Learn about the beta

Organization of U.S. Intelligence


1. Memorandum From Secretary of Defense Johnson

Source: Central Intelligence Agency, Executive Registry, Job 95–G00278R, Box 1, Folder 5. Top Secret. Copies were sent to the Joint Chiefs of Staff; the Director, Subsidiary Plans Division; and the Director of Central Intelligence.


2. National Security Council Report

Source: National Archives, RG 59, S/S–NSC Files: Lot 66 D 148, Psychological Warfare. Secret. NSC Action No. 283 recorded that the Council approved NSC 59 as amended by memorandum action of March 9. The report in its approved form (printed here) was circulated as NSC 59/1 under cover of a March 9 note from Lay and submitted to the President for consideration. NSC Action No. 283 is ibid., S/S–NSC Files: Lot 66 D 95, Records of Action by the National Security Council. A memorandum from Lay to the National Security Council, March 10, indicates that the President approved NSC 59/1 on March 10. (Ibid., S/P–NSC Files: Lot 62 D 1, 1935–62, Box 115)


3. Letter From the Department of State Member of the Standing Committee (Trueheart) to the Chief of the Coordination, Operations, and Policy Staff of the Central Intelligence Agency (Childs)

Source: Central Intelligence Agency, Executive Registry, Job 80–R01731R, Box 43, Folder 7. Top Secret. A handwritten notation indicates a copy was sent to AD/ORE on March 30.


4. Memorandum From the Counselor of the Department of State (Kennan) to the Under Secretary of State (Webb)

Source: National Archives, RG 59, S/P Files: Lot 64 D 563, Chronological. Top Secret.


6. Memorandum From the Joint Chiefs of Staff to Secretary of Defense Johnson

Source: National Security Agency, Center for Cryptologic History, Series V, L.1.2. Top Secret. A stamped notation on the memorandum indicates Johnson saw it.


7. Memorandum of Conversation

Source: Central Intelligence Agency, Directorate of Operations, Job 80–01795R, Box 2, Folder 7. Top Secret. Drafted by [name not declassified]. A handwritten notation on the memorandum reads “Mr. Wisner (Your designee?)”


8. Memorandum by the Assistant Director for Policy Coordination of the Central Intelligence Agency (Wisner)

Source: National Archives, RG 59, S/P Files: Lot 64 D 563, NSC 68. Top Secret. The memorandum bears no indication of addressees.


16. Letter From the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (Hoover) to the President’s Special Consultant (Souers)

Source: National Archives, RG 273, Files of the National Security Council Representative for Internal Security 1947–69, Box 36, Problem 11. Personal and Confidential; by Special Messenger. A handwritten notation reads: “Mr. Coyne has suggested that you probably will choose to discuss this with Mr. Lay and Mr. Coyne.” This is followed by an initial that appears to be an “S”. The initials JPC probably indicate that J. Patrick Coyne, NSC Representative for Internal Security, read the letter. Souers sent a noncommittal reply on July 14. (Ibid.)


18. Director of Central Intelligence Directive 14/1

Source: Central Intelligence Agency, History Staff, Job 84–B00389R, HS/HC–600, Box 4. Secret; Security Information.


19. Memorandum From the Chairman of the Communications Intelligence Board (Armstrong) to the Executive Secretary of the National Security Council (Lay)

Source: National Archives, RG 59, S/S–NSC Files: Lot 62 D 1, NSC Intelligence Directives. Top Secret. Lay circulated the memorandum to the NSC the next day. (Ibid.)


20. Letter From Director of Central Intelligence Hillenkoetter to the Under Secretary of State (Webb)

Source: National Archives, RG 59, INR Historical Files: Lot 58 D 776, National Intelligence Staff Study. Secret. All ellipses in the original letter.


21. Memorandum From the Chief of Staff of the Army (Collins) to Secretary of Defense Johnson

Source: National Archives, RG 218, CCS 334 NSA (7–24–48) Sec. 4 (Formerly NSA). Top Secret. Copies were sent to the Assistant Chief of Staff, G–3, Assistant to the Chief of Naval Operations, Director, P&O Air, and Director of the Joint Staff.


22. Memorandum From the Secretary of State’s Special Assistant for Intelligence and Research (Armstrong) to the Under Secretary of State (Webb)

Source: National Archives, RG 59, INR Historical Files: Lot 58 D 776, National Intelligence Staff Study. Secret. Drafted by Trueheart. Sent through the Executive Secretariat.


23. Memorandum for the Record

Source: National Archives, RG 263, History Staff/History Collection: History Research Project 82–2/00286, Box 4, HS/HC 500, National Intelligence Directives. Secret. Not signed but prepared by CIA General Counsel Lawrence Houston. According to Ludwell Montague, General Walter Bedell Smith as Director of Central Intelligence, October 1950–February 1953, p. 60, Smith had asked Houston for a review of the problems facing CIA and Houston responded on this date. A signed copy of Houston’s August 29 covering memorandum to Smith and another copy of the memorandum for the record are printed in Michael Warner, ed., The CIA Under Harry Truman, pp. 341–347.


24. Memorandum From the Secretary of State’s Special Assistant for Intelligence and Research (Armstrong) to the Under Secretary of State (Webb)

Source: Department of State, A/MS Files: Lot 54 D 291, CIA 1948–1952. Top Secret. The memorandum was under cover of a September 19 memorandum from C.E. Johnson of the Management Staff of the Bureau of Administration to Humelsine, which indicates that a September 20 meeting was scheduled among Webb, Humelsine, Armstrong, and Howe to review relations with the CIA and Johnson’s recommendations for changes in the proposed memorandum to Webb. Johnson recommended adding a statement on the inadequacy of CIA’s intelligence collection and production. He further wanted to delete the reference to showing the memorandum to Smith, preferring this be conveyed to Webb orally. He also believed Smith should be invited to the Department for the meeting and briefed on the Department of State role in and capabilities for intelligence.


25. Director of Central Intelligence Directive No. 4/2

Source: Central Intelligence Agency, Directorate of Operations, Job 78–04513R, Folder 35, Box 2. Secret.


26. Memorandum From [name not declassified] of the Office of Policy Coordination of the Central Intelligence Agency to Thomas A. Parrott of the Office of Policy Coordination

Source: Central Intelligence Agency, Directorate of Operations, Job 80–01795R, Box 3. Top Secret.


27. Memorandum From Theodore Babbitt, Ludwell Montague, and Forrest Van Slyck of the Office of Research and Evaluation of the Central Intelligence Agency to the Deputy Director of Central Intelligence (Jackson)

Source: Central Intelligence Agency, History Staff, Job 84–T00286R, Box 4, Folder 2. No classification marking. The memorandum is unsigned.


28. Memorandum From the Under Secretary of State (Webb) to the Executive Secretary of the National Security Council (Lay)

Source: National Archives, RG 59, S/S–NSC Files: Lot 66 D 148, Psychological Warfare. Secret. This memorandum was circulated by Lay on October 17 as a National Security Council Progress Report. (Ibid.)


29. Minutes of a Meeting of the Intelligence Advisory Committee

Source: National Archives, RG 59, INR Files: Lot 59 D 27, IAC Minutes 11/9/1950–12/20/1951, Box 71. Secret. No drafting information appears on the minutes. The meeting was held in the Director’s Conference Room at the Central Intelligence Agency.


30. Memorandum From the Secretary of State’s Special Assistant for Intelligence and Research (Armstrong) to Secretary of State Acheson

Source: National Archives, RG 59, S/S–NSC Files: Lot 63 D 351, NSC 50 Series. Top Secret. This memorandum received the concurrence of Humelsine, Jessup, and Matthews. Document 24 provides background on this issue.