861a.01/243

The Chairman of the Special Trade Delegation of the Far Eastern Republic to the United States (Yazikoff) to the Secretary of State

Sir: The Dairen Conference which opened on August 26th, 1921 was suddenly terminated on April 16th at the initiative of the Japanese Government at the moment when after seven months of discussion solutions to many problems had been reached. The principal problem, that regarding the evacuation of Japanese troops, or, rather, the date of the evacuation, remained unsolved. The Japanese delegates insisted that a general treaty be signed prior to any discussion of the problem regarding the date of evacuation. The delegates of the Far Eastern Republic, taught by three and one half years of experience with Japanese methods and policies in the Russian Far East, declared that they would sign a general treaty only if the Japanese delegates would simultaneously set down in writing the date of evacuation of Japanese troops from the territory of the Russian Far East. Having no intention to fulfill the obligations assumed by them at the Washington Conference, and wishing at the same time to mask their purposes, the Japanese suddenly and unexpectedly presented new demands for the reconsideration of the general terms of the treaty, and demanded the inclusion in it of the following clauses:

1.
The granting to Japanese subjects rights in commerce and trade and in the development of forest and mining wealth on the territory of the Far Eastern Republic equal to those of the citizens of the Far Eastern Republic.
2.
The consent of the Government of the Far Eastern Republic to the destruction of the war materials of the Far Eastern Republic which are within the territory of the Maritime Province.
3.
An agreement on the part of the Far Eastern Republic not to increase its fleet in the Vladivostok port.

The Delegates of the Far Eastern Republic stated that they were not opposed to a discussion of any new demands, that they were ready to consider the new Japanese proposals, but that, in any event, the question of the date of evacuation of Japanese troops must be [Page 852]definitely established. In reply to this declaration of the Delegation of the Far Eastern Republic, the Japanese delegates stated that they had received instructions from the Japanese Government to end the negotiations.

Wishing to effect a speedy settlement of the difficult situation created on the territory of the Russian Far East in connection with the presence and actions of Japanese troops, the Government of the Far Eastern Republic in its negotiations with the Japanese did everything possible in order to bring to a satisfactory conclusion the long drawn out Dairen conference, but this proved to be impossible. The Japanese did not abandon their intentions to dominate the territory of the Russian Far East under one pretext or another.

In accordance with recent official reports the Japanese are bringing in new troops and are occupying points in the Maritime Province which had already been evacuated by them and which are outside their zone of occupation. The Japanese are working incessantly in erecting fortifications along the coastline of the Russian Far East.

In view of the above mentioned circumstances the Special Delegation of the Far Eastern Republic to the United States is compelled once more to call the attention of the Government of the United States to the grave situation on the territory of the Russian Far East. The Japanese Government is not only not fulfilling the obligations assumed at the Washington Conference, but, on the contrary, is openly carrying out its old policy of domination on and seizure of the territory and sovereignty of the Russian population of the Far East.

The position assumed by the Government of the United States at the Washington Conference with reference to the Siberian problem gave the population of the Far Eastern Republic cause to hope for aid from the Government of the United States in assuring to the Russian people of the Far East the rights which are being violated by the Japanese Government.

I am [etc.]

A. Yazikoff