General:


Contents

  1. For previous correspondence on the relations between Finland and the Soviet Union, the Winter War, and the Peace of Moscow, see Foreign Relations, 1940, vol. i, pp. 269 ff.
  2. For previous correspondence, see Foreign Relations, 1940, vol. i, pp. 539 ff.
  3. Continued from Foreign Relations, 1940, vol. i, pp. 589 632.
  4. For correspondence regarding the intervention of the Soviet Union in Poland on September 17, 1939, and the maintenance by the United States of diplomatic contact with the Polish Government, see Foreign Relations, 1939, Vol. i, pp. 428 ff. and ibid., Vol. ii, pp. 669 ff.
  5. For previous correspondence regarding Soviet activity in the Balkans, see Foreign Relations, 1940, vol. i, pp. 444 ff.
  6. The record here given covers the political aspects of the Conference in which Under Secretary of State Sumner Welles participated as the representative of the Department of State. For an account of the military discussions, see Department of the Army, United States Army in World War II: The War Department, Chief of Staff: Prewar Plans and Preparations, by Mark Skinner Watson (Washington, Government Printing Office, 1950), pp. 400 ff.
  7. Continued from Foreign Relations, 1940, vol. ii, pp. 1 67.
  8. 55 Stat. 764.
  9. For previous correspondence, see Foreign Relations, 1940, vol. ii, pp. 68 ff.
  10. Continued from Foreign Relations, 1940, vol. ii, pp. 208 249. For correspondence regarding Jewish immigration into Palestine, see ibid., vol. iii, pp. 830 ff.
  11. See also vol. vi , section entitled “Chilean Proposal of a Joint Declaration by the American States for the Humanization of War.”
  12. For text of the Load Line Convention and Protocol signed at London, July 5, 1930, see Foreign Relations, 1930, vol. i, p. 261.
  13. Continued from Foreign Relations, 1940, vol. ii, pp. 261 288.
  14. For previous correspondence regarding the regulation of tin production and export, see Foreign Relations, 1940, vol. ii, pp. 288 ff. The United States was not a party to the 1937 agreement which was signed on behalf of the tin-producing states: Belgian Congo, Bolivia, French Indochina, Malay States, Netherlands East Indies, Nigeria, and Siam; for text of the agreement, see British Cmd. 5879; Papers Relating to the International Tin Control Scheme, p. 3.
  15. The representatives of the Governments participating did not meet continuously throughout this period, but the work of the different sessions was of a continuous nature. Sessions were held July 10–August 3, 1941; October 14, 1941–February 28, 1942; and on April 22, 1942. For note regarding proposal in 1939 for a wheat conference, see Foreign Relations, 1939, vol. ii, p. 27.
  16. The Act was approved September 16, 1940; 54 Stat. 885.
  17. Continued from Foreign Relations, 1940, vol. ii, p. 340.
  18. Tabulations of declarations of war by belligerent countries are printed in the Department of State Bulletin, December 20, 1941, p. 551; ibid., February 7, 1942, p. 143; and ibid., November 20, 1943, p. 349.

    For declaration of war by the United States against Japan, see Foreign Relations, Japan, 1931–1941, vol. ii, p. 795. For conversations between the American and Japanese officials preceding the outbreak of war, see ibid., pp. 325 ff., and Foreign Relations, 1941, vol. iv, pp. 1 ff.

  19. This Committee convened for the first time at the Department of State on February 12, 1942; it was suspended on July 12, 1943. For an account of its organization, its meetings, and its membership, see Department of State, Postwar Foreign Policy Preparation, 1939–1945 (Washington, Government Printing Office, 1949), pp. 67–164.