Alphabetical Index.

A.

  • Acapulco: trade report of Consul Sutter 121 123
  • Agricultural implements: trade with Germany 54
  • Agricultural machinery: efforts of Dr. Seelhorst to introduce American models into Bavaria 76 78
  • Agriculture: in Italy; its primitive character 108
    • in Switzerland 137
    • in Turkey; requires little or no machinery 144
  • Ale and beer: exports from the United States to Canada 93
  • Aleppo: commerce of, rapidly disappearing 147
  • Alexandre Line: steamers from New York and New Orleans to Vera Cruz; subsidy suggested 120
  • Argentine Republic (see Buenos Ayres).
    • comments of the Buenos Ayres Herald on the trade-circular 5
  • Arms and ammunition: at present the principal export to Turkey 144
  • Aspinwall: report of Mr. Thorington, consul 31
  • Australia: supplied with hardware and machinery from the United States 81, 83
  • Austria: (See Prague, Trieste, Vienna.)
    • the Oriental trade via Trieste; how American enterprise might share therein 13 16
  • Avonmouth: the new docks; port charges 87, 89

B.

  • Badeau, A., consul-general, London: report; depression of British trade; American competition 81 85
  • Bagdad: trade with Persia, viâ 147
  • Bahamas: condition of trade with the United States; general decline 102 105
  • Baker, E. L., consul, Buenos Ayres: trade-report 5
  • Bartlett, C., consul, Martinique: report 37 40
  • Bavaria: trade with 73 79
    • introduction of American mill-machinery 74
    • effects of the Centennial Exhibition upon American trade with 77- 79
  • Beef (American): trade opening in Germany 57
  • Belfast: trade-report of Consul Donnan 85
  • Bender-Bushir (Persia): necessity for a consulate at 146
  • Berlin: trade-report of Consul-General Kreismann 40 42
  • Berne: report of the acting chargé Mr. Byers. 136 140
  • Bingham, J. A., minister to Japan: trade-report 110 112
    • supplementary dispatch on the cotton-trade in Japan 115 117
  • Birney, J., minister resident at the Hague: report 124 130
  • Bohemia: American productions finding sale in 16
    • direct trade would cheapen the productions of, in American markets 17
  • Brazil: (See Rio de Janeiro and Rio Grande do Sul).
    • views of Mr. Hinds, consul-general at Rio de Janeiro, on the possibility of increasing trade 17
  • Breadstuffs: trade in the Bahamas 103
    • trade in, with Canada 93
    • Canadian complaints of the high duties on, in the United States 100
    • probable market for, in Central America 19
    • American, in Germany 57, 59
    • in Manitoba 102
    • in Switzerland 137
    • in Turkey 141, 144
  • Bremen: suggestion of a sample-depot at 45
  • Bridgland, J. A., consul, Havre: report 36
  • Bristol: trade-report of Consul Canisius 86 89
    • character of American importations to 87
    • port and harbor dues at, and at Avonmouth and Gloucester 87
  • Buenos Ayres: report of E. L. Baker, consul 5
    • comments of the Herald, of, on the trade-circular 5
  • Buffalo-skins: importation of, to the United States 101
  • Bullion: statistics of import and export in Japan 113, 114
  • Butter (artificial): Bavarian importation of American lard for the manufacture of schmalz 73
  • Butter and cheese: the market for, in Denmark 35
  • Byers, S. H. M., acting chargé d’affaires in Switzerland: report 136 140

C.

  • Cairo: relative commercial facilities of, with European countries and with the United States 15
  • Canada: American hardware and machinery competing with British manufacturers 81 83
    • trade with the United States 91 102
  • Canisius, T., consul, Bristol: trade-report 86 89
  • Carpets: Turkish 142, 143
  • Cattle: production in Ontario 96
  • Centennial Exhibition: effects of, on German trade with South America American competition 49
    • Dr. Hermann Grothe’s book on; his views of the excellence of American manufactures 63
    • effect on trade with Bavaria 77, 79
    • the German exhibit at 78
    • visited by Italian merchants 107
  • Central America: trade-report of Mr. Williamson, minister resident 18 30
    • British commercial interests 20
    • obstructiveness of the high tariffs to trade 23
    • amount of foreign trade and of that with the United States 25
    • tables of imports and exports 30
  • Cereals. (See Breadstuffs.)
  • Chance, M., consul, Nassau, N. P.: trade-report 102 105
  • Chemnitz: trade-report of Consul Griggs 44
  • Chili: report of Mr. Osborn; decline of United States trade with Valparaiso 31
  • China-ware: the trade between the United States and Central Germany; effects of a high tariff 68 71
  • Circular to officers: in Spanish American States and Brazil 1
    • in Europe 2
  • Clark, B. F., commercial agent; Samana: trade-report 132 136
  • Clocks: German importations of; bad effects of the efforts of Connecticut makers to force a European market for 72
  • Coal: consumption in Denmark; sources of supply; chance for United States trade 34
    • the market for, in Martinique 37
    • in Switzerland; all imported 137
  • Coffee: in Central America 24
  • Cologne: trade-report of Vice-Consul Herbertz 79
  • Colombia. (See Aspinwall.)
  • Commissions: high rates of, in the United States, an obstacle to trade 21
  • Constantinople: report of Minister Maynard 140 144
    • trade-report of Consul-General Schuyler 144 147
  • Copenhagen: report of Minister Cramer: suggestion of a sample-depot at 33
  • Costa Rica: tables of imports and exports 29
  • Cotton goods: demand for, in Martinique 38
    • in Germany; competing with English goods there 56
    • opportunities for enlarging the market in Italy; the cotton-trade of Genoa 108
    • relative importations of American and British, in Japan 110
    • in Japan; British and American competition 115 117
    • trade with Mexico; British competition; qualities, styles, and prices of fabrics sold 121 123
    • in Portugal; cloths for printing; room for American competition 131
    • in Turkey; British and American trade and competition 142, 144
    • in Persia; British exports 147
  • Cramer, M. J., minister, Denmark: report 33 36
  • Credit: short and long, contrasted; ill effects of long credits on Canadian commerce 97
  • Customs-duties. (See Tariff.)
  • Customs Union: suggestion for the establishment of a general Zollverein, embracing all the States of North and South America 6

D.

  • Denmark: report of Mr. Cramer, minister; necessity of steam-communication with the United States 33 36
  • Dockery, A. V., consul, Leeds: trade-report 89 91
  • Donnan, J. M., consul, Belfast: trade-report 85
  • Duties. (See Tariff.)
  • Dye-stuffs: Turkish; excellence of 142

E.

F.

  • Flax: production in Ireland 85
  • Fort de France: facilities for steamer-communication with 39
  • France. (See Havre and Martinique.)
    • effects of the high tariff on the German toy-trade 65 67
    • decline of production of raw silk 139
  • Frankfort-on-the-Main: trade-report of Consul-General Lee 45
    • suggestion of a sample warehouse at 47, 52
    • facilities of water-communication with 47
    • supplementary report of Consul-General Lee 47 62
  • Free trade: effects on British production and commerce 90
  • Freights: rates from European and American ports to San José de Guatemala 22
  • Furniture: the market for American, in Martinique 37
  • Fur-trade in British America: effect of the United States tariff on the exportation of buffalo-skins 101

G.

  • Genoa: trade-report of Consul Spencer 107 110
    • principal imports from the United States 108
    • suggestion that Swiss trade with the United States pass viâ St. Gothard tunnel and the Mediterranean 137
  • Germany. (See Berlin, Chemnitz, Cologne, Frankfort, Leipsic, Nuremberg, and Sonneberg.)
    • trade with Trieste and the East 14
    • trade, with Central America 21
    • statement of products of the United States in demand 40 42
    • obstacles to American trade; cheap labor, cheap imitations, &c.; goods in demand 47 62
    • trade of, with South America; effects of the Centennial Exhibition and American competition 49
    • reduction of production in 1876; opinions of leading manufacturers 50
    • complaints against the United States tariff 51
    • opinions of leading manufacturers on trade with the United States; 16 letters cited 68 71
  • Gloucester: dock-dues at 89
  • Great Britain. (See Belfast, Bristol, Kingston, Leeds, London, Nassau, Toronto, and Winnipeg.)
    • trade with the East via Trieste 13 16
    • trade with Central America 20
    • imports in excess of exports; American competition; editorial articles from the Times and the Standard, 81 85
    • effects of American protection and competition; opinion at Leeds 90
    • trade with Japan; British trade policy 110
    • and the Japanese cotton-trade 115 117
    • cotton-trade with Mexico; description of qualities and prices of cotton goods sold there 121 123
    • steam-communication with Constantinople and the East 140 145
  • Griggs, N. K., consul, Chemnitz: trade-report 44
  • Grothe, Dr. Hermann: his book on the Centennial Exhibition and American industry 63
  • Guatemala: report of Mr. Williamson on trade between Central America and the United States 18 30
    • trade of; principal imports 25
    • tables of imports and exports 27
    • detailed table of imports for 1876 32

H.

  • Hague, the: report of Minister Birney 124 130
  • Hamburg: suggestion of a sample-depot at 45
  • Hardware: large American sales of, in Mexico 119
  • Hardware and cutlery in Turkey 142, 144
  • Havre: report from Consul Bridgland; increasing consumption of Indian corn as cattle-food 36
  • Herbertz, T. A., vice-consul, Cologne: trade-report 79
  • Hinds, J. M., consul-general, Brazil: trade-report; is satisfied trade with Brazil could be largely increased 17
  • Holland: labor, wages, and cost of living in 124 130
  • Honduras: tables of imports and exports 28

I.

  • India: American manufacturers competing with British 90
  • Indian corn: increasing consumption of, at Havre as cattle-food 36
  • Insurance: high rates of, in the United States an obstacle to American trade with Central America 21
  • Inventions (American): not always adapted to special foreign requirements 145
  • Ireland: American trade with; the flax and linen industries 85
  • Italy. (See Genoa, Rome.)
    • climatic influences, water-power, and agriculture; little opening for increase of trade with the United States 105 107

J.

  • Japan: trade-report of Minister Bingham 110 112
    • reasons why the United States should control the bulk of the foreign Japanese trade 110
    • statistics of imports and exports 111
    • statistics of specie and bullion imported and exported 113, 114
    • statistics of vessels entering and clearing from ports of 215

K.

  • Kingston, Ontario: trade-report of Consul True 99
  • Kreismann, H., consul-general, Berlin: trade-report 40 42

L.

  • Labor: condition of, in Germ any 58
    • in Holland; wages and hours of work 125 127
  • Languages, foreign: comparative utility of, in commerce 21
  • Leather: trade between the United States and Germany 54 60
  • Lee, A. E., consul-general, Frankfort: trade-report 45 47
    • supplementary detailed report 47 62
  • Leedsds: trade-report of Consul Dockery 89 91
    • effects of protection in the United States on the manufactures of 90
  • Leipsic: trade-report of Consul Stewart 42
    • suggestion to exhibit samples at the semi-annual fairs of 43
  • Linen goods: Irish trade in, checked by high duties 85
  • Liquors: the trade in, in Holland; no license law 129
  • Lisbon: report of Mr. Moran, chargé d’affaires 131
  • Locomotives (American): in Canada and Australia 81 83
    • peculiar construction of wheels required for Turkish railroads 146
  • London: trade-report of Consul-General Badeau 81 85
  • Lumber: exports from Ontario in 1876 92
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M.

  • Manitoba. (See Winnipeg.)
  • Manufacturers (American): their mi willingness to conform to special requirements of foreign trade 145
  • Manzanillo: report of Consul Morrill 123
  • Marsh, G. P., minister to Italy: trade-report 105 107
  • Martinique: trade-report of Consul Bartlett; imports and means of communication 37 40
    • character of United States exports to 39
  • Maynard, H., minister to Turkey: trade-report 140 144
  • Mexico. (See also Acapulco and Manzanillo.)
    • trade-report of Consul-General Skilton 117
    • subvention of steamer-lines to, suggested 117
    • table of goods suitable for the Mexican market 118
    • the “free zone” an obstacle to profitable trade in dutiable articles 119
    • additional report from Consul-General Skilton 119 121
    • cotton-trade with; qualities and prices of British and United States goods 121 123
    • peace the first requisite for development of trade with the United States 123
    • suggestion of a treaty of alliance with, to maintain peace there 124
  • Mill-machinery: introduction of American turbines and mills into Bavaria 74
  • Montevideo: memorial addressed to Prince von Bismarck by the German merchants of 49
  • Moran, B., chargé d’affaires, Lisbon: trade-report 131
  • Morrill, A., consul, Manzanillo: trade-report 123

N.

  • Nassau: trade-report of Consul Chance 102 105
    • as a winter-resort for invalids 104
  • Netherlands: labor, wages, and cost of living in 124 130
  • Nicaragua: tables of imports and exports 28
  • Northcote, Sir Stafford: his opinions on the results of American protection and competition 13
  • Northwest British America: statistics; the fur-trade 100 102
  • Nuremberg: trade-report of Consul Wilson 73
    • industrial museum: its efforts to introduce American wares into Bavaria 76 78

O.

  • Obstacles to trade: unwillingness of American manufacturers to conform to special requirements of foreign commerce 145
  • Ontario: trade with the United States 91 102
    • detailed table of imports and exports 94
    • manufacturing interests of 95
  • Oriental trade: viâ Trieste; its decline; causes 13 16
  • Osborn, T. A., minister, Chili: will prepare a trade-report; decline of United States trade with Valparaiso 31

P.

  • Packing: clearness and poorness of, in the United States 21
    • an obstacle to enlarging Central American trade 22
    • defectiveness of; complaints in Germany 41
    • of cotton goods for inland Mexican trade 122
  • Paper-hangings: American makes, in demand in Germany 57
  • Patent law (United States): its effect on American competition in foreign countries 8 13
  • Persia: opportunities for American trade with 140
    • possibilities of American trade with; routes and means of conveyance 145 147
    • trade with Russia 146
    • need of a consulate at Bender-Bushir, on the Persian Gulf 146
  • Petroleum: extensive use in Bohemia; has supplanted Galician mineral oil 16
    • opportunities of commerce in Italy 107
  • Phelps, C. A., consul, Prague: trade-report 16
  • Philadelphia Exhibition. (See Centennial.)
  • Pine apple trade: of the Bahamas 103
  • Portugal: table of imports from England 131
    • the trade in cotton cloths for printing; room for American competition with British goods 131
  • Post, P. S., consul-general, Vienna: trade-report; the effect of United States patent laws on competition in foreign countries 8 13
  • Post-office: in Holland; self-sustaining; receipts and expenses for 1876 130
  • Prague: trade between the United States and Bohemia; report of C. A. Phelps, consul 16
  • Price-lists: of the United States, unsatisfactory as compared with English or French 22
  • Prints (cotton): relative qualities of English and American, offered in Mexican markets 121 123
    • manufacture of, in Portugal; importation of printing-cloths 131
    • in Turkish trade; patterns should be adapted to native taste 145

R.

  • Rathbone, Mr.: his letter to the Economist on the decline of British exports 84
  • Red River settlement. (See Winnipeg.)
  • Reuter, Baron: his Persian railway contract 146
  • Rio de Janeiro: report of J. M. Hinds, consul-general; possible large increase of trade with the United States 17
    • project of establishing a steamer line to, from New York 6
  • Rio Grande do Sul: Vice-consul Upton will prepare a trade-report 17
  • Rome: trade-report of Mr. Marsh, United States minister 105 107
  • Russia: trade with Persia 146

S.

  • Salt: decline of production in the Bahamas 104
  • Salvador: tables of imports and exports 28
  • Samana: report of Commercial Agent Clark 132 136
  • Sample-depot for exhibition of United States products: suggested at Trieste 14
  • suggested at Aspinwall 31
    • at Copenhagen 35
    • at Leipsic 43
    • at Bremen or Hamburg 45
    • at Frankfort 47, 52
    • at Berlin, Leipsic, Breslau, Cologne, Frankfort, Stuttgart, and Munich 59
    • at Berlin, Cologne, and Frankfort 80
    • in various parts of England 86
  • Samples: suggestion that they be admitted into Mexico duty free, or with drawback 118
    • suggestion of sending, with prices, to Swiss industrial museums 138
  • San Domingo: trade-report; dullness of commerce; the cancellation of the interior debt 132 134
    • movements of shipping at Samana in 1875 135, 136
  • San José de Guatemala: rates of European and American freights to 22
  • Saxony: introduction of American products; the people averse to change 44
  • Schmalz (artificial butter): manufacture of, in Bavaria, from American lard 73
  • Schuyler, E., consul-general, Constantinople: trade-report 144 147
  • Seelhorst, Dr., secretary of the General Museum of Nuremberg: his efforts to introduce American agricultural machinery into Bavaria 76 78
  • Sewing-machines: effects of the United States patent monopoly on foreign sales of 11
    • trade in Germany 55
  • Shaw, A. D., consul at Toronto: trade-report 91 99
  • Shipping-dues: at Bristol, Avonmouth, and Gloucester 87 89
  • Shirtings: British, in Japan; poor quality of 116
  • Silk: manufactures in Switzerland; handwork versus machinery 138 140
  • Silver coin: Mexican export duty of 5 per cent 123
  • Skilton, J. A., consul-general, Mexico: trade-report 117
    • additional report on trade and freights 119 121
  • Sonneberg: trade-reports from Consul Winser 62 73
    • account of the toy-trade of 65
    • manufacturers’ protest against the French tariff 67
  • Spanish language: its study more serviceable in commercial preparation than French or German 21
  • Specie: Japanese imports and exports 113, 114
  • Spencer, O. M., consul, Genoa: trade-report 107 110
  • Steuart, J. H., consul, Leipsic: trade-report 42
  • St. Gothard tunnel: influence on American trade with Switzerland 137
  • Subsidy: suggested for the Alexandre line of steamers to Vera Cruz 120
  • Suez Canal: its effect on the direct Eastern trade of the Continent; British participation therein diminished 84
  • Sugar: in Central America 24
  • Sutter, J. A., consul, Acapulco: trade-report 121 123
  • Switzerland: trade with; silk production 136 140
    • American trade to be benefited by the St. Gothard tunnel 137
    • permanent industrial museums 138

T.

  • Tampico: steam communication with ports of the United States; subsidy suggested 119
  • Tariff: of Central American States; obstructiveness to trade 23
    • of Italy and the United States; equally oppose increase of trade 107
    • of Mexico; duties charged on gross weight; an obstacle to trade 119
    • of Mexico; high rates on cottons and woolens 121 123
    • of San Domingo 134
    • (United States): question of procuring reduction, or of levying discriminating duties in Germany against American productions 64
      • letters from sixteen German manufacturers in relation to 68 71
      • effects of American protection upon British manufactures 81 85
      • high duties on Irish flax and linens 85
      • effect on northwestern exports of buffalo-skins 101
      • effects on trade with Italy 109
      • how affecting Swiss silks 138
  • Taylor, J. W., consul, Winnipeg: trade-report 100 102
  • Thayer, A. W., consul, Trieste: trade-report 13 16
  • Thorington, J., consul, Aspin wall: recommends appointment of special agents to encourage commerce 31
  • Thüringian Union: trade with the United States 62 73
  • Times (the): editorial on the decline of British exports and American competition in England 81 83
  • Toronto: trade-report from Consul Shaw 91 99
  • Toy-trade of Thüringia 65 67
  • Trade (foreign): unwillingness of American manufacturers to conform to special requirements of 145
  • Treaty: of alliance with Mexico, suggested 124
  • Trebizond: the route to Persia, viâ; decline of traffic 146, 147
  • Trieste: report of A. W. Thayer, consul; the Oriental trade of Austria 13 16
    • suggested establishment of a sample-warehouse at, and line of steamers to 15
  • True, J. M., consul, Kingston, Ontario: trade-report 99
  • Turbine wheels: introduction and large sale of an American model in Bavaria 74
  • Turkey: (See Constantinople.)
    • commerce; the routes to Persia; how to develop trade with the United States 140 144
    • little prospect of increasing American imports from, except figs 144

U.

  • Upton, G. F., vice-consul at Rio Grande do Sul: will prepare a trade-report 17

V.

  • Valparaiso: decline of United States shipping-trade with 31
  • Vera Cruz:. steamer facilities with the United States 120
  • Videla Dorna, Señor: Argentine chargé d’affaires: note to his government concerning Mr. Evarts’s trade-circulars 6 8
  • Vienna: report of Mr. Post, consul-general; influence of United States patent laws on foreign competition 8 13

W.

  • Wages: in Holland 125 128
    • of Swiss silk weavers and spinners 140
  • Watches (American): their superiority acknowledged in Germany 57
  • Water-power: in Italy; not available for purposes of manufacture 106
  • Wheat. (See Breadstuff’s.)
  • Williamson, G.: minister resident Central America: trade-report 18 30
  • Wilson, J. M., consul, Nuremberg: trade report 73 79
  • Wines: Portuguese; the Douro vintage of 1877 132
  • Winnipeg: trade-report of Consul Taylor 100 102
    • statistics of imports and exports of the Northwest Territory 100, 101
  • Winser, H. J., consul, Sonneberg: trade-report 62 67
    • supplementary report; opinions of German manufacturers 68 71
    • additional report; German prejudices to be overcome 71 73
  • Wool: production in Ontario; exportation to the United States 92
  • Woolen goods: trade between the United States and Great Britain; annually decreasing 91
    • in Mexico; made there under high protective tariff 123
    • manufactures in European Turkey 142

Y.

  • Yarns: cotton, in Japan; relative qualities and prices of British and American 117

Z.

  • Zollverein: suggestion for the establishment of a general customs union between all American States 6
  • Zone (Free) of Mexico: an obstacle to the pro tit able sale of dutiable articles 119
  • Zurich: the silk-trade 138 140