740.0011 European War 1939/18983: Telegram

The Chargé in Turkey (Kelley) to the Secretary of State

56. My 55, January 26, 8 p.m. The Turkish press has not used Izvestia article in which Ambassador MacMurray was accused of supporting German propaganda concerning Russian claims to the Straits as a topic of editorial comment, but this article and the subsequent German propaganda press despatches have resulted in a number of editorials commenting on the attempts of foreign propaganda agencies to influence public opinion in Turkey and on the question of the Straits in some of which Mr. MacMurray’s interview has been mentioned.

Deputy Sadak, who is considered to represent Foreign Office opinion, writing in Aksham of January 22, mentions the news concerning the interview as an example of foreign propaganda directed at Turkey and asserts that Turks are satisfied with the assurances given by the British Government regarding recent Moscow talks. Tan, of the same date, asserts that no propaganda of any kind will influence Turkish public opinion or bring about a change in Turkish policy and Vatan declared that the future of the Straits depends not on present propaganda but on Soviet policy after the [Page 816]war has terminated in the event the democracies win. Deputy Yalchin, in Yenisabah of January 24, referring to Axis propaganda concerning Eden’s visit to Moscow and Mr. MacMurray’s interview, declares that it is not only his personal conviction but also the firm opinion of authoritative circles in Ankara that Turkey does not entertain the slightest doubt regarding the sincere and just intentions of her friends and allies.

The French language journal D’Orient of January 24, in its daily review of the international situation, states it is clear after finally reading the correct text of Mr. MacMurray’s interview as published in the Baltimore Sun that, except for being American from beginning to end and being made without reservation and in complete freedom, it contains nothing which would foster a controversy or prove the correctness of the German allegations.

Kelley