Paraguay


564. Country Analysis and Strategy Paper for Paraguay, February 7, 1969.

The Embassy stated that the main interest of the United States in Paraguay was to maintain a stable, pro-U.S. Government. A secondary interest was to promote the liberalization of the Paraguayan economy.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1967–69, POL 1 PAR–US. Secret. Transmitted to the Department of State as an attachment to Airgram A–14, February 7, 1969.


565. Paper Prepared by the NSC Interdepartmental Group for Inter-American Affairs for the National Security Council, Washington, March 3, 1969.

In its evaluation of the Country Analysis and Strategy Paper (CASP) for Paraguay, the NSC–IG/ARA highlighted two key issues in United States-Paraguayan relations: military aid, and whether increased assistance should be devoted to education.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, NSC Interdepartmental Group, Subject and Country Files: Lot 71 D 224, NSC–IRG/ARA Information Memorandums, 1969. Secret. The CASP for Paraguay is Document 564.


566. Country Analysis and Strategy Paper for Paraguay, February 13, 1970.

The Embassy stated that the main interest of the United States in Paraguay was to maintain a stable, pro-U.S. Government, bulwarked by economic and social development, and broader participation in the political process.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970–73, POL 1 PAR–US. Secret. Drafted by Arzac; cleared by the Country Team in draft form; and approved by Brewin. Transmitted to the Department of State as an attachment to Airgram A–12.


567. Telegram 280 From the Embassy in Paraguay to the Department of State, February 20, 1970.

The Embassy reported complaints from Foreign Minister Sapena that a leftward-moving Bolivia was receiving significantly more U.S. assistance than Paraguay, which was traditionally friendly towards the United States. Sapena added that Paraguay was devoting nearly all its resources to economic development rather than arms purchases.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970–73, POL 13–1 BOL. Confidential. Repeated to USCINCSO for POLAD, La Paz, and Santiago.


568. Decision Memorandum 65 of the NSC Interdepartmental Group for Inter-American Affairs, Washington, July 1, 1970.

The NSC–IG/ARA reviewed and modified three aspects of the FY 1972 CASP for Paraguay: emphasizing the importance of increasing multilateral assistance, recommending that the United States would stay out of the Church-State dispute, and suggesting reduced military assistance to Paraguay.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Office of Policy and Coordination, Subject Files: Lot 74 D 267, Country Analysis and Strategy Paper—Paraguay 1973. Secret. The CASP is published as Document 566.


569. Letter From President Stroessner of Paraguay to President Nixon, July 20, 1970.

President Stroessner told President Nixon that Paraguay faced a threat from communist subversion. The Paraguayan leader expressed concern that there would be cuts in U.S. military assistance.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 760, Presidential Correspondence, 1969–1974, Paraguay, President Alfredo Stroessner. No classification making.


570. Memorandum From Viron P. Vaky of the National Security Council Staff to the President’s Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger), Washington, August 15, 1970.

In a briefing memorandum for President’s Assistant for National Security Affairs Kissinger’s meeting with Ambassador Avila, National Security Council staff member Vaky stated that Avila wanted to reverse a decision to cut the Military Assistance Program (MAP) for Paraguay. However, President Nixon had already decided to reduce the MAP and that Paraguay was not a high priority for U.S. policymakers.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 792, Country Files, Latin America, Paraguay, Vol 1. Confidential. Sent for information. Attached but not published at Tab A is “U.S. Military Assistance to Paraguay.” Tab B is not published. Kissinger wrote on the front of the memorandum, “I bet we have laid into Paraguay with particular relish.” No substantive record of the meeting between Kissinger and Avila has been found. On August 20, the Department informed the Embassy in Asunción that Paraguay should not expect the MAP cuts to be restored. (Telegram 135418 to Asunción, ibid.)


571. Letter From President Nixon to President Stroessner of Paraguay, October 8, 1970.

President Nixon replied to President Stroessner’s request for U.S. military assistance. Even though he stated that the prospect for restoring cuts in Military Assistance Program (MAP) assistance did not look likely, Nixon said he would request authorization from Congress for credit for the purchase of military equipment.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970–73, DEF 19–8 US–PAR. No classification marking. Nixon wrote at the bottom of the letter, “I recall with great pleasure my visit to Paraguay in 1958.” A telegraphic copy of Stroessner’s letter of July 20 is published as Document 569.


572. Telegram 1942 From the Embassy in Paraguay to the Department of State, December 16, 1970, 1530Z.

The Embassy reported that the U.S. military presence in Paraguay provided a means for receiving information on Paraguayan politics, and for exerting influence over the Government of Paraguay.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970–73, DEF 19–9 US–PAR. Secret. Repeated to USCINCSO. The NSC policy decision is published as Document 34.


573. Telegram 741 From the Embassy in Paraguay to the Department of State, April 27, 1971, 2125Z.

The Embassy conveyed Paraguay’s request for additional military assistance. Citing the threat posed by political instability in Bolivian and the leftist Chilean governments, the Embassy concluded that if the U.S. Government failed to provide increased assistance, the Paraguayans could “lose confidence” in the United States.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 792, Country Files, Latin America, Paraguay, Vol 1. Secret; Nodis; Immediate. Copies sent for information to Brasilia, Buenos Aires, Caracas, Lima, Rio de Janeiro, and Santiago. A stamped notation on the telegram indicates that it was received in the White House Situation Room at 10:29 p.m. on April 27.


574. Memorandum From Secretary of State Rogers to President Nixon, Washington, July 28, 1972.

Secretary of State Rogers suggested sending Nelson Gross, the Department of State’s Coordinator for International Narcotics Matters, to prompt the extradition of Auguste Ricord, an alleged international drug trafficker, to the United States.

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Office of East Coast Affairs, Lot 78 D 26, Narcotics–A, Paraguay, August 1972. Secret. Drafted on July 17 by Friedman, Stedman, and Skol; it was concurred in draft by Pfund and Lister; and concurred in by Hurwitch and Stedman. Attached but not published is Nixon’s August 2 letter to Stroessner.


575. Telegram 2217 From the Embassy in Paraguay to the Department of State, August 9, 1972, 1517Z.

Department of State’s Coordinator on International Narcotics Matters Gross informed Paraguayan officials that Paraguay faced a cutoff of U.S. and multilateral assistance unless they extradited Auguste Ricord to the United States. Stroessner decided on August 11 to extradite him.

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 792, Country Files, Latin America, Paraguay, Vol. 1. Secret; Exdis. A stamped notation on the telegram indicates that it was received in the White House Situation Room at 7:41 a.m. on August 10. President Nixon sent a letter to President Stroessner on October 3 thanking him for expediting Ricord’s extradition. (Ibid., Bureau of Inter-American Affairs, Office of East Coast Affairs (ARA/ECA): Lot 78 D 26, “NARCOTICS–A, PARAGUAY, August 1972”)