160. Editorial Note

On April 16, 1982, President Ronald Reagan met with the National Security Council from 11 a.m. to 12:05 p.m. in the Cabinet Room of the White House to discuss National Security Study Directive (NSSD) 1–82, on “U.S. National Security Strategy.” NSSD 1–82, which the Presi[Page 529]dent had signed on February 5, called for a review of: “Fundamental U.S. national security objectives, regional security objectives, impact of Soviet military power and international behavior on U.S. National Strategy, role of Allies in U.S. National Strategy”, and strategic and general purpose forces, security assistance; and interim goals. (Reagan Library, Executive Secretariat, NSC: NSC Meeting File: Records, 1981–88, NSC 00045 16 April 82) The administration appointed former Secretary of the Air Force Thomas Reed to lead the study. He discussed the first five parts of the study at the April 16 NSC meeting. (Ibid.) The NSC met again from 2:15 to 3:15 p.m. on April 27 in the Cabinet Room of the White House to discuss the remaining four parts. (Reagan Library, Executive Secretariat, NSC: NSC Meeting File: Records, 1981–88, NSC 00047 27 April 82)

On May 20, Reagan signed National Security Decision Directive 32, which articulated eleven global objectives that would guide the national security policy of the United States, the first three of which were: “To deter military attack by the USSR and its allies against the U.S., its allies, and other important countries across the spectrum of conflict; and to defeat such attack should deterrence fail”; “To strengthen the influence of the U.S. throughout the world by strengthening existing alliances, by improving relations with other nations, by forming and supporting coalitions of states friendly to U.S. interests, and by a full range of diplomatic, political, economic, and information efforts”; and “To contain and reverse the expansion of Soviet control and military presence throughout the world, and to increase the costs of Soviet support and use proxy, terrorist, and subversive forces.” NSSD 1–82, NSDD 32, and the minutes of the NSC meetings of April 16 and April 27 are scheduled for publication in Foreign Relations, 1981–1988, volume XLIII, National Security Policy, 1981–1984.