accompanying letter from the foreign office inclosed. 1425
970 Same to same (No.56) 1888. Jan. 6 Liquor law: The United States included among the most favored nations by the amended liquor law; the previous omission an oversight; the law so far inoperative. 1427
971 Same to same (No. 59) Feb. 18 Railroads: The negotiations of a British syndicate for building roads in Siam a failure. 1427
972 Same to same (No. 60) Mar. 13 Gold mines: Character of the Banta Phan mines; a concession of them to Chevalier Suzzatie for twenty-five years; a company organized with a capital of $1,250,000; a royalty of 12 per cent, of the profits to go to the Siamese Government; situation of the mines, etc. 1427

spain.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
973 Mr. Strobel to Mr. Bayard (No. 270). 1887. Nov. 2 Liability of Spaniards, naturalized citizens of other countries, to military services in Spain; the law antiquated, and comprising all obligations of citizenship; translation of law inclosed. 1429
974 Mr. Curry to Mr. Bayard (No. 279). Nov. 19 Discharged sailors: The certificate of the United States consul hereafter sufficient in the case of discharged or substituted sailors sent home, and visa of passports dispensed with; note of the foreign minister inclosed. 1430
975 Same to same (No. 281) Nov. 25 Pork and lard: Translation of royal order in regard to inspection of imported pork and lard inclosed. 1430
976 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Curry (telegram). Dec. 8 Commercial agreement: The Spanish minister of foreign affairs willing to extend the agreement until June 30, 1888, and Mr. Curry instructed to sign a protocol extending it to that date. 1431
977 Mr. Curry to Mr. Bayard (No. 290). Dec. 22 Commercial agreement, prolonged until June 30, 1888. 1431
978 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Curry (No. 262). 1888. Jan. 26 Discriminatory duties: The J. W. Parker compelled to pay duty of $1 per ton on clearing from Zaza, when Spanish vessels pay 25 cents; repayment of excess of duties to be asked; papers in the case inclosed. 1432
979 Same to same (No. 266) Feb. 11 Discriminatory dues collected from the J. W. Parker: Dispatch from the consul at Cienfugos in regard to the discriminatory duties imposed inclosed. 1433
980 Same to same (No. 271) Feb. 28 Discriminations against United States vessels practiced in the Spanish West Indies notwithstanding the commercial agreement; case of Spanish steamers making periodic trips to Spain and allowed to enter and clear, even to a foreign port, without paying duties; a Spanish sailing vessel on entering a Cuban from another Spanish port pays 37½ cents, and on clearing for the United States 25 cents; an American vessel pays at the rate of 67½ cents each time; a Spanish vessel entering a Cuban port from Puerto Rico in ballast, on clearing for the United States pays 25 cents, an American vessel pays 62½ cents; satisfactory proof of equality of treatment of American and Spanish vessels to be asked of the Spanish Government, and in default the President will have to rescind his proclamation; instruction to Consul-General Williams and his report on the matter inclosed. 1435
[Page XXVI]981 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Curry (No. 272). 1888. Feb. 28 Discriminatory duties collected from the Jeanie: Copies of correspondence with Consul-General Williams inclosed. 1445
982 Mr. Curry to Mr. Bayard (No. 304). Mar. 3 Anniversary, four hundredth, of the discovery of America: Translation of royal decree embodying measures for its celebration inclosed. 1448
983 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Curry (No. 275). Mar. 19 Discriminatory dues collected on the Jeanie: The collector of customs at Cardenas will report the facts to the authorities at Matanzas and await their decision; copy of letter from the United States commercial agent at Cardenas, covering a letter to him from the collector of that port, inclosed. 1449
984 Same to same (No. 276) Mar. 21 Anniversary, four hundredth, of the discovery of America: Copy of the royal decree for its celebration at Madrid communicated to the Senate committee on the centennial of the Constitution and the discovery of America. 1450
985 Same to same (No. 279) Apr. 2 Discriminatory duties collected on the Uranus of 37 cents, where a Spanish vessel would pay 25; return of the excess of dues to be asked of the Spanish Government; copy of dispatch from united States consul at Cienfuegos inclosed. 1450
986 Same to same (No. 284) Apr. 19 Claim of Messrs. Calixto, Lopez & Co. for the refund of duties collected on a shipment of coffee from the United States at the fourth instead of the third column of rates of the modus vivendi of 1884; an attempt to be made to dispose of the claim; the essential point in it that a favor accorded to a Spanish was refused to an American vessel; copy of report of Consul-General Williams on the subject, with accompanying documents in closed. 1452
987 Mr. Curry to Mr. Bayard (No. 322). May 22 Resolution of the chambers congratulating the Queen on the ovation she received on her journey to the Barcelona exposition, and thanking foreign nations for sending squadrons to that port; popularity of the queen; the exposition participated in by all the European powers, and the United States ship Quinnebaug present. 1465
988 Mr. Carry to Mr. Bayard (No. 324). May 26 Commercial agreement prolonged until a more comprehensive one is made, or two months’ notice is given by either party; approval of Department asked; note to the minister for foreign affairs and copy of agreement inclosed. 1466
989 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Curry (No. 298). June 12 Commercial agreement, signed with Mr. Moret, prolonging the modus vivendi, approved. 1467
990 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Strobel (No. 321). Sept. 8 Estate of General Featheringill, of the Spanish army, reported recently to have died in Spain: Mr. Sam. Prewett believes his wife to have a claim to the property; information to be sent to Mr. Prewett; copies of two letters from Mr. Prewett inclosed. 1467
991 Mr. Strobel to Mr. Bayard (No. 352). Sept. 22 Estate of General John Featheringill; Mr. Prewett’s inquiry one of many in regard to this and other reputed fortunes, equally without foundation; reply to Mr. Prewett inclosed. 1468
992 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Strobel (No. 325). Sept. 26 Discriminatory duties collected from the Jeanie ordered to be returned; copy of dispatch from Consul-General Williams inclosed. 1469

correspondence with the legation of spain at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
993 Mr. de Muruaga to Mr. Bayard. 1888. Jan. 10 Adulteration of wines and counterfeiting marks thereof; Measures to be put in practice to prevent adulteration of wines and the counterfeiting of marks, and an international congress at Madrid to be proposed for the same purpose; desires to know if the United States will be represented. 1470
994 Mr. Bayard to Mr. de Muruaga. Jan. 19 Adulteration of wines and counterfeiting of marks thereof: Action in the matter can not be taken except in accordance with the wishes of Congress; copy of Mr. de Muruaga’s note sent to the Commissioner of Agriculture that his opinion may first be had on the subject. 1470
[Page XXVII]995 Mr. Bayard to Mr. de Muruaga. 1888. Mar. 17 Adulterations of wines, etc.: The United States prepared to send representatives to the congress for the purpose of preventing adulteration and counterfeiting of wines, and the date and place of meeting requested. 1471
996 Mr. de Muruaga to Mr. Bayard. May 1 Filibustering expedition against Cuba being got ready by General Ruz at Key West: The collector of customs at that port informed of the fact, and authority asked by him of the Treasury Department of the United States to confiscate the munitions; measures necessary to effect this, prevent the expedition, and bring the offenders to justice, requested of the Government. 1471
997 Mr. Bayard to Mr. de Muruaga. May 1 Filibustering expedition against Cuba: Copies of Mr. de Muruaga’s note in regard to the expedition sent to the Secretary of the Treasury and the Attorney-General; due complaint, under oath, by some one having knowledge of the facts advised. 1472
998 Same to same May 5 Filibustering expedition against Cuba: The collector of customs at Key West instructed to take prompt measures, and consult with the district attorney regarding the seizure of the arms and arrest of the filibusters; the officers of the Attorney-General’s Department instructed to co-operate. 1473

sweden and norway.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
999 Mr. Magee to Mr. Bayard (No. 110). 1888. Jan. 16 Pork: Importation of American pork into Sweden prohibited unless well salted and cured; presumption that similar action will be taken in Norway; prohibition due to information from Washington that American pork is infected with contagious diseases; disease among swine prevalent in Sweden and Norway, and efforts being made to eradicate it. 1474
1000 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Magee (No. 64). Feb. 4 Pork: No remonstrance to be made to the decree requiring American pork to be well salted and cured; ground for believing Mr. Anderson’s report of Germany influencing Norway to exclude American pork to be true; American interests to be watched. 1474
1001 Mr. Magee to Mr. Bayard (No. 112). Feb. 8 Political: New ministry; protective tariff measures anticipated; the ministry not supported by the people. 1475
1002 Same to same (No. 114) Feb. 11 Railroads, information in regard to, requested of the Swedish Government road from Lulea to Oföten to reach the iron ore there. 1476
1003 Same to same (No. 116) Mar. 6 Commercial relations of Sweden with the United States: The trade carried in foreign bottoms; advantages that would result if it was done by Swedish or American vessels. 1477
1004 Same to same (No. 117) Mar. 11 Pork: Its importation not prohibited by Norway; no representations on the subject made to the Swedish by the German Government; exclusion by Denmark of American pork in retaliation; disease in Sweden imported from Germany; data requested that will assist in removing the prejudice against American pork. 1478
1005 Same to same (No. 119) Mar. 20 Political: New Norwegian ministry; political parties; taxation heavy; endeavors made to lessen Norway’s contribution towards the support of the King. 1479
1006 Same to same (No. 122) Apr. 18 Railroads: State and private roads; their extent, cost, and management; precautions against accidents; the Government building a road to offset the Russian road to the Gulf manufactures. 1480
1007 Same to same (No. 135) July 21 Tariff laws of Sweden: Cotton, its manufactures, and coal oil exempt; breadstuffs, meats, etc., tobacco, and spirits taxed; the bill is framed in the interest of land-owners. 1482
1008 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Magee (No. 96). Aug. 17 Extradition of Albert Erbers, alias Eberson, charged with attempted murder and forgery; Mr. Russell directed to give the address of the fugitive; copy of telegram to the Department from Mr. Wegner and of telegram sent through Mr. Russell inclosed. 1483
[Page XXVIII]1009 Mr. Magee to Mr. Bayard (No. 136). 1888. Aug. 27 Extradition of Erbers, alias Eberson: Request made to the Swedish Government; no answer received; certified copies of the indictment and some one to identify and receive Erbers necessary; he will be arrested, but will not be surrendered unless a naturalized American citizen. 1883
1010 Same to same (telegram) Sept. 9 Extradition of Erbers, alias Eberson: Erbers arrested. 1484
1011 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Magee (No. 99). Sept. 12 Leper immigration from Norway: United States consul at Christiania to be informed that the immigrants were from Stavanger; copies of letters from Mr. Gade to Dr. Kennedy and from Dr. Kennedy, of the Iowa State board of health, to Hon. W. B. Allison inclosed. 1484
1012 Same to same (No. 100) Sept. 13 Extradition of Erbers, alias Eberson: The governor of Iowa notified of his arrest. 1486
1013 Same to same (No. 104) Sept. 21 Extradition of Erbers, alias Eberson: Request made by the governor of Wisconsin to the Department for the surrender of Erbers. 1487
1014 Mr. Magee to Mr. Bayard (No. 141). Sept. 30 Extradition of Erbers, alias Eberson: Erbers held for identification; will not be surrendered unless he is a naturalized American citizen; he denies that he is; he will be tried in Sweden if not extradited; will endeavor to get him voluntarily to return to America; necessary papers not yet received. 1487
1015 Same to same (No. 142) Sept. 30 Leper immigration from Norway: Government assistance promised to prevent leper emigration; emigration not favored; no one allowed to leave the Kingdom unless provided with a certificate, which the consuls may examine; consuls instructed to use care; emigration easily effected through neighboring countries; suggested restrictions on immigration. 1488
1016 Same to same (No. 144) Oct. 20 Extradition of Erbers, alias Eberson: Arrival of Messrs. McManus and Kœhler; extradition of Erbers refused unless proof be given of his naturalization or he returns voluntarily; Erbers insane; it is desired that he be punished in Sweden when recovered. 1489
1017 Mr. Rives to Mr. Magee (No. 112). Nov. 7 Extradition of Erbers, alias Eberson: Refusal of the Swedish Government to surrender him communicated to the governor of Wisconsin and the district attorney at Milwaukee. 1490
1018 Mr. Gade to Mr. Rives (No. 489). Sept. 4 Norwegian law of citizenship declaring the obligations of citizens, requisites for naturalization, and restricting the holding of land by foreigners, etc.: Translation of law inclosed. 1490

switzerland.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
1019 Mr. Winchester to Mr. Bayard (No. 159). 1887. Oct. 4 Passport application of S. M. Pollok: He emigrated to the United States in 1875; was naturalized November 13, 1882, and left for Switzerland November 15, 1882, and is unable to say when he will return; instructions asked. 1496
1020 Same to same (No. 162) Oct. 10 Tariff: Speech of the President of the Swiss Confederation against protective tariff; tariff laws and treaties of Switzerland. 1496
1021 Same to same (No. 165) Oct. 17 Passports: Instructions asked as to whether the declaration of intention to return to the United States shall be exacted of the children of naturalized citizens. 1499
1022 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Winchester (No. 104). Oct. 24 Passport of S.M. Pollok: If Mr. Pollok is abroad as the agent of an American firm, and intends returning to the United States to reside when his agency terminates, he should be granted a passport. 1500
1023 Mr. Winchester to Mr. Bayard (No. 168). Oct. 24 Mormonism in Switzerland: Memorial of the police of Berne to the executive council of the canton reporting the operations of Mormon agents and suggesting measures for their suppression; Mormon emigration agents; openness of their operations; the appeal of Loosti refused by the Federal Council; translation of the police memorial inclosed. 1500
1024 Same to same (No. 169) Nov. 10 Political: Organization of the Swiss Confederacy; elections; parties. 1507
[Page XXIX]1025 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Winchester (No. 108). 1887. Nov. 11 Passports: The forms of application for passports general, and do not preclude other tests of citizenship by the minister; a passport to be refused to expatriated Americans; manner of filling a blank by children of naturalized parents. 1510
1026 Mr. Winchester to Mr. Bayard (No. 173). Nov. 28 Passports: Requests to know whether the legation is right in keeping the old passports of applicants when new ones are refused them. 1511
1027 Same to same (No. 174) Dec. 9 International Copyright Convention: Russia, Holland, Greece, Austria, the United States, and Sweden and Norway not parties; importance attached to the refusal of the United States to sign the convention; the bureau not yet organized. 1511
1028 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Winchester (No. 111).) Dec. 15 Passports: Old should have a pen stroke drawn through the signatures, “canceled” written on their faces, and be returned to the holders. 1512
1029 Mr. Winchester to Mr. Bayard (No. 176). Dec. 15 Political: Organization, duties, etc., of the Bundesrath or Swiss Federal Council. 1512
1030 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Winchester (No. 113). Dec. 19 Protection of the American consulate at Zurich, when threatened by anarchists, by the Swiss Government; the appreciation of the Department to be expressed. 1515
1031 Mr. Winchester to Mr. Bayard (No. 178). Dec. 22 Passport for Mrs. Weiss, a native of Switzerland, whose husband, a naturalized American citizen, deserted her, and who is now a pauper and insane; a passport asked for her by the cantonal ministry of Zurich; probability that it is intended to return her to the United States; instruction requested. 1515
1032 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Winchester (No. 116). 1888. Jan. 5 Passport for Mrs. Weiss: The case similar to that of Mrs. Blumenthal; her continued residence in Switzerland since her desertion by her husband in 1880 revived her Swiss domicile; if a lunatic at the time, the local guardians could have elected. 1516
1033 Mr. Winchester to Mr. Bayard (No. 188). Jan. 31 Anarchist refugees numerous and violent: Three leaders expelled from Switzerland; other expulsions expected if quiet is not restored, and the Zurich municipality requested by the federal council to supervise publication of the Socialist press. 1517
1034 Same to same (No. 190) Feb. 13 Passport for Mrs. Weiss: Her husband reported to be alive in America; inquiries requested to be made for him by the Swiss minister; Department, after inquiry as to the husband, orders a refusal of a passport; instructions asked, in case her stay abroad was involuntary, as to the law giving the wife the citizenship of the husband, if Mr. Weiss be alive, and as to the effect of his life or death on her citizenship. 1517
1035 Same to same (No. 191) Feb. 17 Political: The Swiss Confederation; review of its constitutional, cantonal, and Federal jurisdiction. 1519
1036 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Winchester (No. 129). Mar. 19 Passport for Mrs. Weiss: No necessity for considering the supposititious case put; the only use of a passport for her would be to send her to the United States, where she would be without friends or support. 1531
1037 Same to same (No. 130) Mar. 22 Mormon emigration to the United States: Emigration agents actively at work in Switzerland; representations to be made to the Swiss Government to prevent Mormon emigration to the United States; such emigration probably in violation of the statute against the importation of contract labor; suggestion to be made to the Swiss Government that endeavors be made to secure evidence on this point. 1532
1038 Mr. Winchester to Mr. Bayard (No. 210). Apr. 20 Anarchists in Zurich: Four of their leaders expelled from Switzerland. 1533
1039 Same to same (No. 212) Apr. 21 Mormon emigration to the United States: Cooperation to prevent emigration and discover the agreements made by the emigrants promised by the Swiss Government; emigration laws revised and made more strict. 1534
1040 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Winchester (No. 137). May 11 Mormon emigration to the United States: Mr. Winchester’s course in presenting the case to the Swiss Government approved. 1535
1041 Mr. Winchester to Mr. Bayard (No. 230). Aug. 17 Congress of the Institute of International Law to meet next at Lausanne; list of subjects to be discussed. 1535
[Page XXX]

correspondence with the legation of switzerland at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
1042 Mr. Kloss to Mr. Bayard 1887. Aug. 13 Industrial Property Convention: The adhesion of the United States, with the reservation in the protocol of 1880, notified to the other Governments; request of the French Government to know the position of the United States, under the Constitution, in regard to trade-marks; the answer to which was sent, defining the position; the French Government not satisfied. Is the restriction in the law of 1881 in regard to marks, which consist merely of a name, applicable to foreigners in the United States? Such marks recognized by the convention; answer requested; the law of 1881 can not be maintained in regard to the States; it is a Federal ordinance, and can be changed by Congress. 1535
1043 Same to same Aug. 20 Prepayment of diplomatic and consular correspondence: Circular note on the subject from the federal council inclosed. 1537
1044 Same to same Sept. 13 Industrial Property Convention: Interpretation given by others of the reservations under which the United States acceded to this convention, an explanation of which was requested from the Department. 1538
1045 Mr. Adee to Mr. Kloss Sept. 16 Prepayment of diplomatic and consular correspondence: All such correspondence wholly prepaid by the United States; correspondence with the postal administrations of the states of the Postal Union franked according to treaty; the arrangement proposed not considered advisable. 1539
1046 Mr. Frey to Mr. Bayard 1888. Jan. 5 Trade-marks: The treaty of 1885 between Switzerland and the United States not ratified by the Senate; the approval or disapproval of the Senate requested to be obtained. 1540
1047 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Frey Jan. 11 Industrial Property Convention: The power of Congress in regard to trade-marks not free from doubt; an opinion will not be expressed pending judicial decision; trade-marks registered according to the statutes on the subject; a decision of the legality of the statute can be obtained by appeal to the courts; the treaty-making powers of Congress; general power over trade-marks, etc., not passed upon by the decision of 1879; an opinion from the Executive without legal weight, but possibly misleading. 1540
1048 Mr. Frey to Mr. Bayard Jan. 31 Industrial Property and Literary and Artistic Conventions: Note in regard to their management from the Swiss Federal council inclosed. 1542
1049 Same to same Feb. 18 Literary and Artistic Works Convention: Communication from the Federal council inclosed. 1542
1050 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Frey Mar. 17 Trade-marks: The treaty between Switzerland and the United States prepared by Mr. Bayard’s predecessor and not submitted to Congress; the question raised under the Industrial Property Convention; the power of Congress in the matter in doubt; legislation and judicial decision; the treaty not thought necessary or advisable. 1543
1051 Mr. Rives to Mr. Kloss June 23 Industrial Property and Literary and Artistic Works Conventions: Arrangement for the economic administration of the two unions approved. 1545
1052 Mr. Bayard to Dr. de Claparede. Nov. 28 Death of President Hertenstein: Sympathy of the United States. 1545

turkey.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
1053 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 51). 1887. Oct 31 Expulsion of Jews from Palestine: Copy of a dispatch from the United States consul at Jerusalem, covering a communication from the governor of Palestine inclosed. 1546
1054 Same to same (No. 53) Nov. 2 American missionaries in Turkey: Copy of a letter from the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions commendatory of the Department’s and legation’s action inclosed. 1547
[Page XXXI]1055 Mr. Straus to Mr. Bayard (No.46). 1887. Dec. 5 Seizure of a book on Mormonism, published without authorization: Requested by the Turkish Government to instruct the consul-general to assist in entering the house of Hadje, an American, to seize the book; the instruction given; translation of a note verbale from the Sublime Porte; copies of dispatch to Mr Pringle and his reply inclosed. 1547
1056 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 58). Dec. 7 Petroleum: The Russian Government reported to be endeavoring to obtain exclusive concession for the erection of tanks for Russian petroleum; investigation to be made, and American interests protected; Mr. Cardwell similarly instructed; copy of Mr. Flag’s letter inclosed 1549
1057 Mr. Strauss to Mr. Bayard (No. 47). Dec. 27 Regulations concerning public instructions proposed placing obstacles in the way of foreign schools in the empire: opposed by all the foreign ministers; translation of the regulations and Mr. Straus’s memoranda to the Turkish ministry inclosed. 1550
1058 Same to same (No. 49). Dec. 30 Missionary schools in Syria and the Vilayet of Adana closed; disposition in the empire to obstruct missionary teaching; permission obtained to open the Syrian schools if the curriculum, text-books, and teachers’ certificates be submitted to local authorities; missionaries fail to comply with the requirements; an arrangement anticipated; schools of Adana closed on account of alleged lack of authorization; telegram sent by the grand vizier to the governor-general of Adana to allow them to open; permission to make a tour in Syria and Adana requested; copies of dispatches from Consul-General Pringle and Consul Bessinger inclosed. 1553
1059 Same to same (No. 52) 1888. Jan. 5 Petroleum: The Porte has no knowledge of the proposed concession to Russia for the erection of tanks; a communication to the Egyptian Government on the subject promised; copy of note verbale to the Porte inclosed. 1566
1060 Same to same (No. 56) Jan. 17 Archaeological explorations: Permission to make explorations, formerly given to all, withdrawn, because of its abuse; explorations being conducted by the Turkish Government; foreign societies allowed to take articles not wanted by Turkish museum; scientific explorations will be favored. 1557
1061 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 67). Jan. 28 Missionary schools in Syria and Adana: Action in regard to approved; permission given for a tour through Syria and Adana. 1558
1062 Mr. Straus to Mr. Bayard (No. 57). Jan. 28 Expulsion of Jews from Jerusalem: The limit of the stay of Jews at Jerusalem extended to three months; the prevention of conflicts between Jews and Christians and the rumored intention of Jews to seize Palestine alleged as the reason; the grand vizier promises to consider the case of the expulsion of American citizens in view of treaty stipulations; United States consul instructed to report all cases; the British ambassador agrees with Mr. Straus’s views. 1559
1063 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 70). Feb. 3 Regulations concerning public instruction in Turkey, Mr. Straus’s course in opposing, approved. 1561
1064 Mr. Straus to Mr. Bayard (No. 61). Feb. 18 Missionary schools in the Vilayet of Adana reopened in obedience to the order of the grand vizier. 1561
1065 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 74). Feb. 21 Expulsion of Jews from Jerusalem, Mr. Straus’s protest against, approved. 1562
1066 M r. Straus to Mr. Bayard (No. 63). Feb. 24 Customs immunities previously enjoyed by missionaries in Turkey lately restricted: Note verbale to the Porte formulated by the dragomans of the foreign legations; similar notes sent by most of the legations; copy of note of American legation inclosed. 1562
1067 Same to same (No. 64). Feb. 27 Eviction of the cavass of the United States consulate at Jerusalem from his house: The grand vizier of opinion that he has the right of domicile of an American citizen, and an explanation asked of the governor of Jerusalem. 1563
[Page XXXII]1068 Same to same (No. 65) 1888. Feb. 27 Passport regulations in Turkey: The dragomans of the foreign missions formulate a note verbale objecting to them; copy of Mr. Straus’s note verbale to the Porte inclosed. 1563
1069 Same to same (No. 66) Feb. 28 Protection of naturalized American citizens who return to the native country: Copy of correspondence with Mr. I. L. Barton inclosed. 1565
1070 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 78). Mar. 5 Expulsion of Jews from Jerusalem: A communication from Mavroyeni Bey on the subject, stating that passports are given only to pilgrims and a further permis de séjour required; creed distinctions of American citizens not recognized; acquiescence in the requirement of a declaration of religion impossible 1566
1071 Same to same (No. 81) Mar. 13 Customs immunities of missionaries, Mr. Straus’s note protesting against the abridgment of, approved. 1568
1072 Same to same (No. 84) Mar. 17 Eviction of the cavass of the United States consulate at Jerusalem: Letter from the consul giving particulars of the case; treaties and agreements with Turkey in regard to extraterritoriality of employés; was the cavass employed when the suit was begun? Unwilling to stretch the extraterritoriality of natives employed by United States legation and consulates, and unwilling to instruct Mr. Gilman that real estate of Ottomans employed as guards at United States consulates is taken out of Turkish jurisdiction; position of the Turkish Government to be ascertained; copy of Mr. Gilman’s letter inclosed. 1568
1073 Same to same (No. 85) Mar. 20 Eviction of the cavass of the United States consulate at Jerusalem: Informal presentation of the case to the grand vizier approved. 1572
1074 Same to same (No. 88) Mar. 23 Passport regulations: Complaint received from consul at Jerusalem of harsh application of them in Palestine; copy of the consul’s dispatch and Department’s answer inclosed. 1572
1075 Mr. Straus to Mr. Bayard (No. 68). Apr. 5 Extradition of H. A. Proios: Note verbale received from the Porte claiming Proios to be a Turkish citizen; Mr. Proios holds a passport granted in 1887 in place of one from the State Department dated 1871; information in regard to Proios’s naturalization desired. 1573
1076 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 92) Apr. 14 Missionary schools: Copy of dispatch from consul at Sivas on the attitude of Turkish provincial authorities in regard to, inclosed. 1574
1077 Mr. Straus to Mr. Bayard (No. 69). Apr. 24 Missionary schools re-opened: Tour through the empire; courtesy met with; good understanding between the governors-general and United States consular officers. 1581
1078 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 95). Apr. 25 Extradition of Hercules A. Proios: No valid ground for remonstrance against the Turkish Government’s action; Proios, apparently by long residence in Turkey, has renounced his American citizenship; proof to the contrary to be carefully considered. 1582
1079 Mr. Straus to Mr. Bayard (No. 71). Apr. 30 Extradition of H. A. Proios: Note verbale from the Porte requesting that the United States consul at Odessa be instructed not to oppose the extradition of Proios; the Porte informed that the legation had no jurisdiction, and would refer the matter to the Department; advises its being made a condition that Proios be tried by United States consul unless not naturalized; copy of the Porte’s note verbale inclosed. 1583
1080 Same to same (No. 77) May 9 Missionary schools: All except one reopened; copy of dispatch from Consul Bissinger inclosed. 1584
1081 Same to same (No. 78) May 9 Archaeological explorations: No relaxation of the Turkish law in regard to explorations and excavations obtained by European archaeologists; little hope of obtaining any for Americans; duplicates of discoveries obtainable through Hamdy Bey; support promised by the grand vizier in obtaining the Porte’s permission for excavators to retain a portion of their discoveries; translation of Turkish law on the subject inclosed. 1584
1082 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 96). May 17 Extradition of H. A. Proios: No. 71 received; consul at Odessa called upon for information. | 1588
[Page XXXIII]1083 Mr. Straus to Mr. Bayard (No. 80). 1888. May 19 Expulsion of Jews from Jerusalem is in obedience to orders of the Porte: The English and French ambassadors instructed to protest against; immediate protest made by Mr. Straus in view of the reference of the matter to the Porte’s legal advisers; copy of note to the Porte inclosed. 1588
1084 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 101). May 24 Missionary schools and tour, No. 69, in regard to, received; the portion relating to the reopening of the schools printed in Consular Reports and forwarded to missionary societies; acknowledgments of the Department for ability and tact displayed. 1590
1085 Mr. Straus to Mr. Bayard (No. 85). May 25 Expulsion of Jews from Jerusalem: Copy of English minister’s note, and translation of the French minister’s to the Porte in regard to, inclosed. 1590
1086 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 104) May 31 Eviction of the cavass of the consulate at Jerusalem: Mr. Gillman writes that the appointment of the cavass was bona fide, that a special permit is not always required, and its absence was cured by the certificate recognizing Kassas as consular cavass and exempting him from military service; copy of Mr. Gillman’s dispatch inclosed. 1591
1087 Same to same (No. 107) June 5 Expulsion of Jews from Palestine; Mr. Straus’s presentation of the matter to the Turkish Government approved. 1592
1088 Mr. Straus to Mr. Bayard (No. 86). June 8 Joint-stock companies: Translation of a note verbale from the Porte inclosing a regulation in regard to joint-stock companies, and copy of a note verbale identique sent in reply by the American and other legations inclosed. 1592
1089 Same to same (No. 87) June 8 Printing offices, New Turkish law in regard to, conflicting with the rights of foreigners; evidence of jealousy of foreigners; protest of the legations; translation of the law and copy of note verbale identique sent by the legations to the Porte inclosed. 1594
1090 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 115). June 28 Printing-office regulations of Turkey, Note verbale objecting to, approved; Article V, requiring the renunciation of the right to the protection of his legation, chiefly objectionable; similar Mexican and South American laws; such a condition not recognized by this Government. 1599
1091 Mr. King to Mr. Bayard (No. 105). Sept. 1 Execution of consular judgments, the disposition of the foreign missions is to accept the Porte’s regulation in regard to; copy of the collective notes on the subject sent by all the foreign missions, and the Porte’s reply, covering the regulations, inclosed. 1600
1092 Same to same (No. 109) Sept. 11 Eviction of the cavass of the consulate at Jerusalem: The manner of the eviction doubtless unwarranted, but Mr. Pringle’s suggestion will be adopted and no action taken without instructions; note to Mr. Pringle and his reply inclosed. 1602
1093 Same to same (No. 112) Sept. 18 Extradition of H. A. Proios: Notes to Porte, asking, at the consul-general’s request, the evidence against Proios, not answered; intention of the Porte not to give evidence made plain at interview; Proios refuses to be examined by the sanitary commission; two notes from the Porte, requesting such examination, answered that Proios could not be forced to answer; copy of correspondence with Consul-General Pringle and the Porte inclosed. 1603
1094 Mr. Bayard to Mr. King (No. 134). Sept 21 Extradition of H. A. Proios: Copy of protest of Proios inclosed. 1607
1095 Mr. King to Mr. Bayard (No. 115). Sept. 24 Expulsion from Jaffa of three Jews, bearing American passports, threatened: The minister of foreign affairs and grand vizier requested to send preventive telegrams; copy of Mr. Gillman’s dispatch to Mr. Pringle and Mr. King’s note to the Porte inclosed. 1615
1096 Same to same (No. 124) Oct. 5 Restoration of real property on termination of lease, note from the Porte in regard to; it will be considered by foreign ministers; copy of note inclosed. 1616
1097 Mr. Rives to Mr. Straus (No. 140). Oct. 15 Expulsion of Jews from Jaffa; Mr. King’s action approved; copy of instruction to the United States consul at Jerusalem inclosed. 1617
[Page XXXIV]1098 Mr. King to Mr. Bayard (No. 129). 1888. Oct. 22 Expulsion of Jews from Jerusalem and Jaffa; Copy of notes from the Porte in regard to, inclosed. 1619
1099 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 150). Oct. 26 Extradition of H. A. Proios: Recognition of his citizenship to be withheld and his passport to be canceled; copy of Department’s letter to Proios sent to United States Consul-General Pringle and herewith inclosed. 1620
1100 Mr. King to Mr. Bayard (No. 133). Nov. 3 Archæological explorations: Concession beyond the law obtained, giving explorers the ownership to certain articles discovered and the right to export them. 1623
1101 Mr. Adee to Mr. Straus (No. 156). Nov. 6 Expulsion of Jews from Palestine: It is not supposed that Mr. Straus will take a decided ground as to the right of colonization in mass at the joint consideration of the Porte’s note, but leave himself at liberty to consider individual cases of American Jews. 1624
1102 Mr. Straus to Mr. Bayard (No. 139). Nov. 14 Publication of the Bible in Turkish granted: Decision as to the binding force of Aali Pasha’s note deferred. 1624
1103 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Straus (No. 159). Nov. 21 Archæological explorations: satisfaction of the Department that permission will be granted representatives of the University of Pennsylvania to make explorations in Assyria and Babylonia. 1626

correspondence with the legation of turkey at washington.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
1104 Mavroyeni Bey to Mr. Bayard. 1888.Mar. 2 Expulsion of Jews from Palestine: Jews not allowed to remain over three months in Palestine; the conditions on which the sojourn is permitted. 1627
1105 Mr. Bayard to Mavroyeni Bey. Mar. 5 Expulsion of Jews from Palestine: Note of the 2d instant received; the matter pending at Constantinople; certificates as to intention not given citizens going abroad. 1627
1106 Mavroyeni Bey to Mr. Bayard. Oct. 30 Expulsion of Jews from Palestine: The regulations recited in note of the 2d instant only applicable to Jews emigrating in a body, and no obstacle will be raised to the sojourn of others. 1628
1107 Mr. Rives to Mavroyeni Bey. Nov. 3 Expulsion of Jews from Palestine: Note announcing that the regulations relative to the sojourn of Jews in Palestine apply only to those emigrating in a body, received. 1628

egypt.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
1108 Mr. Cardwell to Mr. Rives (No. 201). 1888. Jan. 4 Suppression of the corvée: The adhesion of the United States asked by Egypt to the partial suppression of the corvée: This relates to the law requiring labor not exceeding thirty days on dikes, canals, etc.; enforced labor proper and necessary on account of the great expense; indefinite abolition of the corvée contemplated by European powers signing at London; France and Russia objected to this decree; the powers now asked to assent to a partial suspension of the corvée, $1,250,000 to be appropriated for the employment of voluntary labor; the thirty days’ limit to remain in force or be extended if necessary; draught of decree inclosed. 1629
1109: Mr. Bayard to Mr. Cardwell (No. 127). Feb. 4 Suppression of the corvée: Neither the approval nor disapproval of the United States called for in the matter of the khedival decree suppressing the corvée: The United States have no concern in the matter, further than to see that no discrimination against Americans is proposed, but as a refusal may embarrass the Khedive, gives a qualified consent; Department’s No. 13 to be consulted; anything in the minister’s note or the decree conflicting with these instruct ions to be reported, and copies of the note and decree sent for the files of the Department. 1630
[Page XXXV]1110 Mr. Carwell to Mr. Rives (No.209). 1888. Feb. 12 Increase in number of American tourists from a dozen, in the winter of 1884–’85, to nearly 2,000 in 1887–’88; climate delightful; no American colony and the good offices of the United States representatives frequently required; consideration shown them by the Khedive and other Egyptians; greater numbers of Americans expected in the future. 1631
1111 Mr. Rives to Mr. Cardwell (No. 133). Mar. 7 Satisfaction of the Department with his efforts to promote the interests of Americans. 1632
1112 Mr. Caldwell to Mr. Rives (No. 212). Mar. 10 A publication showing the importance of American missions in Egypt as an educating agency, to which reference has been so often made, inclosed. 1632

uruguay.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
1113 Mr. Bacon to Mr. Bayard (No. 242). 1888. Aug. 26 Private International Law Congress opened August 25: All South American States except Venezuela and Colombia represented; subjects for discussion. 1635

venezuela.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
1114 Mr. Scott to Mr. Bayard (No. 187). 1887. Sept. 3 Closing of Venezuelan ports against Curacao contemplated: Expulsion of three Venezuelans from Curacao demanded, with the threat of stopping all intercourse if it were not done; the demand refused by the governor of Curaçao; substance of the governor’s reply; the serious injury which will result to American commerce; blockade of Venezuelen ports by Holland, assisted by England, reported probable. 1636
1115 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Scott (No. 126). Sept. 22 Closing of Venezuelan ports against Curacao: Such a measure viewed with great concern; similar case in 1882 and 1883 when duty of 30 percent levied on foreign goods transshipped in a foreign colony en route; decree revoking it; the transference of merchandise from one United States vessel to the other at Curacao not a break in the voyage; the measure, if a suspension of commercial intercourse with the United States, will provoke remonstrance and countervailing measures. 1637
1116 Mr. Scott to Mr. Bayard (No. 194). Oct. 17 Closing of Venezuelan ports against Curacao: The trouble between the two countries settled by the expulsion of two of the three ref refugees. 1639
1117 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Scott (No. 136). Nov. 8 Closing of Venezuelan ports against Curacao: The cause removed, but the principle continuing; the views of the Department to be presented to the Venezuelan Government, informally stating that the right contended for would be insisted on should occasion arise. 1639
1118 Mr. Scott to Mr. Bayard (No. 204). Nov. 30 Closing of Venezuelan ports against Curaçao: The views of the Department will be communicated to the Venezuelan Government. 1640
1119 Same to same (No. 210) Dec. 23 Closing of Venezuelan ports against Curaçao: The Department’s views concurred in by the Venezuelan minister who promises that no damage shall result to American commerce. 1640
1120 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Scott (No. 156). 1888. Mar. 22 Visiting United States vessels not permitted to the United States consul at Puerto Cabello unless furnished with a permit in writing; a general regulation dispensing with a written permit in such cases to be asked of the Venezuelan Government. 1640
1121 Same to same (No. 159) Apr. 12 Law requiring delivery of ship’s papers to Venezuelan customs officers: Instructions of December 4, 1885, to protest against the law repeated; previous correspondence on the subject; report to be made; correspondence in regard to a similar law of Colombia which was repealed. 1642
[Page XXXVI]1122 Mr. Scott to Mr. Bayard (No. 232). 1888. Apr. 28 Obsequies of General Paez, an account of the 1643
1123 Same to same (No. 236) May 23 Law requiring the delivery of all ship’s papers to the customs authorities at the port of entry in Venezuela will be examined into and objections to it presented to that Government; delay advised in view of the disturbed political condition. 1644
1124 Same to same (No. 237) May 24 Obsequies of General Paez: President Lopez’s letter to President Cleveland inclosed. 1645
1125 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Scott (No. 166). Jane 5 Law requiring delivery of ship’s papers to Venezuelan customs officers: The matter not to be deterred until the establishment of a more responsible government, but to be presented now. 1645
1126 Mr. Scott to Mr. Bayard (No. 255). July 31 Law requiring delivery of ship’s papers to Venezuelan customs officers: Note to the minister of foreign affairs inclosed. 1646

circulars.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
1127 18—. Citizenship and naturalization: Information in regard to. 1648
1128 To the consular officers of the United States at seaports. 1888. Mar. 13 American seaman, meaning of the term; Mr. Bayard to Mr. Fairchild, February 11, 1888, and Mr. Fairchild to Mr. Bayard, February 28, 1888, inclosed. 1655
1129 To the diplomatic officers of the United States. July 13 Conference of American States for the settlement of disputes by arbitration: Invitations to be extended to American Governments to attend. 1658
1130 To the diplomatic officers of the United States in Europe. July 26 Life-saving institutions, Reports, designation, and addresses of, to be procured for the Treasury: that Department will give its reports in return. 1659
1131 To the diplomatic officers July 30 of the United States accredited to maritime power 8. Maritime conference: Invitations to be extended to maritime powers to confer at Washington upon the means of securing greater safety for lite and property at sea; the special subjects for discussion enumerated. 1659
1132 To the diplomatic and consular officers of the United States. Aug. 20 Passports: Forms of applications for, and general instructions in regard to, inclosed. 1662
1133 To the consular officers of the United States. Aug. 25 Status of naval seamen after conviction m consular courts, Amendment of the circular of August 19, 1887, in regard to. 1665
1134 Proclamation by the President. Apr. 16 Tonnage duties removed on vessels coming from the ports of the island of Guadeloupe. 1666
[Page XXXVII]

SUPPLEMENTARY SYNOPSES.

Supplement A.

papers relating to the case of lord sackville.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
A Charles F. Murchison to Sir L. S. Sackville West. 1888. Sept. 4 The Presidential election: Englishmen, induced to become United States citizens by Mr. Cleveland’s friendly attitude towards Great Britain, alarmed by his hostility on the fishery question; if it be merely to gain popularity, to be changed after his re-election, will vote for him. California evenly divided between the parties; Mr. Harrison an enemy to British interests; the balance of power with naturalized Englishmen; confidential advice as to Mr. Cleveland’s policy requested that Englishmen may be advised how to vote. 1667
B Sir L. S. Sackville West to Charles F. Murchison. Sept. 13 The Presidential election: Either political party openly favoring Great Britain would lose popularity; the Democratic party aware of this, yet desirous of maintaining friendly relations with Great Britain and settling Canadian questions; allowance to be made on account of the approaching election; every reason to believe that Mr. Cleveland, while maintaining his position, will be conciliatory; an article from the “New York Times” inclosed. 1668
1 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps (telegram). Oct. 25 The Murchison correspondence shown to Mr. Bayard by Lord Sackville, who said his letter was meant to be kept private; amazement and condemnation of Mr. Bayard expressed to him; reflections subsequently made by Lord Sackville in newspaper interviews upon the President and Senate; Lord Salisbury’s attention to be called to the matter, and confidence expressed that he will disapprove it. 1669
2 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard (telegram). Oct. 26 Lord Salisbury absent from town; will see him the 28th; is it certain Lord Sackville was not incorrectly reported? 1669
3 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps (telegram). Oct. 26 The motives of the President and Senate in regard to Canadian questions impugned in his correspondence and in public interviews by Lord Sackville, and his usefulness at an end; public sentiment aroused; Lord Salisbury should understand the necessity of immediate action. 1670
4 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard (telegram). Oct. 28 Lord Salisbury declines to act until receipt of Lord Sackville’s precise language and explanation; the letter alone not regarded as warranting his recall; a recall will end his career; not so a dismissal by the United States, for which there are precedents; delay on the part of the British Government anticipated; advises dismissal, if effective action is necessary; this view supported by the London press; the requirements of comity satisfied; explanations can follow. 1670
5 Report by the Secretary of State to the President. Oct. 29 A letter written by C. F. Murchison, an Englishman, naturalized in the United States, to Lord Sackville, asking advice how he and his fellow countrymen (Englishmen, naturalized citizens of the United States) should vote at the [Page XXXVIII]Presidential election for the best interests of England, and containing reflections upon the United States Government in regard to controversies with Great Britain; reply made by Lord Sackville giving the advice and sanctioning the aspersions on the United States Government; subsequent utterances of Lord Sackville reported in newspapers impugning the faith of the United States, which have not been publicly denied; the question whether such conduct is compatible with the dignity of the United States; the complete severance of the original allegiance of Englishmen settled by treaty of 1870; advises that the attention of the Attorney-General of the United be called to section 5335, United States Revised Statute (quoted), as bearing upon Murchison’s conduct; the facts and sentiments of the United States Government communicated to the British; necessary to consider whether intercourse through the present British minister shall not be discontinued; precedents for such action. 1671
6 Mr. Bayard to Lord Sackville. Oct. 30 Lord Sackville’s continuance in his present official position not compatible with the good relations of the two Governments; a passport inclosed. 1672
7 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps (telegram). Oct, 30 Lord Sackville informed that his continuance in his present official position is no longer acceptable, and a passport given him; another channel of intercourse between the two Governments necessary; Her Majesty’s Government to be so informed. 1673
8 Lord Sackville to Mr. Bayard Oct. 30 Acknowledging the receipt of the letter requesting his withdrawal and of the passport which it inclosed. 1673
9 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps (No. 990). Oct. 31 Reflections upon the conduct of Lord Sackville; he has been informed that his official position is no longer acceptable; copies of the Sackville-Murchison correspondence, of the interviews with Lord Sackville, published in the New York Tribune, and the report of the Secretary of State to the President, inclosed 1673
10 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard (No. 842). Nov. 2 Lord Salisbury informed of the Murchison letter and newspaper interviews reflecting upon the President and Senate of the United States; that public sentiment was aroused; that the United States Government declined intercourse through him and requested his recall; reply of Lord Salisbury that the letter being private was not sufficient cause for recall, and that action could not be taken until informed of the language and explanation of Lord Sackville; that a recall would ruin his prospects—not necessarily so a dismissal by the United States; believed that the British Government would neither act quickly nor decisively and would prefer action to be taken by the United States Government; This only inferred from the remarks of Lord Salisbury; the impossibility of Lord Sackville’s remaining at Washington conceded by the London press at first, his dismissal now considered an affront to Great Britain; the language used by Lord Sackville, and details requested for Lord Salisbury; cablegrams to and from the Department; correspondence with Lord Salisbury and extracts from London papers inclosed. 1676
11 Same to same (No. 845) Nov. 7 Correspondence in regard to the Sackville-Murchison incident given to press by the British Government, and will probably be laid before Parliament the 8th instant; opinions expressed in Parliament will be communicated; delay in publishing the correspondence of the Department until informed of the proposed action of Great Britain advised; cable dispatch, the published Sackville correspondence, and extracts from London papers, inclosed. 1697
[Page XXXIX]12 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps 1888. Nov. 20 Lord Sackville’s interviews with newspaper reporters held in Washington, and telegraphed to other places; the number of reporters unknown; newspaper accounts previously sent; no contradiction or retraction by Lord Sackville: wide-spread publication of interviews. 1703
13 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard (No. 858). Dec. 1 Extract from the “Times” containing question asked in the House of Commons, and answer of Sir James Fergusson, with respect to the appointment of a new minister to Washington, and a leader from the Daily News inclosed. 1704
14 Same to same (No. 861) Dec. 5 Copy of note to Lord Salisbury concerning the dismissal of Lord Sackville, and covering papers connected therewith, inclosed. 1705
15 Same to same (No. 874) Dec. 29 Lord Salisbury informed that his note has been transmitted to the Department for its consideration, leaving it open to the Department to reply; the obligation of a Government to withdraw its minister at the request of the Government to which he is accredited stated simply to Lord Salisbury, without supporting argument; note from Lord Salisbury inclosed. 1710
16 Same to same (No. 893) 1889. Jan. 12 Official correspondence of the British Government and article in the Morning Post inclosed. 1712
17 Same to same (No. 901) Jan. 16 Extracts from the Times and Daily News in regard to the official published correspondence inclosed. 1714
18 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps (No. 1054). Jan. 30 Agrees that the principle involved is more important than the particular case; desires not to discuss the sufficiency, but give the reasons for Lord Sackville’s dismissal to his Government in a friendly way; Lord Sackville’s offense interference in domestic politics; the Murchison letter and reply considered; the character of Lord Sackville’s act not affected by the motive of his correspondent, and he aware that his letter would be shown to others; the correspondence not only interfering in domestic affairs, but impugning the motives of the President; the situation made worse by subsequent newspaper interviews, not publicly denied; Lord Sackville’s excuse for not doing so; his private letter of denial not co-extensive with the language used, and appearing to make a personal issue, which can not be accepted; the President’s motives again impugned in his letter to Lord Salisbury; the principle governing the recall and dismissal of ministers, and Lord Salisbury’s position considered; case of Lord Stratford against it; Sir H. Bulwer’s case not a parallel with the present; objection personal to Lord Sackville; the present issue not whether reason should be given for asking recall of a minister, but whether, when interference in domestic affairs has been alleged, the minister’s Government has a right to decide his culpability; the Department’s position is, as laid down by Calvo, that a minister should be recalled at request; no need to give reasons; if the offense be grave he may be dismissed, and also if not recalled at request; Lord Salisbury’s position inconsistent with national independence; the nature of a minister; his dismissal not a cause of war; regret of the President at the incident. 1718
Appendix British official publication, United States, No. 4 (1888). 1725
[Page XL]

Supplement B.

papers relating to the treaty of extradition, signed june 25, 1886, by the plenipotentiaries of the united states and great britain.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
1 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard (No. 143). 1885. Nov. 23 Interview with Lord Salisbury for the purpose of renewing the negotiations; engaged in the mean while in reviewing the draught; objections to it submitted before taking ground on it with the British Government; objections to allowing extradition for the following grounds enumerated in the draft; in Article II for obtaining goods or money of $50 value by false pretenses; in Article II, receiving goods, etc., of $50 value, knowing them to have been obtained by false pretense; in Article III, abduction and kidnapping; in Article IV, “for participation in any of the aforesaid crimes,” etc.; objections to the following provisions: In Article III, that “neither government shall be required to grant extradition for an offense of which, as it is stated or described in the demand for extradition, it has jurisdiction;” in Article VII, that a fugitive, when extradited, may be tried for any previous offense enumerated in Article II; in Article VIII, that an indictment shall be prima facie sufficient evidence for extradition, subject to rebuttal. Delays will result from subordinate parts of the proposed treaty; submits a proposition to extend the treaty of 1842; the extension favored by Lord Salisbury, and can be immediately effected; arguments in favor of a concise treaty of extradition and against a too much elaborated one; proposed convention supplemental to the treaty of 1842 inclosed. 1730
2 Same to same (No. 307) 1886. June 26 The convention extending the provisions of the treaty of 1842, relating to extradition, signed; the convention substantially as approved, and so not submitted, to avoid delay; unobjectionable, but unnecessary clauses added: (1) extradition is made to extend to persons convicted; (2) four crimes added to the seven specified by treaty of 1842; other crimes, which should have been added, would have made agreement difficult; (3) the restriction of the application of the convention, as regards the added crimes, to those subsequently committed, usual; (4) no extradition for political offenses an established rule, and a provision to that effect unnecessary but harmless; (5) the clause allowing trial only for the offense named in the extradition papers, until opportunity to return has been given, approved by the Department, and necessary by act of Parliament; (6) Article VII superfluous, but harmless; only expressing the law that would any way apply; the convention understood by both parties not to prevent the negotiation of a more elaborate treaty; such a treaty not advisable; the convention and treaty of 1842 sufficient; copy of the convention inclosed. 1740

Supplement C.

papers relating to the seizure of british sealing vessels in behring sea.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
1 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. 1886. Sept. 27 Seizure of three British Columbian sealing schooners, the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton, by United States revenue officers reported; particulars requested 1746
2 Same to same Oct. 21 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: Protests against it in the name of his Government. 1746
[Page XLI]3 Earl of Iddesleigh to Sir L. S. Sackville West. 1886. Oct. 30 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton, by United States revenue officers: Report on, awaited; further details received, and the case to be presented to the United States Government; the schooners seized in the open sea, 60 miles from shore; the crew of two turned adrift at San Francisco, that of the third, the seal skins and schooners kept at Oonalaska; account as published in the Alaskan; sovereignty over all Behring Sea east of the westerly boundary of Alaska apparently claimed by the United States, and British vessels seized in support of it; the seizure a violation of international law; Mr. Bayard to be acquainted with these facts and requested, if they be correct, that reparation be made for the seizure and consequent losses. 1746
4 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville west. Nov. 12 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: Delay owing to non-receipt of information from the Treasury Department; still awaiting report of the trial and judgment; will send it when received; communications acknowledged. 1748
5 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. Dec. 7 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: Vessels preparing for seal fishing; desires to know if they will be seized for fishing outside the territorial waters of Alaska, and that assurance be given that they will not, pending settlement of the question. 1749
6 Same to same 1887. Jan. 9 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and. Thornton: Instructed to again bring the matter to Mr. Bayard’s attention; previous correspondence; the vessels seized 60 miles from shore; the masters of the seized vessels imprisoned and fined; this a violation of international law; if these facts are true, reparation expected; hopes the cause of delay has been removed. 1749
7 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Jan. 12 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: Information asked of the Attorney-General as soon as requested by Sir Lionel; telegram sent to Portland to expedite matters; the circumstances of the seizure not known, but must be devoid of uncertainty; no avoidance of international obligation need be apprehended. 1751
8 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. Feb. 1 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: Requests to know if papers in regard to, have been received. 1751
9 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Feb. 3 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: Papers expected in a fortnight; discontinuance of all pending proceedings, and release of the vessels and prisoners ordered by the President, without conclusion of any questions involved in the seizures. 1752
10 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. Feb. 4 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: Acknowledges Mr. Bayard’s note of February 3. 1752
11 Same to same Apr. 4 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: Requests to know if seal schooners will be molested when not near land, and if the papers relating to the trial of those seized have been received. 1753
12 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Apr. 12 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton United States revenue officers: The records of the trial under examination at the Department; the framing of regulations governing the seal fisheries delayed by their remoteness and special peculiarities; United States laws on the subject in Revised Statutes, sections 1956–1971, in force for seventeen years, and but one violation; regulations to prevent killing of seals will be communicated when determined on; sections 1956–1971, Revised Statutes, inclosed. 1753
13 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. July 8 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: Copy of judicial record requested. 1756
14 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. July 11 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: Two copies of the judicial proceedings in regard to, inclosed. 1757
[Page XLII]15 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. 1887. Aug. 11 Seizure of the British sealing schooners Grace, Dolphin, and W. P. Say ward by United States revenue officers, far from Sitka, reported by the British commander-in-chief, and also that several others were seen being towed in; the understanding of the British Government, from Mr. Bayard’s note of February 3, was that pending the settlement of the question no seizure would be made. 1788
16 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Aug. 13 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, and W. P. Say ward: No promise in the note of February 3 that pending a settlement no seizures would be made; no information on the subject; note of February 3 bad reference to previous seizures; will ascertain whether the circumstances of the last seizures will admit of their being released. 1788
17 Marquis of Salisbury to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Sept. 10 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton by United States revenue officers: Summary of previous instructions and correspondence of Sir Lionel with Mr. Bayard; Mr. Bayard understood to say there would be no more seizures pending a settlement; subsequent seizures reported; no justification for the condemnation of the three vessels; they were seized outside the limit of maritime jurisdiction; the claim of Russia to jurisdiction over Behring Sea. not acknowledged by England or the United States, and therefore no right over it was received by the United States with the purchase of Alaska; England not affected by agreements of the United States with Russia; the position of the United States in regard to the claim of Russian jurisdiction shown by their official correspondence with the Russian minister; this dispatch to be communicated to Mr. Bayard; compensation to the crews and owners of the vessels expected. 1789
18 Sir L. S. Sackville west to Mr. Bayard. Sept. 29 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton by United States revenue officers: The schooners not released; reason desired. 1793
19 Same to same Oct. 4 Seizure of the Alfred Adams: The Adams boarded by United States revenue officers, the skins and arms on board confiscated, and a letter given the captain to be delivered to the United States marshal at Sitka, but which he sent to Lord Landsdowne; the envelope worn through during: transmission; the letter inclosed. 1793
20 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Garland. Oct. 7 Seizure of the Alfred Adams: Transmits the British minister’s note of October 4. 1794
21 Same to same Oct. 8 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: Transmits note of Sir Lionel West, complaining that they have not been released; information requested. 1794
22 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Oct. 11 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton by United States revenue officers: Awaiting an answer from the Attorney-General in regard to delay in releasing the vessels; the delay not due to the Government. 1795
23 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. Oct. 12 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, and W. P. Sayward: The release of the vessels requested, reserving the question of compensation; deposition of the Sayward’s mate that no seals had been taken in Behring Sea inclosed. 1795
24 Mr. Garland to Mr. Bayard. Oct. 12 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: First telegram directing their release thought not genuine by the marshal and not obeyed; a second sent. 1796
25 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Oct. 13 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: The first telegram directing their release through mistake not obeyed; a second sent; regret that the delay was due to officials of the Government. 1796
26 Same to same Oct. 13 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, and W. P. Sayward: Note requesting their release received; the facts stated in the inclosed deposition will be investigated. 1797
[Page XLIII]27 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Garland. 1887. Oct. 13 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: Surprised that they were not released; the British minister informed. 1797
28 Mr. Garland to Mr. Bayard. Oct. 15 Seizure of the Carolena, Onward, and Thornton: Telegram directing their release sent before receipt of Mr. Bayard’s letter; a letter sent since to the marshal. 1797
29 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. Oct. 19 Seizure of the Alfred Adams, and the continuation of such proceeding protested against. 1798
30 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Oct. 22 Seizure of the Alfred Adams: Protest of the 19th instant received. 1798
31 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. Oct 26 Seizure of the Alfred Adams, report of the Canadian minister of marine and fisheries on, and other papers relating to the, inclosed. 1798
32 Mr. Garland to Mr. Bayard. 1888. Mar. 9 Seizure of the Carolena etc.: The bond indicated in the memorandum can be given; doubtful at first as to cases of forfeiture; the form of the bond: memorandum inclosed. 1803
33 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. Mar. 26 Preservation of fur-seals: The Russian Government communicated with in reference to the proposed concerted action of the United States, Great Britain, and Russia; this action not an admission of the claims of the United States to jurisdiction in Behring Sea, nor affecting claims for compensation to the vessel seized. 1804
34 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Mar. 30 Preservation of fur-seals: Acknowledges receipt of Sir Lionel West’s note of March 26. 1804
35 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. Apr. 2 Seizure of British vessels fishing in Behring Sea, report that the United States has ordered; importance of enabling the British Government to contradict the report. 1805
36 Same to same Apr. 18 Claims for compensation to British schooners seized and warned off by United States authorities in Behring Sea just received; wishes to know if the United States will agree to a mixed commission to inquire into the right to compensation, and amount. 1805
37 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Apr. 21 Claims for compensation to vessels seized: The cases in court, pending appeal; better to await the decision of the appellate court. 1805
38 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. Apr. 30 Seizure of the Carolena, etc.: Proposes extension of time for appealing the cases until diplomatic negotiations for their settlement can be had, in the failure of which, the legal remedy will not be prejudiced; the skippers to be released on security, this understood to have been done. 1805
39 Same to same May 25 Seizure of the Carolena, etc.: Reply asked to the above note of April 30. 1806
40 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. May 28 Seizure of the Carolena, etc., interview requested in the afternoon in regard to. 1806
41 Same to same May 28 Seizure of the Carolena, etc.: Delay in answering note of the 30th ultimo, due to desire for explanation of the word “skippers;” no “skippers detained, but the proceedings in rem; an extension of time for appeal favored, but not within the power of the Executive; the prosecution will extend the time by agreement with defendants as far as possible. 1806
42 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. May 28 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: The proctors of some of the vessels having failed to appeal, the sentences have become final; the right of release on bond has been lost, and only diplomatic remedy left. 1807
43 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. May 29 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Reply sent to notes of April 30 and May 25; note of 28th May received; regrets the failure to take appeal; will ask the Attorney-General what can be done. 1807
44 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Garland. May 29 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Incloses copy of the British minister’s note of 28th instant; can the decrees of condemnation be reviewed? 1808
45 Mr. Garland to Mr. Bayard. May 31 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: No method known by which the decrees of condemnation can be reviewed. 1808
[Page XLIV]46 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. 1888. Aug. 6 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Four British ships taken to Port Town-send for sale in consequence of the judge refusing to bond the owners on the ground that the application was too late; requests postponement of sale pending decision as to legality of seizure. 1808
47 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Jenks Aug. 8 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Note of Sir L. West requesting postponement of sale of vessels inclosed; hopes delay will be granted, if it will not cause irreparable loss. 1809
48 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Aug. 8 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Copy of note asking postponement of sale of vessels sent the Attorney-General. 1809
49 Mr. Jenks to Mr. Bayard Aug. 10 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Postponement of sale ordered, and the marshal directed to take bonds in lieu of the vessels. 1809
50 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Aug. 13 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Sale of the vessels ordered to be postponed, and marshal ordered to take bonds in lieu. 1810
51 Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard. Aug. 16 Seizure of the Carolena, etc.: Mr. Bayard’s note of August 13 received. 1810
52 Mr. Jenks to Mr. Bayard Sept. 3 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Opinion regarding immediate sale of three vessels requested; copies of letters from the United States marshal inclosed. 1810
53 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Sept. 10 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Opinion as to immediate sale asked of the Acting Attorney-General; his letter inclosed and an opinion on it requested. 1811
54 Mr. Jenks to Mr. Bayard Sept. 26 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: The three vessels transferred to Marsh al Hamilton and anchored at Port Townsend; advice as to their sale requested, owing to the cost of keeping them and diminution in value; letters of Mr. Grant and Mr. Hamilton to Mr. Garland inclosed. 1812
55 Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West. Sept. 27 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Letter from the Attorney-General stating that the four vessels are at Port Townsend; none bonded; the appraisement of three said to be too high; the cost of keeping and advancing season make a sale necessary; assurances against loss desired if the sale be longer postponed. 1813
56 Mr. Garland to Mr. Bayard. Oct. 11 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Advice as to expediency of selling vessels requested; letter from United States attorney for Alaska inclosed. 1814
57 Lord Sackville to Mr. Bayard Oct. 12 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck: Re-appraisement of the Grace and Dolphin, and acceptance of the bonds of the owner of the Anna Beck requested by the privy council of Canada; extract from the minutes of the privy council inclosed. 1815
58 Mr. Rives to Mr. Garland Oct. 17 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, and Anna Beck: British minister’s note asking re-appraisement, etc., inclosed; views requested. 1815
59 Mr. Garland to Mr. Bayard Oct. 20 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: The libels heard on stipulations of the masters’ attorney; the vessels condemned and ordered to be sold; time fer appeal expired; the owners desirous of a sale; the aggregate tonnage, 279; vessels may be a total loss if kept advises an early sale. 1816
60 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Garland Oct. 27 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Advises immediate sale. 1816
61 Mr. Garland to Mr. Bayard Nov. 17 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Letter advising sale received; United States marshal directed to sell as speedily as possible. 1817
62 J Mr. Bayard to Mr. Garland Nov. 17 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Mr. Garland’s letter of October 17 received; desires to be informed of steps taken. 1817
[Page XLV]63 Mr. Herbert to Mr. Bayard 1888. Nov. 23 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: The owners of the Ada do not object to the appraisement. 1817
64 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Garland Nov. 27 Seizure of the Grace. Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: The owners of the Ada do not object to the appraisement; Mr. Herbert’s note of the 27th ultimo inclosed. 1818
65 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Herbert Nov. 28 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Note of the 23d instant received. 1818
66 Mr. Herbert to Mr. Bayard Dec. 5 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Incloses copy of Lord Sackville’s note of October 12, to which no answer has been received; an answer requested. 1818
67 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Herbert Dec. 10 Seizure of the Grace, Dolphin, Anna Beck, and Ada: Lord Sackville’s note of October 12 requesting re-appraisement communicated to the Attorney-General by whom an immediate sale was advised; the opinion concurred in by the Department; as delay would only result in loss, the sale ordered; further information requested, and when received will be communicated. 1818
68 Mr. Stevens to Mr. Rives (No. 388). Dec. 31 Seizure of the Araunah off Copper Island: All the papers in regard to, given Mr. Stevens by Captain Sieward; all the latter’s expenses paid by British agents, except those paid by the Russian Government, and a small personal sum; the most pertinent papers inclosed. 1819

Supplement D.

papers relating to the negotiations for the conclusion of treaties for the protection of fur-seals in behring sea.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
france.
1 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Vignaud (No. 256). 1887. Aug. 19 Fur-seals: Points out danger of indiscriminate killing of; instructs legation to invite French Government to enter into a convention with the United States to restrict the taking of; identic instructions have been sent to United States legations in Germany, Great Britain, Japan, Russia, Sweden, and Norway. 1824
2 Mr. McLane to Mr. Bayard (No. 490). Oct. 22 Fur-seals: The French Government is willing to consider favorably any project of a convention for the protection of; incloses a note from Mr. Flourens to that effect. 1824
3 Mr. Bayard to Mr. McLane (No. 271). Nov. 18 Fur-seals: The Department is gratified at the French Government’s response; further instructions will be sent. 1825
4 Same to same (No. 293) 1888. Feb. 7 Fur-seals: Incloses printed copies of instruction No. 782 to minister of the United States at London discussing the question of the protection of. 1825
germany
5 Mr. Coleman to Mr. Bayard (No. 498). 1887. Sept. 1 Fur-seals: Incloses copy of note to the German Government, inviting it to enter into a convention with the United States to restrict the taking of. 1826
great britain.
6 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard (No. 618). Nov. 12 Fur-seals: Mr. Phelps states that he has had a conversation with Lord Salisbury on the subject of the protection of, and that Great Britain acquiesces in the proposal of the United States, but desires a sketch of the system of regulations proposed. 1827
[Page XLVI]7 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps (No. 733). 1887. Nov. 25 Fur-seals: The Department is gratified at the acceptance by the British Government of the proposal made by the United States; the subject will receive further attention. 1827
8 Same to same (No. 782) 1888. Feb. 7 Fur-seals: Describes habits and life of; proposes to prevent the hilling of, with fire-arms, etc., between April 15 and November 1, anywhere north of 50° north latitude and between 160° west of Greenwich and 170° east of same meridian of longitude; shows the result of the absence of protection in the South Pacific; incloses memorandum by Mr. Clark on the fur-seal fisheries, also a letter from Mr. H. W. Elliott on the same subject. 1828
9 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard (No. 690). Feb. 18 Fur-seals: Has communicated copy of instruction No. 782 to Lord Salisbury, and asked for an interview with him; has also asked for an interview with the Russian embassador; asks whether legislation by Congress would not be needed to carry out proposed regulations. 1836
10 Same to same (No. 692) Feb. 25 Fur-seals: Has had interviews with Lord Salisbury and with the Russian embassador; Lord Salisbury assents to proposed arrangement, and the Russian embassador regards it favorably and will communicate with his Government. 1836
11 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps (No. 810). Mar. 2 Fur-seals: Refers to the advisability of a convention; legislation to carry out regulations would probably be needed; thinks a system of joint policing of the seas may be devised, as in slave-trade convention of 1862 with Great Britain; incloses copy of North Sea fisheries treaty of 1882. 1837
12 Mr. White to Mr. Bayard (telegram). Apr. 7 Fur-seals: Will have an interview shortly with Lord Salisbury and Mr. de Staal; has just learned from Mr. de Staal that the Russian Government wished to include the seas about the Commander Islands, and the sea of Okhotsk. 1838
13 Same to same (No. 720) Apr. 7 Fur-seals: Repeats statements of telegram of April 7. 1838
14 Mr. Bayard to Mr. White (telegram). Apr. 9 Fur-seals: The United States do not object to the extension of the arrangement to the whole of Behring Sea. 1839
15 Same to same (No. 849) Apr. 18 Fur-seals: Repeats statements of his telegram of April 9; Okhotsk Sea can be included. 1840
16 Mr. White to Mr. Bayard (No. 725). Apr. 20 Fur-seals: Conference held; Mr. de Staal proposes the prohibition of importation into the protected area of alcoholic drinks, fire-arms, gunpowder, and dynamite; Lord Salisbury proposes to include that part of sea of Okhotsk and of the Pacific north of north latitude 47° and to close the protected season on October 1 instead of November 1. 1840
17 Mr. Bayard to Mr. White’ (No. 864). May 1 Fur-seals: The Department does not object to the extension of the area, and proposes October 15 as close of the protected season; the convention should contain a clause providing for subsequent adhesion of other powers; thinks it advisable to regulate the subject of prohibited imports separately. 1840
18 Mr. White to Mr. Bayard (No. 767). June 6 Fur-seals: The Canadian Government has cautioned sealers in Behring Sea against using force if interfered with by United States officials: incloses extract from The Times. 1841
19 Same to same (No. 786) June 20 Fur-seals: Called on Lord Salisbury to discuss the terms of the proposed convention; he was awaiting a memorandum on the subject from the Canadian Government, and could do nothing until it was received; it had not been received at the date of the dispatch; incloses an extract from The Times containing questions asked in Parliament on the subject of the seal fisheries. 1842
[Page XLVII]20 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Phelps (No. 948). 1888. Aug. 9 Fur-seals: Incloses copy of No. 491 from the United States minister to Japan in regard to the attack by the Russians on the British schooner Nemo, engaged in otter hunting off Copper Island; also reporting the request of the Japanese Government that its subjects should not be shipped on vessels engaged in otter hunting. 1843
21 Mr. Rives to Mr. Phelps (No. 982). Oct. 23 Fur-seals: Incloses copy of No. 374 from United States consul at Victoria, British Columbia, reporting the seizure of the British schooner Araunah off Copper Island by the Russians, the attack on the Nemo, and the catch of the Victorian sealers.
22 Letter from Ottawa in Boston Herald. Refers to destruction of whales in Hudson Bay by New England whalers; proposes high license as a remedy; if the United States can claim jurisdiction over Behring Sea, Great Britain can claim it over Hudson and Boothia Bays. 1844
japan.
23 Mr. Hubbard to Mr. Bayard (No. 387). 1887. Sept. 28 Fur-seals: In reply to Department’s instruction states that he has proposed to Japan to enter into a convention for the protection of, waiving all exceptional marine jurisdiction that might be claimed by the United States. 1845
24 Same to same (telegram) Sept. 29 Fur-seals: Requests for the Japanese Government copies of the Treasury regulations and contracts concerning the seal fisheries and a more definite statement of the protection to be extended to them. 1845
25 Same to same (No. 388) Sept. 29 Fur-seals: The Japanese Government is anxious to enter into the proposed convention, also into a similar one for the protection of the seal fisheries of their own northern islands; repeats statements made in his No. 387 and his telegram of September 29.
26 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Hubbard (No. 156). Sept. 30 Fur-seals: The Department is gratified to infer from his telegram of September 29 that Japan is ready to negotiate; a memorandum is now being prepared. 1846
27 Mr. Hubbard to Mr. Bayard (No. 393). Oct. 10 Fur-seals: Incloses copies of his note to Count Ito and the latter’s reply in regard to the proposed convention; Japan desires to protect the sea-otter and to enlarge the protected area so as to embrace its habitat. 1846
28 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Hubbard (No. 171). Nov. 21 Fur-seals: The Department is pleased to learn that Japan is ready to negotiate; few of the Governments addressed have so far replied, and their answers are awaited before sending further instructions to him. 1848
29 Mr. Hubbard to Mr. Bayard (No. 483). 1888. June 23 Fur-seals: States that he has received nothing since No. 171 on the subject; Japan has inquired when the United States will resume the consideration of the question; incloses copy of his note replying to Count Ito’s. 1848
30 Same to same (No. 491). July 13 Fur-seals: Incloses copy of a note from Count Okuma requesting that he will instruct United States consuls not to ship Japanese on American vessels engaged in otter or seal hunting; describes the attack on the Nemo off Copper Island; incloses copy of his instruction to the consul-general of the United States at Tokio. 1849
31 Same to same (No. 492) July 13 Fur-seals: Japan desires to know the nature of the consultation going on in London with a view to instructing its minister to take part therein, if it is of the nature of an international conference; incloses copy of Count Okuma’s note and of his reply. 1851
32 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Hubbard (No. 223). July 18 Fur-seals: In reply to Mr. Hubbard’s No. 483 states that negotiations with Japan have been delayed by the protraction of the negotiation with Great Britain and Russia; in the mean time it might be well to ascertain the views of the Japanese Government respecting the protection of the sea-otter. 1853
[Page XLVIII]33 Same to same (No. 232) 1888. Aug. 9 Fur-seals: In reply to Mr. Hubbard’s No. 492 states that negotiations are still pending at London owing to the obstruction of Canada; the convention with Japan will have to be framed so as to protect the sea-otter, and Japan’s views on that question are desired. 1853
russia.
34 Mr. Wurts to Mr. Bayard (No. 139). 1887. Sept. 3 Fur-seals: Has communicated to the Russian Government the invitation of the United States to enter into a convention for the protection of. 1854
35 Mr. Lothrop to Mr. Bayard (No. 151). Dec. 8 Fur-seals: Incloses a copy of a note from Mr. de Giers accepting the proposal of the United States to enter into a convention on the subject; presents the views entertained in Russia in regard to the question. 1854
36 Same to same (No. 161) 1888. Feb. 22 Fur-seals: States that he has communicated to the Russian Government the request that the Russian ambassador at London should co-operate with Mr. Phelps in respect to the subject. 1856
37 Same to same (No. 164) Mar. 12 Fur-seals: States that the Russian ambassador at London has been instructed to co-operate with Mr. Phelps. 1856
sweden and norway.
38 Mr. Magee to Mr. Bayard (No. 118). Mar. 20 Fur-seals: States that as Sweden and Norway do not engage in the catching of, the Royal Government does not think it necessary to enter into any convention; it proposes that the convention may be so framed that other powers may adhere afterwards. 1856

Supplement E.

Part I.

papers relating to differential rates of tonnage dues.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
Message from the President to Congress. 1889. Jan. 14 Incloses a report from the Secretary of State with correspondence respecting the imposition of differential rates of tonnage dues under the fourteenth section of act of June 26, 1884, and under the act of June 19, 1886, on vessels entering ports of the United States from foreign countries. 1857
belgium.
1 Mr. Tree to Mr. Bayard (No. 26). 1885. Dec. 13 States that he has asked Baron Lambermont for a construction of the “favored-nation” clause, and that the latter replied that as the language differed in different treaties it was not possible to give a general construction; Mr. Tree thinks that the concession made in section 14 of the act of June 26, 1884, is geographical in its character and not national. 1866
2 Mr. Porter to Mr. Tree (No. 20). 1886. Jan. 2 States that Mr. Tree’s construction of section 14 agrees with that taken by the President in his message to Congress; observes that if the 3-15 rate of tonnage dues be granted to Belgian vessels coming from Belgian ports under the “favored-nation” clause of the treaty, it would be to accord a favor to them which would not be granted to United States vessels, they having to pay the 6-30 rate under the law when coming from Belgian ports. 1867
[Page XLIX]3 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Tree (No. 72). 1887. Jan. 5 Incloses copies of correspondence with legation of Sweden and Norway at Washington on same subject; the United States propose to make Belgium the offer contemplated by section 11 of the act of June 19, 1886. 1867
4 Mr. Tree to Mr. Bayard (No. 196). Jan. 24 Acknowledges No. 72 1868
Correspondence with the Legation of Belgium at Washington.
5 Mr. de Bounder to Mr. Bayard. 1895. June 19 States that section 14 of the act of June 26, 1884, grants the 3-15 rate of tonnage dues to vessels coming from ports of Central and North America, Mexico, Colombia, and of the British possessions, and imposes the 6-30 rate on vessels coming into the United States from all other ports; under the “favored-nation” clause of the Belgian treaty claims the 3-15 rate for vessels coming from Belgian ports; in case it be shown that no tonnage or light-house dues are exacted of American vessels in Belgian ports claims, under the second paragraph of section 14, absolute exemption from payment of tonnage dues for Belgian vessels in United States ports. 1868
6 Mr. Bayard to Mr. de Bounder. Nov. 7 States that the subject has been submitted to the Attorney-General, who holds that the discrimination is purely geographical, and is not national; the President does not, therefore, admit Belgium’s right to claim the 3-15 rate under the “favored-nation” clause. 1869
denmark.
Correspondence with the Legation of Denmark at Washington.
7 Mr. de Lövenörn to Mr. Bayard. 1885. Aug. 27 Same claim and same arguments essentially as that made in Belgian minister’s note of June 19, 1885. 1870
8 Mr. Bayard to Mr. de Lövenörn. Nov. 7 Same reply as that made to the Belgian minister on the same date. 1871
germany.
9 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Pendleton (No. 181). 1887. Jan. 5 Refers to the claim made by the German Government to the 3–15 rate of tonnage dues; incloses correspondence with the legation of Sweden and Norway; refers to the request of the Netherlands for the reciprocal abolition of tonnage dues in certain ports under section 11 of the act of June 19, 1886. 1871
Correspondence with the Legation of Germany at Washington.
10 Mr. von Alvensleben to Mr. Bayard. 1885. Aug. 3 Same claim and same argument essentially as that made in the Belgian minister’s note of June 19, 1885; asserts that the treaty of May 1, 1828, between Prussia and the United States, is valid for all Germany. 1872
11 Mr. Bayard to Mr. von Alvensleben. Nov. 7 Same reply as that made to the Belgian minister on the same date. 1873
12 Count Leyden to Mr. Bayard. Nov. 17 Acknowledges Mr. Bayard’s note of November 7, and states that its contents have been brought to the knowledge of the Imperial Government. 1874
13 Mr. von Alvensleben to Mr. Bayard. 1886. Feb. 16 States that the line of argument taken by the United States in Mr. Bayard’s note of November 7, 1885, is unusual, and is calculated to destroy the value of the “favored nation” clause; declares that Germany collects no tonnage tax; quotes a decision of the Secretary of the Treasury of May 11, 1885, in favor of his position; asks a reconsideration of the matter. 1874
[Page L]14 Mr. Bayard to Mr. von Alvensleben. 1886. Mar. 4 Acknowledges Mr. von Alvensleben’s note of February 16; states that it will receive consideration. 1876
15 Mr. von Alvenaleben to Mr. Bayard. Aug. 1 Refers to act of June 19, 1886; states that while intended to be based on reciprocity, the idea is not logically carried out; the countries to which the three-fifteenths rate is granted may charge more than that rate on American vessels in their ports, but Germany is obliged to show that her rate of tonnage duty is below the six-thirtieths rate in order to obtain a reduction from that; rate; alleges that this is in contravention of the “favored nation” clause of the Prussian treaty with the United States; declines to accept the reasoning of Mr. Bayard’s note of November 7, 1885, and asks for a further reply. 1877
italy.
Correspondence with the Legation of Italy at Washington.
16 Baron de Fava to Mr. Bayard Feb. 16 Same claim and same argument essentially as that made in Belgian minister’s note of June 19, 1885. 1878
17 Mr. Bayard to Baron de Fava Mar. 12 Same reply as that made in note of November 7, 1885, to the Belgian minister. 1880
portugal.
Correspondence with the Legation of Portugal at Washington.
18 Mr. Bayard to Viscount das Nogueiras. 1885. May 21 Acknowledges the minister’s note of March 15, previous, requesting, under the “favored nation” clause of the treaty with Portugal, the same favors for vessels coming from ports of Portugal as were granted under the President’s proclamation of January 31 last to vessels from ports of Mexico and Central America; quotes opinion of Secretary of the Treasury; desires information as to amounts of tonnage duties levied by Portugal. 1881
19 Same to same Nov. 7 Same reply made to the minister’s note of March 15 as that made in Mr. Bayard’s note to the Belgian minister of November 7. 1882
sweden and norway.
20 Mr. Porter to Mr. Magee (No. 49). 1887. Aug. 5 Asks whether there is any difference in the rates of tonnage dues charged in the ports of Sweden and in the ports of Norway; shows that at one time the rate was adjusted in the ports of Norway on a geographical basis, and states that the United States claimed the most favorable rate under Article VIII of the treaty of 1827, and that their claim was conceded. 1883
21 Mr. Magee to Mr. Bayard (No. 101). Nov. 7 Incloses translation of sections of the ordinances of Sweden and of Norway relating to tonnage dues; gives the classification adopted in Norway in 1827, which is still in force. 1884
22 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Magee (No. 55). Nov. 28 The Department wishes to know whether the discriminating tonnage duty which was charged in 1827 on vessels entering Norwegian ports is still levied on vessels of other nationalities than those of the United States. 1885
23 Mr. Magee to Mr. Bayard (No. 106). Dec. 14 Since 1827 no discriminating tonnage duties have been charged in Norway, and no geographical distinction is made. 1885
24 Same to same (No. 133) 1888. July 17 He has received a note from the minister of foreign affairs, stating that the discriminating tonnage duty levied in Norway in favor of vessels trading with ports in the White Sea and Arctic Ocean has been removed; incloses copy of the note. 1886
[Page LI]25 Mr. Reuterskiöld to Mr. Bayard. 1885. June 17 Claims that the benefit of lower tonnage dues on vessels coming from certain regions to ports of the United States, granted under section 14 of the acts of June 26, 1884, should be extended, under Article VIII of the treaty of July 4, 1827, to vessels coming from ports of Sweden and Norway. 1887
26 Same to same Oct. 4 Restates claim made in his note of June 17, whether the reduction is based on geographical situation of the countries favored or on their nationality, makes no difference as regards the claim of Sweden and Norway. 1888
27 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Reuterskiöld. Nov. 7 Acknowledges note of June 17, and makes same reply as that made to the Belgian minister in note of November 7. 1888
28 Mr. Reuterskiöld to Mr. Bayard. Nov. 11 States that Mr. Bayard’s note of November 7 does not answer his of October 4; Sweden and Norway do not make their claim under the “favored nation” clause, but under Article VIII of the treaty of 1827; again submits claim. 1889
29 Same to same 1886. Mar. 8 Requests an answer to his notes of June 17 and October. 4, 1885. 1890
30 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Reuterskiöld. Mar. 29 Acknowledges notes of June 17, October 4, and November 11, 1885; insists that section 14 of the act of June 26, 1884, does not conflict with Article VIII of the treaty of 1827; when Sweden and Norway have acceded to the terms of the act of 1884 they can enjoy the benefits thereof. 1890
31 Mr. Reuterskiöld to Mr. Bayard. Mar. 31 Protests against the decision of the United States Government; reserves right to communicate further arguments under the instruction of his Government. 1891
32 Same to same June 30 Incloses copy of instruction to him from the Swedish minister of foreign affairs, insisting that, under the “favored nation” clause, and under Article VIII of the treaty of 1827, Swedish, Norwegian, and American vessels sailing from ports of Sweden and Norway to the United states, should be entitled to the 3-15 rate of tonnage duty; argument of the question. 1892
33 Same to same Nov. 15 Under instruction of his Government, protests against act of June 19, 1886, as in contravention of treaty of 1827, inasmuch as in certain cases it favors American vessels as compared with Swedish and Norwegian; also protests against it as maintaining the position taken by the United States on the question of tonnage duties, a position which his Government can not accept. 1894
34 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Reuterskiöld. Dec. 20 Acknowledges note of June 30 from Mr. de Reuterskiöld; Count Ehrensvärd has confused “navigation” and “commerce”; Sweden and Norway can only claim privilege under Article VIII for their own vessels; it could not be allowed under the law to American vessels, and the Swedish construction of Article VIII would favor Swedish and Norwegian vessels at the expense of American; declines to admit this claim. 1895
35 Same to same Dec. 20 Acknowledges Mr. Reuterskiöld’s note of November 15; states that he has not shown wherein the acts of June 26, 1884, and June 19, 1886, favor United States vessels more than Swedish and Norwegian; admits that the act of 1886 does not grant the 3-15 rate of tonnage duty to Swedish and Norwegian vessels coming from ports of Sweden and Norway, but neither does it grant it to American vessels coming from those ports; insists that it is based on the correct principle. 1898
[Page LII]36 Mr. Reuterskiöld to Mr. Bayard. 1887. Mar. 9 Incloses copies of correspondence between the United States and Sweden and Norway in 1828 in which the former demanded the lowest rate of tonnage duty charged in the ports of Norway, where a discrimination was made on a geographical basis; the demand was conceded, by Sweden and Norway, and the construction of Article VIII of the treaty of 1827 was admitted to be what the Swedish Government has maintained throughout the present correspondence; he presumes the Government of the United States will abide by that construction and admit the justness of the claim of Sweden and Norway. 1900
37 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Fairchild. June 2 Incloses copies of the correspondence passed between the Department and the Swedish legation; asks whether the Treasury can grant the 3-15 rate to Swedish and Norwegian vessels sailing from ports of Sweden and Norway. 1905
38 Mr. Fairchild to Mr. Bayard. June 20 Acknowledges Mr. Bayard’s letter of June 2; has referred matter to Commissioner of Navigation, whose decision is final; incloses report from latter stating that under the law the 3–15 rate can not be granted in the case in question. 1905
39 Mr. Woxen to Mr. Bayard 1888. Nov. 10 States that the discriminating tonnage duty levied in Norway in favor of vessels trading with ports in the White Sea and Arctic Ocean has been abolished; asks that Congress shall remedy the conflict between Article VIII of the treaty of 1827 and the act of June 26.1884. 1907
40 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Woxen Dec. 6 States that the matter will be communicated by the President to Congress. 1908

Part ii.

correspondence relative to the abolition of tonnage dues.

No. From and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
41 Mr. Bayard to United States ministers (circular). 1887. July 9 Extract from an act of Congress “to abolish certain fees for official services to American vessels,” etc.; the — Government to be invited to co-operate; the act broad enough to effect a reduction or abolition of tonnage dues; a country in which charges are less than in the United States may obtain a reduction, e. g. the Netherlands; the invitation extended to all countries; report to be made as to whether there is any discrimination against United States vessels in the ports of —; proclamation of the President removing duties on vessels from ports of the Netherlands, and acts of Congress, public No. 67, of June 26, 1884, and No. 85, of June 19, 1886, inclosed. 1909
austria.
42 Mr. Roosevelt to Mr. Bayard (No. 51). 1888. Apr. 7 Austria declines to co-operate in the abolition of tonnage dues, owing to the reduction in her port dues which would result from the necessary extension of the same treatment to all “most favored “nations; translation of Mr. Szöchyeny’s note inclosed. 1919
belgium.
43 Mr. Tree to Mr. Bayard (No. 251). 1887. Aug. 18 Department’s circular of July 9, 1887, communicated to the Prince de Chimay in a note, of which copy is inclosed; will ascertain and report in regard to discrimination. 1920
[Page LIII] brazil.
44 Mr. Jarvis to Mr. Bayard (No. 139). 1888. Aug. 6 Brazil declines to co-operate with the United States (1st) because she has no merchant-marine; (2nd) because her light-house tax corresponds to the tonnage tax in the United States, and is not excessive; (3rd) because foreign ships engage in the coastwise trade without extra burdens; many of these vessels carry the United States flag; no discrimination in Brazil against United States vessels; Mr. Da Silva’s note inclosed. 1922
china.
45 Mr. Denby to Mr. Bayard (No. 450). 1887. Sept. 8 Dispatch communicating Department’s circular of July 9, 1887, to the Yamen being translated into Chinese; the subject of discrimination will be examined into. 1923
46 Same to same (No. 453) Sept. 15 No discrimination in China against vessels from the United States. 1924
47 Same to same (No. 458) Sept. 21 China declines to co-operate in the abolition of tonnage dues, as she has few ships in the carrying trade. 1925
denmark.
48 Mr. Anderson to Mr. Bayard (No. 208). 1888. Feb. 24 Department’s circular of July 9, 1887, communicated to the Danish minister in a note; copy of note and translation of answer inclosed. 1925
49 Same to same (No. 209) Feb 25 Department’s circular of July 9, 1887, made the subject of two notes; the reply received from the Danish minister in answer to the first in regard to discrimination in tonnage dues; none yet received in regard to their proposed abolition; efforts to effect their abolition reported as being made; Count Sponneck instructed as to the position of the Danish Government. 1927
france.
50 Mr. Vignaud to Mr. Bayard (No. 471). 1887. Aug. 29 Mr. Flourens has submitted the propositions in Department’s circular of July 9, 1887, to, his colleagues, and will communicate their opinion; he desires three more copies of the circular. 1927
germany.
51 Mr. Coleman to Mr. Bayard (No. 496). 1887. Aug. 25 Department’s circular of July 9, 1887, communicated to the German minister; United States Consul-General von Versen reports that there is no discrimination in Germany against United States vessels; note to Count Berchem inclosed. 1927
Correspondence with the legation of Germany at Washington.
52 Mr. von Alvensleben to Mr. Bayard. 1888. Jan. 24 No tonnage or equivalent tax levied on United States vessels, and no discrimination against them in German ports; the issuance of a proclamation by the President suspending the collection of tonnage taxes on vessels from German ports requested; rights and privileges heretofore claimed with regard to the treatment of German vessels in United States ports reserved; return of taxes collected on German shipping since June 19, 1886, requested. 1929
53 Mr. Bayard to Mr. von Alvensleben. Jan. 26 The President will at once issue a proclamation suspending the collection of tonnage dues on vessels from German ports; the requested return of tonnage dues collected since June 19, 1886, reserved for consideration. 1939
54 Same to same Jan. 30 Printed copies of the President’s proclamation suspending the collection of tonnage dues on vessels from German ports inclosed. 1930
55 Mr. von Alvensleben to Mr. Bayard Feb 25’ Duties again collected on the Saale at New York on her arrival from Bremen; requests that the authorities be instructed that their action is in contravention of the President’s proclamation; papers inclosed. 1931
[Page LIV]56 Mr. Bayard to Mr. von Alvensleben. 1888. Feb. 28 The levying of duties on the North German line brought to the attention of the President, and is being investigated. 1933
great britain.
57 Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard (No. 625). 1887. Nov. 19 The Marquis of Salisbury’s reply to note communicating Department’s circular inclosed. 1933
italy.
58 Mr. Dougherty to Mr. Bayard (No. 167). Oct. 15 No distinction in Italy made between vessels of Italy or any country and those of the United States in the matter of tonnage charges: note from the Italian minister of foreign affairs inclosed. 1934
Correspondence with the legation of Italy at Washington.
59 Mr. Ferrara to Mr. Bayard 1887. July 18 United States and other vessels pay the same duties as Italian vessels in Italian ports; requests that Italian vessels coming from ports of countries covered by proclamations suspending the collection of tonnage taxes may enjoy those benefits. 1935
60 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Ferrara July 26 Mr. Ferrara’s note not sufficiently negativing all discrimination against United States vessels in Italian ports; an express statement according to the exclusive proviso of the proclamations desired; the Treasury Department will be requested to extend the benefits of the proclamation to Italian vessels, if no discrimination exists. 1936
61 Mr. Ferrara to Mr. Bayard July 27 No discrimination in the ports of Italy against United States vessels, either as compared with those of Italy of any other country; requests that the Secretary of the Treasury be so informed that Italian vessels may enjoy the benefits of the President’s proclamations. 1936
62 Mr. Bayard to Count de Foresta. Aug. 23 Italian vessels coming from ports mentioned in the President’s proclamation of April 22, 1887, will be admitted under its terms. 1937
japan.
63 Mr. Hubbard to Mr. Bayard (No. 383). Sept. 24 Japan can not fully co-operate with the United States in the abolition of tonnage dues; translation of note of Count Inouye Kaoru inclosed. 1937
64 Same to same (No. 417) Dec. 28 Note from Count Ito on the subject of the abolition of tonnage dues inclosed. 1938
65 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Hubbard (No. 186). 1888. Feb. 4 The desire of Japan to abolish tonnage dues and charges on vessels communicated to the Treasury Department; a full report must be made giving the charges on American vessels in Japanese ports before the status of Japanese vessels in the United States can be determined; the letter of the Secretary of the Treasury inclosed. 1940
66 Mr. Hubbard to Mr. Bayard (No. 452). Mar. 20 No tonnage or light dues levied on American vessels, but $17 for entrance and $7 for clearance for each vessel in lieu thereof; American vessels on an equality with Japanese; note of the Japanese minister of foreign affairs inclosed. 1940
67 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Hubbard (No. 210). May 2 The charges on vessels of the United States in Japan an offset to tonnage and shipping dues in America, and no reason appears for reducing present rates unless the Japanese Government does likewise; the letter of the Secretary of the Treasury, covering a report from the Commissioner of Navigation on the subject, inclosed. 1942
mexico.
[Page LV]68 Mr. Manning to Mr. Bayard (No. 204). 1887. Aug. 31 Department’s circular of July 9, 1887, sent to the Mexican treasury department by Mr. Mariscal for information. 1943
69 Mr. Connery to Mr. Bayard (No. 244). Oct. 10 Mexico unable to co-operate in the abolition of tonnage dues; translation of Mr. Mariscal’s note inclosed. 1944
the netherlands.
70 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bell (No. 81). Jan. 5 The advantages extended by the shipping act of June 26, 1884, claimed by European Governments, but not then by the Netherlands, under the most favored nation treaty clause; an offer made by that Government to accept the reciprocal proposals in the act of June 19, 1886; the satisfaction felt at this offer to be unofficially communicated; copies of correspondence with the Swedish minister inclosed for information. 1945
71 Mr. Bell to Mr. Bayard (No. 214). Jan. 21 Department’s instruction No. 81 unofficially communicated to the minister of the Netherlands, who expressed his desire for an early adoption of the necessary measures. 1946
72 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Bell (No. 82). Feb. 10 Mr. Bells No. 214 read with interest; copy of House bill No. 10703 and of Department’s letter of the 14th ultimo to the chairman of the Shipping Committee of the House of Representatives inclosed, as illustrating the views of this Government. 1946
Correspondence with the legation of the Netherlands at Washington.
73 Mr. de Weckherlin to Mr. Bayard. 1886. Nov. 8 No tonnage, light-house, beacon and buoy, or other equivalent dues collected; no discrimination against United States vessels, and no export duties levied in the Netherlands or the free ports of the Dutch West Indies; requests the suspension of the collection of tonnage dues in the United States on vessels from those ports in accordance with the act of Congress of June 19, 1886; list of free ports in the Dutch East Indies inclosed. 1947
74 Mr. Bayard to Mr. de Weckherlin. 1887. Apr. 22 The President’s proclamation issued suspending the collection of tonnage dues on vessels from the Netherlands and the free ports of the Dutch East Indies, except on vessels belonging to countries whose dues are greater than those levied in the United States; the Department invites the Government of the Netherlands to extend the abolition of tonnage dues to all the Dutch East India ports; the President’s proclamation inclosed. 1948
75 Mr. de Weckherlin to Mr. Bayard. May 3 Acknowledges receipt of the Presidents proclamation; the invitation to the Netherlands to extend the abolition of tonnage dues to all East India ports forwarded. 1950
76 Same to same June 28 Expresses Mr. Karnebeek’s thanks for the President’s proclamation suspending the collection of tonnage dues on vessels from the Netherlands and their East India free ports; the extension of the arrangement to all ports will be considered. 1951
peru.
77 Mr. Buck to Mr. Bayard (No. 282). Sept. 1. Copy of note sent, in conformity to Department’s circular of July 9, 1887, to Mr. Elias inclosed. 1951
russia.
78 Mr. Wurts to Mr. Bayard (No. 136). 1887 Aug. 11 Department’s circular of July 9, 1887, communicated to the Russian Government 1952
[Page LVI]79 Mr. Lothrop to Mr. Bayard (No. 159). 1888. Feb. 18. No discrimination in Russian ports against vessels from America, but Russia declines to co-operate with the United States, as proposed in Department’s circular of July 9, 1887, since Russian vessels would be placed at a disadvantage, and there is practically no direct intercourse between the countries; copy of Mr. Vlangaly’s note inclosed. 1953
sweden and norway.
80 Mr. Magee to Mr. Bayard (No. 99). 1887. Oct. 24 The proposition of the United States looking to the abolition of tonnage and other dues will be considered by the councils of Sweden and Norway; changes in the council of state may delay its consideration. 1954
Correspondence with the legation of Sweden and Norway at Washington.
81 Mr. Ibsen to Mr. Bayard 1888. May 21 List of the kinds and amounts of all dues levied in the United States on Swedish vessels requested with a view to the abolition of all such dues. 1955
82 Mr. Adee to Mr. Ibsen June 9 List of the kinds and amount of dues levied on Swedish vessels; copy of letter of the Secretary of the Treasury covering the report of the Commissioner of Navigation inclosed. 1955