199. Editorial Note

On November 6, 1973, President’s Deputy Assistant for National Security Affairs Brent Scowcroft wrote Secretary of State Henry Kissinger a message about a meeting on the trade bill he had had that morning with Secretary of the Treasury George Shultz, President’s Assistant for International Economic Affairs Peter Flanigan, Special Representative for Trade Negotiations William Eberle, Deputy Special Representative for Trade Negotiations William Pearce, and National Security Council staff member Helmut Sonnenfeldt. Scowcroft reported that "Everyone, except us, wishes to proceed with the Bill. We held [Page 721]firm for postponement, and Haig is with us. The scenario as it stands now is that the President will call Albert later on today and request postponement." (Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Scowcroft Daily Work Files, Box 5, 11/1–8/73) President Richard Nixon did not telephone Albert on November 6. However, he did meet with Albert at a bipartisan Congressional leadership meeting on energy policy in the Cabinet Room on November 7. (National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, White House Central Files, President’s Daily Diary) According to The New York Times, November 8, 1973, page 2, the President handed Albert a note during this meeting that requested a postponement in consideration of the trade bill. Albert agreed.

On November 8, Scowcroft reported on the morning’s staff meeting in a message to Kissinger, noting that, "Flanigan, having finally accepted defeat on his position on the Trade Bill, is now changing his tune with respect to his earlier assertions that postponement meant the end of the bill. He is now pointing out that the House now realizes the President means business and that this might generate support, that the Jewish leaders might be prepared to be somewhat more accommodating, and that, above all, you must meet with Jackson immediately upon your return." (Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Scowcroft Daily Work Files, Box 5, 11/1–8/73)