Index.

Geneva edition Second edition
Page Page
Adams, Charles Francis:
day of probable arrival in London known in advance 56 28
arrives in London 57 28
comments on negotiations regarding declaration of Paris 78 36
complains of doings at Nassau 232 95
complains of insurgent operations in British jurisdiction 248 101
says insurgent government is interested in blockade-running 282–284 114 115
further representations as to blockade-runners 288 117
representations as to the Honduras 289 117
notifies Earl Russell that sale of Sumter will not be recognized 321 130
informs Earl Russell of the character of the Florida 335 135
brings to Earl Russell’s notice treatment of Florida in colonies 361 144
calls Earl Russell’s attention to the Alabama 366 147
sends Earl Russell affidavits regarding Alabama 373 149
confers with Earl Russell about the Alabama 375 150
complains to Earl Russell of the Georgia 397 158
complains to Earl Russell of enlistments for the Georgia 399, 400 159
complains to Earl Russell of the Georgia 404, 405 161
complains to Earl Russell about the Shenandoah 421, 450 167, 178
complains to Earl Russell about the Laurel 452 179
Adams, John Quincy:
correspondence regarding claims of Portugal 139–145 60 62
Admiralty and colonial instructions:
of January 31, 1862, unfriendly to United States 229 94
abstract of those instructions 233 96
Agrippina, The:
takes stores and coal to Alabama at Terceira 378 151
takes coal to same at Martinique 382 152
Ajax, The:
inquiries as to 298 120
Alabama, The:
short sketch of 243 99
Lord Russell thinks it a scandal to British laws 254 104
description of 364 146
built for insurgent man-of-war 365 146
contracted for by Bullock 365 146
crew of, wages paid by Fraser, Trenholm & Co 366 146
customs officers report her a man-of-war 368 147
attention of Liverpool collector called to her 369 147
he sees nothing wrong in her 369 148
Mr. R. P. Collier’s opinion taken as to 370 148
affidavits as to character of obtained and officially communicated to British government 371 148
these affidavits remain a week unacted upon 373 149
orders then given to detain 373 149
orders revealed and Alabama escapes 375 150
goes to Moelfra Bay and the Hercules follows next day with crew 376 150
gross inefficiency, or worse, of the collector 376 150
the Alabama proceeds to Terceira 377 151
receives arms, stores, and coal from Bahama and Agrippina 378 151
was adapted for warlike purposes when she left Liverpool 379 151
was fitted out there, at least in part 380 152
Semmes’s opinion of the vessel 381 152
she receives coal from Agrippina at Martinique 382 152
is received at Jamaica as a man-of-war 382 152
[Page 192]Alabama, The:
goes to Brazil and the Cape of Good Hope 383 153
Mr. Adams complains to Earl Russell 383 153
her tender, the Tuscaloosa, (see Tuscaloosa) 385, 387 153, 154
she coals at Singapore 386 154
she coals again at Table Bay. 386 154
is sunk off Cherbourg by the Kearsarge 387 154
reasons why Great Britain is liable for her acts 388 155
Alar, The:
takes arms and stores to the Georgia 396 158
Alexandra, The:
ruling of the court in the case of 161 68
seizure, trial, and acquittal 258 105
ruling of the court in, emasculated the foreign enlistment act of 1819 259 106
Amendments:
of municipal laws may be asked by a belligerent 147 63
of law of 1819 asked by the United States and refused 251, 253 103
Amphion, The:
inquiries as to 297 120
Archer, The:
career of. 363 145
Arman. (See Bullock; France.)
Arming:
when arming a vessel is a violation of neutrality 159 68
should be prevented by due diligence 211 87
Ayliffe:
views as to diligence and negligence note. 153 65
Bahama:
takes out Florida’s armament. 334 135
arrival at Nassau 337 136
arms and crew from, for Alabama 378 151
Barbadoes:
a base of hostile operations. 358 143
Baring, Thomas:
speech on the Georgia 401 160
Belgium:
course of the government of, contrasted with that of the British government 462 183
Belligerents, (see Blockade; Russell:)
insurgents recognized as 47 25
recognition determined upon before May 1, 1861 50 26
France consulted as to recognition 52 27
answer of the French government 53 27
President’s proclamation not then received 53 27
privateering of, legalized by Queen’s proclamation 58 29
right to issue such proclamation not denied 63 31
it was an unfriendly act 63 31
and issued with an unfriendly purpose 64 31
may ask to have defective neutrality laws amended 147 63
Benjamin, Judah P.:
sends agents of insurgent war department to Nassau 224 92
Bermuda:
(steamship) runs blockade with arms, &c 221 91
(island) well adapted as a depot of insurgent supplies 224 92
an insurgent depot established there 238 98
Bernard, Mr. Mountague:
computes amount of cotton in 1861 note 219 90
statement regarding Fraser, Trenholm & Co. note 220 91
describes Nassau note. 224 92
describes the Alexandra note 258 105
[Page 193]Bernard, Mr. Mountague:
gives list of vessels detained by Great Britain 296 120
his criticism on Mr. Fish’s dispatch not sustained 300 121
his statement concerning the Florida note 344 138
his statement as to prosecutions for offenses against foreign enlistment act 400 159
Blackstone, Sir William:
defines extent and force of law of nations 120 53
Blockade:
notice of, by proclamation 45 24
proclamation of, when news of, received in England 47 25
an imperfect copy submitted to law officers for opinion 49 25
Blockade-runners:
general character of, determined by insurgent government 223 92
converted into men-of-war, and vice versa 414 164
Blockade-running:
operations in 1862 237 97
operations in 1863 274 111
insurgent government interested in 278 113
complaints thereof to British government 282 114
answer that it is no offense 282 114
further proof of insurgent interest in 286 116
Bluntschli, Dr.:
definition of neutrality 123 54
criticism on the Alabama 171 72
Brazil:
course of the government of, contrasted with that of the government of Great Britain 465 184
Bright, Mr.:
views as to the Queen’s proclamation 62 30
speech of, March 13, 1865 91 41
Bullock, James Dunwoody:
sent to England by the insurgents 218 90
arrives there in the summer of 1861 240 99
has an office with Fraser, Trenholm & Co 241 99
contracts for Florida and Alabama 241, 365 99, 146
superintends construction of rams 261 106
contracts for construction of men-of-war in France 266 108
remittances to. 269 109
writes Waddell to stop destruction by Shenandoah 448 177
Burden of proof:
thrown upon Great Britain to show that it exercised diligence 319 128
Cairns, Lord:
definition of due diligence 157 67
comment on the word “escape” note 216 89
Calvo:
collects authorities defining neutrality 124 54
Campbell, Lord:
views as to effect of Queen’s proclamation 59 29
was Lord Chancellor when proclamation issued 98 44
Canning, Mr.:
his opinion regarding conduct of United States as a neutral 107 48
Cape Town, (see Tuscaloosa:)
Alabama at 386 154
Georgia at 401 160
Chickamauga:
description of, and her career 413 164
shifts from blockade-runner to man-of-war 413 164
reasons why Great Britain liable for acts of 415 165
[Page 194]Claims of the United States:
general statement of, by American commissioners 10, 469 9, 185
rejection of, by British commissioners 12, 469 10, 185
detailed statement of, where to be found and should be met by award of a gross sum 469, 480 185, 189
Clarence, The:
career of 363 145
Coal, (see Alabama; Georgia; Florida; Shenandoah:)
great need of insurgents of, at Bermuda, in 1863 277 113
what is a just rule regarding supplies of note 325 131
permission refused to the United States to deposit at Nassau 329 132
Cockburn, Sir Alexander:
charge to jury in Highatt’s case 395 157
Cobden, Richard:
says Great Britain has recognized duty to detain offending
vessel coming within its jurisdiction 163–166 69 70
comments on loss of mercantile marine of United States 472 187
Collier, R. P.:
solicitor general in 1863, and now attorney general 370 148
his opinions in the Alabama matter 370, 372 148, 149
Commission:
as man-of-war, effect of on offending vessel 202 84
how regarded by France, Great Britain, Spain, and Portugal 209 86
Common law of England:
international law is part of 61, 118 30, 52
Compensation for injuries:
when it should be made 136, 169 59, 71
Confederate States. (See Insurrection.)
Connecticut:
repairs refused to, at Barbadoes 357, 442 143, 175
Contraband of war:
a ship constructed in a neutral port for the use of a belligerent not to be confounded with 193 80
opinion of Ortolan, as to 195 81
opinion of Heffter, as to 196 81
opinion of Chief Justice Marshall, as to. 201 83
dealings in, in what the trade of Nassau differed from 229 94
fraudulently cleared at Nassau for St. John’s 236 97
Cotton:
furnished means for carrying on the war 218 90
amount unexported in April, 1861 note 219 91
Crimean war:
course of Great Britain toward Prussia during 108 48
Dacotah, The:
treatment of, at Bermuda 353 141
Dallas, Mr.:
interview with Lord John Russell, April 9, 1861 43 23
interview with same, May 1, 1831 46 24
Davis, Jefferson, (see Insurrection:)
chosen president of insurgent government 37 21
his speech acknowledging the same 38 21
Deposit of offense:
cannot be made fraudulently 209, 213 86, 88
Diligence:
what is due 150 64
correlative with negligence 151 64
necessary extent of, in order to escape responsibility 152 65
definition of term due diligence 158 67
duty of a neutral to exercise 211, 212 87
abandonment of, in advance by Great Britain 256, 317 104, 128
Drouyn de Lhuys:
his note to Mr. Dayton, concerning iron-clads 267 109
[Page 195]Dudley, consul:
his energetic action regarding the Alabama 370 148
England. (See Great Britain.)
Equipping:
when equipping a vessel is an offense 159 68
defined in the Alexandra case 161 68
defined in the British act of 1870 161 69
should be prevented by due diligence 211 87
Evidence, (see Treaty of Washington:)
of the United States, how cited and arranged 30 17
Fawcett, Preston & Co.:
contract for the Florida 241, 332 99, 134
Fish, Mr.:
his instructions to Mr. Motley } 64, 300 31, 121
466 184
the allegations in those instructions sustained 300 121
contrasts the course of Great Britain with that of other powers 466 184
Fitting out:
of a vessel, when a violation of duties of a neutral 159 68
should be prevented by due diligence 212 87
Florida, The:
construction of, advanced in November, 1861 241 99
sketch of proceedings as to 242 99
money sent to Nassau for, through J. Fraser & Co 246 101
proceedings at Nassau as to 247 101
Lord Russell thinks it a scandal to British laws 254 104
Bullock makes contract for 332 134
coals at Liverpool and registers as a British vessel 333 134
armament for, shipped in the Bahama 334 135
clears for Palermo and Jamaica 336 135
customs officers report to be a man-of-war 336 135
arrives at Nassau 337 136
proceedings against, at Nassau 338 136
complaints as to, disregarded 341 137
civil authorities neglect duty in proceedings against 343 138
judge disregards law and evidence in decision as to 346 139
crew enlisted for, at Nassau 347 139
clearance of for St. John’s a fraud 348 139
receives arms and stores in British waters 348 139
attempts to elude Spanish laws and fails 350 140
enters and leaves Mobile 350 140
coals and provisions in excessive quantities at Nassau 351 141
receives fresh supplies at Barbadoes in one month thereafter 355 142
protest of Admiral Wilkes as to 355 142
receives repairs at Bermuda 358 143
goes to Brest 359 144
receives crew, armament, and machinery from Liverpool 359 144
receives repairs and supplies at Bermuda 360 144
these repairs of, and supplies excessive 361 145
termination of cruise at Bahia 302 145
career of tenders of 363 145
reasons why Great Britain is liable for acts of 363 145
Foreign Enlistment Act of 1819:
is founded on the United States laws 107 47
intended to aid in performances of international duties 108 48
duies recognized by it 111 49
commission to revise 113 50
report of commissioners as to 114 51
object of proposed commission 116 51
inefficiency of the act 250 102
propositions for amendment of 251, 253 103
declined by Great Britain 251, 253 103
emasculated by ruling in Alexandra case 258 105
[Page 196]Foreign Enlistment Act of 1870:
provisions of 117 51
judicial construction of 117 52
its object, to enable Great Britain to fulfill international duties 117 52
France:
joint action of, invited and secured 45 21
how regards the effect of a commission on a cruiser illegally fitted out 209 86
detains vessels constructed by Arman 267 109
course of, contrasted with Great Britain’s 463 183
Eraser, Trenholm & Co.:
firm of, when founded in Liverpool 219 91
treasury depositaries of insurgents 220 91
insurgent remittances to Bullock through 269 109
supply Walker with coal at Bermuda. 278 113
pay wages of Alabama crew 366 146
Genet, (see Washington:)
commissions French privateers in United States in 1793 127 55
Jefferson’s rebuke of 129 56
Georgia, The:
sketch of career 256 105
built for insurgents, description of 392 156
crew for, engaged and shipped in Liverpool 393 157
registered as a British vessel 393 157
armed from the Alar 396 158
negligence of British government as to 398 158
complaints of enlistments for 399 159
returns to Liverpool 401 160
her career sketched by Mr. Thomas Baring 401 160
goes into dock at Liverpool. 406 161
captured by the Niagara 406 162
reasons why Great Britain liable for acts of 406 162
Gkorgiana, The:
inquiries as to 296 120
Gettysburgh:
preparations for the battle of 276, 277 112
Gladiator, The:
insurgents contract in London to purchase 225 93
arrives in Nassau with arms and munitions of war 226 93
gets permission to break bulk and transship 226 93
Gladstone, Right Hon. W. E.:
declines to consider effect of Queen’s proclamation on privateering 58 29
speech of October 7, 1862 89, 215 41, 89
speech of June 30, 1863 95 43
Gran Para, The:
opinion of the court in the case of 201, 206 83, 85
Granville, Lord:
definition of due diligence 157 67
Great Britain, (see United States; Crimean war:)
friendly relations of, with United States before 1860 31 19
various treaties with 31, 32, 33 19, 20
early informed of views of Mr. Lincoln’s Government 42 23
joint action of, with France 45 24
invitation of, for such joint action unfriendly 46 24
law of nations part of law of 61, 118 30, 52
conduct in Trent affair 82 38
cabinet of, personally unfriendly to United States 97 43
people of, with some exceptions, unfriendly 98 44
possible reasons for such unfriendliness 99 44
action of, influenced by it 102 45
its neutrality laws 1071–18 47 51
proclamation of its neutrality 57, 122 28, 53
instructions to officials of, during insurrection 125 55
[Page 197]Great Britain:
minister of, intervenes against course of Genet 129 56
reply of Mr. Jefferson to 129 58
duties recognized in its correspondence with United States 135 58
branches of insurgent government established in 221 91
admiralty instructions of, unfriendly to the United States 228 94
recapitulation of breaches of international duty of 300 121
the base of the insurgent naval operations 310 125
the arsenal of the insurgents 310 125
the systematic operations of the insurgents in a violation of its international duties 311 128
its neutrality partial and insincere 313 128
hostile and unfriendly acts tolerated in 314 127
abandons all diligence in advance 317 128
confidential instructions of, supposed to conflict with published instructions of January 31, 1862 430 171
course of, contrasted with the course of other Powers 466 184
Gross sum:
reasons for awarding a, to the United States 467 185
Hammond, Mr.:
British minister to United States in 1793 128 56
complains of acts of Mr. Genet 128 56
receives Mr. Jefferson’s reply 129 56
Hardwick, Lord:
views as to privateering 59 29
Hautefeuille:
definition of neutrality 124 64
his views regarding construction of a vessel of war on belligerent account in neutral territory 171 72
Hawk, The:
a blockade-runner, inquiries as to 297 120
Hector The:
built for Great Britain 296 120
Heffter:
on contraband of war and the illegal construction of ships of war 196 81
Heyliger, Lewis:
appointed agent at Nassau for disposal of insurgent cotton,
and for shipment of arms and supplies 225 92
has confidential relations with colonial authorities 228 94
operations of, in 1862, reviewed 237 97
takes charge of Florida and Bahama at Nassau 337 136
Hercules, The, (see Alabama:)
inquiries as to 298 120
Hickley, Captain, R. N.:
his opinion of the Florida at Nassau 338 136
Huse, Caleb:
sent to England by the insurgents. 218 90
ships arms and munitions thence in 1861 221 91
ordered to ship purchases to West India Islands 235 97
operations of, in 1862, reviewed 237 97
Insurgents:
government interested in blockade-running 282 114
make Great Britain the base of their naval operations 310 125
Insurrection, (see Belligerents:)
secession of South Carolina and other States 36 21
election of president and vice-president 37 21
a large party in the South opposed to 39 22
letters of marque authorized 44 24
would have succumbed earlier hut for aid from Great Britain 311 126
International, The:
decision as to, under foreign enlistment act of 1871 117 52
[Page 198]International Law:
a part of the common law of England 61, 118 30, 52
Iron-clads, (see Laird’s rams:)
insurgents’contract for six, in 1862 246 101
Jacquemyns. (See Rolin.)
Jamaica:
the Alabama at. 382 153
Jay’s Treaty. (See United States.)
Jefferson, Mr.:
reply to Mr. Hammond’s representations 129 56
his views of the duty of a neutral nation 133 58
Joint High Commission:
meeting at Washington 9 9
protocol of conferences 10 9
Jones & Co.:
ship crew for Georgia in Liverpool 393 157
trial of members of, before Sir Alexander Cockburn 394 157
Klingender, M. G. & Co.:
connected with Fraser, Trenholm & Co note 323 130
purchase the Sumter at Gibraltar 323 130
and pay the wages of Alabama crew note 323 130
Laird, John:
speech of, April 27, 1863 90 41
& Son’s contract for Alabama 241 99
and accompany her as far as the buoy when she sails 376 150
Lairds’ rams:
contract for, and construction 261 106
various representations by Mr. Adams as to 263 107
Lord Russell refuses to interfere with 263, 264 107
the seizure and detention of, not an abandonment of previous lax rule by British government 264 108
Laurel, The:
takes arms and crew to Shenandoah 419 166
Mr. Adams complains of 452 179
Lewis, Sir George Cornwall:
says a proclamation will be issued by the Queen 56 28
opinion as to the duties of neutrals 60 30
Lincoln, President, (see United States; Blockade:)
elected President 36 21
inaugurated. 42 23
convenes Congress, and calls out militia 44 24
Liverpool:
branches of insurgent government established at 221 91
collector of, notified as to Alabama 369, 371 147, 148
Louisa Ann Fanny, The:
inquiries as to 298 120
Lyndhurst, Lord:
views as to law of England and duties of neutrals 60 30
Maffitt, Commander:
arrives in Nassau 227 93
sends to Bullock men discharged from Florida 269 110
ships crew for Florida at Nassau 347 139
Mansfield, Lord:
opinion in case of Russian ambassador 119 52
Marshall, Chief Justice:
opinion in the Gran Para case 201, 206 83, 85
on the effect of a commission upon a man-of-war 204 84
Maury, The bark:
seized by request of British minister at Washington 134 58
seizure without cause and discharged 135 58
Melbourne. (See Shenandoah.)
[Page 199]Mercantile Trading Company:
form partnership with insurgent government 279 113
Monroe, James:
correspondence regarding claims of Portugal 138 59
Municipal laws:
designed to aid in performance of international duty 106 47
international obligation not dependent upon them 106, 211 47, 87
an evidence of the nation’s sense of its duties 108 47
neutral bound to enforce 211 87
belligerent may require enforcement of 211 87
and enactment of new, if existing laws insufficient 211 87
Great Britain held legal proof of violation of, to be necessary before its action as a neutral could be required 369 147
Municipal proclamation:
the United States had a right to expect the enforcement of 135 58
Nashville, The:
escapes from Charleston. 328 132
receives excessive supply of coal at Bermuda 329 132
Burns the Harvey Birch 330 133
arrives at Southampton 330 133
proceeds to Bermuda and coals there 330 133
reasons why Great Britain should be held responsible for acts of 331 133
Nassau:
well adapted for a depot of insurgent supplies 223 92
made an insurgent depot and base of operations note 224, 225 92, 93
Mr. Adams complains of, to Lord Russell 232 95
made depot for quartermaster’s stores 280 114
civil authorities of, act in interest of insurgents. 342 137
Netherlands:
course of government of, contrasted with that of Great Britain 463 183
Neutrality:
definitions of, by Phillimore, Bluntschli, Hautefeuille, and Lord Stowell 123, 124 54
duty to observe 210 87
failure to observe as to San Jacinto and Honduras 288 117
Neutrality laws, (see Foreign Enlistment Act:)
of United States enacted at request of Great Britain 133 58
Neutrals, (See Paris.; Belligerents; Treaty of Washington:)
duties of, as defined in the treaty of Washington 22, 148 14, 63
duties and rights of, as defined in the declaration of Paris 69 33
animus of, the sole criterion according to Lord Westbury 101 45
bound to enforce municipal laws in belligerent’s favor 108, 211 48, 87
duties of, recognized in the Queen’s proclamation 123, 125 54, 55
bound to enforce municipal proclamations 135, 211 58, 87
use all the means in its power to prevent violations of their neutrality 136, 212 59, 87
when liable to make compensation 136, 212 59, 87
should amend defective neutrality laws when requested by belligerents 147, 211 63, 87
when should institute proceedings to prevent violations of neutrality 147 63
should detain offending vessels coming within their jurisdiction 162, 211 69, 87
should not permit their ports to be made the base of hostile operations 166, 212 70, 87
summary of the duties of, as applicable to this case 210–213 86 88
obligations of, as to an offending vessel, not discharged by commission as man-of-war 213 88
nor by evasion of municipal law 213 88
when they may not set up a deposit of the offense 213 88
North:
sent to England by the insurgents 218 90
Miss, names the Virginia, (or Georgia) 392 156
[Page 200]Oreto. (See Florida.)
Ortolan, Theodore:
views of, as to construction of men-of-war for belligerents in neutral ports 181 76
says such vessel not to be confounded with ordinary contraband of war 195 81
Palmer, Sir Roundell:
his definition of due diligence 157 67
his statement of the opinions of British lawyers note 162 69
his views as to the effect of a commission upon an offending vessel 204 84
his speech on the Georgia 403 160
Palmerston, Lord:
thinks separation must take place 55 28
awaiting opinion of law officers 55 28
speech of March 27, 1863 94 42
speech of, June 30, 1863 96 43
speech of, July 23, 1863 108 48
minatory conversation with Mr. Adams 234 96
Pampero, The:
seizure of, and trial 260 106
Paris, Declaration of:
unfriendly course of Great Britain as to, detailed 65–82 31 38
Phantom, The:
a blockade-runner. 297 120
Phillimore, Sir R. J.:
decision in the case of the International 117 52
definition of neutrality 123 54
Pierantoni:
criticism on the Alabama 184 77
Portugal:
abstract of correspondence between, and the United States 137–146 59 62
principles recognized by, in that correspondence 146 62
recognizes international duty to make compensation for injuries committed by cruisers fitted out in neutral port 169 72
how regards effect of commission on such cruiser 209 86
course of government of, contrasted with that of British government 463 183
Prioleau, Charles K.:
managing member of Fraser, Trenholm & Co 220 91
becomes naturalized as British subject 220 91
Privateering:
declaration of congress of Paris, as to 69 33
Great Britain willing to legalize with insurgents 74 35
but not with the United States 77 36
Proclamation:
announcing blockade. (See Blockade.)
recognizing insurgents as belligerents. (See Belligerents.)
the Queen’s, a recognition of the international duties of Great Britain 105 47
such duties recognized by it defined 123, 125 54
Prosecutions. (See Bernard.)
Prussia:
course of government of, contrasted with that of British government 464 183
Rams. (See Laird’s rams.)
Rappahannock:
short sketch of 291 118
is detained by French authorities 292 118
course of French government as to, contrasted with conduct of British officials 293 118
Regret. (See Treaty of Washington.)
[Page 201]Retribution, The:
built at Buffalo, captured by rebels 390 156
turned into a cruiser 390 156
her career 390, 392 156
Rolin, Jacquemyns:
views as to the Queen’s proclamation 64 31
views as to British neutrality 87 40
criticism on Mr. Bernard’s book 176 74
Rules, (see Treaty of Washington; Neutrals:)
the principles stated in these rules in force before the Treaty of Washington 148 63
Russell, Lord John, (see Russell, Earl, where references to, are indexed:)
created Earl Russell during insurrection. 97 44
Russell, Earl, (see Dallas; Adams, Charles Francis:)
promises to await Mr. Adams’s arrival 43 23
discusses independence with insurgent commissioners 51 26
calls the United States the northern portion of the late Union 54 27
is doubtful June 1, 1881, whether there is a war 57 28
speech of, October 14, 1861 87 40
speech of, February 5, 1863 90 41
speech of, June 9, 1864 96 43
says the insurgents build ships of war in Great Britain because they have no ports of their own 215 89
reply to Mr. Adams’s complaints regarding Nassau 232 95
declines to act on Mr. Adams’s complaints regarding insurgent operations in February, 1863 249 102
declines to advise amendment of foreign enlistment act 251, 253 103
says the Alabama and Oreto are a scandal to British laws 254 104
thinks the interest of the insurgent government in blockade-runners should not be interfered with } 282, 284 114, 115
290 117
letter to Mason, Slidell, and Mann., 309 125
reply to Mr. Adams’s note regarding sale of Sumter 322 130
sends Mr. Adams the report of customs officers on the Florida at 336 135
reply to Mr. Adams regarding treatment of Florida at Bermuda 361 144
tells Mr. Adams to refer evidence about Alabama to Liverpool collector 386 146
conference with Mr. Adams after escape of Alabama 375 150
says Alabama was partly fitted out in Great Britain 380 152
reply to Mr. Adams’s complaints about Georgia 397 158
forwards Bullock’s letter to Waddell 448 178
reply to Mr. Adams’s complaints regarding Laurel 453 180
Russia:
course of the government of, contrasted with that of Great Britain 464 183
Russian Ambassador:
arrest of, in time of Queen Anne 119 52
Saldanha’s expedition:
arrest of, at Terceira 194 81
Salisbury, Marquis of:
speech of, when Lord Robert Cecil. 99 44
San Jacinto:
how treated at Barbadoes 356 142
Santisima Trinidad:
opinion in case of 197 82
Sea-King, The. (See Shenandoah.)
Semmes, Raphael, (see Alahama:)
his opinion of the Alabama 381 152
[Page 202]Seward, Mr.:
instructs Mr. Adams to complain of insurgent operations made from British jurisdiction 248 101
Ships. (See Vessels.)
Shenandoah, The, or Sea-King:
short sketch of 293 118
built in Clyde, and attracted Dudley’s attention 416 165
description of 416 165
sold to father-in-law of Prioleau 416 166
sails armed, and under command of Corbett, a well-known blockade-runner 417 166
her officers and crew sail from Liverpool in the Laurel 418 166
is armed from the Laurel at Madeira 420 167
is short of men 421 167
arrives at Melbourne 424 168
her transfer to the insurgents known there in advance of her arrival 424 168
representations as to, by United States consul to authorities 424 169
captain of, asks permission to coal and make repairs 426 169
permission granted 427 169
delay in reporting what repairs were necessary 427 170
report as to repairs made five days after arrival 428 170
permission to repair again granted 428 170
captain is requested to name day when he can go to sea 429 170
many men are illegally enlisted or crew of 429 170
proceedings as to, in colonial legislature 430 170
correspondence with colonial authorities regarding enlistments for 431 171
enlistments continue; repairs suspended 432 172
repairs resumed and completed 433 172
three hundred tons of coal taken from a transport sent for the purpose from Liverpool 434 172
consul furnishes proof of illegal enlistments to colonial authorities 434 172
no action taken thereon 434 173
number and notoriety of enlistments 435–439 173 174
no supplies or coal needed for 439 174
repairs prolonged to enlist men 440 174
no repairs needed 441 175
critical examination of report of repairs 443–447 176 177
returns to Liverpool 449 178
violations of neutrality by 450 178
reasons for holding Great Britain liable for acts of 454 180
Singapore:
Alabama coals at 386 154
Slavery:
opposition to the limitation of, the cause of secession 37 21
Spain:
recognizes international duty to make compensation for injuries by cruisers fitted out in violation of international duty 169 72
how, regards the effect of a commission on such cruisers 209 86
course of the government of, contrasted with that of the British government 464 183
Stoerkodder, The, or Stonewall:
short sketch of career of 268 109
Story, Mr. Justice:
definitions of diligence 154, 156 66
opinion in the case of the Santisima Trinidad 197 82
Stephens, Alexander H.:
vice-president of insurgent government 37 21
his views as to slavery 38 22
his speech against secession 38 22
[Page 203]Sumter:
proceedings at Gibraltar as to 245 100
proceedings at Trinidad as to 247 101
coals at Trinidad 320 129
arrives at Gibraltar 321 129
shut up there by Kearsarge 321 129
sold under protest of United States consul 321 130
treatment of, a partiality toward insurgents 323 130
reasons why Great Britain liable for acts of 327 132
Sumter, Fort:
surrender of 44 24
Swedish vessels:
the case of 187 78
Tacony, The:
career of 363 145
Tallahassee, The:
fitted out in London as a privateer 409 163
her career 410 163
what was done at Halifax as to 411 163
reasons why Great Britain liable for acts of 412 164
Tenterden, Lord:
memorandum on neutrality laws 106 47
says privateering was suppressed by reason of the course adopted by Washington 131 57
Terceira, (see Saldanha’s expedition:)
Alabama arrives there. 378 151
Transshipment of contraband of war:
the permission in colonial ports a failure to perform the duties of a neutral 227 93
injurious to the United States 227 93
Treaty of Washington:
expresses regret at escape of the cruisers 18 12
terms of submission of claims of the United States 18 12
meeting of the arbitrators, provisions for 19 13
time for delivery of cases and evidence 20 13
time for delivery of counter cases and evidence 21 13
when originals must be produced 21 13
duties of agents of each government 21 13
counsel may be heard 22 14
rules applicable to the case, (see Neutrals) 22, 149 14, 63
award, when and how made 24 14
board of assessors, how constituted and duties of 25 15
the first clause in the first rule to he found in United States neutrality law of 1794 150 64
what is due diligence 150–158 64 67
fitting out, arming, or equippiug, each an offense 159 68
reasons for words “specially adapted,” &c 159 68
continuing force of second clause of first rule 163 69
limitation and explanation of second rule 167 71
recognizes obligation to make compensation for injuries 169 71
Treaty of 1794. (See United States.)
Trenholm, George A.:
principal member of firm of Fraser, Trenholm & Co., and secretary of insurgent treasury 220 91
Trent. (Bee Great Britain.)
Trinidad:
The Sumter at 247, 320 101, 129
Tuscaloosa, or Conrad:
a prize captured by the Alabama 270 110
claims to be received at Cape Town as a tender 270 110
is seized, then released, and recived as man-of-war 272 110
this decision reversed in London 272 111
comes again to Cape Town and is seized 273 111
this act disapproved in London 274 111
[Page 204]Twenty-four hours’rule:
contained in admiralty and colonial instructions 233 98
United States, (see Great Britain; Washington:)
relations with Great Britain before 1860 friendly 31 19
various treaties with Great Britain 31–33 19 20
number of States and Territories in 1860 note 35 20
election of Mr. Lincoln as President 36 21
secession of South Carolina and other States 36 21
cause of secession 37 21
neutrality law of 1818 note 112 50
had no municipal law in 1793 to aid in performance of international duties 127 55
course during President Washington’s administration 127 55
treaty of 1794 131 57
construction thereof by commissioners 132 57
enact neutrality laws at request of Great Britain 133 58
correspondence with Portugal 137–146 59 62
principles recognized by that correspondence 146 63
what they regard as due diligence 158 67
seizure of Spanish gun-boats in 1869 160 68
character of southern blockaded coast 222 92
Vessels of war, (see Commission; Contraband; Neutrals:)
of belligerents, sale of, in neutral ports 322 130
Virginia, The:
inquiries as to 298 120
Wachusett:
treatment of, at Bermuda 353 142
Walker, Norman S.:
made insurgent agent at Bermuda 238 98
his urgent demand for coal 277 113
is supplied with coal by Fraser, Trenholm & Co 278 113
Washlngton, President:
his course toward Mr. Genet 1291–31 56 57
determines to restore prizes captured by privateers fitted out in United States
his course suppressed privateering 131 57
Westbury, Lord:
appointed Lord High Chancellor, June, 1861 98 44
regards animus of neutral as sole criterion 101 45
says United States may use Queen’s proclamation to prove animus 101 45
says ship should not be built in neutral port by belligerent with view to war 185 78
Wilkes, Admiral:
correspondence with governor of Bermuda 355 142