Papers relating to foreign affairs.

GREAT BRITAIN.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1861.
74 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Nov. 22 Acknowledging reception of missing despatch in reference to case of Mr. Bunch, and transmitting copy of note to Earl Russell announcing revocation of Mr. Bunch’s exequatur; reasons therefor. Sense entertained by President of action of Lord Lyons. 3
75 do Nov. 22 Transmitting copy of note of Earl Russell in reference to intercepted bag of Mr. Bunch and to correspondence of British subjects in southern States. 5
81 do Nov. 29 Position of law officers of Crown on Trent question; serious aspect of affairs. Earl Russell’s reply in regard to revocation of Mr. Bunch’s exequatur; thinks reasons insufficient. If necessary, communication will continue to be made with authorities of insurgents, but will not imply acknowledgment of their independence. Conduct of Mr. Adams has been such as to command esteem and respect. 6
Mr. Adams replies, sustaining action of United States government in reference to Mr. Bunch. Acknowledgment of friendly conduct of British government towards himself. 6
143 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Dec. 13 Approving action of Mr. Adams in reference to Bunch case. 12
144 do Dec. 13 Will hear British government in reference to correspondence of its subjects in south, and do whatever is possible consistent with safety and welfare of United States. 12
95 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward, (extract.) Dec. 27 Aspect of affairs in England still serious, but signs of a more friendly feeling and a better understanding of the United States. Efforts of private citizens abroad towards counteracting misrepresentations of insurgent emissaries. 12
1862.
[Page IV]102 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward, (extract.) Jan. 17 Settlement of the Trent affair. Incidents and effects in England. 14
103 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Jan. 17 Results of settlement of Trent affair. Schemes of insurrectionary emissaries; their promises of negro emancipation. 16
105 do Jan. 24 Exportation of arms and munitions from England. Vessels of the insurgents in foreign ports. 17
171 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Jan. 31 Policy of the United States towards Great Britain. 17
172 do Jan. 31 Instructing to ask explanations of refusal to allow United States steamers to coal at Nassau. 18
109 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Jan. 31 English opinions on the American question. Position and strength of parties in Parliament. 19
178 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Feb. 4

Transmitting correspondence in regard to passage of British troops through Maine.

Recognition of insurgents as belligerents has only tended to the prolongation of a strife injurious to European interests.

20
179 do Feb. 5 Approving proceedings in regard to the Nashville. Refers to reports of intended recognition and intervention to break blockade. American people will not allow insurrection to succeed, either with or without foreign aid. 21
112 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Feb. 7 Parliamentary proceedings in regard to recognition. Efforts of insurgent emissaries. Speech of the lords commissioners. 22
180 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Feb. 10 Military operations. Progress of the Union armies. 25
114 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Feb. 13 Proceedings in Parliament in reference to blockade and treatment of British subjects Unfavorable opinions entertained towards United States. 25
182 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Feb. 13 Insurgents only enabled to prolong the war by European sympathy and aid. Inconveniences of this policy to Great Britain herself. Neglect to enforce the neutrality proclamation. 34
184 do Feb. 14 Case of the English steamer General Miramon. 35
186 do Feb. 17 Efficiency of the blockade 36
187 do Feb. 17 Obstructions of Charleston harbor 36
187b do Feb. 17 Relations of slavery to the insurrection. Inevitable results of the contest. 37
190 do Feb. 19 Conflicting opinions about result entitling the U. States to a suspension of judgment. 38
123 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Feb. 27 Representations to Earl Russell concerning the fitting out of the Oreto. His reply. 39
197 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Feb. 28 Restoration of trade on inland ways and waters in consequence of successes of Union armies. 41
125 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Mar. 6 Note to Earl Russell in reference to action of authorities of Nassau. 41
[Page V] 1862.
199 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Mar. 6 The blockade. Its admited results the true test of its efficiency. Rapid failure of the resources of the insurgents. What; benefit does Great Britain derive from her position ? 42
201 do. (extract) Mar. 7 Approval of all Mr. Adams’s proceedings. Mr. Motley’s co-operation. 44
128 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Mar. 7 Discussions in Parliament. Less disposition to interference. Outfit of steamers in English ports to break the blockade. 44
203 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Mar. 10 The blockade and its effects. The question of emancipation. 45
207 do Mar. 11 Insurance by English capitalists of vessels engaged in running the blockade and carrying contraband of war. 46
131 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Mar. 13 Supplies and ships for the insurgents. Desire for a permanent separation, in order to lessen the power of the United States. Note to Earl Russell in the case of the General Miramon. 47
Earl Russell’s reply 49
209 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Mar. 15 Declining strength of the insurrection. Concession of belligerent rights unnecessary. 49
210 do Mar. 17 Same. 50
Circular Mar. 17 Passport regulations rescinded 50
132 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Mar. 20 Consequences of the refusal to accept adhesion of United States to Declaration of Paris. 50
213 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Mar. 25 Successes of the Union arms 52
135 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Mar. 27 Efforts by British subjects to violate the blockade. Case of the Oreto. General belief in a permanent separation of the United States. 53
137 do Mar. 27 Transmitting notes of Earl Russell in regard to case of the Nashville, and treatment of the Flambeau at Nassau. 56
218 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. April 1 Violations of the blockade. Mistaken course of the British government. Our desire to cultivate friendly relations. 59
220 do April 2 Insurrections in China and elsewhere 61
140 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. April 3 No disposition to retract recognition of insurgents as belligerents. Further correspondence in case of the Oreto. 61
224 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. April 3 The blockade and the Merrimac 63
225 do April 4 Fitting out of vessels of war in England for the insurgents. 63
226 do April 8 Signing of the treaty to suppress the African slave trade. 64
142 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. April 11 Further in regard to the Oreto. British government still declines to take action in the case. 65
228 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. April 14 Position of military affairs 67
[Page VI] 1862.
144 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. April 16 Conversation with Earl Russell. Remonstrances against encouragement given to the insurgents. Earl Russell thinks the British government cannot change its position. 70
232 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. April 16 Embarrassments of commerce resulting from recognition of insurgents as belligerents. 73
235 do April 19 The grievances and alienations between the two countries deducible from the concession of belligerent rights to the insurgents. 74
146 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. April 24 Case of the Emily St. Pierre 75
148 do April 25 Fluctuations of public opinion on reception of news from America. Persistence in furnishing supplies to the insurgents. 76
238 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. April 26 State of affairs at home 77
240 do April 28 The capture of New Orleans. Five steamers for the insurgents fitting out in England. 78
244 do May 1 Subscriptions in Liverpool to aid the insurrection. 78
150 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. May 2 Opening of the International Exhibition. Increase of pressure for intervention. 78
151 do May 2 Correspondence with Earl Russell in regard to the cases of the Labuan and the Emily St. Pierre. 79
245 do May 5 Successful progress of the campaign. Partial opening of southern ports. Ratification of the treaty to suppress the slave trade. 82
156 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. May 8 Transmitting correspondence in regard to blockade. Earl Russell pronounces it a great injury to other nations. Says Great Britain cannot frame new statutes to aid it. Mr. Adams again calls attention to the efforts to violate it in defiance of national comity and international law. 83
158 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. May 9 Case of the Emily St. Pierre. British government decline to take action, on ground that they have no jurisdiction or legal power.

86

248 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. May 9 Approval of demand for restoration of the Emily St. Pierre. 87
249 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. May 12 Military and naval successes. Modifications of the blockade. 88
250 do May 12 The President’s proclamation opening certain southern ports to trade under restrictions. 88
159 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward, (extract.) May 15 Conversation with Earl Russell on progress of the war. Public sentiment of the two countries in reference to each other. 89
160 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. May 15 Further correspondence in the case of the Emily St. Pierre. British government decline to interpose to restore the vessel. 91
[Page VII] 1862.
253 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. May 19 All the important southern ports now recovered, except Wilmington, Charleston, Mobile, and Galveston, and those well blockaded. Regulations for trade with the reopened ports. 95
254 do May 20 The case of the Labuan under judicial investigation. 96
255 do May 22 Communications from the Navy Department relative to the case of the Emily St. Pierre. 97
164 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. May 22 Conversation and correspondence with Earl Russell, who thinks the British government cannot change its policy. Mr. Adams urges that its practical effect has been to uphold the insurrection. 97
165 do May 23 State of the Mexican question. Disruption of the agreement between the three powers. 100
258 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. May 26 Restitution decreed in the case of the Labuan. 101
260 do May 28 Effects of reopening of ports. Prospects of the war, and course of foreign nations in regard to it. The interests of all maritime nations connected with our own. The relations of slavery to the contest. 101
261 do May 29 The case of the Emily St. Pierre 106
263 do May 31 The case of the Emily St. Pierre 106
264 do June 2 Position of military affairs 106
266 do June 2 Purchases of arms and military supplies in England by the insurgents. 108
271 do June 7 Mexican affairs 109
272 do June 9 Naval and military events 109
273 do June 9 The case of the Emily St. Pierre 110
174 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. June 13 Transmitting correspondence with Earl Russell in case of the Emily St. Pierre. 110
175 do June 18

Case of the Emily St. Pierre. A similar case during the administration of President Adams.

Correspondence with Earl Russell in regard to prohibition of export of saltpetre.

113
176 do June 20 Conversation with Earl Russell on progress of the war. 114
275 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. June 23 The United States ship-of-war Saginaw ordered away from Hong Kong, China. 115
277 do June 24 Progress of military and naval affairs 116
179 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. June 26 Continuance of efforts to break the blockade. 117
180 do June 26 Diminution of the cotton supply. Its results. 118
281 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. June 26 Nassau used as a place of deposit by the insurgents for munitions of war. 119
282 do June 27 Revival of commerce at New Orleans and Memphis. Military events. 120
284 Mr. F. W. Seward to Mr. Adams. June 30 Position of military affairs 121
[Page VIII] 1862.
182 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. July 3 The cotton supply. The condition and opinions of the British people. 122
287 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. July 5 Extreme advocates and opponents of slavery acting as if in concert to precipitate a servile war. 124
288 do July 7 The military situation 124
290 do July 8 Mexican treaty not ratified 126
295 do July 9 General Butler’s order concerning the women in New Orleans. 127
293 July 9 Case of the Emily St. Pierre 127
184 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. July 9 Transmitting correspondence relative to the fitting out of a new war steamer (the 290) for the insurgents. 128
296 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. July 11 The guarantee of the isthmus of Panama to New Granada. The United States desire to act in accord with the other powers interested. 131
185 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. July 11 Increase of active sympathy with the rebellion. 133
298 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. July 12 Military events and their effects 134
299 do July 12 Probable issue of letters of marque to suppress the piracy of the insurgents. 135
Circular July 14 Transmitting copy of President’s message to Congress on the subject of emancipation. 136
186 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. July 17 Effect of news of battles before Richmond. Parliamentary proceedings. 136
187 do July 17 Transmitting correspondence in reference to the repairs of the Tuscarora at Southampton. 137
188 do July 17 Transmitting correspondence in relation to the Saginaw at Hong Kong. 139
189 do July 17 Communications between European powers in regard to mediation in American affairs. 139
191 do July 18 Transmitting note from Earl Russell in regard to the slave trade treaty, and passports for vessels legally employed. 141
303 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. July 18 The supply and export of cotton. Exaggerations of the amount destroyed. Intervention will end the trade by extinguishing the slave labor system. 142
306 do July 24 Restrictions on transhipment of certain merchandise at New York. 144
194 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. July 27 Correspondence with Earl Russell relative to the case which occurred in 1799 similar to that of the Emily St. Pierre. 147
196 do July 25 Evidence in regard to the war steamer fitting out at Liverpool for the insurgents, (the 290.)— Efforts to induce the British government to interpose for her detention. 149
308 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. July 28 The struggle in America considered in its relations to Europe. Purposes of the American people. Consequences of intervention. 154
[Page IX] 1862.
312 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. July 31 Reply accepting propositions of Earl Russell in regard to slave trade treaty and passports for vessels. 158
197 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. July 31 Closing of Parliament. Desire generally entertained for the dismemberment of the Union. 159
198 do July 31 Further correspondence in regard to the case of the Saginaw at Hong Kong. 161
199 do July 31 Sailing of the 290, the British government failing to take steps to detain her. 162
201 do Aug. 1 Conversation with Earl Russell in regard to use made of Nassau by the insurgents; the cases of the Oreto and 290, and the guarantee of the isthmus of Panama to New Granada. 162
202 do Aug. 1 Appointments under the treaty for the suppression of the slave trade. 164
314 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Aug. 2 The true relations of the American continent to Europe misunderstood abroad. The inefficacy and disastrous consequences of European interference in American affairs. 165
316 do Aug. 4 Trade at New Orleans. The export of cotton 168
318 do Aug. 4 Approval of Mr. Adams’s proceedings in regard to the Tuscarora. 169
203 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Aug. 7 Pursuit of the 290 directed to be made by the Tuscarora. 169
205 do Aug. 7 Transmitting Earl Russell’s letter to Liverpool merchants about the uses made by them of the port of Nassau. 170
19 Circular Aug. 8 Advantages offered to emigrants by the present condition of the United States. 172
18 do Aug. 8 No passports to be granted to persons liable to military duty. 172
319 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Aug. 8 Reorganization and increase of the armies of the United States. 172
322 do Aug. 13 European intervention and its consequences. Military events. 173
323 do Aug. 13 Satisfaction derived from just and friendly proceedings of British government in regard to the Oreto and Nassau. 174
324 do Aug. 14 The exclusion of American cruisers from British ports in China. 175
326 do Aug. 15 Treasury regulations in regard to exportations from New York to Nassau. 175
20 Circular Aug. 18 Foreign intervention. Policy of the United States in regard to it. Necessary permanence of the American Union. Foreign interference useless and foreign domination impossible 176
327 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Aug. 18 Withdrawal of the army of the Potomac from the peninsula. 179
208 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Aug. 22 Effect of American news. Publication of Earl Russell’s reply to despatch No. 260. 180
210 do Aug. 22 Note to Earl Russell giving assent to his proposition in regard to the treaty for the suppression of the slave trade. 181
[Page X] 1862.
331 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Aug. 25 Earl Russell’s reply to Liverpool merchants received with satisfaction. 182
211 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Aug. 29 Italian affairs. English sympathy with the Garibaldi movement. 182
214 do Sept. 4 Conversation with Earl Russell in regard to vessels endeavoring to violate the blockade. 183
216 do Sept. 4 Earl Russell’s acknowledgment of response to his suggestion about the treaty for the suppression of slave trade. 185
219 do Sept. 5 Case of the Oreto 185
336 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Sept. 8 Position of military affairs 188
221 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Sept. 12 Distress in the manufacturing districts. Public sentiment in Great Britain. 189
340 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Sept. 13 Evidence in regard to the Oreto and the Florida. 191
341 do Sept. 15 Retreat of insurgents from the border of the loyal States. 192
345 do Sept. 15 Italian and Mexican affairs 193
347 do Sept. 15 The cotton trade in New Orleans 193
349 do Sept. 15 The great battle of Antietam 193
351 do Sept. 17 Relations with Japan 194
353 do Sept. 19 Correction of erroneous reports in regard to a conversation between Mr. Adams and Lord Palmerston. 194
Circular Accompanying the President’s proclamation of warning to the insurrectionary States. 195
356 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Sept. 23 The casa of the Oreto 197
24 Circular Sept. 25 Regulations respecting passports 198
225 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Sept. 25 Mr. Dayton’s course. State of public sentiment. The Italian question. 198
227 do Sept. 26 The case of the 290 (Alabama) 199
359 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Sept. 26 Gradual exhaustion of the insurgent States. The insurrection passing its crisis. The President’s warning. 201
360 do Sept. 30 Colonization 202
Mr. Moran to Mr. Seward. Sept. 30 The pirate Alabama 204
229 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Oct. 3 State of public opinion in Europe. The cotton supply. 205
230 do Oct. 3 The depredations committed by the pirate Alabama. Remonstrance addressed to Earl Russell. 206
362 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Oct. 4 Position of military and naval affairs 208
367 do Oct. 10 Approval of Mr. Adams’s proceedings in regard to the 290, (Alabama.) 208
368 do Oct. 10 Failure of the projected invasion of the loyal States by the insurgents. Rumors of intervention. The Union to be maintained at all hazards. 208
237 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Oct. 10 The President’s proclamation of warning. Speeches of English statesmen. 209
[Page XI] 1862.
238 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Oct. 10 Transmitting further correspondence with Earl Russell in regard to the outfit of vessels in English ports for the insurgents. 210
369 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Oct. 13 Referring to preceding despatches 211
372 do Oct. 18 The attempted invasion of the loyal States by the insurgents. Its failure. The President’s proclamation of warning to insurrectionary States. 211
373 do Oct. 20 Approval of Mr. Adams’s remonstrance against the fitting out of vessels for the insurgents in English ports. 213
374 do Oct. 20 The depredations of the 290, (Alabama) 214
376 do Oct. 21 Transmitting copy of despatch to Mr. Dayton. 215
378 do Oct. 25 Approval of Mr. Adams’s reply to Earl Russell. 215
379 do Oct. 25 The President’s proclamation. Progress of military and naval operations. 215
381 do Oct. 25 Transmitting communications from Mr. Harvey in regard to the depredations of piratical vessels. 216
382 do Oct. 27 Position of military affairs 217
383 do Oct. 27 Resolutions of the New York Chamber of Commerce in regard to pirates from British ports. 217
242 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Oct. 16 Further correspondence in the case of the 290, (Alabama.) 219
243 do Oct. 17 Speeches of Mr. Gladstone and Sir G. C. Lewis. Lord Lyons’s return. Indications of English sentiment in regard to intervention. 221
244 do Oct. 23 The case of the 290, (Alabama) 222
248 do Oct. 24 Conversation with Earl Russell in regard to American affairs. Position of Great Britain in reference to intervention defined. 223
249 do Oct. 28 Escapes from the blockade 225
250 do Oct. 28 Rumored instructions to Lord Lyons prior to his departure. Possible complications in European affairs arising from the eastern question, the Greek insurrection, &c. 225
253 do Oct. 30 Earl Russell declines a convention for the emigration of free colored persons from the United States to British colonies. 227
384 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Oct. 30 Breach of international obligations by the British gunboat Bull Dog, in transporting officers for the 290, (Alabama.) 228
385 do Nov. 3 Position of military and naval affairs. Case of the Blanche at Havana. The emeute in the island of St. Vincent. The piratical acts of the 290. The elections. 229
386 do Nov. 3 Two vessels for the insurgents reported to be in process of construction at Birkenhead. 230
[Page XII] 1862.
387 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Nov. 4 State of affairs in the United States 230
389 do Nov. 4 European projects of intervention 231
390 do Nov. 4 The case of the 290, (Alabama) 231
392 do Nov. 10 The insurrection and European ideas in regard to it. 232
394 do Nov. 10 The results of the elections 233
395 do Nov. 10 Escapes from the blockade 234
396 do Nov. 10 Case of the 290, (Alabama) 234
399 do Nov. 14 English opinions. Pirates fitted out in Liverpool. 235
403 do Nov. 18 Military and naval affairs 235
404 do Nov. 18 The voluntary colonization of free colored persons from the United States in British colonies. 236
257 Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. Nov. 6 The piratical acts of the Alabama, and their effects in English opinion. Supplies of arms for the insurgents. 236
408 Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. Nov. 21 Acknowledgment of the preceding despatch. A British war steamer sent to cruise for the Alabama. 237
NOTES.
1861.
Mr. Seward to Lord Lyons. Dec 3 Cases of the seamen of the British schooners Revere and Louisa Agnes, captured for violation of the blockade. 238
Do Dec. 3 The same subject 240
Do Dec. 11 Enlistment of minors who are British subjects. 240
Lord Lyons to Mr. Seward. Dec. 16 Cases of the seamen of the Revere and Louisa Agnes. 241
1862.
Do Jan. 4 Death of H. R. H. Prince Albert 242
Mr. Seward to Lord Lyons. Jan. 7 Imprisonment and exaction of an oath from the crew of the British schooner Adeline. 242
Mr. Welles to Mr. Seward. Jan. 4 The same 242
Mr. Seward to Lord Lyons. Jan. 7 Death of H. R. H. the Prince Consort.. 243
Do Jan. 8 Improper treatment of the British flag in the prize schooner James Campbell. 244
Mr. Welles to Mr. Seward. Jan. 7 The same subject 244
Lord Lyons to Mr. Seward. Jan. 9 The same subject 245
Earl Russell to Lord Lyons. Jan. 10 The Trent affair 245
Mr. Seward to Lord Lyons. Jan. 13 The suspension of the habeas corpus. Case of William Patrick. 247
Lord Lyons to Mr. Seward. Jan. 14 The same subject 247
Earl Russell to Lord Lyons. Jan. 23 The Trent affair 248
Mr. F. W. Seward to Lord Lyons. Feb. 6 Correspondence of consuls in ports of insurgent States. 253
[Page XIII] 1862.
Mr. Seward to Lord Lyons. Feb. 13 Case of alleged maltreatment of the captain of the schooner Louisa Agnes. 254
Mr. Welles to Mr. Seward. Feb. 12 The same 254
Mr. Seward to Lord Lyons. Feb. 21 Neutral rights in maritime war 256
Lord Lyons to Mr. Seward. Feb. 21 The same 256
Do Mar. 6 Cases of the seamen of the Revere and Louisa Agnes. 257
Do Mar. 19 Despatch bag taken from J. P. Crosse at Baltimore. 257
Mr. Seward to Lord Lyons. April 5 The same subject 258
Memorandum of conversation. May 30 Complaints of harsh treatment of British subjects in New Orleans. 259
Mr. Edwards to Lord Lyons. May 30 Shipments of coal and merchandise to Nassau. 260
Lord Lyons to Mr. Seward. June 12 British subjects forced to enter the military service of the insurgents, and subsequently become prisoners of war. 261
Mr. F. W. Seward to Lord Lyons. June 14 The same subject 261
Mr. Seward to Mr. Stuart. June 20 Exports to Nassau and other British colonial ports. 262
Mr. Chase to Mr. Seward. June 14 The same subject 262
Mr. Seward to Mr. Stuart. June 23 Case of Peter Goolrick, British vice-consul at Fredericksburg. 263
Do June 24 Case of Mr. Coppell, British acting consul at New Orleans. 265
Mr. Stuart to Mr. Seward. June 25 Case of Peter Goolrick. 265
Mr. F. W. Seward to Mr. Stuart. July 1 British subjects, prisoners of war who had been forced into the military service of the insurgents. 266
Mr. Wolcott to Mr. Seward. June 28 The same subject 266
Mr. Seward to Mr. Stuart. July 5 Exports to Nassau 267
Do July 12 The case of Peter Goolrick 267
Mr. Ruggles to Mr. Seward. July 3 Report in the case of Peter Goolrick 268
Mr. Seward to Mr. Stuart. July 23 Restrictions on exports from New York to Nassau. 273
Mr. Stuart to Mr. Seward. Aug. 1 The same 273
Mr. Seward to Mr. Stuart. Aug. 18 The same 274
Mr. Chase to Mr. Seward. Aug. 13 Report of the collector of New York on the same subject. 275
[Page XIV] 1862.
Mr. Seward to Mr. Stuart Aug. 20 Seizure of sugars at New Orleans 282
Mr. Johnson to Mr. Seward. Aug. 19 The same subject 282
Mr. Seward to Mr. Stuart. Aug. 20 Only citizens of the United States liable to military duty. 283
Mr. F. W. Seward to Mr. Stuart. Sept. 1 Acknowledging copy of a despatch of Earl Russell. 284
Mr. Stuart to Mr. Seward. Sept. 2 Search of the vessels Annette and Dart by United States cruisers. 284
Do Sept. 2 Case of the Will-o’ -the-Wisp 285
Mr. Seward to Mr. Stuart. Sept. 4 The suppression of the African slave trade 285
Do Sept. 5 Efforts to prevent misunderstandings and difficulties on the Canadian frontier. 286
Do Sept. 6 Case of the Will-o’-the-Wisp 286
Mr. Stuart to Mr. Seward. Sept. 6 British subjects called upon for military service. 286
Mr. Seward to Mr. Stuart. Sept. 11 Exports of cotton from New Orleans 287
Do Sept. 11 Case of Francis Carroll 288
Mr. Stuart to Mr. Seward. Sept. 13 Measures adopted to carry out the treaty for the suppression of the African slave trade. 289
Mr. Seward to Mr. Stuart. Sept. 18 Case of Francis Carroll 292
Major Turner to Mr. Seward. Sept. 17 The same 292
Mr. Stuart to Mr. Seward. Sept. 25 Restrictions on trade between New York and British West Indian ports. 293
Mr. Seward to Mr. Stuart. Sept. 25 The same subject 295
Do Oct. 3 The same subject 296
Mr. Stuart to Mr. Seward. Oct. 12 The same subject 304
Earl Russell to Mr. Stuart. Sept. 22 The same subject 304

FRANCE.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1861.
91 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. Dec. 6 The Trent affair. Views of the French government. 307
95 do Dec. 11 Indications of public opinion. General Scott’s visit to Paris. 307
94 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. Dec. 26 Note of Mr. Thouvenel to Mr. Mercier 308
95 do Dec. 28 Relations with Great Britain 308
1862.
100 do Jan. 2 Approval of Mr. Dayton’s proceedings 309
104 do Jan. 23 Position of military affairs. Passage of the tax bill. Effect of European policy. 309
109 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. The question of the blockade and of recognition under consideration. Interview with Mr. Thouvenel. Suggestions of a permanent settlement of the rights of neutrals. 310
[Page XV] 1862.
109 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. Feb. 3 Suggestions for facilitating correspondence with French subjects in the south. 313
112 do Feb. 12 State of opinion in France in regard to American affairs and the blockade. Conversation with the Emperor. 313
114 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. Feb. 19 Maritime law in regard to neutrals. The obstruction of Charleston harbor. The blockade. Military and naval affairs. 315
117 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. Feb. 21 Progress of military affairs. Southern emissaries in Europe. 317
120 do Feb. 27 Transmitting Mr. Billault’s speech in the French Senate on American affairs. Indications of a growing indisposition to interference. 318
118 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. Feb. 27 Mail communication with southern States 319
123 do March 8 The efficiency of the blockade. Military movements. 320
127 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. March 18 Suffering in France. Desire for cotton, and for mail communication with the southern States. 321
128 do March 19 Amelioration of maritime law in regard to rights of neutrals. 322
129 do March 25 Views of the Emperor in regard to the progress of the war and the concession of belligerent rights to the insurgents. 323
130 do March 26 The President’s emancipation policy, and its effects in Europe. 324
133 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. Mar. 26 Sentiments of the United States government towards France. The opening of cotton ports. The recognition of the insurgents as belligerents by the European governments. 325
131 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. Mar. 31 The cotton question and the question of mail communication with the insurgent States. France declines to withdraw the concession of belligerent rights, and is acting in concert with England. 327
136 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. April 1 Siege of southern commercial cities 329
137 do April 8 Maritime rights of neutrals 329
138 do April 15 The recognition of the insurgents as belligerents alone prolongs the war. Reasons why it should be withdrawn. Survey of the military situation. 329
139 do April 16 The co-operation of Congress with the States for the gradual removal of slavery. 333
137 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. April 17 The question of the opening of the cotton ports. The concession of belligerent rights to the insurgents. 333
141 do April 22 Distress in the manufacturing districts of France for lack of cotton. Anxiety of the government for their relief. 334
141 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. April 22 Mr. Mercier’s visit to Richmond. Position of military affairs. 335
[Page XVI] 1862.
146 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton.. April 28 The capture of New Orleans. The fitting out of piratical vessels against American commerce in European ports. 335
148 do May 1 The United States have a right to expect at least actual neutrality from the nations which have proclaimed it, instead of aid and sympathy to the insurgents. 336
149 do May 5 Opening of the southern ports. The insurrection would collapse if the expectation of foreign favor was withdrawn. 337
Circular May 2 Mail communication with the recovered portions of the insurgent States. 337
151 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. May 7 Restoration of trade with New Orleans and other ports. All maritime nations share in the misfortunes produced by the war, and it is for the interest of all of them to discourage action which unnecessarily protracts it. 338
152 do May 8 The Mexican question 338
154 do May 10 The distress in Europe caused by the war would be immediately relieved if the European governments would cease to protract it by holding out delusive hopes to the insurgents. 339
158 do May 12 The Mexican question 340
147 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. May 16 The question of revoking the concession of belligerent rights to the insurgents. 340
149 do May 22 Further upon the same subject. Conversation with Mr. Thouvenel. France and England to act together. Europeans admit the ability of the United States to overcome the south, but question their ability to govern it afterwards. Reply of Mr. Dayton. 341
151 do May 26 The same subject continued. Article from the Constitutionnel. 343
154 do June 2 No probability of a revocation of the concession of belligerent rights at present. 345
163 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. June 3 Progress of the war. Reasons for a modification of the policy adopted by France. Fallacy of the assumption that the insurgent States, when overpowered, cannot be governed. 345
156 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. June 5 Relations between France and Mexico 348
164 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. June 6 Position of military affairs 349
160 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. June 12 Effects of American news in France. The pressure for cotton. 349
161 do June 13 The Mexican complication 350
166 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. June 20 European errors about America in consequence of judging us by European standards only. 351
167 do June 20 Approval of Mr. Dayton’s course 354
170 do June 21 France and Mexico. Relations of the United States to both countries. 354
[Page XVII] 1862.
163 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. June 23 The difficulties with foreign consuls in New Orleans. 355
166 do June 28 Enclosing speech of M. Jules Favre in the chamber of deputies. 356
168 do July 9 Public opinion in France in regard to American affairs. 370
178 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. July 10 Foreign interference deprecated from motives of prudence and humanity, not from apprehension The United States not unprepared. If it comes, Europe must reconquer America, or America become forever isolated and independent of Europe. European domination cannot be rebuilt here upon the foundation of African slavery. 371
183 do July 15 The Comte de Paris and Due de Chartres and the Prince Napoleon. American sentiment towards the French nation and in regard to parties in France. 372
173 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. July 17 The prolongation of the war. The Emperor’s departure from Paris. 373
186 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. July 21 Purchase of supplies by ships-of-war 374
178 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. Aug. 2 Current rumors in regard to propositions for mediation. 374
180 do Aug. 4 Intervention not immediately probable 375
194 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. Aug. 4 Transmitting copies of correspondence in regard to several questions. 375
181 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. Aug. 8 Unfounded rumors corrected 375
196 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. Aug. 9 Paupers from the United States in foreign countries. 376
199 do Aug. 13 Progress of military affairs. Rapid enrolment of the new levies. 376
200 do Aug. 18 Withdrawal of the army from the peninsula. 377
201 do Aug. 23 Position of the United States in regard to the Franco-Mexican question. 377
202 do Aug. 23 Friendly relations with the Spanish American States. 378
203 do Aug. 23 The war, though accompanied, like all wars, by alternate successes and disasters, steadily advancing toward the accomplishment of the restoration of the Union. The interest of foreign nations. 378
205 do Aug. 25 The preservation of the neutrality of the Isthmus of Panama. 380
185 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. Aug. 29 The same subject 380
215 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. Sept. 15 The same subject 381
219 do Sept. 19 The insurgents driven out of Maryland 381
220 do Sept. 19 Magnitude of the voluntary armies of the United States. 381
221 do Sept. 20 Applications of Europeans to enter the military service of the United States. The military organizations of the country. 382
222 do Sept. 24 The South American republics 383
[Page XVIII] 1862.
223 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. Sept. 24 Approval of proceedings of Mr. Dayton 383
224 do Sept. 24 The same 383
225 do Sept. 24 Immigration from Europe to the United States. 384
179 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. Aug. 4 The Isthmus of Panama 384
182 do Aug. 8 Mexican affairs 384
183 do Aug. 28 Acknowledgment of despatches 385
189 do Sept. 3 Probabilities of intervention 386
190 do Sept. 3 Opinions of Americans abroad 387
191 do Sept. 9 Immigration to the United States 387
192 do Sept. 10 Relations with South American republics 388
193 do Sept. 12 The treaty negotiations between Mexico and the United States. 388
195 do Sept. 13 Rumors of negotiations for recognition of the insurgents. 389
197 do Sept. 17 Misrepresentations of events in America by the telegraph and press. 390
199 do Sept. 18 Pamphlets on the American question 391
200 do Sept. 23 International postal arrangements. Letter from the American consul at Vienna to Garibaldi. 391
230 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. Oct. 3 Acknowledgment of pamphlets on the American question. 392
206 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. Oct. 6 Case of Mr. Moquardt at Vera Cruz 392
234 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. Oct. 8 No mediation or compromise admissible. Exhaustion of the energies of the insurrection. 393
236 do Oct. 10 Recall of the American consul at Vienna 394
208 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. Oct. 14 The President’s proclamation of warning to the insurgent States. 394
211 do Oct. 14 Retirement of Mr. Thouvenel and appointment of Mr. Drouyn de l’Huys. 395
237 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. Oct. 20 The project of recognition of the insurgents. Condition and prospects of the government contrasted with those of the insurgents. No peace admissible at the cost of a single acre of the Union. 395
213 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. Oct. 21 The change in the French ministry 399
214 do Oct. 23 Mexican affairs 400
240 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. Oct. 27 Military events 401
229 do Oct. 3 Approval of Mr. Dayton’s proceedings. Satisfaction with Mr. Thouvenel’s explanations. 402
247 do Nov. 4 The change in the French ministry for foreign affairs. 402
246 do Nov. 4 The proclamation of warning, and European opinions in reference to it. 402
245 do Nov. 4 The position of military affairs 403
248 do Nov. 10 The change in the French ministry 403
249 do Nov. 10 The war in Mexico 404
[Page XIX] 1862.
220 Mr. Dayton to Mr. Seward. Nov. 6 Conversations with Mr. Drouyn de I’Huys in reference to American affairs. Position of France in regard to intervention defined. 404
258 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dayton. Nov. 21 Acknowledgment of the preceding despatch. 405
NOTES. 1861.
Mr. Mercier to Mr. Seward. Dec. 7 Permission to French subjects to leave New Orleans. 406
Mr. Seward to Mr. Mercier. Dec. 11 The same subject 406
Mr. Mercier to Mr. Seward Dec. 23 The same subject 407
Mr. Seward to Mr. Mercier. Dec. 31 The same subject 406
1862.
Mr. Mercier to Mr. Seward. Jan. — Postal communication with French subjects in the blockaded ports. 408
Mr. Seward to Mr. Mercier. Jan. 10 The same subject 408
Mr. Thouvenel to Mr. Mercier. Jan. 19 The communication from the French government in reference to the Trent affair. 409
Do Jan. 23 The obstruction of the harbor of Charleston 409
Mr. Seward to Mr. Mercier. Feb. 7 The Trent affair 410
Do Feb. 10 Postal communication with French subjects in blockaded ports. 411
Do Feb. 20 The obstruction of Charleston harbor 411
Mr. Pelissier to Mr. Thouvenel. Mar. 3 Case of Tunstall and Myers at Tangier ; Mr. De Long’s circular, and Mr. Pelissier’s reply. 413
Mr. Thouvenel to Mr. Mercier. Mar. 13 The same subject 414
Do Mar. 20 The same subject 415
The Acting Consul Gener’l of France to Mr. Thouvenel. Feb. 27 The same subject 415
Mr. Seward to Mr. Mercier. April 4 The same subject 417
Memorandum April 12 The same subject 417
Mr. Mercier to Mr. Seward. May 16 The tariff and its effects upon French silk manufactures. 417
Mr. Seward to Mr. Mercier. May 20 The same subject 419
Do May 26 The same subject 419
Mr. Chase to Mr. Seward. May 26 The Fame subject. Note to the chairman of Committee of Ways and Means. 420
Count Mejan to Mr. Thouvenel. May 30 Condition of New Orleans and Louisiana. The cotton supplv. 420
Memorandum May 31 Conversation in regard to alleged irregularities and severities of Major General Butler at New Orleans. 423
Mr. F. W. Seward to Mr. Mercier. June 12 Customs regulations in regard to wine and ardent spirits. 424
Mr. Chase to Mr. Seward. June 6 The same subject. Circular to collectors 424
[Page XX] 1862.
Mr. Mercier to Mr. Seward. July 31 Deposits of specie made by French subjects with their consul at New Orleans. 426
Vicomte Treilhard to Mr. Seward. Aug. 8 Case of Fdward Dupasseur &Co 427
Mr. Seward to Vicomte Treilhard. Aug. 9 The same subject 429
Vicomte Treilhard to Mr. Seward. Aug. 12 Communication between the French legation and the French consulate at Richmond. 430
Mr. Seward to Vicomte Treilhard. Aug. 13 The same subject 430
Mr. Seward to Vicomte Treilhard. Aug. 20 Case of Edward Dupasseur & Co 430
Mr. Johnson to Mr. Seward. Aug. 19 The same subject 431
Mr. F. W. Seward to Vicomte Treilhard. Aug. 27 Communications between the French legation and the French consulate at Richmond. 432
Mr. Watson to Mr. Seward. Aug. 23 The same subject 432
Vicomte Treilhard to Mr. Seward. Aug. 29 Acts of Major General Butler at New Orleans. 433
Mr. Thouvenel to Mr. Mercier. The same subject 433
Mr. Seward to Vicomte Treilhard. Sept. 4 The same subject 434
Mr. Thouvenel to Mr. Mercier. Sept. 19 Export of cotton from Louisiana 435
Vicomte Treilhard to Mr. Seward. Oct. 6 Cases of Richard Aldige’ & Co., Messrs. Goodchaux, Charles Hauspe, Paul Vidal, G. Levois, L. C. Chauvin, concerning sugars. 435

RUSSIA.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
15 Mr. Clay to Mr. Seward. Jan. 7 European sentiment in regard to American affairs. 443
17 do Jan. 24 Conversation with Prince Gortchakow. The Trent affair. 445
30 Mr. Seward to Mr. Clay. Feb. 4 Moral and material strength of the Union. 446
2 Mr. Cameron to Mr. Seward. June 26 Arrival at St. Petersburgh. Reception by Prince Gortchakow and interview with the Emperor. Friendly expressions towards the United States. 447
5 Mr. Seward to Mr. Cameron. July 23 Acknowledgment of the preceding despatch. 449
4 Mr. Cameron to Mr. Seward. July 23 Plan of telegraphic communication between Russia and the United States. Visit to the imperial palace at Peterhof. Friendly sentiment of the Russian government and people. 449
7 Mr. Seward to Mr. Cameron. July 28 Mr. Clay’s audience of leave 450
[Page XXI] 1862.
5 Mr. Cameron to Mr. Seward. Aug. 5 The ports of Nicolaieff and Kherson. Passport regulations. The President’s proposition to Congress in regard to emancipation. 451
6 do Aug. 7 Russian opinions in regard to intervention 452
8 Mr. Seward to Mr. Cameron. Aug. 13 European opinions and projects of intervention. 453
8 Mr. Cameron to Mr. Seward. Aug. 19 Projects of intervention. Russia has no part or sympathy in them. The emancipation question. 454
11 Mr. Seward to Mr. Cameron. Sept. 6 Mutual respect and good will expressed on the part of Russia and the United States. 456
10 do Sept. 6 Position of military affairs. Emissaries of the insurgents abroad. 456
9 Mr. Cameron to Mr. Seward. Sept. 9 European opinion and policy. The proposed interoceanic telegraph to connect Russia and the United States across the Pacific. 457
13 Mr. Seward to Mr. Cameron. Sept. 16 Military affairs. The invasion of the loyal States by the insurgents repelled. 458
15 Mr. Taylor to Mr. Seward. Oct. 25 Decree of a basis for the reorganization of the administration of justice in the Russian empire. 460
16 do Oct. 29 Conversation with Prince Gortschakow in regard to American affairs. Position of Russia defined. Change in the ministry. 463
5 Mr. Seward to Mr. Taylor. Nov. 22 Acknowledgment of the preceding despatch. Position of affairs. 465
6 do Nov. 24 The establishment of the new judicial system in Russia. 466

SPAIN.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
1 Mr. Seward to Mr. Perry. Jan. 14 Mr. Perry to act as charge d’affaires during the temporary absence of Mr. Schurz. Position of affairs. 469
3 do Jan. 23 Recent successes of the Union armies 469
11 do Feb. 22 Foreign intervention 469
28 do April 22 Approval of Mr. Perry’s proceedings. Relations with Spain. The second year of the insurrection opens with indications of a conclusion in favor of the Union. 470
31 do May 29 Mexican affairs 471
33 do June 23 Action of Spain towards Mexico. Appointment of Mr. Koerner, minister to Spain. 471
34 do June 24 Mexican affairs 472
39 do July 31 The course of the Spanish government towards the United States. 472
40 do Aug. 2 The treaty with Great Britain for the suppression of the African slave trade. 473
41 do Aug. 5 Approval of proceedings of Mr. Perry 473
2 Mr. Seward to Mr. Koerner. Aug. 25 Instructions to Mr. Koerner 474
3 do Aug. 25 The relations between the United States and other maritime powers. 474
[Page XXII] 1862.
47 Mr. Seward to Mr. Koerner. Sept. 15 Departure of a brig of the insurgents from Barcelona. 475
6 do Oct. 21 The rumors of recognition. Position of the United States. Case of the Blanche. 475
1861.
35 Mr. Schurz to Mr. Seward. Oct. 26 Vessels of the insurgents in the ports of Cuba 476
39 do Nov. 9 The Queen’s speech. Indications of a friendly disposition on the part of Spain towards the United States. 477
17 Mr. Perry to Mr. Seward. Dec. 28 The Trent affair. The Spanish government refuses to hold conference with emissaries of the insurgents. 481
1862.
39 do Mar. 8 Relations of Spain to the United States. The Spanish government to act independently in regard to our affairs. 482
do Mar. 15 The Mexican question. Action of the three powers. Public opinion in Spain. 483
46 do Mar. 30 The affair of the Sumter. Mutual interests of Spain and the United States. Position of Spain in regard to the insurrection. 488
49 do April 15 Mexican affairs. Policy of Spain in regard to Spanish America. 491
53 do May 3 Emissaries of the insurgents in Spain. The case of the pirate Sumter. 494
57 do May 25 Termination of the Spanish-Mexican expedition. 498
58 do May 30 Conversation with Mr. Calderon Collantes with reference to the allied expedition to Mexico. 504
68 do July 7 Position of the United States in regard to Mexican affairs. The projected treaty. 507
69 do July 11 The treaty between the United States and Great Britain for the suppression of the African slave trade. 509
70 do Aug. 1 Relations between Spain and other European powers. 510
73 do Aug. 16 Case of the brig Mary Scaife 511
76 do Aug. 26 Policy of the United States with reference to the Spanish American powers. 513
81 do Sept. 21 Opinions in Spain in regard to the civil war in the United States. 514
NOTES. 1861.
Mr. Seward to Mr. Tassara. Dec. 10 Case of the Nuestra Senora de Regia 517
1862.
Mr. Tassara to Mr. Seward. May 28 Pursuit of vessels into waters within the jurisdiction of Cuba by United States cruisers. 518
Mr. Seward to Mr. Tassara. June 2 The same subject 519
Mr. Tassara to Mr. Seward. June 28 Complaint of General Butler’s action in regard to quarantine regulations at New Orleans. Case of the Cardenas. 520
[Page XXIII] 1862.
Mr. Seward to Mr. Tassara. July 16 The same subject 522
Mr. Tassara to Mr. Seward. July 23 United States cruisers on the coast of Cuba. 523
Do Aug. 7 Case of the Cardenas 524
Mr. Seward to Mr. Tassara. Aug. 9 United States cruisers on the coast of Cuba. 527
Do Sept. 9 Case of the Avendano Brothers. Complaints of severities and exactions. Suggestion of a joint commission for the settlement of claims. 527
Mr. Tassara to Mr. Seward. Aug. 26 Case of the Cardenas 528
Do Sept. 11 Case of the Avendano brothers. 531
Mr. Seward to Mr. Tassara. Sept. 17 Case of the Cardenas 531
Mr. Tassara to Mr. Seward. Oct. 20 Case of the Blanche 532
Mr. Seward to Mr. Tassara. Oct. 23 The same subject 536
Do Nov. 15 Case of the Avendano Brothers 537

PRUSSIA.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
21 Mr. Seward to Mr. Judd. Jan. 8 Friendly expressions on the part of the Prussian government. 543
30 do May 6 Difficulties arising from a conflict between the naturalization laws of the United States and the military laws of Prussia. 543
2 Mr. Seward to Mr. Kreismann. Sept. 6 1861. Emigration and enlistment of Europeans 544
14 Mr. Judd to Mr. Seward. Dec. 14 1862. The Trent affair. Prussian sentiment 544
18 do Feb. 17 Rumors of southern emissaries in Prussia. Such emissaries not received. 545
3 Mr. Kreismann to Mr. Seward. Aug. 9 Europeans desiring to enter the armies of the United States. 546
NOTES. 1861.
Mr. Seward to Baron Gerolt. May 14 Co-operation of western powers on diplomatic affairs in Japan. 547
do Aug. 6 The opening of the Japanese ports 548

AUSTRIA.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
9 Mr. Seward to Mr. Motley. Jan. 10 Approval of Mr. Motley’s proceedings. Position of affairs. 549
12 do Feb. 17 Public sentiment in Europe and at home. Progress of military affairs. 549
13 do Mar. 4 The Trent affair and its results 550
[Page XXIV] 1862.
14 Mr. Seward to Mr. Motley. Mar. 10 Just and friendly action of Austria. The Mexican question. 551
19 do Sept. 16 Offers of military service by Europeans. Position of military affairs. Failure of the attempted invasion of the loyal States. 551
1861.
2 Mr. Motley to Mr. Seward. Nov. — Arrival in Vienna. Official reception by Count Rechberg Conversation in regard to American affairs. Reception by the Emperor. 553
1862.
3 do Jan. 20 The Trent affair. Opinions in Austria.... 559
4 do Feb. 12 Conversation with Ct. Rechberg. Friendly course of the Austrian government. The Mexican question. 561
5 do June 22 Relations between the United States and Austria continue satisfactory and cordial. 565
7 do Aug. 25 The cotton supply. European sentiment 565
21 Mr. Seward to Mr. Motley. Oct. 9 Recall of Mr. Canisius, consul of the United States at Vienna. 566
22 do Nov. 18 Relations with Austria. Justice, moderation, and forbearance of the Austrian government during the insurrection. 567
8 Mr. Motley to Mr. Seward. Oct. — European projects of intervention. Sentiments of the European governments and people in regard to the United States. Austrian criticisms upon military movements Condition of the Austrian empire. 568

ITALY.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
39 Mr. Seward to Mr. Marsh. Jan. 31 Complications of foreign commerce consequent upon the insurrection. 575
50 do Aug. 25 Position of military affairs 575
52 do Sept. 13 The same subject 576
54 do Oct. 8 Policy of the United States in regard to insurrectionary movements in Italy. 577
36 Mr. Marsh to Mr. Seward. Jan. 6 Depredations of the pirate Sumter in the Mediterranean. 577
37 do Jan. 13 The Trent affair. Opinions in Italy 579
40 do April 4 Interview with Garibaldi. Effects of recent American news upon opinion in Europe. 579
53 do Oct. 20 Italian affairs. Relations between Italy and France. 582
58 Mr. Seward to Mr. Marsh. Nov. 10 Acknowledgment of the preceding despatch. 582
NOTES.
Baron Ricasoli to Chevalier Berti-natti. Jan. 21 The Trent affair. Neutral rights in maritime war. 580
Mr. Seward to Chevalier Bertinatti. Feb. 19 Acknowledgment of the preceding despatch. 581

PORTUGAL.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
[Page XXV] DESPATCHES. 1862
60 Mr. Seward to Mr. Harvey. July. 9 Emigration the cure for social evils in both hemispheres 583
61 do July. 9 Position of military and naval affairs Foreign intervention certain to encounter determined resistance. 583
63 do Aug. 4 Monument to Camoens 584
77 do Aug. 13 Acknowledgment of despatches 584
129 Mr. Harvey to Mr. Seward. June. 29 The monument to Camoens 585
140 do Aug. 11 Opinions in Portugal in regard to American affairs 585
141 do Aug. 13 The President’s proposition to Congress in regard to emancipation. 586
153 do Sept. 16 The civil war. The social changes consequent upon it at home and the disposition to interfere entertained abroad. 587
158 do Oct. 3 Complaints of proceedings at the islands of the Azores Use of those islands by the insurgents, and depredations on American ships. 588
159 do Oct. 4 Vessels sent to the Azores. Pursuit of the Alabama. 592

NETHERLANDS.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
33 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. Jan. 9 The Trent affair. Its effect in Europe 595
42 Mr. Seward to Mr. Pike. Feb. 5 European opinions in reference to American affairs, reflected from home. 595
44 do Feb. 27 Vessels of the insurgents seeking shelter in the ports of the Netherlands. The war protracted by the course of European powers. Financial measures. 596
45 do Mar. 8 The recognition of the insurgents as belligerents prolongs the insurrection. 597
46 do Mar. 10 Position of financial and military affairs. 597
47 do Mar. 15 The same subject 598
42 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. Mar. 19 No immediate prospect of interference. European troubles. 598
43 do Mar. 16 More stability in the United States even now than in Europe. 599
44 do April 2 Correspondence with Mr. Maesen. The recognition of the insurgents as belligerents. Reluctance of the Netherlands to adopt a different policy from that of the larger powers. 600
48 Mr. Seward to Mr. Pike. April 2 The system of finance and revenue in the Netherlands. 601
50 do April 8 Improved condition of public opinion in Europe. 601
45 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. April 9 Reply of Mr. Maesen on the subject of the recognition of the insurgents as belliger- ents. 602
[Page XXVI] 1862.
46 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. April 16 Continuation of the same correspondence The government of the Netherlands declines to change its attitude 602
51 Mr. Seward to Mr. Pike. April 16 The interests of the Netherlands are with the success of the Union. 605
52 do April 26 Acknowledgment of receipt of despatches. 606
48 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. April 30 Iron-clad ships. The cotton supply. Condition of manufacturing districts. Emancipation . 606
53 Mr. Seward to Mr. Pike. May 9 Improved position of affairs in the United States. 607
54 do May 10 The concession of belligerent rights to the insurgents. 607
49 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. May 14 The treaty of 1782 608
55 Mr. Seward to Mr. Pike. May 21 Effects of the recognition of the insurgents as belligerents upon European nations themselves 608
50 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. May 28 The modification of the blockade. Distress in the manufacturing districts. The Mexican question. 609
58 Mr. Seward to Mr. Pike. June 4 The refusal of the Netherlands to modify the decree extending shelter to insurgent vessels. 610
51 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. June 11 T5e treaty of 1782. Opinion in regard to American affairs. 610
59 Mr. Seward to Mr. Pike. June 21 The position of military affairs. Mexico. 611
52 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. June 25 The impression that intervention would be unavailing deepening in Europe. 611
60 Mr. Seward to Mr. Pike. July 9 The war protracted by the mistaken policy of European states. 611
54 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. July 16 The Japanese embassy. Effect of American news in Europe. 612
55 do July 23 False reports circulated in Europe by emissaries of the insurgents. State of European sentiment. Emancipation of slaves in Dutch colonies. 613
63 Mr Seward to Mr. Pike. Aug. 4 The Japanese ports. Despondency and apprehension about our affairs in Europe the reflex of expressions of disappointment at home. 614
56 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. Aug. 6 European opinions 614
64 Mr. Seward to Mr. Pike. Aug. 8 Return of confidence in the public mind. Intervention unprofitable. Emancipation in the Dutch colonies. 615
57 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. Aug. 13 Condition of industrial and financial affairs in Holland. 616
58 do Aug. 27 Italian affairs. The cotton supply 616
59 do Sept. 3 European astonishment at the magnitude of the resources of the United States. 617
67 Mr. Seward to Mr. Pike. Sept. 6 Case of the consul of the Netherlands at New Orleans Position of military affairs. 618
69 do Sept. 15 Failure of the attempted invasion of the loyal States by the insurgents. 619
60 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. Sept. 17 Effect of military news from America. 620
[Page XXVII] 1862.
70 Mr. Seward to Mr. Pike. Sept. 19 Retreat of the insurgents from Maryland 620
61 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward Sept. 24 Effects of American news in Europe 621
72 Mr. Seward to Mr. Pike. Oct. 8 Successes of the national armies. 621
74 do Oct. 13 Condition of the Netherlands. Crisis of the civil war in the United States. 622
63 Mr. Pike to Mr. Seward. Oct. 15 The President’s proclamation of warning. Its effects upon European sentiment. 622
76 Mr Seward to Mr. Pike. Nov. 5 The condition of affairs. The gradual exhaustion of the strength of the insurrection. 623
79 do Nov. 21 Approval of Mr. Pike’s proceedings in reference to Anglo-American colonization Effects of the insurrection upon financial affairs. Resources and credit of the government. 624
NOTES.
Mr. Seward to Mr. Van Limburg. June 5 Conflict between the military authorities of the United States and the consulate of the Netherlands at New Orleans. 625
Mr. Van Limburg to Mr. Seward. June 6 The same subject 627
Do June 7 The same subject 629
Do June 7 The same subject 629
Mr Seward to Mr. Van Limburg. June 7 The same subject 630
Do June 7 The same subject 631
Mr. Van Limburg, to Mr. Seward. June 9 The same subject 631
Do June 9 The same subject. 632
Mr. Seward to Mr. Van Limburg. June 9 The same subject. 632
Mr. Van Limburg to Mr. Seward. June 19 Admission of ships-of-war of the United States and of vessels of the insurgents into the ports of the Netherlands. 633
Do July 19 Emigration of free persons of color from the United States to colonies of the Netherlands. 634
Mr. Seward to Mr. Van Limburg. July 22 The same subject. 634
Mr. Van Limburg to Mr. Seward. July 28 The occurrences at the consulate of the Netherlands at New Orleans. 635
Mr. Seward to Mr. Van Limburg. Aug. 20 The same subject. 636
Mr. Van Limburg to Mr. Seward. Aug. 22 The same subject. The Count de Mejan to act as consul ad interim. 638
Mr. Seward to Mr. Van Limburg Aug. 25 The same subject. 639
Mr. Van Limburg to Mr. Seward. Aug. 30 The same subject. 639
Mr. Seward to Mr. Van Limburg. Sept. 4 The same subject. 642
[Page XXVIII] 1862.
Mr. Van Limburg to Mr. Seward. Sept. 10 The same subject. 644
Mr. Seward to Mr. Van Limburg. Sept. 13 The same subject. 644
Mr. Van Limburg to Mr. Seward. Sept. 29 The consul of the Netherlands at Philadelphia enrolled for military duty. 644
Do Sept. 27 Complaint of the action of the court of general sessions in New York in reference to officers of the Netherlandish vessel Jan Van Galen. 646
Mr. Seward to Mr. Van Limburg. Sept. 30 The same subject 649
Do Sept. 30 Case of the consul of the Netherlands at Philadelphia. 649
Mr. Van Limburg to Mr. Seward. Oct. 9 Cases of the officers of the Jan Van Galen and the consul of the Netherlands at Philadelphia. 650
Do Oct. 29 Case of the consul of the Netherlands at Philadelphia. 651

BELGIUM.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
54 Mr. Seward to Mr. Sanford. Mar. 17 Passports no longer required. Position of affairs. 653
59 do May 6 Opening of southern ports and modifications of the blockade. 653
do May 10 Impossibility of a permanent division of the United States. Foreign commerce dependent on the maintenance of the Union. 654
60 do May 23 Wasting effects of the war upon the wealth and energies of the insurgent States. Encouragement of the insurrection by foreign powers reacts injuriously upon their own commerce and manufactures. Relations of slavery to the contest. 654
2 Mr. Seward to Mr. Goodrich. July 15 The tariff 657
64 Mr. Seward to Mr. Sanford. Sept. 18 European interests as affected by the war. Military affairs. 658
65 do Oct. 6 The cotton supply 659
66 do Oct. 6 Public opinion at home and abroad. 659
67 do Oct. 10 Failure of the attempted invasion of the loyal States by the insurgents. 660
68 do Oct. 13 Misapprehensions abroad in regard to the United States government. Its determination to maintain the Union inflexible and uncompromising. 661
43 do Jan. 9 The Trent affair 662
46 do Jan. 14 The Trent affair 662
55 do Mar. 20 Public opinion in Europe. 663
[Page XXIX] 1862.
58 Mr. Sanford to Mr. Seward. April 3 Favorable impression made in Europe by military and naval successes. 663
66 do Aug. 26 Conversation with Mr. Rogier in regard to intervention and emancipation. Emissaries of the insurgents not received by the Belgian government. 664
67 do Sept. 2 Condition of the manufacturing districts. Effects of the scarcity of cotton. 665
69 do Sept. 26 The insurrection and its prospects. International Congress for the promotion of social science. 667
68 do May 12 Taxation illustrated by an analysis of the revenue system of Belgium. 668
74 Mr. Seward to Mr. Sanford. Nov. 19 The same subject. 696

BRAZIL.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1861.
3 Mr. Webb to Mr. Seward. Oct. 24 Arrival at Rio de Janeiro. Official reception and entrance upon duties of the mission. Presentation to the Emperor. Speeches on that occasion. The Sumter’s visit to Maranham. Acts of former minister and consul at Rio de Janeiro. Instructions to consuls. 697
12 Mr. Seward to Mr. Webb. Dec. 12 Acknowledgment of preceding despatch. Approval of proceedings. 703
13 do Dec. 12 Approval of circular to consuls concerning the secession flag in Brazilian ports. 703
1862.
17 Mr. Webb to Mr. Seward. May 20 Facilities for colonization in Brazil. Aspects of slavery in Brazil and in the United States. 703
33 Mr. Seward to Mr. Webb. July 21 The same subject. 712
Mr. Webb to Mr. Seward. July 5 The admission of the pirate Sumter at the port of Maranham. 715
Do The same subject. Presentation of various claims against the Brazilian government 719
22 do Aug. 23 Vessels of the insurgents in the port of Rio de Janeiro. 724
24 do Sept. 7 The same subject. 728
38 Mr. Seward to Mr. Webb. Sept. 27 Position of affairs in the United States. The case of the Sumter. Claims against Brazil. 728
[Page XXX]

MEXICO.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
1862
17 Mr. Corwin to Mr. Seward. Feb. 22 Negotiations between Mexico and the allied powers. Movements of the allied troops. Vessels of the insurgents in Mexican ports. 729
18 do March 20 Proposed treaty between Mexico and the United States. Progress of negotiations between Mexico and the allied powers. 730
19 do March 24 State of affairs in Mexico 732
20 do March 28 Disputed points between the allied powers and Mexico. Taxation of property of foreigners. Correspondence in reference to the tax. Position of military affairs. Correspondence in reference to the proposed loan to Mexico. 733
22 do April 28 State of relations between Mexico and the allied powers. Copies of official documents. Protest against the proposed treaty. 739
46 Mr. Seward to Mr. Corwin. May 10 Instructions in regard to recognition of revolutionary changes of government. 746
48 do May 28 The proposed treaty with Mexico in regard to a loan. Consideration of the matter reserved. 747
24 Mr. Corwin to Mr. Seward. May 20 Acknowledgment of despatches. Exchange of ratifications of treaties. 748
49 Mr. Seward to Mr. Corwin. June 7 Advice of the Senate in regard to treaty negotiations with Mexico. 748
50 do June 24 The same subject. 748
26 Mr. Corwin to Mr. Seward. June 3 State of military affairs in Mexico, and of relations with the allied powers. 749
28 do June 28 Correspondence between the captain of an insurrectionary regiment on the Texan frontier and the Mexican authorities. 750
51 Mr. Seward to Mr. Corwin. July 14 The check before Richmond. General condition of affairs. Relations between Mexico and the allied powers. 753
30 Mr. Corwin to Mr. Seward. July 11 Position of military affairs in Mexico. 754
31 do July 28 Demands made by insurgents in the United States for the right of marching troops across Mexican territory. Projects of the insurgents to separate the northern Mexican states from the republic. Military operations of the French and Mexican forces. Diplomatic correspondence touching Mexican affairs laid before the Spanish Cortes. 754
53 Mr. Seward to Mr. Corwin. Aug. 23 Position of military and naval affairs 767
32 Mr. Corwin to Mr. Seward. Aug. 28 Resignation of Sr. Doblado to take a military command. The military situation in Mexico. Appointment of Mr. Fuente to the ministry of foreign affairs. Condition of the Mexican government. Treaty negotiations. Correspondence with the department of foreign relations in regard to the pamphlet of Sr. Attimirano. 768
[Page XXXI] 1862.
55 Mr. Seward to Mr. Corwin. Sept. 15 The military situation. 772
33 Mr. Corwin to Mr. Seward. Sept. 28 Prospects of the French in Mexico. Mexican opiuion in regard to the civil war in the United States. 773
58 Mr. Seward to Mr. Corwin. Oct. 21 Position of military affairs. 774

SWITZERLAND.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES 1862.
18 Mr. Seward to Mr. Fogg. Mar. 10 State of affairs 775
25 Mr. Fogg to Mr. Seward. Oct. 25 Emigration to the United States. 775

DENMARK.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
23 Mr. Seward to Mr. Wood. Jan. 22 Position of military affairs 777
24 do Feb. 10 European opinions 777
26 do Feb. 24 Progress of affairs. The unwise recognition of the insurgents as belligerents. 777
29 do April 8 Belligerent rights in maritime war 778
31 do April 22 Unfounded despondency about the progress of the war and its injurious results. 778
40 do Sept. 25 Recognition of the insurgents not apprehended. 779
82 Mr. Wood to Mr. Seward. Nov 4 Emissaries of the insurgents in Denmark. 780

SWEDEN.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1861.
11 Mr. Haldeman to Mr. Seward. Dec. 10 The Trent affair. Count Piper’s reception by the United States government. 781
1862.
do Jan. 10 The Trent affair. Swedish opinion... 781
do April 24 The battle of the Monitor and Merrimack. Swedish exultation in the genius of Ericsson and Dahlgren. 782
23 do Sept. 18 The danger of intervention passed. 782
[Page XXXII]

TURKEY.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
19 Mr. Seward to Mr. Morris. Mar. 31 Neutral rights in maritime war. 783
20 do April 1 Approval of the treaty negotiated by Mr. Morris. Decline of national prestige abroad an inevitable consequence of dissension at home 783
26 do June 4 Decree of the Sultan prohibiting the entrance of the piratical vessels of the insurgents into Turkish ports. 784
36 do Sept. 19 Just and liberal course of the Turkish government. Punishment of murderers of. American missionaries. Approval of Mr. Morris’s proceedings. 784
1861.
1 Mr. Morris to Mr. Seward. Aug. 25 Reception by the Turkish government. 786
4 do Oct. 25 Audience with the Sultan. Address of Mr. Morris. The Sultan’s reply. Cordial and friendly position of relations between the two countries. 786
1862.
14 do Mar. 26 Prohibition of the entrance of piratical vessels of the insurgents in Turkish waters. Decree prohibiting importation of munitions of war into Turkish ports. 788
17 do May 6 The same subject. 788
22 do July 3 Celebration of the anniversary of the accession of the Sultan. Address of the diplomatic corps. 789
32 do Oct. 16 Execution of a murderer of an American missionary. Justice of the Turkish government. Conduct of the United States consul at Beyrout. 791
41 Mr. Seward to Mr. Morris. Nov. 18 Satisfaction of the United States government with the justice and good faith shown by the Sultan. Commendation of the consul at Beyrout. 792

JAPAN.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1860.
26 Mr. Harris to Mr. Cass. Aug. 1 The residence of Americans at Yedo for purposes of trade. Postponement of the opening of the city to trade suggested. 793
1861.
20 Mr. Harris to Mr. Seward. May 8 Transmitting letters from the Tycoon and the ministers of foreign affairs in regard to a postponement of the opening of certain specified ports. 794
The Tycoon of Japan to the President of the United States. June 2 The postponement of the opening of ports. 797
[Page XXXIII] 1861.
21 Mr. Harris to Mr. Seward. June 7 Measures taken for the arrest and punishment of the murderers of Mr. Heusken. 797
26 do July 2 The postponement of the time for opening Yedo to trade. 798
29 do July 10 Request to be recalled 799
30 do July 12 The attack on the British legation 799
31 do July 15 Decision of the Netherlands consul general not to return to the capital. 801
40 do Oct. 14 Detection and death of two of the assailants of the British legation, and steps taken to secure the arrest of the others. Obligation entered into by a secret association, having for its object the expulsion of foreigners. 802
49 do Nov. 23 The question in regard to the opening of the ports. The steps taken to obtain satisfaction for the murder of Mr. Heusken, and to insure the future security of foreign legations in Japan. 804
50 do Nov. 27 Efforts of the Japanese government to bring the murderers of Mr. Heusken to justice. Payment of $10,000 for the benefit of Mrs. Heusken. 806
52 do Dec. 2 Transmitting correspondence with the diplomatic representatives of European powers in Japan in regard to the postponement of the opening of the city of Yedo to trade. 807
1862.
16 Mr. Pruyn to Mr. Seward. April 30 Arrival at Yedo and official reception 810
18 do May 5 Interview with the minister for foreign affairs and other officials. 811
19 do May 15 Day fixed for an audience with the Tycoon. 811
21 do May 24 Transmitting letter from the Japanese ministers for foreign affairs to the Secretary of State. Their commendation of Mr. Town send Harris. 812
20 do May 17 Audience with the Tycoon. Address of Mr. Pruyn, and reply of the Tycoon. 812
1861.
17 Mr. Seward to Mr. Harris. July 23 The proposed postponement of the opening of certain ports. 813
18 do Aug. 1 Conference with the diplomatic representatives of European powers in regard to the proposed postponement. The murder of Mr. Heusken. 814
20 do Oct. 7 The measures taken to bring to justice the murderers of Mr. Heusken. 816
1862.
24 do Oct. 21 Acceptance of Mr. Harris’s resignation. Approval of official action. Appointment of Mr. Pruyn. 816
1861.
2 Mr. Seward to Mr. Pruyn. Nov. 15 Instructions to Mr. Pruyn 897
[Page XXXIV] 1861.
25 Mr. Seward to Mr. Harris. Nov. 19 Transmitting letter from the President of the United States to the Tycoon of Japan. 818
Mr. Seward to Mr. Pruyn. Dec. 9 Recovery and return of the sword stolen from Japanese envoys during their stay at Baltimore in 1860. 818
3 do Dec. 19 The attack on the British legation, and the measures adopted by the Japanese government in regard to it. Relations between diplomatic representatives at Yedo. 819
4 do Dec. 20 Decision of the Netherlands consul general not to return to Yedo. 819
1862.
7 do Feb. 5 Detection of persons engaged in the attack on the British legation. 820
8 do March 11 Transmitting reply to the minister for foreign affairs 820
10 do March 24 Acknowledgment of Mr. Harris’s suggestions. 820
9 do March 24 Reparation made by the Japanese government for the murder of Mr. Heusken. 821
1861.
Mr. Seward to the Ministers for Foreign Affairs. Aug. 1 Reply in reference to postponement of the time for opening ports, and the murder of Mr. Heusken. 821
The President to the Tycoon. Aug. 1 Reply to the Tycoon’s letter. 822
1862.
Mr. Seward to the Ministers for Foreign Affairs. March 5 The retirement of Mr. Harris and the appointment of Mr. Pruyn. 822
do Aug. 7 The same subject. 823

CHINA.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1861.
3 Mr. Burlingame to Mr. Seward. Nov. 14 Exchange of visits with the governor general at Canton. Examination in regard to murder of American missionaries. 825
6 do Dec. 24 Arrival at Shanghai, Military successes of the Taiping rebellion against the Chinese government. Fall of Ningpo. Steps taken by consuls for the protection of foreign residents. Letters from the English and Russian ministers welcoming Mr. Burlingame. 825
1862.
7 do Jan. 9 Results of the expedition of Vice-Admiral Sir James Hope to demand payment for robberies committed by the rebels, and protection of British interests. The rebels refuse and threaten. Letter of Vice-Admiral Hope. 831
[Page XXXV] 1862.
8 Mr. Burlingame to Mr. Seward. Jan. 23 Visit to Ningpo. Its condition. Measures for the protection of the foreign settlement. Depredations of the rebels on their approach to Shanghai. Steps taken for the defence of the city by French and English troops and American volunteers. Establishment of a consulate at Kin-Kiang. 832
8 Mr. Seward to Mr. Burlingame. March 6 Instructions in regard to relations with the imperial government, and co-operation with the French and British ministers for the protection of the lives and property of Americans. Identity of the interests of Great Britain, France, and the United States in China. 839
12 Mr. Burlingame to Mr. Seward. March 22 Payment of claims in accordance with the award of the commissioners. Progress of the war. The imperialists defeat the rebels in several battles, and propose attempting to recapture Ningpo. Notice for the removal of foreign merchants. Opening of ports of Tungchow and New-chang to certain specified trade. Appointment of consul at Tein-tsin. 839
9 Mr. Seward to Mr. Burlingame. April 2 Approval of Mr. Burlingame’s proceedings. 842
11 do April 22 Progress of affairs in the United States. 843
16 Mr. Burlingame to Mr. Seward. May 19 Payment of claims under the treaty. Suggestions in reference to disposition of the balance Establishment of an educational institution proposed. 843
14 Mr. Seward to Mr. Burlingame. May 29 Approval of proceedings. State of affairs.. 846
22 Mr. Burlingame to Mr. Seward. July 24 Arrival at Peking. Friendly reception by Chinese authorities and foreign legations. Correspondence with them. 847
15 Mr. Seward to Mr. Burlingame. Aug. 1 Acknowledgment of despatches 850

ROME.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
2 Mr. Seward to Mr. Blatchford. Sept. 25 Instructions to Mr. Blatchford on entering upon his mission. 851
3 do Oct. 13 Friendly expressions of Cardinal Antonelli 852

EGYPT.

[Page XXXVI]
No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1861.
10 Mr. Thayer to Mr. Seward. Nov. 13 Exclusion of vessels of the insurgents from Egyptian ports. American manufacturers placed on equal footing with those of England in regard to facilities for obtaining cotton in Egypt. Evidence of the Viceroy’s good will towards the United States. 853
12 do Nov. 26 Punishment of perpetrators of the outrage in Upper Egypt on an agent of American missionaries. Letter of the Viceroy to the President of the United States. Exclusion of insurgent vessels from Egyptian ports. 854
1862.
17 do March 13 Effects of news from America upon public opinion abroad. Privateers in the Mediterranean. The cotton trade in Egypt. Visit of the Prince of Wales to Egypt, and of the Viceroy to the great exhibition, England. Opening of a new railway. Generous gift of the Viceroy to American missionaries. 855
11 Mr. Seward to Mr. Thayer, April 8 Gratification with the liberality of the Viceroy to American citizens and missionaries. The privateers in the Mediterranean. 856
1861.
The President of the U. States to the Viceroy of Egypt. Oct. 11 The punishment of the parties concerned in the persecution of the agent of American missionaries. 857

MOROCCO.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
Mr. De Long to Mr. Seward. Feb. 20 Arrest and confinement of Messrs. Myers, Tunstall, and circumstances connected therewith. 859
5 do Feb. 27 The same subject. Unsuccessful attempt of a mob to rescue the prisoners. Correspondence with the Moorish minister of foreign affairs and the commander of the Tuscarora. The prisoners put on board the Ino, and sent to the United States. 860
Do March 5 The same subject. Correspondence with the diplomatic agents of European governments at Tangier. 865
Do March 20 The same subject. Despatches from the American charge at Madrid to the captain of the Tuscarora. Friendly action of the Moorish government. 869
2 Mr. Seward to Mr. De Long. April 3 The same subject 873
[Page XXXVII] 1862.
2 Mr. Seward to Mr. McMath. April 28 The same subject. Review of the case 873
9 Mr. De Long to Mr. Seward. April 23 The same subject. Correspondence with the Viceroy. Cordial friendship of the Moorish government for the United States. 878
3 Mr. F.W.Seward, to Mr. McMath, July 1 The same subject. Acknowledgment of the friendly expressions of the Viceroy. 880

GUATEMALA.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
12 Mr. Crosby to Mr. Seward. May 6 Proposed colonization of persons of African descent in Central America. Adaptation of the country for that purpose. 881
18 Mr. Seward to Mr. Crosby. June 19 The same subject 882

GUATEMALA AND SALVADOR.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
NOTES. 1862.
Mr. Yrissari to Mr. Seward. Aug. 26 Protest against the projected colonization of persons of African descent in Central America. 883
Mr. Seward to Mr. Yrissari. Sept. 5 The same subject. Colonization not to be attempted without first obtaining the consent of the government to receive and protect the persons colonized. 883
Mr. Yrissari to Mr. Seward. Sept. 9 The same subject 884
Mr. Seward to Mr. Yrissari. Sept. 15 The same subject 886

COSTA RICA.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
33 Mr. Riotte to Mr. Seward. May 15 Proposed colonization of persons of African descent in Central America. Opinions in Costa Rica. Correspondence with Mr. Iglesias, minister for foreign affairs. 887
19 Mr. Seward to Mr. Riotte. June 4 The same subject 888
47 Mr. Riotte to Mr. Seward. Sept. 14 The same subject 888
27 Mr. Seward to Mr. Riotte. Oct. 6 The same subject 889
29 do Oct. 9 The same subject 890

HONDURAS.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
[Page XXXVIII] DESPATCHES.
1862.
11 Mr. Partridge to Mr. Seward. Aug. 26 Proposed colonization of persons of African descent in Honduras. Conversation with the President of Honduras. Adverse public opinion. 891
8 Mr. Seward to Mr. Partridge. Sept. 18 The same subject 892

NICARAGUA.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
DESPATCHES. 1862.
27 Mr. Dickinson to Mr. Seward. Sept. 12 Proposed colonization of persons of African descent in Central America. Opinion in Nicaragua. Correspondence with the minister of foreign relations in Nicaragua, and with the minister of the United States in Costa Kica. 893
29 do Sept. 13 Transmitting notes from the minister of foreign relations, opposing the projected colonization. 897
24 Mr. Seward to Mr. Dickinson. Oct. 6 The same subject 898
25 do Oct. 9 The same subject 898

COSTA RICA, NICARAGUA, AND HONDURAS.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
NOTES. 1862.
Mr. Molina to Mr. Seward. Sept. 19 Proposed colonization of persons of African descent in Central America. Protest on the part of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Honduras, against such colonization. Reasons therefor. 899
Mr. Seward to Mr. Molina. Sept. 24 The same subject. Colonization not to be attempted without consent of the government. 903
Mr. Molina to Mr. Seward. Sept. 29 The same subject 904
Mr. Seward to Mr. Molina. Oct. 1 The same subject 905
Mr. Molina to Mr. Seward. Oct. 9 Establishment of passport system in Nicaragua. 906
Mr. Seward to Mr. Molina. Oct. 13 The same subject 907

ECUADOR.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
[Page XXXIX] DESPATCHES.
1862.
42 Mr. Hassaurek to Mr. Seward. Oct. 2 Proposition of Mr. Benigno Malo to sell lands to the United States for colonization purposes. 909
23 Mr. Seward to Mr. Hassaurek. Nov. 6 The same subject 910
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