861a.01/240: Telegram

The Ambassador in Japan (Warren) to the Secretary of State

[Paraphrase]

66. On April 19 I had a lengthy discussion with Uchida concerning the situation which arises from the breaking off of the Dairen negotiations, which is announced in the press. Later I discussed the same question with Minister of War Yamanashi. Although the representative of the Far Eastern Republic in a statement gives the refusal of Japan to set a definite date for the evacuation of her troops from Siberia as the reason for the break, Uchida declares that the Japanese were willing to remove their troops three months after a military agreement should be concluded which would cover the method and manner of evacuation, and that while this question was being discussed by the delegates and while they were waiting for instructions the delegates of the Far Eastern Republic announced that they were leaving. The conclusion of Uchida is that the Far Eastern Republic had received a request from the Moscow government to await the results of the conference at Genoa.

I was informed by Yamanashi that he was making preparations for the immediate relief of part of the troops now in Siberia by sending over an equal number of fresh troops. He said that this should have been done last September but that he had delayed action in hopes that the negotiations at Dairen would be successful.

I said that I was greatly disappointed that no agreement had been reached at the Dairen Conference …

The present attitude of the Government is to await Russian developments and the outcome of the Genoa Conference.

The Harbin report concerning the supposed lease by Japanese interests of the Ussuri Railway and the protest against it by the Far Eastern Republic through Bosc [sic] are founded upon incorrect information. Upon inquiry made at my request, the Manchuria Railway through its President, who is now in Tokyo, and also Uchida, deny that there is any foundation for the report. I have assurance [Page 851]of Uchida that the Japanese Government has not been consulted, that it has no knowledge of any such negotiations, and that no plan for acquisition of the Ussuri Railway by the Manchuria Railway or by Japanese interests will receive the Government’s support.

Warren