The Near East, South Asia, and Africa


Contents

  1. Continued from Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 921 952.
  2. For previous correspondence concerning this subject, see Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 20 ff. passim.
  3. For previous correspondence regarding interest of the United States in the Anglo-Ethiopian Agreement of 1942, see Foreign Relations, 1942, vol. iv, pp. 116 ff.
  4. Continued from Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 124 166.
  5. For previous correspondence on relief for Greece, see Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 167 ff.
  6. For correspondence on the granting of financial assistance to the Greek Government in 1943, see Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 167 ff., passim.
  7. Continued from Foreign Relations, 1942, vol. ii, pp. 794 797.
  8. Continued from Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 178 231.
  9. For previous correspondence relating to the food situation in India see Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 296 ff.
  10. Continued from Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 289 296.
  11. For previous correspondence concerning these subjects, see Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 561 ff. and pp. 319 ff., respectively; for text of Declaration issued at the Tehran Conference by President Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Churchill, and Soviet Premier Stalin, see Foreign Relations, The Conferences at Cairo and Tehran, 1943, p. 646.
  12. For previous correspondence, see Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 453 ff.
  13. For previous correspondence, see Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 437 ff.
  14. Continued from Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 510 561.
  15. For previous correspondence, see Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 625 ff.
  16. For previous correspondence concerning this subject, see Foreign Relations, 1941, vol. iii, pp. 486 ff., passim.
  17. For previous correspondence relating to the interest of the United States in the defense and security of Liberia, see Foreign Relations, 1942, vol. iv, pp. 355 ff.
  18. For previous correspondence relating to the protection of American treaty rights in Morocco, see Foreign Relations, 1941, vol. iii, pp. 550 ff. and 586 ff.
  19. For previous correspondence relating to the interest of the United States in the political situation in Morocco, see Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 738 ff.
  20. For correspondence relating to the Spanish occupation and control of the Tangier Zone, and reservation of American rights therein, see Foreign Relations, 1940, vol. iii, pp. 783 ff., and ibid., 1941, vol. ii, pp. 586 ff.
  21. Continued from Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 747 829.
  22. For previous correspondence on this subject, see Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 833 ff.
  23. Continued from Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 854 920.
  24. For previous correspondence regarding American rights in Syria and Lebanon, see Foreign Relations, 1938, vol. ii, pp. 1003 ff.
  25. For previous correspondence concerning the interest of the United States in the development of self-government in Syria and Lebanon, see ibid., 1943, vol. iv, pp. 953 ff.
  26. Concerning the attitude of the United States toward the entry of Turkey into the war, see bracketed note, Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, p. 1057; for previous correspondence regarding preemptive buying of Turkish goods, see ibid., pp. 1111 ff.; for previous correspondence on the efforts of the United States and the British Governments to acquire Turkish chrome and to prevent its sale by Turkey to Germany, see ibid., pp. 1150 ff.
  27. For previous correspondence, see Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. iv, pp. 1087 ff.