List of Papers

(Unless otherwise specified, the correspondence is from or to officials in the Department of State.)

THE FAR EASTERN CRISIS

Chapter I: January 1–April 15, 1936

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Jan. 6 (34) From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the London Naval Conference (tel.)
Conversation with Craigie of British Foreign Office, who stated he had learned the Japanese and Chinese were negotiating a nonaggression pact, and suggested a nonaggression pact in the Pacific for the United States, the United Kingdom, and Japan.
1
Jan. 7 (4) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Status of Sino-Japanese exchange of views preliminary to formal discussions.
2
Jan. 7 (4) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Transmittal of substance of telegram No. 34 of January 6 regarding a possible Sino-Japanese nonaggression pact; request for comments and any pertinent information.
(Sent also to the Embassy in Japan as No. 2.)
3
Jan. 9 (9) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Dissatisfaction of Japanese military with the anti-Japanese actions and attitude of General Sung and his army.
3
Jan. 9 (10) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Japanese demands for redress in connection with recent anti-Japanese acts of General Sung’s soldiers.
4
Jan. 9 (11) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
No knowledge of any proposal for Sino-Japanese nonaggression pact, and comments regarding the situation.
5
Jan. 9 (7) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
No knowledge of negotiations in regard to a Sino-Japanese nonaggression pact, and comments regarding Craigie’s pact suggestions contained in No. 34 of January 6.
7
Jan. 10 (40) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Impression of British Foreign Minister Eden that talk of nonaggression pact is a play for time on the part of the Chinese.
8
Jan. 10 (10) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Unconfirmed report of Japanese intention to land troops at Foochow and Tsingtau.
8
Jan. 13 (15) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Explanation, by a Japanese diplomatic official, of movements of several Japanese officials whose activities had aroused apprehension.
9
Jan. 14 (17) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Report on local political developments.
10
[Page VI]Jan. 15 (18) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information relative to Sung’s increasingly autonomous regime.
10
Jan. 15 (180) From the Ambassador in China
Reasons for opinion that a tripartite pact, mentioned in No. 34 of January 6, would not be feasible.
11
Jan. 15 (92) From the Consul General at Canton to the Ambassador in China
Transmittal of secret document concerning the alleged activities of the Japanese looking toward the establishment of an autonomous government of “South China.”
14
Jan. 16 (21) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice of progress of Japanese activities and Sino-Japanese negotiations and conversations.
16
Jan. 17 (19) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Report of demands of student representatives regarding the Sino-Japanese situation, and Chiang’s statement in reply.
16
Jan. 19 (25) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information relative to revenue instructions issued by the Hopei-Chahar Political Council.
18
Jan. 20 (26) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Other developments in the Hopei-Chahar political situation.
18
Jan. 21 (22) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Publication of the provisional general principles governing the organization of the Hopei-Chahar Political Affairs Commission.
19
Jan. 22 (2617) From the Ambassador in Germany
Transmittal of a London newspaper clipping relative to an alleged German-Japanese military agreement, and indications which support the possibility of such an arrangement.
19
Jan. 22 (195) From the Ambassador in China
Report of Japanese sugar smuggling in U. S. Infantry camp at Chinwangtao and advice of curtailment in British sugar trade in Tientsin due to activities of sugar smugglers in North China.
20
Jan. 23 (23) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Office press statement in refutation of reference, in speech of Japanese Foreign Minister Hirota, to alleged concurrence by Chinese to Japanese three principles vis-à-vis China.
21
Jan. 23 (51) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Report from a local official that the Japanese Consul General has received instructions to adopt a stronger attitude in dealing with local Chinese authorities in view of the Nanking Government’s changed attitude toward Japan.
22
Jan. 23 (33) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Comments relative to Sino-Japanese situation in North China.
22
Jan. 23 (1648) From the Ambassador in Japan
Report of numerous border incidents between armed “Manchoukuo” and Outer Mongolian forces.
23
[Page VII]Jan. 25 (1655) From the Ambassador in Japan
Observations relative to the withdrawal of the Japanese delegation from the London Naval Disarmament Conference.
25
Jan. 27 (24) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information that Isogai, Japanese Military Attaché, seemingly favors the Chinese Government’s desire to have Sino-Japanese negotiations returned to regular diplomatic channels.
29
Jan. 27 (34) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Opinion that recent occurrences in Inner Mongolia will completely alienate the Mongols from the Chinese.
29
Jan. 30 (19) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
British Ambassador’s report of conversation with Foreign Minister Hirota, who expressed the hope that China would ultimately recognize “Manchoukuo.”
30
Jan. 30 (40) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Report regarding postal and customs revenues; observations concerning activities of forces along the border of the demilitarized zone.
30
Jan. 30 (14,500) Report by the Military Attaché in Germany
Official denial by Major von Pappenheim, of the War Ministry, of truth of a London Morning Post report of a German-Japanese military alliance.
31
Jan. 31 (39) From the Chargé in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Conversation with a Kremlin emissary who expressed concern regarding Soviet-Japanese dissensions in the Far East and recently published reports of a German-Japanese alliance directed against activities of the Comintern.
33
Jan. 31 (196) From the Consul General at Harbin to the Ambassador in China
Observations in support of opinion that the higher authorities of the Kwantung Army wish to avoid serious complications with Outer Mongolia and Soviet Russia at the present time.
34
Feb. 1 (21) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Publication of two articles, evidently trial balloons put out by the Foreign Office, reporting comprehensive political negotiations involving the United States, United Kingdom, and Japan.
35
Feb. 1 (16) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Explanation to press correspondents that there have been numerous conferences regarding questions of trade but no conferences on political matters in the Far East.
36
Feb. 3 (17) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Uneasy feeling in some Soviet circles that a spring or summer outbreak of conflict between Japan and Soviet Union is possible.
36
Feb. 4 (44) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice of various conversations between Japanese and Chinese leaders regarding the future course of the Japanese military in North China.
37
[Page VIII]Feb. 4 (24) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Observations relative to the Siberian-Mongolian border situation and to the possibility of a Japanese-Soviet war in the spring or summer.
38
Feb. 4 (81) From the Ambassador in China
Advice of prevalence of belief that hostilities between China and Japan will commence within the next two or three months.
39
Feb. 7 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Conversation with the Soviet Ambassador, newly returned from Russia, who indicated that he is now more hopeful about the situation in the Far East and in Europe.
40
Feb. 7 (1665) From the Ambassador in Japan
Detailed consideration, pursuant to telegrams No. 2 of January 7 and No. 7 of January 9, relative to bases for and against the conclusion of revised political agreements in respect to the Far East.
42
Feb. 10 (19) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice of noncommittal statement made by the Secretary relative to a speech by Senator Pitt man before the Senate February 10.
49
Feb. 11 (59) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice of continuing military conferences, and report that the Hopei-Chahar Council is considering the establishment of a commission to supervise education.
49
Feb. 11 (125) From the Consul General at Sydney
Increasing Australian apprehension concerning recent Japanese moves in the Orient.
50
Feb. 12 (26) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Press comments minimizing importance of Senator Pittman’s anti-Japanese speech before the Senate.
52
Feb. 12 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs to the Secretary of State
Chinese Ambassador’s request for an appointment with the Secretary to ascertain the U. S. attitude in the event that the Chinese Government refuses to accede to Japanese demands to negotiate on the basis of Hirota’s three-point program.
52
Feb. 12 (234) From the Ambassador in China
Transmission of Peking & Tientsin Times (British) editorial, and detailed comments relative to China’s present attitude in the conflicting policies of China, Japan, and the Soviet Union in Eastern Asia.
53
Feb. 13 (45) From the Chargé in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Analysis of information relative to the Kremlin’s views with regard to the possibility of a Japanese attack this year.
56
Feb. 14 (46) From the Chargé in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Summary of a Tass telegram which reported an attack on the Mongolian Frontier Guard by a Japanese-Manchurian detachment on February 12.
57
Feb. 14 (63) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
From Harbin: Confirmation by Japanese Mission of newspaper reports regarding Soviet-Japanese encounter on February 12.
58
[Page IX]Feb. 14 Memorandum by the Ambassador in China
Conversation with Dr. Kiep, head of the German Economic Mission, who stated that his Mission had no political significance but was in the Far East solely for the purpose of learning of opportunities for increasing German trade.
58
Feb. 15 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Chinese Ambassador, who had found that he was not instructed to see the Secretary, but who repeated his earlier inquiry relative to the U. S. position on Japan’s China policy and had his attention called to American disinclination toward “foreign entanglements.”
60
Feb. 18 (35) From the Second Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Chinese plan for defense and belief in some circles that Chiang is preparing to assist Soviet forces against Japan, although he has stated that China would remain neutral in event of Soviet-Japanese hostilities.
61
Feb. 18 (1) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Report of fuller press statements by Japanese officers relative to military activities, and advice of continuing student agitation in Peiping.
62
Feb. 20 (79) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Views of a Japanese Embassy official, who stated that the January conversations of important officers had resulted in the present apparent relaxation of Japanese military policy in North China.
63
Feb. 20 (950) To the Ambassador in Japan
Suggestion of advisability of bringing to the attention of the Japanese Foreign Office the reported discrimination against American automotive trucks in Manchuria.
64
Feb. 21 (58) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Conversation with Litvinov, Commissar for Foreign Affairs, who believes that a Japanese attack on the Soviet Union is not imminent.
64
Feb. 23 (60–61) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Official statement in Moscow Daily News (text printed) reporting the Japanese and Soviet attitudes relative to the inclusion of neutral representatives in a mixed commission for investigating a border incident of January 3.
66
Feb. 24 (87) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Statement to newsmen by Tada, commander of the Japanese North China Garrison, relative to conditions in the Hopei-Chahar area.
66
Feb. 25 (89) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Tokyo press report of army changes which presumably presage a substantial increase in the numerical strength of the North China Garrison.
67
Feb. 28 (74) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Advice from the Chinese Ambassador in Moscow that if Japan insists upon the “three principles” or advances into Shantung, Chiang will positively fight.
68
[Page X]Feb. 29 (43) From the Consul General at Shanghai
Arrival of Hachiro Arita, newly appointed Japanese Ambassador to China.
68
Mar. 3 (106) From the Ambassador in China
Summary of current developments in the anti-Communist campaign in the Shensi-Shansi sector.
68
Mar. 5 (50) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Chinese Foreign Minister Chang-Chun’s statement that China has not agreed to Hirota’s three points, and newly appointed Japanese Ambassador Arita’s report to the contrary.
72
Mar. 5 Memorandum by the Counselor of Embassy in China
Chinese Finance Minister Kung’s opinion that United States and the European Powers should take steps to curb the serious threat to international peace and security offered by Japanese imperialistic ambitions.
73
Mar. 6 (51) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Announcement in emergency Cabinet meeting that Japanese Military Attaché Isogai refuses to permit Central Government troops to enter Shansi to oppose the Communists unless Hirota’s three-point program is accepted.
74
Mar. 7 (119) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
From Canton, March 6: Report of widening rift between the Canton military and the Nanking authority.
75
Mar. 14 (53) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information from an Executive Yuan official that the Chinese authorities and Japanese civil officials are unable to stop smuggling operations in North China owing to the interference of the Japanese military.
75
Mar. 16 (135) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Minor developments in Sino-Japanese relations in North China.
76
Mar. 17 (56) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s note (text printed) relative to the duties and rights of the Hopei-Chahar Political Affairs Commission.
77
Mar. 18 (1470) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union
Report of conversation with Mr. Sakoh, Counselor of the Japanese Embassy, who discussed the proposed Soviet-Japanese commission for the demarcation of the boundary between the Soviet Union and “Manchoukuo” and the necessity for Japan’s taking Vladivostok from the Soviet Union.
78
Mar. 18 (1734) From the Ambassador in Japan
Opinion of Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs that question of Manchurian discrimination against American trucks should be handled by the interested parties dealing directly with the “Manchoukuo” authorities.
80
Mar. 18 (1740) From the Ambassador in Japan
Review of developments in Soviet-Japanese relations, with particular reference to the Siberian-”Manchoukuo” and Mongol-Manchu borders and the arrest of the Japanese Staff of the Soviet Embassy in Tokyo.
80
[Page XI]Mar. 18 (1741) From the Ambassador in Japan
Evaluation of situation following a change of government in Japan brought on by the violence of February 26.
84
Mar. 20 (59) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Joint communiqué (text printed) stating that the four lengthy daily conferences held by the Foreign Minister and the Japanese Ambassador, March 16–19, were confined to an informal exchange of views to facilitate satisfactory progress of future negotiations for readjusting Sino-Japanese relations.
87
Mar. 26 (326) From the Ambassador in China
Summary of conversations with various officials at Nanking, regarding the Sino-Japanese situation.
88
Mar. 27 (332) From the Ambassador in China
Transmission of documents purported to be a record of the Sino-Japanese negotiations in 1935 which allegedly led to the “Ho-Umetsu Agreement.”
89
Mar. 27 (337) From the Ambassador in China
Conversations with the Finance and Foreign Ministers, who expressed pleasure in the sentiments of Senator Pitt man’s anti-Japanese speech before the Senate.
91
Mar. 28 (67) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information from a Foreign Office representative who concurred in the general impression that North China developments must await clarification of the situation in Tokyo.
91
Mar. 28 (93) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Tass statement which constituted the first semi-official admission of a Soviet-Mongolian mutual assistance agreement.
92
Mar. 30 (1753) From the Ambassador in Japan
Information from various representatives relative to an alleged military agreement between Germany and Japan, supposedly directed against the Soviet Union.
93
Apr. 1 (70) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Request for information pertaining to the reported tariff agreement between the authorities of the “autonomous” area of North China and Japan.
94
Apr. 1 (95) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Frontier clashes between Japanese-Manchurian forces and those of the Mongol People’s Republic; and opinion of Krestinsky, Acting Commissar for Foreign Affairs, that the incidents were inspired by the younger military group in Japan in an effort to provoke war with the Soviet Union.
94
Apr. 1 (133) From the Ambassador in China
Conversation with Sir Alexander Cadogan, the retiring British Ambassador, who reported farewell interviews with various officials regarding the handling of the Sino-Japanese situation.
95
Apr. 2 (163) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Possibility that present quiet in the student situation may be disrupted due to the students’ restlessness, inept handling by Chinese authorities, and the attitude of the Japanese military.
98
Apr. 2 (164) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Tass report from Moscow of heavy losses incurred in a Mongol repulse of Japanese-Manchurian detachments.
99
[Page XII]Apr. 3 (97) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Exchange of opinions between the Japanese Ambassador and the Soviet Commissar for Defense, who anticipated further Mongol-Manchurian frontier differences and stated that any Japanese attack on the Soviet Union would be met by an attack twice as severe.
100
Apr. 3 (168) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Report of several Japanese appointments and of conversations at Tientsin with Sung and other Chinese leaders concerning the situation in Chahar and Shansi and the alleged existence of a secret Sino-Russian treaty.
100
Apr. 4 (99) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Belief of Soviet official that the recent frontier fighting was the undisciplined action of younger Japanese officers and insistence that no Soviet military were with the Mongolian troops which repelled the attack.
101
Apr. 4 (134) From the Ambassador in China
Editorial based on Senator Pittman’s speech, which indicates China’s bitterness in relinquishing hope of U. S. assistance in resisting Japan.
102
Apr. 6 (82) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Résumé of an Associated Press correspondent’s interview with Suma of the Japanese Embassy, who stated that Japan will have to use force against China and that Great Britain must recognize Japan as the leading power in the Far East.
103
Apr. 7 (83) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Communiqué to the press (text printed) announcing that the Foreign Office had lodged a vigorous protest with the Soviet Government against the mutual assistance protocol, concluded March 12, between the Soviet Union and Outer Mongolia.
104
Apr. 8 (84) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Views of Chinese and Japanese officials intimating that the communiqué quoted in No. 83 of April 7 was issued in part to refute indirectly Japanese suspicions of a Sino-Soviet mutual assistance pact.
105
Apr. 8 (100) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Publication of text of the Protocol of Mutual Assistance between the Soviet Union and the Mongolian People’s Republic.
105
Apr. 9 (85) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Japanese pressure on Tientsin Mayor and General Sung for a written agreement providing for Sino-Japanese military cooperation against Communists, and Japanese objection to the dispatch of large numbers of National Government troops to Shansi based on probability of their consolidating Chiang’s authority in that Province.
106
Apr. 9 (82) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Telegram from the American Ambassador at London (text printed) of a conversation with a Foreign Office official who mentioned disturbing reports from China, the possibility of unconsidered moves by the Chinese, and the necessity for Chiang to reach a decision as to his course.
106
[Page XIII]Apr. 9 (103) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Publication of the Chinese protest against the Soviet-Outer Mongolian Protocol and the Soviet reply. Soviet optimism in the belief that Japanese political position is weakening in North China, Manchuria, and Inner Mongolia.
107
Apr. 10 (224) From the Consul General at Harbin to the Ambassador in China
Observations relative to a Hsinking news despatch concerning the reported Soviet-Outer Mongolian agreement and a Harbin Nichinichi editorial which claims that Soviet policy toward Japan and “Manchoukuo” has recently changed from passive defense to positive action.
108
Apr. 11 (89) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Office note to the Soviet Ambassador (text printed) renewing protest in respect to the Soviet-Outer Mongolian protocol.
109

Chapter II: April 16–June 30, 1936

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Apr. 16 (191) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Observations regarding the delaying tactics of the Chinese in North China and the steady economic and social penetration of the Japanese.
111
Apr. 16 (92) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information from a Chinese Cabinet official that the Hopei–Chahar Council has agreed to form a Sino-Japanese anti-Communist commission.
112
Apr. 17 (94) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
News article attributing release of the missionary Bosshardt to a change in Communist policy; and opinion that the seemingly complete reversal is logical in view of the present strained Soviet-Japanese relations.
112
Apr. 18 (99) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Press comments on Kawagoe’s nomination as Japanese Ambassador to China.
(Footnote: Confirmation of appointment May 1.)
114
Apr. 20 (201) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Sung’s reported aversion to yielding to Japanese representations of major importance; and advice of pending Sino-Japanese conversations and renewed activity in military construction.
114
Apr. 20 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Advice of lengthy newspaper statement by Marshal Li, military spokesman for Kwangsi, who urges war resistance against Japan as China’s sole salvation at this juncture.
116
Apr. 20 (385) From the Ambassador in China
Conversation with Special Delegate Cheng, of the Foreign Ministry, who believes the Japanese are anxious for more active cooperation.
116
[Page XIV]Apr. 21 (203) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Inauguration of the Reconstruction Committee of the Hopei-Chahar Political Council and appointment of two of Sung’s subordinates to positions indicating the continuing extension of Sung’s control in Hopei Province.
117
Apr. 21 (204) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Warning to Americans to evacuate Sinpin because of lack of protection against banditry.
117
Apr. 22 (103) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information from a Chinese official that the Chinese Government will lower certain tariff rates as the only effective means of stopping the smuggling of Japanese goods into North China.
118
Apr. 22 (349) From the Consul General at Harbin
Summary of effects of the Kwantung Army’s policy upon developments in Manchuria.
118
Apr. 29 (110) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Increasing evidences of preparations for actual warfare.
122
Apr. 29 (213) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Report of various developments including a Japanese suggestion that Japanese nationals be granted free residence in North China.
124
Apr. 30 (113) From the Second Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Official denial by Foreign Office that Sung has entered into an agreement with the Japanese military for Sino-Japanese cooperation against Communism. Opinion of Foreign Office official that Sung may be forced to capitulate to maintain effectiveness of customs in the North where large quantities of Japanese goods are being smuggled.
125
Apr. 30 (215) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice that extended uncurbed activities of smugglers in North China are leading to complete disorganization of trade and to disastrous impairment of customs revenues.
126
Apr. 30 (114) From the Second Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information from a Foreign Office official who stated that China will assume Soviet acceptance of China’s position if no reply is received to China’s second protest relative to the Soviet-Outer Mongolian Pact.
127
Apr. 30 (115) From the Second Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Office press denial of reports of a secret Sino-Soviet treaty.
128
Apr. 30 (217) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information regarding several changes in the status of Japanese military in Hopei Province.
128
Apr. 30 (1798) From the Ambassador in Japan
Detailed observations regarding the “continental” versus the “oceanic” schools of thought in the development of a Japanese expansion policy.
129
Apr. 30 Memorandum by the Ambassador in China of a Conversation With Sir Frederick Leith-Ross
Discussion of likelihood of a Sino-Japanese war.
(Footnote: Temporary assignment of Leith-Ross to China as financial adviser to the British Embassy.)
134
[Page XV]Apr. 30 (159) From the Consul General at Shanghai to the Ambassador in China
Conversation between a British newspaper correspondent and the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy regarding smuggling in North China and Japanese policy vis-à-vis China.
136
May 2 (118) From the Second Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Office concern regarding conclusion of a German-“Manchoukuo” commercial agreement which may result in a general breakdown in the present policy of nonrecognition of the Manchurian regime.
137
May 2 (120) From the Second Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information from a German Embassy official who stated that the German-“Manchoukuo” agreement was necessary for economic reasons.
138
May 2 (121) From the Second Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Office denial of press reports of declaration of autonomy by Teh Wang.
139
May 5 (122) From the Second Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Observations regarding relations between the National Government and the Southwest, and belief that Southwestern opposition is more military than political.
139
May 6 (229) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information from Chinese officials that conversations between Sung and the Japanese Military have reached an impasse.
140
May 6 (94) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
British Ambassador’s oral protest to the Foreign Minister regarding extensive Japanese smuggling in North China, the Foreign Minister’s reply that little could be done in amelioration at this time; and the British Ambassador’s inquiry as to whether the United States was prepared to make a similar approach.
141
May 8 (52) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Authorization to make an oral and informal approach to the Foreign Minister, similar to the British approach.
142
May 9 (1580) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union
Denial by Assistant Commissar for Foreign Affairs of the rumored secret agreement between the Soviet Union and Sinkiang.
143
May 10 Statement by Mr. J. Stowell Wright, Acting Territorial Director in Hawaii of the Federal Housing Administration
Conversation with the Japanese Consul General, who frankly expressed his opinions concerning the United States.
(Footnote: Information that statement with a covering report had been sent to the War Department.)
144
May 12 (133) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information from a Foreign Office official regarding efforts toward control of the smuggling situation.
145
May 12 From the Chinese Embassy
Résumé of the growth of smuggling in North China and advice of its present uncontrollable proportions.
146
[Page XVI]May 13 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Indications of further strengthening of military control in the Southwest and attendant lessening of prospects for reconciliation with Nanking.
149
May 13 (104) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice of oral and informal approach authorized in No. 52 of May 8 and Vice Minister’s belief that the smuggling situation is largely due to high Chinese tariff on certain commodities.
149
May 13 (135) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Finance Minister’s opinion that U. S. representations to both Japan and China expressing concern over effects of smuggling operations would be desirable.
150
May 14 (241) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Confidential information from the Japanese Embassy that the North China Garrison will be strengthened.
150
May 14 (117) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions for the Counselor of Embassy to orally inform the Finance and Foreign Ministers that the North China smuggling situation has been brought to the attention of the Chinese Foreign Office at Nanking and the Japanese Foreign Office at Tokyo.
151
May 15 (243) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Sung’s continuing delay in reaching an agreement with the Japanese Military and recent developments in his step-by-step efforts to increase the autonomy of his regime.
151
May 16 (140) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Office confirmation of press report that the Foreign Office had made oral representations on May 7 to the Japanese Embassy against Japanese Garrison increase in Tientsin and advice that the Foreign Office has instructed the Chinese Embassy in Tokyo to make further representations in the matter.
153
May 16 From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Finance Minister’s belief that further strongly phrased foreign protests against smuggling would continue the improvement which has been noted recently in the attitude of the Japanese Military.
153
May 16 (105) From the Consul General at Mukden
Observations regarding trade promotion activities in Manchuria.
(Footnote: Department’s concurrence with views.)
154
May 18 (143) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information from the Foreign Office of U. S. statement to press reaffirming the 1935 policy relative to North China; and of a Chinese note to Japan, May 15, reviewing smuggling situation and asking that the Japanese military be restrained from interference in customs matters in North China and for withdrawal of protection to Japanese and Korean smugglers.
156
May 18 (108) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Unsigned and undated memorandum (text printed) from the Foreign Minister who submitted the identical document to the British on May 4 expressing his views concerning the smuggling situation.
157
[Page XVII]May 19 (146) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Opinion of a foreign adviser to the Chinese Government that a continuation of the present extensive smuggling would have indirect unfavorable effects upon American and other foreign interests.
158
May 19 (249) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Inefficacy of anti-smuggling measures.
159
May 20 (109) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Various views on the effect of the British and the U. S. representations relative to customs, including the British Ambassador’s belief that Matsudaira, Minister of the Imperial Household, was considerably impressed with the potential seriousness of the situation.
160
May 20 (252) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information from foreign military observers regarding Japanese troop arrivals in North China and advice of their assignments.
161
May 20 (34) To the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Confirmation of statement to press May 16, and request for summary of Foreign Office note to Japan reviewing the smuggling situation, items mentioned in No. 143 of May 18.
162
May 21 (148) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Soviet Ambassador’s explanation to an American correspondent of Soviet policy in the Far East; correspondent’s impression that ultimate aims envisage Soviet control of Mongolia, Manchuria, and part of North China.
162
May 21 (110) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Evidence that the American and British démarches against smuggling have served to focus attention on the issue, and information that high officials are being sent to North China to observe the situation.
163
May 22 (149) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Office note to Japan (text printed), as requested by the Department in No. 34, May 20.
163
May 22 (150) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Conversation with the Soviet Ambassador and the Foreign Minister who mentioned measures now being taken to suppress smuggling and indicated general concurrence with the Soviet Ambassador’s description of Japan’s attitude and the correctness of the Soviet attitude toward Japan.
165
May 22 (477) From the Ambassador in China
Transmittal of despatch from the Consulate General at Mukden on the subject of native Communist armies in Manchuria.
166
May 23 (111) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Information that the Japanese Garrison in North China will be increased by several thousand officers and men and denial by Japanese officers that an army division is to be organized in North China.
166
[Page XVIII]May 25 (259) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Denial by Chinese officials that Sung has entered into any important agreement with the Japanese; report of serious dissatisfaction among Sung’s subordinates both military and civilian; and unconfirmed rumors relative to troop movements.
167
May 25 (157) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s address (text printed) on Sino-Japanese relations which was delivered at a weekly memorial service.
168
May 26 (64) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to orally and informally inquire of the Foreign Office regarding the present status of the proposed investigation of the smuggling situation.
171
May 27 (282) From the Ambassador in the United Kingdom (tel.)
Foreign Secretary’s address before the House of Commons relative to the smuggling traffic in North China (excerpt printed), indicating Japanese interference in Chinese attempt at suppression.
171
May 27 (114) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Foreign Office arrangements to investigate the smuggling situation.
172
May 28 (264) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Report of Japanese occupation of ground and of various buildings in important railway areas.
172
May 28 (159) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Japanese protests against Chinese allegations regarding the smuggling situation.
173
May 29 (163) From the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Advice of British Counselor’s conversation at the Foreign Office regarding smuggling in North China, and opinion that a similar U. S. approach would afford an indirect opportunity to test German-Japanese relations.
173
May 29 (267) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Résumé of developments indicating worsening trend in Sino-Japanese relations.
174
May 29 (64) To the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Instructions to discuss at the Foreign Office, orally and informally, and not as under instruction of the Department, the smuggling situation in North China; and information for use in such discussion.
175
May 29 (268) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information indicating that measures of the National Government are effecting no decrease of smuggling in North China.
176
May 29 (1866) From the Ambassador in Japan
Review of recent developments affecting Soviet-Japanese relations.
177
May 30 (116) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice of representations by the British Ambassador to the Foreign Minister regarding arrests of Chinese employees of British concerns in Manchuria in violation of extraterritorial rights.
181
[Page XIX]May 30 (117) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Arita’s denial of Japanese Consul General Suma’s statement to a British Embassy representative that the smuggling situation was a political, not an economic issue; and press report of Suma’s ultimatum to Chiang Kai-shek.
181
May 30 From the Consul General at Tientsin (tel.)
Advice of student agitation, concentration of undesirable Japanese in first special area, and further Japanese troop arrivals.
182
May 31 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Information that conference between Southwest leaders and the Nanking delegation May 25–28 accomplished nothing toward unification, with mention of effect of Hu Han Min’s alleged will on Southwest opinion.
183
June 1 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Comments on various reports concerning Sino-Japanese activities, including document purported to be Hu Han Min’s will.
184
June 1 (271) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Student activities in opposition to Japanese aggression.
185
June 1 (66) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Suggestion that the Embassy orally and informally approach the Foreign Office calling attention to the effect of smuggling upon American trade and reaffirming U. S. concern in the situation.
186
June 1 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Local reports that a document, allegedly Hu’s will, was prepared by Japanese-instigated Kwangsi leaders.
187
June 1 (491) From the Ambassador in China
Observations regarding an article by General Doihara, who expressed his views with regard to the Russo-Japanese problem.
187
June 3 (167) From the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Foreign Office belief that Germany will make representations to the Japanese Government regarding the seriousness of the smuggling situation in North China and opinion that neither Japanese nor Russians want to fight.
188
June 3 (119) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Compliance with instructions in No. 66 of June 1 and impression from interview that other governments can expect no cooperation from the Japanese Government at this time in the suppression of smuggling.
189
June 3 (497) From the Ambassador in China
Observations regarding the Chinese position that there is nothing in the Tangku Truce to justify Japanese interference in operation of the Customs Preventive Service in Eastern Hopei.
189
June 4 (165) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Denial by National Government officials that the Southwest has declared or threatened war against Nanking, although troops are concentrated in strategic area; Domei report of Southwest’s “demands.”
190
[Page XX]June 4 (282) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information from the Chancellor of Peiping University, recently returned from Nanking, who stated that the crisis in Sung’s regime has forced him to decide against independence of Hopei and Chahar from the Nationalist Government.
192
June 4 (274) From the Consul General at Mukden to the Ambassador in China
Observations regarding the German-“Manchoukuo” trade agreement, including reference to Article 3 wherein without explanation Germany’s favorable trade balance with Japan is taken into consideration in the trade arrangements of the two contracting “countries.”
193
June 5 (167) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information from Cabinet official who stated that Japan is attempting to undermine China’s powers of resistance by creating disunion rather than to goad China into open war.
194
June 6 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Manifesto issued by Marshals Chen, Li, and Pai and senior officers of First and Fourth Group Armies stating that Japan’s aggression is now at its height and earnestly requesting orders to proceed north to face the enemy; also publication of a Southwest resolution urging authorization of such mobilization.
195
June 8 (123) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Conversation with the British Ambassador who stated that in his judgment the Japanese would not at present cooperate to improve the situation in China and that the Leith-Ross visit to China had been upon the invitation of the Japanese Foreign Office and military officers.
196
June 9 (173) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Current reports regarding developments in Japanese intrigue.
196
June 9 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Information on the Southwest, including reports of Chinese and Japanese military moves, student petitions and depreciation of Kwangsi currency.
198
June 10 (175) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Report that on June 9 Chiang Kai-shek telegraphed to Chen Chi Tang, a Southwest leader, appealing for national solidarity.
200
June 10 (176) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Conversation between an American news correspondent and the Foreign Minister who said that a plenary session of the Fifth Central Executive and Supervisory Committees would be called to resolve the Southwestern militarist crisis and emphasized that China was working to solve international issues diplomatically.
200
June 10 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Mobilization proclamation by Marshals Pai and Li announcing that resistance to Japan is the sole purpose of the northern expedition; avoidance of commitments by Marshal Chen.
201
June 10 (510) From the Ambassador in China
Conversation with the Soviet Counselor of Embassy who expressed the opinion that the Japanese will accomplish their purpose without war and that there is little likelihood of a Japanese attack on Russia.
201
[Page XXI]June 11 (177) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Plans for convening a plenary session and reports concerning troop movements.
202
June 11 (125) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Publication of text of treaty between Japan and “Manchoukuo”, signed June 10, described as the first step toward abolition of extraterritoriality in Manchuria.
203
June 12 (179) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Conversation between Finance Minister Kung and the Japanese Military Attaché relative to “pretended” anti-Japanese character of recent political maneuver in the Southwest.
203
June 12 (489) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
Advice that the Chinese Ambassador in France has been instructed to sound out the representatives of the interested powers at Geneva as to their reaction in the event the National Government is forced by the action of Canton to go to war with Japan.
204
June 12 (183) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Report of halt of the northward advance of the Southwestern troops.
204
June 12 (301) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information regarding the tense situation in North China and belief of Chinese observers that Japanese pressure on Sung is being increased for the purpose of causing him to sign an agreement of significant scope.
205
June 12 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Strong rejoinder by Southwest Political Council to Nanking’s telegram of June 9.
206
June 15 (304) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Student demonstrations against Japanese aggression and Chiang, and delivery of apology to the Japanese Embassy by a municipal official.
207
June 15 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Press statement by Marshal Chen asserting that the Southwest thrust was solely to bring about adoption of a national policy of active resistance to Japan; attitude of Marshals Li and Pai; and certain apprehension regarding next moves of Chiang and the Kwangsi leaders.
207
June 17 (187) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Report of negotiations between the National Government and Chen and between Kwangsi leaders and provincial chairmen acting for the Government, and statement from a British official that investigation showed that the present démarche is a Japanese attempt to divert attention from North China activities.
208
June 17 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Reply to a Japanese protest, assuring protection of Japanese nationals but asserting that the political and military authorities of Kwangtung cannot suppress the anti-Japanese publicity and counter-Japanese movements, which are the natural reaction to Japan’s actions.
209
[Page XXII]June 17 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
General belief that situation remains unchanged and that since the Japanese protest was addressed only to Kwangtung, the Japanese action may be possible further evidence of Japanese support of Kwangsi.
210
June 18 From the Chinese Embassy
Description of smuggling in North China under Japanese protection.
(Footnotes: Information that Chinese Ambassador was told that the United States had taken no recent steps vis-à-vis Japan; and that authorization was given to tell him of past representations on the subject.)
211
June 19 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Information pertaining to developments in the Southwest following an alleged conference at Hengchow, Hunan, during which Southwest leaders are said to have rejected Nanking terms.
212
June 20 (313) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Meetings of Japanese officials at Tientsin presumably to decide policy with regard to the regime of Sung, who has apparently stiffened his attitude.
213
June 22 (238) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Chinese Minister’s opinion that China would consider no pertinent action before the League without prior assurances of support from the powers.
(Footnote: Later confirmation of China’s position as set forth by the Minister.)
215
June 22 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Published message from Southwest leaders urging that Nanking immediately lead armed resistance against Japan; information regarding troop positions; and an informant’s allegation that report of Hengchow conference was unfounded.
215
June 22 (133) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Explanation of belated press report which stated that Hirota had again refused a Soviet proposal to conclude a Russo-Japanese nonaggression pact.
216
June 23 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Joint demands upon Nanking by the Kuomintang Committee and the Southwest Council for assurances on five points, and Kwangsi report of the departure of all Japanese advisers from that province.
216
June 24 (198) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Office denial of Japanese press reports that Suma sternly warned the Chinese Foreign Minister against the continuation of malicious propaganda against Japan.
218
June 24 (139) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Information from the War Department indicating the completion of troop movements for reenforcement of the North China Garrison to a strength of slightly under 5,000 men.
218
[Page XXIII]June 25 (203) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Office information of the Government’s spirit of pessimism resulting from difficulties with Chen and with the Kwangsi leaders, and from apparent failure of its attempt to cause split between them; other reports of Nanking-Southwest friction.
218
June 25 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Observations concerning conversations in Japan and the United States of Shigeru Yoshida, recently appointed Japanese Ambassador to Great Britain, who stressed the need for Japanese expansion and emphasized the idea that United States, Great Britain and Japan should cooperate in regard to the Far East.
(Footnote: Assistant Chief’s intimation that Yoshida’s efforts in London may serve to attract some British attention and support and thus partially obscure Japan’s continued aggression in China.)
220
June 25 (546) From the Ambassador in China
Report from Colonel Joseph W. Stilwell, Military Attaché, who stated that from his recent travel along the so-called Lung-hai line he had observed no evidence of any kind of military activity, belief of his office that General Chiang has no present intention of opposing the Japanese there.
223
June 27 (207) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Issuance of a press statement by General Chiang giving conditions of settlement with the Southwest; Foreign Minister’s analysis of situation, and indication of National Government’s willingness to compromise on matters of administration and finance, but insistence on termination of military insubordination.
224
June 27 (329) From the First Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information regarding the policy of the North China Garrison and indications that a military conflict in the South is probably unavoidable.
225
June 29 (209) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information from a Foreign Office official that the North China situation is more critical than the crisis in the Southwest.
226
June 29 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Press statements including text of Southwest Committee’s telegram, allegedly addressed to Nanking, wherein appear the five joint demands presented by the Kuomintang and the Southwest Council; confirmation of previously reported heavy troop movements northward and mounting apprehension.
226
June 29 Memorandum by the Ambassador in China of a Conversation With the First Secretary of the Japanese Embassy in China
Indications that the Japanese are very pessimistic as to the future of Sino-Japanese relations.
228
June 30 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Li’s appointment as Commander in Chief of the Fourth Group Army and extracts from his speech of acceptance which was in marked contrast with Chen’s previous conciliatory advices that Nanking’s leadership be accepted.
229
[Page XXIV]

THE FAR EASTERN CRISIS

Chapter III: July 1–October 15, 1936

Date and number Subject Page
1936 July 2 (333) From the First Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
From Mukden, July 1: Foreign Minister’s published statement relative to gradual abolition of extraterritoriality in “Manchoukuo”, and announcement of readiness to enter into agreements with interested governments to safeguard future status of their nationals.
230
July 3 (552) From the Ambassador in China
Review of political, military, economic and financial developments in China during the past six months.
231
July 4 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Conversations with local authorities who had planned to hold the Dollar Steamship Company responsible for refusal to transport by steerage to Shanghai an anti-Japanese delegation of 300 hitherto unheard-of individuals.
236
July 7 (343) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
From Tsinanfu, July 6: Report that Han Fu Chu, Chairman of the Shantung Provincial Government, is sending a representative to entreat Chiang to refrain at all costs from armed conflict with the Southwest.
237
July 10 (353) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Arrival at Peiping of Wang Keh-min, an economic and financial expert strongly endorsed by the Japanese, who hope he will accelerate Sino-Japanese economic cooperation in North China.
237
July 10 (262) From the Consul General at Tientsin to the Ambassador in China
Information that General Chang Hsueh-liang is preparing to adopt an independent course of action in the event of civil war; developments in the North and Southwest.
238
July 11 (222) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Opening session of the Fifth Central Executive and Supervisory Committees; and opinion that rapidly changing Southwest situation may necessitate formulation of a mandate for Chiang’s use in subduing the Southwest rebels.
240
July 12 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Advice of Southwest Political Council’s telegram to the second plenary session urging adoption of the Southwest’s five-point program mentioned in telegrams of June 23 and June 29.
241
July 13 Memorandum by the Counselor of Embassy in the United Kingdom, Temporarily in Washington
Conversation with Cadogan, soon to become an Under Secretary in the British Foreign Office, regarding the Far Eastern situation, during which Cadogan indicated the general lines along which he would advise his Government.
241
July 13 (356) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Statement by Wang Keh-min to U. P. correspondent that Japanese are sincere and reasonable in their aims for economic development and that if Nanking can accept the Japanese suggestions he will return to Peiping to administer economic cooperation.
243
July 13 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Report of numerous defections of military and civil officials indicating a genuine opposition to Chen Chi-tang program.
244
[Page XXV]July 14 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Information regarding activities of Southwestern military leaders in forcing Chen’s acceptance of a revised program.
245
July 14 (225) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Press report of three resolutions passed by the plenary session, including names of appointees to a national defense council.
246
July 15 (226) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Press release of summarized translations of two plenary session speeches made by Chiang.
246
July 18 (228) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Chinese Government’s refusal to permit Japanese commercial planes to operate between Fukuoka and Shanghai.
247
July 18 (229) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information concerning Japanese assistance to Kwangsi, and Government’s hope for Yu’s speedy conquest of Kwangtung.
247
July 18 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Information from a special delegate for Foreign Affairs who indicated that a changeover in leaders has lessened the gravity of the situation.
249
July 19 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Advice of continuing troop movements with Canton outwardly quiet.
250
July 21 (372) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Reports that developments in Sino-Japanese relations in North China seem in abeyance pending the outcome of the situation in the Southwest and return or nonreturn of Wang Keh-min to Peiping.
250
July 22 (375) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Word of appointments to the Hopei–Chahar Political Council.
251
July 24 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
General Yu Han Mou’s arrival and assumption of office as Commander in Chief of the Kwangtung forces and final steps in the abolition of the Southwest Council and Executive Committee.
252
July 27 (234) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice of various National Government appointments and belief that Chiang has outwitted his enemies and that the consolidation of the Government’s authority in the Southwest is assured.
253
July 29 (235) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information of various exchanges of posts and additional appointments.
254
July 29 (100) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to reaffirm informally to the Foreign Office this Government’s continued interest in the North China smuggling situation and to make inquiries regarding the findings of the recent investigation by the Chief of the Eastern Asia Bureau.
254
[Page XXVI]July 29 (610) From the Ambassador in China
Information of Embassy instructions to Consul General at Mukden relative to payment by American nationals of “Manchukuo” taxes which are nondiscriminatory.
255
July 31 (618) From the Ambassador in China
Detailed information pertaining to Japanese penetration in areas of Chahar and Suiyuan Provinces occupied by Mongols, and in areas along the Peiping-Suiyuan Railway under Chinese administration.
255
Aug. 6 (1970) From the Ambassador in Japan
Observations regarding several new indications of a Japanese desire for improved relations with Great Britain, and new factors affecting Anglo-Japanese relations.
261
Aug. 8 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Analysis of political implications of recent developments in connection with Japanese foreign trade.
264
Aug. 10 (399) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Report of several clashes between Chinese provincial forces and unidentified opponents believed to be Chinese malcontents paid by Japanese to test the situation in eastern Suiyuan.
267
Aug. 12 (244) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Attempts of Chiang and other officials of the National Government to consolidate their power in the Southwest.
267
Aug. 17 (169) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Conversation with the Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs who stated that smuggling had decreased to only one-sixth or one-seventh of its former proportions and that the situation was being rapidly alleviated through natural processes.
268
Aug. 21 (410) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information indicating the possibility that the Japanese Ambassador hopes that he can persuade the Japanese military to suspend political activities for a time and can effect some economic agreements which will improve the general Sino-Japanese situation.
269
Aug. 21 (2001) From the Ambassador in Japan
Observations regarding a Japanese Army plan to settle 5,000,000 Japanese emigrants in Manchuria.
270
Aug. 25 (249) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Expression of satisfaction of the Secretary General of the Executive Yuan with the Japanese Ambassador’s announced intentions, including the assurance that he will discuss all pending questions with the National Government rather than with local authorities.
271
Aug. 26 (250) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Oral account of the Chengtu incident from Suma, who believes that the agitation against the reopening of the Consulate General had been deliberately fomented by Nanking Government officials.
272
Aug. 26 Memorandum by the Ambassador in Japan
Conversation with the Foreign Minister regarding Japanese relations with the Soviet Union, China, and the United States.
273
[Page XXVII]Aug. 28 (422) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Comments by a Japanese Embassy official that the Japanese Ambassador’s recent visit to North China increased his understanding of the situation, and that his pending conversation with Chiang will be concerned with a three-point economic program involving railway construction and the development of agriculture and mining.
275
Sept. 1 (427) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information from Kalgan Mission of difficulties in securing permits to continue and enlarge mission work; suggestion to mission that it prepare a list of its activities and properties for transmittal to the Japanese Embassy with a request that Japanese in that area be issued orders to protect Americans there.
276
Sept. 1 (429) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Substantiation of earlier information concerning Japanese control of the Mongols in Inner Mongolia.
277
Sept. 2 (18) From the Consul at Mukden to the Ambassador in China
Report on the present insecure status of American citizens resident in Sinpin.
278
Sept. 4 (215) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions to submit to the Japanese Embassy data mentioned in No. 427 of September 1, indicating that the information is supplied to prevent interference with Americans; but to avoid expressly asking the Japanese Embassy to issue orders to protect American citizens.
280
Sept. 5 (260) From the Second Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice of continuing deadlock in Nanning peace negotiations between Chiang’s representatives and Southwest leaders.
280
Sept. 7 (261) From the Second Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Report from Foreign Office officia that the Southwest impasse has been practically dissolved.
281
Sept. 9 (262) From the Second Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Japanese Embassy’s position that a recent incident at Pakhoi, in which a Japanese was killed by a Chinese mob, is another instance of anti-Japanism which the Chinese Government must immediately take adequate steps to suppress.
281
Sept. 9 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Information of allocation of Japanese Yangtze River forces and of successful curbing of anti-Japanese expressions in Chengtu.
282
Sept. 9 (D. 5038 No. 3303) From the Belgian Ambassador
Transmittal of considerations (text printed) regarding the “Manchoukuo” declaration July 1 concerning the privilege of extraterritoriality in Manchuria.
283
Sept. 10 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Despatch of Japanese gunboat carrying two Canton Japanese Consulate General officials to investigate the Pakhoi incident.
287
Sept. 11 (710) From the Ambassador in China
Observations regarding Anglo-Japanese relations and opinion that Great Britain is not yet ready to compromise with Japan.
288
[Page XXVIII]Sept. 14 (445) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
From Shanghai: Advice of decision reached at conference convened by Japanese Ambassador that, should Nanking Government lack authority to facilitate Japanese investigation of Pakhoi incident, the Japanese authorities on the spot should take appropriate measures.
291
Sept. 14 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Refusal of landing permission to Japanese gunboat at Pakhoi, but landing of Chinese investigating party from Chinese gunboat permitted.
292
Sept. 15 (186) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Vernacular press reports that Pakhoi case is assuming a more serious aspect consequent upon the opposition to the landing of Japanese investigators.
292
Sept. 15 (448) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Wang’s decision against accepting a position in North China and possibility that this action will contribute in some degree to greater autonomy in the North.
293
Sept. 16 (266) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Conference between the Japanese Ambassador and the Foreign Minister concerning the Chengtu incident; and speculation that extraordinary Japanese caution in negotiations regarding the Chengtu and Pakhoi incidents is due to concern lest Japan be involved in a major conflict.
294
Sept. 16 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Return of Chinese gunboat to Canton with investigating party following an unsuccessful attempt to investigate the Pakhoi incident.
295
Sept. 16 (119) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Advice of Japanese representations against anticipated mock trial of the Emperor and an anti-Japanese demonstration at New York; and instructions to inform Foreign Office that there is no legal basis for their prevention, but that precautions are being taken to safeguard persons and property of Japanese nationals against any violence.
296
Sept. 17 (267) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Request by the Japanese Ambassador, under instructions from Tokyo, that the Chinese authorities take prompt measures to enable the Japanese investigators to carry out their mission at Pakhoi.
297
Sept. 17 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Information of departure of three Japanese gunboats, of a nonprovocative meeting of Japanese residents with the Japanese naval and military officers, and of a proclamation quoting instructions from Chiang warning against disturbances.
297
Sept. 17 (187) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Compliance with Department’s instructions in No. 119 of September 16, and hope of the Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs that the story of the mock trial of the Emperor of Japan could be withheld from the Japanese newspapers.
(Footnote: Advice that meeting of September 17 did not include the mock trial.)
298
[Page XXIX]Sept. 17 (188) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Information from the Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs who said that if diplomatic negotiations relative to Chengtu and Pakhoi incidents failed, pressure from the Japanese defense forces might be renewed.
298
Sept. 17 (120) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Secretary’s statement to the press clarifying the policy of perpetuating the doctrine of the Kellogg Pact.
298
Sept. 17 (271) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information that Chiang has ordered Yu Han Mou’s army to Pakhoi which should enable the Japanese investigators to land at that place shortly.
299
Sept. 18 (G–2 Report No. 9462) Report by the Military Attaché in China
Conversation with the Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs of “Manchoukuo” who conveyed the impression that Japan believes a Soviet-Japanese war within five years is inevitable and that the Chinese situation is very secondary by comparison.
299
Sept. 19 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Landing of Japanese patrols for stationing in the Japanese concession following the mortal shooting of a Japanese policeman allegedly by a Chinese noncommissioned officer.
302
Sept. 19 (455) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Clash between Japanese and Chinese troops at Fengtai leading to an apology to Colonel Mutaguchi of the Japanese Embassy Guard by the Chinese general in command.
303
Sept. 22 (190) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Opinion of both a Foreign Office official and the Chinese Counselor of Embassy that Japan will not push matters with China to a critical point at this time.
303
Sept. 22 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Evacuation of Nineteenth Route Army from Pakhoi and information regarding reorganization of Kwangsi forces.
305
Sept. 23 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Arrival of Japanese landing force and conference between the Hupei Governor and the Japanese Consul General, who demanded that the Chinese accept full responsibility for the killing of the Japanese policeman in a Chinese-patrolled area.
305
Sept. 24 (509) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Report on the killing of a Japanese sailor and wounding of two others by Chinese in Hongkew district within the International Settlement; the landing of a Japanese naval party and the posting of patrols in the Hongkew and Chapei areas.
306
Sept. 24 (279) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Negotiations between the Japanese Ambassador and the Foreign Minister in an effort to reconcile Sino-Japanese differences with reference to Japanese objectives and to the recent anti-Japanese incidents.
307
Sept. 24 (511) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Written protest from Mayor Wu to Japanese authorities regarding the posting of Japanese naval units in Chapei area and Japanese request that the Chinese authorities apprehend the perpetrators of the recent shooting.
309
[Page XXX]Sept. 25 (281) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Further information on the conferences between the Foreign Minister and the Japanese Ambassador in which the latter made proposals for fundamental settlement of Sino-Japanese difficulties, with stress on economic cooperation and what would amount to practical alienation of five northern provinces.
310
Sept. 25 (193) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Conservative press opinion that Japan’s fundamental policy with regard to the Chinese situation remains unchanged and report that a Foreign Office official said that if negotiations fail, Japan will take other measures.
311
Sept. 26 (194) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Dissatisfaction of Japanese with Nanking negotiations and Foreign Minister’s urgent suggestion that Chiang Kai-shek return to Nanking for the conferences.
311
Sept. 26 (515) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Further curtailment of Japanese naval landing party activities, and Japanese Counselor of Embassy’s advice that Sino-Japanese negotiations, now at a standstill, would be broken off unless satisfactory instructions are received from Chiang Kai-shek.
312
Sept. 26 (282) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Conversation with a Foreign Office official who outlined the general Sino-Japanese situation giving as his opinion that the mild attitude of the Japanese Foreign Office was inspired by caution rather than by good will.
312
Sept. 26 (465) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Effective customs interference with railway transport of smuggled goods, but no control over profitable motor truck smuggling.
313
Sept. 28 (517) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Information from a press representative that the Japanese Ambassador has presented seven demands to the Nationalist Government in the nature of an ultimatum.
314
Sept. 28 (197) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Reported decision of Japanese military to insist that China be pressed for settlement of the question of an autonomous regime in the five northern provinces.
314
Sept. 28 (520) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Advice that situation in Shanghai is quiet, but tense in the Japanese community, and that there has been an increase in Japanese naval strength in area.
315
Sept. 28 (22) From the Consul at Kobe
Information that an economic mission composed of business leaders and supported by the army has been sent to Manchuria and North China.
315
Sept. 29 (285) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Account of proposals and counterproposals exchanged between the Foreign Minister and the Japanese Ambassador in a conversation on September 23.
316
[Page XXXI]Sept. 29 (470) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice of growing conviction that Japanese are determined to use incidents as leverage for agreement along lines of Hirota’s three points.
317
Sept. 29 (198) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Evidence of a more determined effort by the Foreign Office to solve questions pending with China.
318
Sept. 30 Memorandum by the Assistant Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Interview with Ambassador Grew and the British Chargé who submitted an aide-mémoire informing the Department of the British Government’s plan to approach the Japanese and Chinese Governments in regard to present Sino-Japanese relations.
319
Sept. 30 (125) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Request for comments concerning an Associated Press despatch from Tokyo in regard to the possible resignation of the War Minister and the entire Cabinet following rejection by the Cabinet of extensive administrative reforms advocated by the army and navy.
321
Sept. 30 (126) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Summary of British aide-mémoire of September 30 and instructions to submit opinion regarding arguments which might influence the Japanese attitude, together with the British Ambassador’s views, and to request Ambassador Johnson to cable his suggestions regarding a U. S. approach to Japan and China at this time.
321
Oct. 1 (287) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Opinion that the Foreign Office has delayed replying to Arita’s September 28 press statement in order to secure Chiang’s approval of reply.
322
Oct. 1 (525) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Renewed activity of Japanese forces reportedly in anticipation of a decision in the Nakayama case, rumored concentration of Chinese troops in vicinity of Shanghai and Chinese banks’ transference of funds to foreign banks.
323
Oct. 1 (199) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Belief that administrative reform will have no significant influence on Japanese policy in China and that the Cabinet will not resign.
324
Oct. 1 (200) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Compliance with instructions in No. 126 of September 30 and opinion that informal conversations with Japanese officials will be the desirable approach in view of the British Ambassador’s report of his interview with the Foreign Minister.
324
Oct. 1 (374) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information from the Chinese Ambassadors in France and the United Kingdom respecting the recent Sino-Japanese negotiations, with indication of the Japanese demands, and respecting Chinese hope that the United States will take some step to bring about a détente in Sino-Japanese relations, with mention of intended steps by the British and French.
326
[Page XXXII]Oct. 1 (2061) From the Chargé in Japan
Information on probable Japanese objectives, and evidences that Japan’s policy is to press China just short of outright military coercion.
327
Oct. 2 (527) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Advice of decision satisfactory to the Japanese in the Nakayama case and possibility of relaxation of strong precautionary measures taken by the Japanese.
328
Oct. 2 (471) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Belief that an approach either to the Japanese or to the Chinese Government would serve no useful purpose at this time.
328
Oct. 2 (202) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Japanese protest that press reports of Japanese demands were malicious propaganda and contrary to a Sino-Japanese arrangement not to reveal the contents of the negotiations.
329
Oct. 2 (472) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Increasingly alarming situation aggravated by the provocative and truculent attitude of the Japanese military.
330
Oct. 2 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the Chinese Ambassador, who urged the American Government to take action similar to the British Government at Tokyo in asking the Japanese Government to be conciliatory toward China.
330
Oct. 2 Memorandum by the Assistant Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Statement of U. S. position relative to the Sino-Japanese situation in reply to the French Ambassador’s inquiry as to whether United States planned to approach the Japanese Government.
331
Oct. 2 (127) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to inform the Japanese Government by informal conversation of the solicitous interest of the American Government in the Sino-Japanese situation and to secure comments on the serious developments referred to by the press.
332
Oct. 3 (473) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Rumors of plans for a new committee to dispose of the smuggled goods accumulated in Tientsin and report of movements of smuggled goods from Tientsin to the interior.
333
Oct. 3 (290) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Review by Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs of the discussions between the Japanese Ambassador and the Foreign Minister, and suggestion that United States might follow the British lead in urging moderation on the Japanese Government in the current crisis in Sino-Japanese relations.
333
Oct. 3 (203) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Conversations with the Vice Foreign Minister, who emphasized Japan’s desire for a solution of issues with China by diplomacy; Embassy’s belief that the Japanese Government is still in command of the China situation despite reports to the contrary in the press abroad.
335
[Page XXXIII]Oct. 3 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Chinese preparations for a possible conflict, and shipment of large consignments of silver to places of greater safety.
336
Oct. 3 To the Belgian Ambassador
U. S. attitude with regard to the July 1 declaration of the “Manchoukuo” Minister for Foreign Affairs pertaining to extraterritorial rights enjoyed by foreign nationals.
337
Oct. 4 (204) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Press report of an interview between the Chinese Ambassador and the Foreign Minister who emphasized the importance of the present negotiations for adjusting Sino-Japanese relations and expressed the conviction that Japan’s true intentions would become known when Kawagoe meets Chiang.
338
Oct. 4 (128) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Instructions for Ballentine to read to the Vice Foreign Minister a close paraphrase of a statement (text printed) expressing U. S. gratification that the Japanese Government desires to solve the Sino-Japanese problems by diplomacy.
338
Oct. 5 (293) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Two excerpts (texts printed) from a statement by the Chinese press reflecting the seriousness of the situation and the hope that a rupture in Sino-Japanese relations may be avoided.
(Footnote: Advice that statement was drafted by the Foreign Office and approved by Chiang, but was not issued officially for policy reasons.)
339
Oct. 5 (295) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Arrival of Chiang in Nanking.
340
Oct. 6 (206) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Compliance with instructions in No. 128 of October 4; Foreign Office denial in the press that British or U. S. representations have been made regarding Chinese questions.
340
Oct. 6 (296) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Views of an official of the Executive Yuan regarding Sino-Japanese relations and his hope that the Japanese would moderate their demands realizing that China has been pushed to the last extremity.
341
Oct. 6 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the British Chargé, who read the report of the British Ambassador’s conversation of October 1 with the Japanese Foreign Minister (summary printed) regarding the Sino-Japanese situation, and who said his Government felt “time for concerted action had not yet arrived.”
341
Oct. 7 (65) To the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Suggestions for appropriate oral and confidential response to any question by responsible Chinese officials regarding U. S. attitude toward the Sino-Japanese situation.
343
Oct. 8 (297) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice of interview between Chiang and the Japanese Ambassador; and information from Leighton Stuart, president of Yenching University, who believes that the most prevalent Chinese popular sentiment advocates resistance to Japan, since yielding would be more disastrous than unsuccessful resistance.
345
[Page XXXIV]Oct. 8 (535) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Renewed and heavy exodus of Chinese from Hongkew and Chapei districts.
346
Oct. 9 (491) From the First Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Report that a tax on smuggled kerosene is being collected by a Japanese firm in Tientsin, paid to the Chairman of the Hopei–Chahar Political Council and the kerosene freely distributed in eastern Hopei and Chahar.
346
Oct. 9 (298) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information concerning Japanese Ambassador’s interview with Chiang, who gave assurance that China was willing to settle incidents in accordance with international law and spoke of other outstanding issues; reply to Foreign Minister’s inquiry as to whether U. S. representations on the Sino-Japanese situation had been made at Tokyo.
347
Oct. 9 (492) From the First Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Indications that warlike activities may be renewed on the Chahar-Suiyuan border.
348
Oct. 10 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation With the French Ambassador
Exchange of information regarding developments following informal contacts with the Japanese in an effort to promote a peaceful solution in the Sino-Japanese situation.
349
Oct. 14 (300) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Conversation with Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs, who believes the Japanese military are committed to a program intended to place China under the complete control of Japan.
351
Oct. 15 (778) From the Ambassador in China
Reasons, expressed by the Secretary of the German Embassy in Tokyo, why Japan is not ready for war at this time.
352

Chapter IV: October 16–December 31, 1936

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Oct. 16 (304) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Government plans to move from Nanking if hostilities seem unavoidable.
353
Oct. 16 (2091) From the Chargé in Japan
Observations regarding an improvement in Japanese-Soviet relations.
353
Oct. 17 (248) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Request for summary reports covering recent conversations in Nanking with representative persons, of whatever nationalities, and a detailed estimate of the present Sino-Japanese situation.
356
Oct. 17 (308) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice of expected renewal of negotiations between the Foreign Minister and the Japanese Ambassador, and of opinion of German military adviser that China would accept challenge should Japan attempt decisive campaign in Shanghai-Hangchow-Nanking area.
357
[Page XXXV]Oct. 19 (507) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Compliance with instructions in No. 248 of October 17 and opinion that China is prepared to meet Japanese force with force.
357
Oct. 20 (309) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information from the Vice Foreign Minister that no agreement was reached in Foreign Minister’s exchange of views October 19 with the Japanese Ambassador; evidence of lessened tension in Nanking.
358
Oct. 21 (252) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Request for information in regard to an Associated Press report that Japanese air routes have been established between several North China points and Japan.
359
Oct. 22 (311) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Further discussions between the Japanese Ambassador and the Foreign Minister devoted almost exclusively to the unacceptable Japanese proposal for joint cooperation against the Communist menace.
360
Oct. 22 (510) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information that an air agreement has been signed and that the Huitang Company is being organized to deal with through air traffic.
360
Oct. 23 (312) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Press announcement that Chiang’s journey to Sian October 22 was for the purpose of inspecting bandit suppression activities, but it is rumored that Chiang intends to negotiate terms leading to inclusion of Communist forces in the Chinese Army.
362
Oct. 23 (514) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
From Shanghai: Reported annoyance of Japanese authorities with Chiang’s military dispositions as not consonant with the peaceful settlement suggestions which are being discussed in the Sino-Japanese negotiations.
362
Oct. 23 (511) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
From Nanking: Request for approval to transfer arms and equipment from the U. S. S. Guam to the Embassy for use in a possible emergency of civil disorder and shooting.
363
Oct. 23 (512) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
From Nanking: Request for authorization to speak informally to the Chinese military authorities asking on behalf of American interests involved that purely commercial character of the Chinese National Aviation Corporation be preserved if hostilities begin.
Ambassador’s approval of suggested action.
363
Oct. 24 (255) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Approval of transfer of arms and equipment as requested in No. 511 of October 23, and instructions to take effective precautions against any publicity.
364
Oct. 24 (314) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
War Minister’s insistence that object of Chiang’s journey to Sian was really bandit suppression and report that Chiang has been talking about war with Japan some weeks.
364
[Page XXXVI]Oct. 27 (517) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Report that a life insurance monopoly is shortly to be established in “Manchoukuo,” and recommendation that no action be taken unless the right of coexistence is denied to private companies.
365
Oct. 28 (315) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Office official’s advice that no progress had been made in sixth conference, October 26, between Japanese Ambassador and Foreign Minister; and his fear that no agreement would be possible unless new instructions came from Japan.
366
Oct. 28 (260) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions for action in the event of an actual crisis.
366
Oct. 29 (2107) From the Chargé in Japan
Observations concerning recent developments in the Chinese situation.
367
Oct. 30 (262) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Concurrence with recommendation in No. 517 of October 27.
368
Oct. 30 (523) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Continuation of smuggling and resultant tax loss by the Chinese Government.
368
Oct. 30 (2113) From the Chargé in Japan
Observations relative to a Kuokumin article which indicated that Japan has now abandoned the idea of a political arrangement with Great Britain for cooperation.
369
Oct. 31 (316) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information which was released to the press by the Foreign Office relative to three protests lodged with the Japanese Ambassador.
370
Oct. 31 (524) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Outline of reasoning upon which was based the Ambassador’s approval for informal representations to Chinese military authorities noted in No. 512 of October 23.
371
Nov. 3 (1) From the Consul at Tsinan to the Ambassador in China
Conversation with General Han Fu-chu, who seemed to believe that war is the only solution of the present crisis.
371
Nov. 7 (322) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information regarding a conversation between Chiang Kai-shek and Leighton Stuart, president of Yenching University, relative to Sung’s attitude toward Japanese aggressive plans.
372
Nov. 9 (537) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Appearance in the press of disturbing reports in regard to the Chahar-Suiyuan situation.
373
Nov. 10 (325) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Little hope of agreement in seventh conference scheduled November 10 between the Foreign Minister and the Japanese Ambassador; report that Suma has said that Japan has not receded from any of its proposals and that no importance should be attached to current reports of China’s preparedness to resist Japan by force.
373
[Page XXXVII]Nov. 11 (326) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information from Japanese Embassy that while no specific agreement was reached at the seventh conference, the viewpoints of the two parties were perceptibly closer.
374
Nov. 12 (581) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Cooperation of municipal police and Japanese authorities in investigation of the fatal shooting of a Japanese seaman, allegedly by a Chinese.
374
Nov. 12 (328) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice from press correspondent that Japanese are awaiting full report of the killing of the Japanese seaman and that at the recent conference the Chinese stated that for certain concessions they would consider restricted joint operation against Communists.
375
Nov. 12 (539) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Interference, by Sung’s orders, with functioning of customs preventive service officers just outside Tientsin and reports of smuggling activities at Taku.
375
Nov. 13 (545) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Unconfirmed press report of an attack by pro-“Manchoukuo” forces on the Chahar–Suiyuan border.
376
Nov. 13 (2127) From the Chargé in Japan
Belief of Chinese Counselor of Embassy that a Sino-Japanese war is inevitable. Comments on Japanese public opinion which evinces a calmer and less truculent attitude toward Chinese questions.
377
Nov. 16 (465) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Information regarding rumored alignment of Japan with Italy and the projected Italian recognition of “Manchoukuo” in exchange for Japanese recognition of Ethiopia.
378
Nov. 17 (551) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Confirmation of fighting reported in No. 545 of November 13, and attack by pro-“Manchoukuo” forces north of Taolin.
379
Nov. 18 (556) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice from a member of the Naval Attaché’s staff that press reports of fighting on Suiyuan–Chahar border are highly exaggerated.
379
Nov. 18 (482) From the Consul General at Shanghai
Transmittal of detailed memorandum (excerpt printed) concerning the possible neutralization of Shanghai in the event of a Sino-Japanese conflict.
380
Nov. 20 (563) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information regarding the fighting in the Suiyuan area.
386
Nov. 24 (572) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Fighting by Chahar forces operating from Pailingmiao and Mongol protest against the oppression of Suiyuan.
387
Nov. 25 (574) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Press reports that counterattacks by Suiyuan forces threw back the Chahar irregulars along the Wuchuan–Kuyang front and that the National Government has directed Teh Wong to withdraw from Pailingmiao.
388
[Page XXXVIII]Nov. 25 (570) From the Ambassador in the United Kingdom (tel.)
Conversation with Craigie of the Foreign Office, who doubted that any worthwhile Anglo-Japanese agreement could be concluded.
389
Nov. 25 (2147) From the Chargé in Japan
Summary of conditions which appear to have led to a noticeable decrease in Japanese expressions of belligerency against Soviet Russia and China.
389
Nov. 26 (333) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Evidence of lack of frankness of the Chinese Government regarding obligations it has incurred; and advice of growth of feeling in the Government that it should deny validity of any agreement not concluded by its direct emissaries.
393
Nov. 26 (2160) From the Chargé in Japan
Observations regarding the Soviet Union’s suspension of negotiations with Japan following report of a Germ an-Japanese accord.
394
Nov. 27 (879) From the Ambassador in China
Comments on the expansion of Japanese activities in the everyday life of Peiping.
396
Nov. 28 (577) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information regarding apparent preparations for future eventualities in the Suiyuan area, which has been quiet since the capture of Pailingmiao.
398
Nov. 30 (335) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Promise of German Ambassador to request information, desired by the Foreign Minister, concerning German–Japanese anti-Communist agreement. Advice that Italian Ambassador will call on Foreign Minister in regard to Italo-Japanese agreement relating to recognition of present status of Ethiopia and Manchuria.
399
Nov. 30 (245) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Information regarding the Italo-Japanese agreement negotiations which apparently are not connected with the recently concluded German-Japanese anti-Comintern agreement.
399
Dec. 1 (247) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Italian Ambassador’s disparagement of press emphasis given to recent Italo-Japanese negotiations which followed so closely the conclusion of the German-Japanese agreement; and opinion that the Japanese authorities wish to avoid the implication that a German-Italian-Japanese Fascist bloc is being formed.
400
Dec. 1 (521) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Popular belief that the new Japanese-German agreement is directed solely against Soviet Russia; and opinion that greater Chinese concern will be felt over conclusion of the Japanese-Italian agreement regarding Abyssinia and “Manchoukuo.”
401
Dec. 2 (337) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information from an Executive Yuan official who stated that while still ignorant of the precise content and significance of the German and Italian agreements with Japan, the Chinese Government is again impressed with the fact that China must depend entirely on its own exertion for protection from aggression.
402
[Page XXXIX]Dec. 2 (338) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information from a Foreign Office official that the Chinese Government has made several oral protests to the Japanese Embassy in regard to the alleged Japanese instigated attacks on Suiyuan.
403
Dec. 2 (504) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Official communiqué reporting Japanese Minister’s statement to the Foreign Minister of Japan’s decision to transform its Legation in Addis Ababa to a Consulate General; expectation of Tokyo and Rome communiqués relative to Italian relations with “Manchoukuo.”
403
Dec. 3 (583) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
From Tsingtau: Landing of 800 armed sailors from a Japanese merchant marine to protect Japanese cotton mills which had declared a lockout, and seizure by the landing party of several local officials.
404
Dec. 4 (341) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s oral protest, confirmed by note to Japanese Ambassador, against landing of Japanese sailors at Tsingtau; and his return of a Japanese aide-mémoire recapitulating the previous seven discussions.
404
Dec. 4 (588) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
From Tsingtau: Release of arrested Chinese and belief of authorities that landing action was designed to force out the present local administration.
406
Dec. 4 (286) From the Consul at Harbin to the Ambassador in China
Verification by the Italian Consul of a press report that the Italian Ambassador in Tokyo has been granted permission through the “Manchoukuo” Ambassador to establish a Consulate General in Mukden.
406
Dec. 8 (592) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
From Mukden, December 7: Decision of the “Manchoukuo” Concordia Society to campaign for funds among Japanese and Manchurians to aid the Inner Mongolian volunteer army against bandit Communism, and report of daily arrivals of Japanese wounded evidently from the Suiyuan front.
407
Dec. 8 (254) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Possibilities that the Tsingtau situation has a political rather than defensive background or that it was to demonstrate Japan’s future action should all diplomatic negotiations for the protection of Japanese nationals cease.
407
Dec. 9 (255) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Opinion that Cabinet’s difficulties are mainly due to the failure of the Japanese negotiations with China and not to the recently concluded German-Japanese agreement.
408
Dec. 10 (601) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information regarding movements of Suiyang forces.
409
Dec. 10 (277) From the Ambassador in China
Transmittal of a memorandum (text printed) of a conversation with Suma of the Japanese Embassy, whose observations included a remark that the bad situation in the Pacific and Asia might be stabilized by some very simple agreement between United States and Japan.
410
[Page XL]Dec. 10 (913) From the Ambassador in China
Seizure of smugglers’ trucks by Shantung Provincial authorities.
(Footnote: Release of trucks to Japanese Consul General after his oral assurance that there would be no more smuggling in Shantung by Japanese or Koreans.)
413
Dec. 12 Memorandum by the Ambassador in China
Conversation with the British Ambassador who stated that the Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs had suggested, as his own idea, that the powers issue a joint statement in support of the Kellogg Pact and that he proposed to talk with the American Ambassador about it also.
413
Dec. 13 (349) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Official press report of rebellion by Chang Hsueh Liang and his troops against the Central Government; his detention of Chiang Kai-shek; and his circular telegram advocating le-sistance against Japan, a Chinese treaty with Soviet Russia, and the formation of a democratic government.
414
Dec. 13 (604) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Demonstrations by students who demand an anti-Japanese policy.
415
Dec. 13 (605) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Reported demands by Chang’s troops including war against Japan and the admission of Communists to Kuomintang, and Chang’s personal message to Madame Chiang guaranteeing her husband’s safety.
416
Dec. 13 (606) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Confirmation from Tsingtao Consulate that the strike there has been amicably adjusted; unconfirmed report that part of Japanese landing party has returned to their ships.
416
Dec. 14 (350) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information from Hsu Mo that the Central Government has received assurances of support from Sung and other provincial governors and report that Feng Yu Hsiang has offered himself as hostage for the release of Chiang.
417
Dec. 14 (258) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Information relative to British and Soviet recommendations to China not to overplay its hand but to make certain unessential facesaving concessions to Japan.
418
Dec. 14 (79) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions to call on the Foreign Minister and/or the Acting Chairman of the Executive Yuan and express orally the U. S. solicitude with regard to the safety of Chiang.
419
Dec. 14 (80) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions to make full report of the outstanding facts in the Sianfu situation and of related facts, to maintain close contact with Chinese officialdom and diplomatic colleagues, and to report promptly and continuously any comments or suggestions.
419
Dec. 14 (608) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice that Chinese officials appear to be in a very confused state of mind regarding events in Shensi and are apparently without information except from Nanking.
420
[Page XLI]Dec. 14 (917) From the Ambassador in China
Statement reportedly dictated by the late General Huang Fu covering Sino-Japanese issues and seemingly reflecting the attitude of most enlightened Chinese.
422
Dec. 15 (612) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice of Sung’s adherence to his anti-Communistic policy and to obedience to Nanking Government’s orders.
422
Dec. 15 (352) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Acknowledgment of No. 79 of December 14.
423
Dec. 15 (613) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
From Tsingtau: Withdrawal from cotton mills of Japanese landing party, 300 to their ships, the remainder to billets.
423
Dec. 16 (354) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice that the situation is rendered exceedingly obscure by lack of information from Sian; conversation with Foreign Minister in which the Ambassador conveyed U. S. solicitude for Chiang’s safety.
423
Dec. 16 (615) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Observations relative to the Sian imbroglio, and opinion that negotiations and compromise rather than military operations offer the best prospect for the release of Chiang and solution of the problem.
425
Dec. 16 (616) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Request for instructions in regard to making representations to the Peitaiho Police Chief relative to robberies of American property, and to the East Hopei regime regarding additional taxes levied against the Standard-Vacuum Oil Company.
425
Dec. 16 (2188) From the Ambassador in Japan
Analysis of Soviet-Japanese relations following the Soviet reaction to the German-Japanese agreement and involving Soviet reluctance to sign pending fisheries pact.
426
Dec. 16 (377) From the Consul at Tientsin to the Ambassador in China
Comment on scheme which permits duty-free importation of passenger automobiles and motor trucks for use by the Japanese military.
429
Dec. 17 (355) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Observations regarding military and political situations; following Government announcement of a punitive expedition against Chang Hsueh Liang headed by the Minister of War.
430
Dec. 17 (620) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information regarding the situation along the Suiyuan front and opinion that any effective attack by “irregulars” is improbable in the near future.
431
Dec. 17 (357) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Release of General Chiang Ting Wen, who was among those held in Sian, and his expected arrival in Nanking with a personal letter from Chiang.
432
Dec. 18 (360) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Kung’s expression of appreciation for U. S. concern for Chiang’s safety.
432
[Page XLII]Dec. 18 (536) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Conversation with the Foreign Minister who has sent a personal appeal to Chang for Chiang’s release and who believes that Chang was influenced by the Soviet Union in the capture and detention of Chiang.
432
Dec. 18 (361) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice of conferences relative to Chiang’s safety and of a Government mandate ordering a punitive campaign against Chang, and report that Chiang and all other Government leaders are safe.
433
Dec. 18 (84) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Request for comments on British aide-mémoire inquiring whether American Government would cooperate in a plan for Chiang’s release by assuring Chang of his personal safety.
434
Dec. 18 (291) From the Consul at Harbin to the Ambassador in China
Observations relative to probable reactions of the local Chinese to a Sino-Japanese conflict.
434
Dec. 19 (362) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Arrival at Nanking of letter from Chiang to Ho Ying Chin (text printed) requesting cessation of hostilities and indicating his possible early return.
436
Dec. 19 (363) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Cessation of active hostilities, pending anticipated release, as requested by Chiang in letters to Madame Chiang and Ho Ying Chin; official manifesto giving reasons for punitive expedition against rebels.
437
Dec. 19 (365) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Opinion that Chinese prestige would be enhanced if China can solve the Sian problem alone but suggestion that Embassy be authorized to inform the Foreign Minister that the American and British Governments are prepared to ensure safe departure from China of Chang.
438
Dec. 19 (86) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions regarding extent of U. S. cooperation with the British Government in possible attempt to effect safe conduct of Chang Hsueh-liang and Yang Hu Cheng out of China.
439
Dec. 20 (627) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Eight demands allegedly issued by Chang at Sian on December 12.
440
Dec. 21 (628) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Evidence that Shensi revolt may have been due more to internal than to Japanese or Russian instigation.
441
Dec. 21 (368) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Efforts to effect evacuation of American missionaries and other foreigners from Sian.
442
Dec. 21 (662) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Report that T. V. Soong is endeavoring in a private capacity to secure Chiang’s release and Japanese attitude of watchful waiting toward the outcome of negotiations between the Nanking Government and Sian.
442
[Page XLIII]Dec. 21 (302) To the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Authorization for informal representations regarding Peitaiho robberies and protection of American interests.
(Footnote: Embassy’s report that unmolested shipments have now been made by the Standard-Vacuum Oil Company and no American action need be taken.)
443
Dec. 21 (369) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Holographic letter to Young Marshal from T. V. Soong demanding Chiang’s release and listing of points for such release contained in editorial distributed by plane to Sian forces.
443
Dec. 21 (629) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Indications that the Shensi revolt has served to temporarily suspend student agitation at Peiping and that reorganization of the northwest military is inevitable.
444
Dec. 21 (370) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Explanation to the French Ambassador of the British proposal contemplating safe conduct out of China to Chang Hsueh-liang and Yang Hu Cheng; information from Foreign Minister that Soong was still in Sian.
445
Dec. 22 (371) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Report on return of Soong to Nanking; indication the real power at Sian is Yang Hu Cheng, whose attitude toward Chiang’s release is uncertain.
445
Dec. 22 (372) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
To Peiping: Request that the Military Attaché be advised to go or to send another officer to Loyang to consider what may be done for the safety of American citizens in Shensi.
446
Dec. 23 (633) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Compliance with Nanking’s No. 372 of December 22; and belief that Military Attaché should strongly urge evacuation of Americans from Shensi.
446
Dec. 23 (377) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Report that Kung hopes for some results from private negotiations within next two or three days during which military operations are suspended.
446
Dec. 23 (637) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice of rebel radio attacks on the National Government with prominence given to anti-Japanese sentiment, and mention made of organization of the Northwest National uprising; also advice of recent troop movements.
447
Dec. 24 (379) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice based on press releases regarding Kung’s instructions to provincial and local authorities and conferences between local authorities and the Control Yuan President who is consolidating support of the Government policies in East Shensi.
447
Dec. 24 (638) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Circular telegram issued by Generals Sung Che Yuan and Han Fu Chu suggesting conference of Government leaders and elder statesmen to deal with the Sian trouble.
448
Dec. 25 (380) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Report from Foreign Office that Chiang had reached Loyang safely.
448
[Page XLIV]Dec. 25 (90) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions to express to the Foreign Office U. S. gratification over Chiang’s release.
449
Dec. 26 (381) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Report of arrival of Generalissimo, T. V. Soong, and the Young Marshal, Chang Hsueh-liang.
449
Dec. 28 (641) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Return from Loyang of Military Attaché, who reports belief that the release of Chiang practically ends the Shensi trouble and need for evacuation of Americans therefore unnecessary.
449
Dec. 29 (643) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
From Mukden, December 28: Report that Japanese troops are preparing to resume operations during the first half of January.
449
Dec. 29 (644) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Improved conditions in Shensi area.
450
Dec. 29 (382) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Rejection of Chiang’s resignation from all concurrent offices by the Standing Committee of the Central Executive Committee and relegation of Chang Hsueh-liang to the Military Affairs Committee for appropriate discipline.
450
Dec. 30 (646) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Report by an American newspaper correspondent returned from Loyang that Chiang’s release is generally attributed to acceptance of most of the points set forth in Chang’s circular telegram and that young officers supplanting older men in Chang’s army have undergone intensive political and military training and now dominate Chang.
451
Dec. 30 (2203) From the Ambassador in Japan
Protocol of agreement signed December 28 (text printed) extending for one year the Soviet-Japanese Fishery Treaty of 1928, following Soviet unwillingness to sign a new treaty.
451
Dec. 31 (387) 1937 From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Settlement of the Chengtu and Pakhoi incidents by exchange of notes between Foreign Office and Japanese Embassy.
452
Jan. 12 (975) From the Ambassador in China
Review of developments in China during the last six months, including an official statement (summary printed) giving present position of the Chinese Government relative to subjects which have been under negotiation with Japan.
453
[Page XLV]

CHINA

Problem of China’s Economic Reconstruction and the Attitude of the United States and Other Governments Respecting Financial Assistance to China

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Jan. 3 Memorandum by Mr. Raymond C. Mackay of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Discussion between the Chinese Ambassador and the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs, concerning recent developments in negotiations for postponement of payments due on credits extended to China.
459
Jan. 3 To the Chinese Embassy
Record of observations made to the Chinese Ambassador relative to the Chinese Government’s attitude toward credit payments.
461
Jan. 6 (11) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Information that Leith-Ross, Financial Adviser to the British Embassy in China, has advised the Chinese Government to change its silver coinage standard to the alloy used in Great Britain.
462
Jan. 11 (24) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Surrender of silver to Central Bank by all foreign banks except the Japanese.
462
Feb. 6 (31) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Statement of Suma, First Secretary of the Japanese Embassy, to Leith-Ross that in view of the imminent Sino-Japanese rapprochement it would not be fitting for any other nation to intervene in China’s currency or fiscal matters.
463
Feb. 17 (107) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
From the Ambassador: Request for reply to Financial Minister Kung’s inquiry whether the American Government would receive favorably an application for reinstatement of the uncompleted part of the cotton and wheat loan.
463
Feb. 21 (15) To the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
For the Ambassador: Instructions to inform Kung orally that the American Government would not be prepared to reinstate the canceled portion of the cotton and wheat credit of 1933.
464
Feb. 24 (113) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Press reports that the Central Political Council has approved Kung’s economic policy for China.
464
Feb. 25 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Chinese Ambassador, who submitted Kung’s inquiry regarding the U. S. attitude toward holding in abeyance the payment due March 1 on the Reconstruction Finance Corporation credit.
465
Feb. 27 (120) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Information that K. P. Chen, Shanghai banker, will confer in Washington with the Secretary of the Treasury on behalf of the Finance Minister and that the Chinese expect reinstatement of the cotton and wheat credit during the visit.
466
Mar. 4 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Telephonic conversation with the Chinese Ambassador who stated that Chen’s mission was on the invitation of the Secretary of the Treasury and would include discussions about monetary affairs as well as outstanding credits.
466
[Page XLVI]Mar. 4 (18) To the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Instructions to inform Kung orally and discreetly that Chinese officialdom including Chen should be discouraged from expectation of reinstatement of canceled portions of cotton and wheat credit.
467
Mar. 6 (139) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Compliance with instructions in No. 18 of March 4 and Kung’s apparent disappointment in the U. S. attitude.
(Footnote: Information that Chen and party sailed March 13.)
468
Mar. 26 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Advantages and disadvantages of a dissolution of the China Consortium, with the suggestion that question be discussed with the interested American banking group, giving intimation that breaking up of Consortium would be regretted.
(Footnote: Advice of authorization to discuss the matter with Mr. Lamont of J. P. Morgan & Co. representing the American Group of the China Consortium.)
469
Mar. 31 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Chinese Ambassador who expressed the opinion that the disappearance of the China Consortium at this time would have an upsetting and harmful effect on China’s interests.
472
Apr. 1 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation With Mr. Thomas W. Lamont of New York
Discussion of possible breakup of the China Consortium, the matter of the Hukuang Bonds, and the divergence of views between British and American Groups.
473
Apr. 9 (84) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Arrival of K. P. Chen and party and opening of conversations with Treasury Department officials in regard to “mutual monetary problems.”
475
Apr. 13 Memorandum by the President of the Export-Import Bank of Washington
Conversation with the Chinese Ambassador who presented proposals from his Government for modification in payments due upon loans assigned to the Export-Import Bank by the Farm Credit Administration and by the Reconstruction Finance Corporation.
475
Apr. 17 (211) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Press report of an interview with an officer of the Finance Committee of the Legislative Yuan who advocates an income tax as the main source of revenue during the extraordinary national emergency and report of a statement by Kung that China is on a managed silver standard.
476
Apr. 22 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Extract from conversation between Secretary of the Treasury Morgenthau and Japanese Financial Commissioner Yutaro Tomita, who stated that the Japanese banks had not turned in their silver because the monetary reform in China was not succeeding.
477
[Page XLVII]Apr. 25 (231) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Advice of extension of time limit for exchanging silver for legal tender notes and increasing tendency to surrender silver.
479
Apr. 30 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman, of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs, of a Conversation With the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy
Remark to the Japanese Counselor that U. S. Government is not now in position to give information beyond that given to the press in regard to the negotiations between the Treasury and the group of Chinese officials and bankers.
480
May 14 From the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs to the Secretary of State
Approval of Treasury Department’s proposed arrangements with the Chinese bankers, and suggestion that for political reasons the British and Japanese Governments be taken into confidence as far as practicably possible.
480
May 14 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Chinese representatives’ favorable reception of suggestion that before making official announcement the Chinese Government inform the British and Japanese of arrangements just made with the Treasury Department.
481
May 18 (270) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Press release by Kung outlining supplementary measures of monetary reform.
481
May 19 (120) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Press statement by Morgenthau, May 18 (text printed), announcing completion of the Chinese mission for the improvement of internal stability of national currency and the achievement of greater international stability.
482
May 20 (121) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions for embassies and consulates to submit reports covering reactions in their respective areas to the monetary reform measures and explanatory statements recently issued.
(Footnote: Information of varying reactions.)
483
May 20 (277) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Chinese expression of concern that the Nanking Government has no control over the silver accumulation in Canton and that Japan may mint and smuggle in coins similar to Chinese subsidiary silver coins.
483
May 23 (154) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Favorable and optimistic local reaction to Kung’s announcement relative to monetary reform.
484
May 23 (254) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice that there has been little reaction in Peiping to the monetary reforms, but that opinion in banking circles is that Kung’s statement of May 18 is confusing and disturbing.
484
May 23 (125) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions to summarize any press comment in regard to measures for monetary reform and statements of May 18.
485
[Page XLVIII]May 24 (255) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice that there has been no press comment on monetary reforms or on the statements of May 18.
485
May 25 (156) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Formal note from the Foreign Minister constituting authorization for the Chinese Ambassador to sign an agreement negotiated with the Export-Import Bank for the revision of the schedule of flood relief and cotton and wheat loan payments.
486
June 5 (154) To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Instructions to submit available information in regard to the currency situation in South China and the financial and monetary aspects of conference held at Canton between the Nanking delegation and Southwest leaders.
486
June 8 (316) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Report of meager information available relative to request in No. 154 of June 5.
487
June 8 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Reports of confused situation resulting from lack of progress in negotiations between Nanking and local authorities for the adoption of the national currency program.
487
June 9 (320) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Information regarding Canton’s request for Government help in currency reform.
488
June 12 (309) From the Chargé in the United Kingdom (tel.)
Announcement by the Chinese Minister of Railways that a loan for the completion of the Shanghai-Hangchow-Ningpo Railway will shortly be floated with the aid of a syndicate of British and Chinese corporations.
488
June 20 Press Release Issued by the Export-Import Bank of Washington
Announcement of consolidation of credits made available to the Chinese Government to finance purchase of American cotton, wheat and flour.
489
Undated [Rec’d June 25] From the British Embassy
Press statement issued by Leith-Ross on leaving China giving an outline of his impressions concerning the financial and economic difficulties of China.
490
July 9 (571) From the Ambassador in China
Conversation with the Japanese Counselor of Embassy who implied that the Japanese had served notice upon England through Leith-Ross that Western Powers would lend money to China at present at their own peril and at the further risk of Japan’s displeasure.
495
July 21 (160) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Press report of a Sino-American agreement allegedly negotiated in United States by Chen and providing American credit to China to finance the purchase of munitions.
495
July 21 (96) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Information that American assistance in unification of Chinese currency and revenues consisted of advice only and press account reported in No. 160 of July 21 was apparently planted for political purposes.
496
[Page XLIX]July 21 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation With Mr. William P. Hunt
Observations relative to a projected transaction involving a loan to China for the purchase of cotton to resell to Germany, broached by Hunt, allegedly acting for China.
(Footnote: Economic Adviser’s concurrence with Secretary’s disapproval of project.)
496
July 29 From the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs to the Secretary of State
Suggestion that the Secretary of the Treasury be asked for texts of any agreements that may have been signed by him and the Chinese Finance Minister.
(Footnote: No record of action found in Department files.)
499
July 30 (419) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Rumors that China seeks loan for economic development from Great Britain, France, Belgium and Japan and that Japanese press is extending feelers for revival of Anglo-Japanese friendship.
499
Aug. 26 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with Mr. Hunt relative to his cotton credit project.
(Footnote: Memorandum of October 28 initialed by the Secretary of State specified that under existing conditions the American Government should not extend to the Chinese credits of the nature indicated above.)
500
Oct. 14 (375) To the Ambassador in the United Kingdom (tel.)
Request for available information regarding a London press statement relative to a British Treasury agreement to grant Government credits to China.
501
Oct. 17 (247) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions to telegraph information available relative to a reported British loan to China.
501
Oct. 20 (310) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Office statement that reports of British loan or export credit are premature.
502
Dec. 29 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Telephone conversation with Mr. Lamont regarding an alternative to the British proposal to rescind a resolution relating to the China Consortium agreement.
502

Measures Taken by the United States for the Protection of American Lives and Property in China

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Jan. 29 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Confirmation of press reports regarding heavy fighting, with the Communist objective believed to be a juncture with Communist forces in Szechuan, and further warnings to American missionaries in the area.
503
[Page L]Feb. 4 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Flight of missionaries to Szechuan and indications that the Kweiyang Garrison has successfully repulsed the Communists and that Kwangsi forces are still holding.
504
Feb. 10 (57) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
From Yunnanfu: Advance of Red Army and concern for safety of two Americans at Chaotung who have not heeded warning to evacuate.
504
Feb. 17 (34) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information to Yunnanfu regarding Foreign Office instructions to local authorities to afford protection to Americans at Chaotung and to any others in places of danger, and word from Yunnan Provincial Government that the Communists are still in western Kweichow.
505
Feb. 17 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Assurance that all Americans in Kweichow Province have been evacuated to places of safety.
505
Mar. 4 (110) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Measures taken to protect Americans in areas affected by incursion of Communist troops, and reports from Taiyuan that a counterattack is being launched following a severe reverse at the hands of Communists.
505
Mar. 4 (111) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information regarding fighting near Fenchow and a list of Americans remaining in the city.
506
Mar. 7 (120) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
From Hankow: Dispatch of U. S. S. Tutuila to investigate reported Communist threat to American missionaries in Hwangshihkong.
507
Mar. 10 (123) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Military Attachés opinion that Fenchow will not be occupied and that Communist activity in Shansi has no direct relation to Sino-Japanese affairs.
507
Mar. 11 (124) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
From Hankow, March 10: Report that Hwangshihkong situation has cleared and that the Tutuila has returned to Hankow.
508
Mar. 18 (Cir. 26) From the Ambassador in China to the American Consular Officers in China
Instructions for guidance in incidents involving relations between the American Government and another government and in cases involving an infraction of personal or property rights of foreigners in which American citizens are in any way concerned.
508
Mar. 19 (165) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Information from China Inland Mission relative to a Shansi telegram which reported unexpected arrival of Communists at Hwochow-Chaoecheng and the presence of Hungtung missionaries in the city.
509
[Page LI]Mar. 20 (58) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice that Foreign Office has been requested to see that adequate protection is accorded Americans at Hungtung.
509
Mar. 21 (170) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Report that Hungtung communications have been cut and that British missionaries at Linfen have requested evacuation by airplane.
509
Mar. 22 (144) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
List of missionaries who have arrived from Taiku and names of those still at their posts or en route.
510
Mar. 23 (145) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Further missionary arrivals.
510
Mar. 24 (62) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Efforts to rescue the Thomas family at Hungtung, including request to Foreign Office that troops be sent.
510
Mar. 24 (63) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice from the Foreign Office that instructions have been issued to military forces in the Hungtung area to take special measures for the protection of foreign residents.
511
Mar. 24 From the Consul General at Tientsin (tel.)
Telegram from Fenyang (text printed) stating that the six missionaries there are not in danger.
511
Mar. 26 (64) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Word from Shansi Provincial Government that the reported capture of Hungtung by Communists was without foundation, and assurance from Foreign Office that the Government is doing its utmost to safeguard foreign lives.
512
Mar. 27 (66) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Office communiqué which attributed reports of the fall of Hungtung and Linfen as due to the temporary suspension of railway service occasioned by heavy demand on its rolling stock.
513
Mar. 30 (71) From the Second Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice that Foreign Office will attempt to obtain information relative to the safety of Americans at Hungtung.
514
Mar. 31 (73) From the Second Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information regarding Government troop activities and further evacuation of missionaries.
514
Apr. 1 (158) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information from the British Military Attaché just returned from Taiyuan, regarding the military situation.
515
Apr. 3 (78) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Report from Foreign Office that missionaries in Hungtung and Linfen are safe, and expectation that Government troops will shortly occupy both places.
515
Apr. 9 (86) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice that the sieges of Hungtung and Linfen have been raised and that protection is being afforded the missionaries there.
516
[Page LII]Apr. 9 (186) From the Vice Consul at Yunnanfu
Belief that Yunnanfu is in no danger and word of safe evacuation of American residents from exposed outlying areas.
516
May 20 (467) From the Ambassador in China
Embassy’s explanation of spheres of responsibility of the Consulates and the Navy for the protection of American citizens in connection with the question of Americans at Foochow.
516
June 11 (299) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
From Hankow, June 10: Confirmation from Pingliang of Red movement westward and warning to all Americans known to be in or en route to Kansu or Chinghai.
518
June 12 From, the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
Advice that U. S. S. Monocacy will leave Hankow for Changsha June 13.
518
June 16 From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
Report from U. S. S. Monocacy at Changsha to the Yangtze Patrol Commander regarding evacuation plan for American nationals in Changsha, and advice of warning to certain Missions.
519
June 17 From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
Information concerning generally quiet situation in area.
519
June 17 (523) From the Ambassador in China
Defense plan for Foochow including an evacuation and concentration plan worked out by the Consulate and now on record with the naval authorities.
520
June 26 (84) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Press release issued June 25 regarding certain acts of Japanese military personnel in Peiping.
(Footnote: List of acts concerning which the American Embassy in Peiping has made representations to the Japanese Embassy.)
520
July 1 (86) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Press release issued June 30 reporting a satisfactory reply from the Japanese Embassy in Peiping to the memoranda submitted by the American Embassy there relative to incidents involving Japanese military personnel and American citizens and premises.
521
July 4 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Information concerning conditions in Kwangsi.
521
July 6 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Increasingly serious situation in Kwangsi, advice to Americans to evacuate, and request for U. S. S. Mindanao to be sent to Wuchow.
522
Aug. 1 (386) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
From Canton, July 31: Confirmation from Wuchow that Kwangsi military experts are preparing a provisional defense while withdrawing the principal base up river and advice that the U. S. S. Mindanao left Canton for Wuchow this morning.
523
[Page LIII]Aug. 6 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Information regarding Americans still remaining in Kwangsi and progress of the Central Government in overcoming Kwangsi intransigeance.
523
Aug. 12 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Advice of warning sent to all American missionaries known to be in Kansu area threatened by Communists who may converge there.
524
Sept. 5 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Information regarding Communist movements in Kansu and the evacuation of Americans in the affected area.
524
Nov. 12 (540) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
From Nanking, November 11: Note from Foreign Office (text printed) requesting that all foreign residents be withdrawn from certain provinces where a bandit suppression campaign is now in progress.
524
Nov. 19 (558) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Report from Tientsin that notice contained in No. 540 of Nov. 12 has been communicated to Americans, and advice of withdrawal of several Americans from Suiyuan.
525
Nov. 20 (350) From the Consul at Tientsin to the Ambassador in China
Advice of compliance with the request of the Chinese Foreign Office for the withdrawal of Americans.
525
Dec. 16 (618) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice of efforts to ascertain the situation of American citizens in Sian and vicinity.
526
Dec. 20 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Reports of safety of Americans at Sian, Pingliang and Tsingning.
527
Dec. 22 (630) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
To Hankow: Advice of request (text printed) sent to the Kansu Provincial Government asking protection and evacuation facilities for American citizens, and instructions to advise Americans in Kansu and Chinghai to evacuate.
527
Dec. 22 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Hope that Embassy will reenforce request concerning information of and protection for Americans in Kansu.
527
Dec. 23 (374) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice that urgent attention is being given to matter of safety of Americans, and request for information and helpful suggestions.
528
Dec. 23 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
No word from Sian or Kansu since the coup, and advice to Americans in Kansu and Chinghai to evacuate.
529
Dec. 23 (378) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information from Sian that Americans are safe.
529
Dec. 25 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
From Lanchow, December 20: Safety of all foreigners in Lanchow.
529
[Page LIV]Dec. 26 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Advice that the news of Chiang’s release has been received with joy and relief and that Kansu is quiet, with all Americans at Lanchow and other points safe.
530
Dec. 28 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Further advice of continuing quiet and an easing of the situation.
530
Dec. 31 From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Disturbance in area west of Sian, and evacuation of American missionaries to Nancheng, southwestern Shensi.
531

Opposition of the Department of State to Proposed Withdrawal of American Army Forces From North China; Retention of American Embassy in Peiping

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Feb. 7 To the Secretary of War
Views in substantiation of the Department’s opinion that American garrison should not be withdrawn from Tientsin.
531
Feb. 21 To the Ambassador in China
Concurrence with opinion expressed by General Kilbourne to the effect that Protocol Forces should be maintained in North China.
534
Mar. 19 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Summary of bases of conclusions reached by officers of the Division against moving the American Embassy from Peiping or withdrawing American armed forces from Peiping and Tientsin.
535
Mar. 30 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Reasons for retaining the Embassy at Peiping and U. S. armed forces at Peiping and Tientsin.
537
Apr. 13 Memorandum by the Ambassador in China of a Conversation With the Commanding Officer of the United States Army Troops in China
Discussion of advisability of retaining summer camp of Tientsin regiment at Chingwantao; Ambassador’s opinion that the camp should not be discontinued.
540
Apr. 14 Memorandum by President Roosevelt to the Secretary of State
Suggestion that the subject of moving the American Embassy to Nanking be discussed with the Chinese Ambassador.
541
May 15 From the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs to the Secretary of State
Chinese Ambassador’s confidential admission that Chinese officialdom would prefer that U. S. Mission remain at Peiping and U. S. armed forces in North China.
541
June 30 (329) From the Chargé in the United Kingdom (tel.)
Plan for removal of the British Embassy to Nanking announced in the House of Commons by the Under Secretary for Foreign Affairs.
543
July 2 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the British Ambassador regarding removal of Embassies from Peiping to Nanking.
543
[Page LV]July 6 (565) From the Ambassador in China
Observations relative to the acquisition of an Embassy site in Nanking.
544
July 24 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the British Ambassador, who stated that the removal of the British Embassy from Peiping to Nanking would not take place in the near future.
546
Aug. 3 Memorandum by the Counselor of Embassy in China, Temporarity in Washington
Discussion with the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs and General Embick, in which the Counselor’s views relative to the need for keeping the 15th Infantry in Tientsin were presented, and the relative importance of U. S. and British interests in the Far East considered.
546
Aug. 22 (204) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Denial of a press report that “the great powers are quietly preparing to abandon Peiping”, and instructions to discourage inferences of broader significance in Ambassador’s entry into residence at Nanking.
549
Aug. 25 (415) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information regarding movement of certain Embassies from Peiping to Nanking.
550
Aug. 28 (209) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Clarification of Department’s conception of the Peiping and Nanking establishments and the question of the seat of residence in relation thereto.
551
Aug. 28 (210) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions relative to rereading previous communications concerning the Embassy location.
552
Sept. 11 (704) From the Ambassador in China
Compliance with instructions in No. 204 of August 22, and information regarding the British Government’s intention to retain Embassy status in Peiping.
553

Attitude of the Department of State on the Export to China of Arms or Munitions, Including Military Aircraft

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Jan. 27 (85) To the Ambassador in China
Request for information regarding reported unavailability of the Yunnan Railway facilities for the shipment to China of American aircraft and accessories.
553
Jan. 31 (31) From the British Ambassador
British unwillingness to concur with U. S. suggestion of August 1, 1935, for bilateral action for control of aircraft export to China.
554
Feb. 6 (32) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Finance Minister’s protest regarding publicity given to China’s purchase of munitions in the United States.
555
[Page LVI]Feb. 10 (12) To the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Information to be communicated orally to the Finance Minister with reference to publication of figures covering U. S. shipments of munitions to China.
556
Feb. 10 To the British Ambassador
Discussion of desirability of a bilateral procedure in respect to the export of aircraft to China.
557
Apr. 22 Memorandum by the Chief of the Office of Arms and Munitions Control
Discussion with Chinese Ambassador of discriminatory effect of Chinese procedures on American aircraft exporters, and Ambassador’s intimation that difficulties complained of would be remedied if the United States would cease to publish export statements. Suggestion by telephone to Rogers, president of the Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce, that he discuss matter with Finance Minister Kung.
558
May 5 Memorandum by the Assistant Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Advice from the Chinese Ambassador that in reply to his inquiry the Chinese Foreign Office had secured assurance from the Aviation Commission that there was no discrimination against American exporters or American products.
560
June 24 To the British Ambassador
Suggestions for cooperation in obtaining practical uniformity of procedure by all the governments concerned in the matter of exportation of arms to China.
560
July 8 Memorandum by the Assistant Chief of the Office of Arms and Munitions Control
Conversation with the First Secretary of the Chinese Embassy, who expressed the belief that while the contemplated change to quarterly export statistical publication would be highly agreeable to his Government, a complete cessation of publication would be even more agreeable.
562
July 23 (224) To the Ambassador in China
Request for views of Ambassador and Consul General at Shanghai on Chinese Ambassador’s attitude toward regulations governing export of arms and munitions to the International Settlement at Shanghai, and on procedures used by the British and French.
562
Aug. 18 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Arms and Munitions Control
Telephone conversation with the Chinese Ambassador, who expressed regret that the U. S. monthly export statistics must continue to be published but recognized the fact that discontinuation at this time might be misinterpreted with relation to shipments to Spain.
(Footnote: Further Chinese request, October 23, for cessation of publication of license statistics and Department’s adherence to issuance of monthly summaries.)
563
Sept. 14 To the British Chargé
Inquiry as to whether the British Government desires to take action to counteract the unsatisfactory regulations of certain governments in their munitions exports to China.
(Footnote: Information that although no reply, other than an acknowledgment, was received, negotiations on the general subject continued in 1937.)
564
[Page LVII]Jan. 14 (172) From the Ambassador in China
Transmittal of certain Chinese provisional regulations for the control of the purchase of narcotics; and information of instructions to the Foochow Consulate to advise Americans to give general adherence to the general administrative provisions, but not to admit right of Chinese to restrict supplies of narcotics in certain cases involving Americans.
565
Jan. 29 (19) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions to submit comments on the revised regulations governing the import of narcotics into China.
566
Feb. 1 (115) From the Consul General at Shanghai to the Ambassador in China
Transmittal of material relative to the revised narcotics regulations.
567
Feb. 18 (69) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Inauguration of Peiping–Tientsin opium inspectorate, which will supersede similar organs in the area, with no apparent object other than an increase in revenue.
568
Feb. 20 (40) To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Inquiry regarding current narcotic law application in Chinese Courts in the International Settlement and French Concession.
568
Feb. 25 (115) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Reply to No. 40 of February 20, indicating application of new laws over the objection of the Shanghai Municipal Council and the French authorities.
568
Feb. 28 (272) From the Ambassador in China
Further information regarding new regulations governing importation of narcotics into China.
569
Mar. 11 (299) From the Ambassador in China
Indications that American interests in China are little concerned by the new narcotic regulations except as regards the monopolistic features thereof, and recommendation that American citizens in China be directed to conform.
570
Apr. 2 (166) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Press reports regarding the institution of the proposed monopoly control in China.
572
Apr. 10 (89) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Approval of recommendation contained in No. 299 of March 11, with understanding that exclusive jurisdiction over American nationals in China must be retained by American authorities.
573

Efforts for the Consideration of American Claims Outstanding Against China

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Jan. 21 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation with the Chinese Ambassador
Discussion concerning procedure in relation to the Chicago Bank Loan and other obligations.
574
Jan. 21 (73) From the Ambassador in China
Finance Minister Kung’s proposals for liquidation of British and American loans now in default.
575
[Page LVIII]Jan. 30 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Chinese Ambassador, who reported the Finance Minister’s decision that the Chinese Government could not adopt the plan proposed for handling the Chicago Bank Loan payment but must adhere to arrangements similar to those adopted for other outstanding obligations.
576
Mar. 5 (110) From the Ambassador in China
Efforts to secure for Ault and Wiborg Co. a settlement of outstanding indebtedness incurred by the Chinese Bureau of Engraving and Printing at Peiping.
(Footnote: Information that Chinese Ambassador on October 5, 1937, reported that the Bureau was unable then to take up matter of payment.)
577
Mar. 7 (52) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Request for additional information regarding a commission, appointed by the National Government and headed by the Finance Minister, for the readjustment of domestic and foreign loans.
579
Mar. 7 (113) From the Ambassador in China
Discussion of the Chinese attitude against setting up a Sino-American Claims Commission.
579
Mar. 12 (127) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
List of persons designated by the Chinese Government as members of the reorganized commission mentioned in No. 52 of March 7, which was repeated to Nanking.
582
Mar. 14 (54) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Advice of reorganized loan committee’s intention to work on plans to meet bond issue debts and not on China’s entire indebtedness.
582
Apr. 1 (54) Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation With Mr. Thomas W. Lamont, of New York
Discussion concerning the Hukuang loan and possible procedures by the American and British Groups in the Consortium.
583
Apr. 5 (115) To the Ambassador in the United Kingdom (tel.)
Instructions to confer with the Foreign Office on views of American group regarding the separate negotiations of the British Group with the Chinese Government for settlement of both the Tientsin-Pukow and Hukuang loans on the same basis.
584
Apr. 7 (186) From the Ambassador in the United Kingdom (tel.)
Discussion of the loan matter with Foreign Office officials, who promised to endeavor to reply soon.
586
Apr. 9 Memorandum by Mr. Raymond C. Mackay of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation With the Chinese Ambassador
Chinese Ambassador’s informal presentation of certain recent developments in connection with the Chicago Bank Loan and his intention to discuss directly with the Export-Import Bank both the Chicago Bank Loan and the wheat and cotton credits of 1931 and 1933.
587
[Page LIX]Apr. 11 (123) To the Ambassador in the United Kingdom (tel.)
Information to be conveyed orally to the proper British officials concerning the proposed settlement of both Tientsin–Pukow and Hukuang loans.
588
Apr. 11 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Cabled information that prominent Shanghai Chinese believe liquidation of claims of material American creditors would be greatly facilitated if the American Government should express interest at this time and designate Mr. Forbes, previously head of Far East economic mission, as an executive of the Export-Import Bank.
589
Apr. 16 (209) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Information relative to efforts of the Chinese Government to service various loans and to reorganize the Central Bank of China along the lines of the Federal Reserve Bank.
589
Apr. 18 (212) From the Ambassador in the United Kingdom (tel.)
Informal communication of Department’s views to British official in accordance with instructions in No. 123 of April 11, and advice that Leith-Ross served merely as adviser in the loan negotiations.
590
Apr. 22 (111) To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Acknowledgment of information contained in No. 209 of April 16 and comments to be relayed orally to the informant.
590
May 1 (239) From the Ambassador in the United Kingdom (tel.)
Unwillingness of British Treasury to assume responsibility for making any suggestions to British bondholders regarding settlement of Tientsin–Pukow and Hukuang loans.
591
May 5 (245) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Compliance with instructions in No. 111 of April 22.
591
May 12 Memorandum by the Third Secretary of Embassy in China
Conversation with the Commercial Secretary of the British Embassy, who said that he understood it was the American banks’ refusal to agree to the settlement offered by the Chinese Government which was at present holding up the successful conclusion of the negotiations in regard to the Hukuang loan.
592
May 19 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation With the Vice President of the Continental Illinois National Bank and Trust Company
Report by Mr. Abbott that due to dissatisfaction with the offer made by the Chinese Government for an adjustment of the Chicago Bank Loan contract, the matter will be taken up by the Foreign Bondholders Protective Council.
593
June 26 (161) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information regarding proposed cooperation of the British Committee in an effort to obtain for holders of Hukuang bonds terms which are at least equal to those offered in connection with the Tientsin–Pukow loan.
593
July 16 (578) From the Ambassador in China
Conversation with the Adviser to the Chinese Minister of Finance, who regretted the misunderstanding regarding the Hukuang Loan Agreement which he stated had the same provision as that in the Tientsin–Pukow Railway agreement for a contingent lien upon the Customs revenues.
594
[Page LX]Aug. 24 (246) To the Ambassador in China
Opinion that in view of improved financial condition of the Peiping–Hankow Railway the monthly payments to creditors should be increased; and discretionary instructions to press the matter.
(Footnote: Ambassador’s report that policy recommended above has been pursued for the last year.)
594
Sept. 5 (252) To the Ambassador in China
Advice of reported Chinese settlements with British and Japanese holders of the Russian issue of Chinese Loan of 1913; discretionary instructions to approach authorities to obtain terms no less favorable for American holders of the issue.
595
Sept. 15 (223) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions to arrange an early interview with the Finance Minister to present orally the American Government’s hope that the Chinese Government will give sympathetic consideration to the Foreign Bondholders Protective Council’s new proposals for equitable settlement terms for the Chicago Bank Loan.
596
Sept. 17 (269) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Assurance from the Finance Minister that careful consideration would be given the new proposals for settlement of the Chicago Bank Loan.
597
Oct. 4 (477) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information relative to negotiations for the adjustment of loans and the reorganization of the Salt Administration.
598
Nov. 6 (840) From the Ambassador in China
Compliance with instructions in No. 252 of September 5.
599
Dec. 1 (74) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Authorization to cooperate informally with colleagues, but to take no lead, in endeavoring to persuade the Chinese Government to retain foreign participation in the administration of the Salt Gabelle.
(Footnote: Assurance from Vice Foreign Minister, following British and U. S. informal representations, that nothing would be done to impair Salt Administration efficiency.)
600

Representations by the United States Against the Establishment of Monopolies in China

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Jan. 27 (190) From the Ambassador in China
Information concerning the proposed match monopoly and intention, in line with treaty provisions, to withhold support from an American company in its effort to obtain favorable concessions from the monopoly group.
600
Feb. 27 (103) From the Ambassador in China
Comments relative to the slight British financial interest involved in the proposed match monopoly and a request for advice regarding the extent to which opposition to the monopoly should be continued.
602
[Page LXI]Mar. 28 (67) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Concurrence with expressed intention to take no further step relative to the match monopoly unless necessary for emphasis of the American Government’s opposition to monopolies.
603
May 19 (250) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
From Shanghai: Report of a proposal for a Chinese Government tobacco leaf monopoly which if adopted would vitally affect American leaf trade.
603
May 22 (124) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions to initiate thorough investigation and to approach the appropriate Chinese authorities regarding the proposed tobacco leaf monopoly and the reported intention of the Chinese Government to increase duties applicable to imported leaf tobacco; also to discuss the matter with British colleague.
604
May 27 (144) To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Instructions to repeat certain reports, relative to a proposed vegetable oil refinery, to Peiping and Nanking; also to indicate Department’s desire that thorough investigation be initiated and appropriate steps taken to safeguard American interests.
605
June 2 (274) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
From Nanking, May 28: Confirmation of Chinese Government’s plan for leaf tobacco monopoly and proposal to raise the import duty on leaf tobacco. Advice of Embassy’s written protest and British Embassy’s informal oral representations against the monopoly.
605
June 10 (296) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Observations concerning the proposed vegetable oil monopoly; and opinion that the Chinese Government has embarked on a policy of controlling production and sale of a number of important commodities in an attempt to benefit the industries and develop attractive revenues for the Government.
606
June 18 (309) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Reports from the Consuls General at Nanking and Hankow to the effect that the Chinese Government actually contemplates monopoly control of the wood oil business; and intention of Embassy to file written protest against the monopoly similar to the protest against the tobacco leaf monopoly.
608
June 24 (157) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Approval of written protest to Chinese Government regarding the proposed wood oil monopoly, and suggestion that colleagues concerned may wish to lodge similar formal protest.
609
July 1 (560) From the Ambassador in China
Report concerning various conversations between Foreign Ministry officials and Consuls General in an effort to effect a substantial modification of the vegetable oil monopoly scheme.
609
July 16 (585) From the Ambassador in China
Rumors of the Government’s tungsten monopoly; and evidence that the Commercial Attaché at Shanghai has been assisting one of the monopoly organizations to make contacts in the United States.
(Footnote: Department’s approval of Embassy’s letter to the Commercial Attaché regarding his assistance to a monopoly organization, and instructions to request that he refrain from further activity.)
610
[Page LXII]Aug. 20 (659) From the Ambassador in China
Foreign Office note, July 25, containing assurance that no restrictions will be imposed upon legitimate commerce in tung oil and other oil products. Embassy’s instructions to Peck, Counselor of Embassy, to obtain a detailed interpretation of the scheme before making further formal communications to the Foreign Office.
612
Sept. 4 (692) From the Ambassador in China
Failure of Peck, in a conversation with an Executive Yuan official, to secure assurances desired by tung oil merchants; and advice of new note to the Foreign Office.
613
Sept. 9 (216) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions to investigate and take appropriate steps in the matter of a proposal, reportedly sanctioned by the Finance Minister, for the formation of a semi-official company for the purchase and sale of leaf tobacco crops.
615
Sept. 12 (443) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice of transmittal of No. 216 of September 9 to Shanghai and of instructions to Nanking (texts printed) regarding action relative to the monopoly project.
615
Sept. 17 (268) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Conversation with the Finance Minister, who confirmed the plan for organizing a semi-official tobacco crop company.
616
Sept. 20 (457) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information from Shanghai regarding proposed semi-official leaf tobacco company, report of British and Japanese opposition, and opinion that the Embassy should take action against any monopolistic features of the proposed organization.
617
Sept. 25 (463) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Difficulties of an American leaf tobacco company in attempts to purchase leaf tobacco at Hsuchang, Honan; and instructions to Nanking to call this interference to the attention of the Foreign Office, requesting cessation of such discrimination.
619
Sept. 25 (464) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice that Japanese at Nanking delivered a verbal protest against the proposed leaf tobacco monopoly.
620
Oct. 7 (763) From the Ambassador in China
Advice of instructions to Peck to bring to the attention of the Chinese authorities the granting of exclusive rights to a Chinese tobacco company to manufacture mentholated and anisated cigarettes.
621
Oct. 12 (495) From the First Secretary of Embassy in China (tel.)
Foreign Office instructions to the Honan Provincial Government to permit American merchants to purchase leaf tobacco, and semi-official assurance from the Director of the Political Department of the Executive Yuan that the project for a leaf tobacco monopoly in Honan Province has been dropped.
622
Oct. 24 (513) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Continuing obstructions to American leaf tobacco business at Hsuchang despite assurances to contrary; and protests to Honan Provincial authorities.
622
[Page LXIII]Oct. 30 Memorandum by Mr. Myrl S. Myers of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Discussion between a Department official and a New York representative of two match companies owned by Swedish Match Company, who stated that while American match companies in China had had no difficulty in securing chemical import permits, they may be refused such permits in the future due to tax stamp and permit control by the Chinese Match Sales Union.
623
Nov. 4 (529) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Efforts to obtain purchasing privileges for the Lienwha Leaf Tobacco Company at Hsuchang and the detailing of a consular representative to secure treaty rights.
(Footnote: Report of successful interview between the consular representative and the Hsuchang magistrate.)
624
Nov. 28 (890) From the Ambassador in China
Note from the Foreign Office denying the validity of Embassy’s arguments against the establishment of the leaf tobacco monopoly organization.
626
Dec. 30 (946) From the Ambassador in China
Note from the Foreign Office stating that no restrictions have been imposed upon the legitimate trade of American citizens, and Embassy’s opinion that nothing further need be done until there is actual evidence of restraints upon American firms engaged in the vegetable oil business.
626
Jan. 4 (953) From the Ambassador in China
Discussion of Chinese reply to protest against the Chinese grant of exclusive patent rights to a Chinese corporation to manufacture mentholated and anisated cigarettes.
627

Rejection by the United States of Application of Chinese Income Tax to American Citizens

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Aug. 11 (401) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Observations regarding recently promulgated Chinese provisional income tax regulations, and opinion that American Government should adopt attitude similar to the British Embassy’s recommendation of nonconsent to payment of tax by British subjects unless also paid by other foreign nationals.
628
Sept. 3 (430) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Foreign Office note, August 25, transmitting income tax regulations and requesting that American nationals be instructed to comply therewith. Attitude of other Embassies.
629
Sept. 5 (436) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Publication of mandate (text printed) designating date for the enforcement of income tax regulations.
630
Sept. 16 (224) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions to inform the Foreign Office that the present income tax regulations cannot be considered applicable to American nationals.
630
[Page LXIV]Sept. 17 (270) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Finance Minister’s opinion that foreigners in China should pay the income tax, but assurance that unless tax were collected from all other foreign nationals including Japanese, no effort would be made to collect from the Americans.
631
Sept. 19 (226) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Authorization to indicate to the Finance Minister the Department’s willingness to give the matter further consideration in the event that all other governments concerned acquiesce in imposition of income tax.
632
Sept. 23 (276) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Discussion with Finance Minister Kung, who felt disappointed and hurt that United States had evinced a less friendly attitude than Great Britain in the matter of regulations governing the income tax.
632
Sept. 23 (277) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Views of certain governments regarding payment of the Chinese income tax.
634

Reservation of American Rights in Proposed Changes for Control of Pilotage at Shanghai

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Aug. 19 (658) From the Ambassador in China
Information on the Shanghai pilotage question, with summary of proposal for filling vacancies by the Inspector General of Customs, which was unanimously accepted by the Shanghai Pilots Association.
(Footnote: Information of Japanese attitude on the question.)
635

Assistance to Pan American Airways in Securing Rights Needed To Extend Its United States–Philippine Service to China

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Feb. 27 (17) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Request for information which might clarify a Washington Post item relative to reported U. S. negotiations for a clipper ship base in China and Pan American intention to link the Philippines and China despite Japanese objections; information that Post Office Department has made no move in the matter.
638
Feb. 29 (45) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Résumé of efforts to assist Pan American Airways in its efforts to bring about contact between the Chinese Government and its own planes at Portuguese Macao for mail exchange, and advice that no Japanese objections have been heard of.
(Footnote: Information relayed to the Post Office Department.)
639
May 22 (473) From the Ambassador in China
Belief of the Director of the China National Aviation Corporation that Portuguese delay in the Pan American Airways matter is due to British pressure resulting from desire of British Imperial Airways to fly its planes over Chinese territory.
641
[Page LXV]June 15 (188) From the Ambassador in China
Information regarding a change in proposed Pan American–China National connection point from Macao to Hong Kong in line with arrangements made between the British Imperial Airways and the China National Aviation Corporation.
641
July 11 (213) From the British Ambassador
Formal application and terms of arrangement relative to an extension of the Pan American air service to Hong Kong.
643
Aug. 24 Memorandum by the Assistant Chief of the Division of Protocol and Conferences
Clarification by the British Chargé of meaning of note granting Pan American Airways permission to operate into, through, and away from the colony of Hong Kong.
643
Aug. 29 To the British Chargé
Acknowledgment of note No. 213, July 11, and statement that in the event of the United States granting other nations operating facilities on the trans-Pacific route a British application for similar facilities would be given sympathetic consideration.
644
Sept. 11 (697) From the Ambassador in China
Information regarding anticipated satisfactory culmination of negotiations for facilities for Pan American Airways at both Macao and Hong Kong.
645
Dec. 8 (430) From the Consul at Hong Kong
Organization of a Portuguese company by Pan American Airways to comply with Portuguese law requirements for airport operation at Macao.
(Footnote: Advice of the signing of an agreement between the Crown Colony of Hong Kong and Pan American Airways for direct air transport of first-class mail to and from United States via Philippines.)
646

Attitude of the Department of State With Respect to the Application of Chinese Laws to American Insurance Companies Doing Business in China

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Mar. 9 (111) To the Ambassador in China
Observations relative to the application of the Insurance Enterprise Law, and instructions to make oral representations to the Foreign Office regarding certain provisions of the law which would be inconsistent with treaties and unduly burdensome to American insurance companies operating in China.
647
May 9 (235) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Belief of American insurance companies that there is no necessity for immediate action by the Embassy; their hope the Embassy will be authorized to make written representations at an opportune time.
651
May 11 (112) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Authorization as requested in No. 235 of May 9.
652
[Page LXVI]Nov. 5 From the American Embassy in China to the Chinese Foreign Office
Transmittal of memorandum containing suggestions for modification of the insurance law, resulting from a study by representatives of American firms, and expression of belief that it would be to the general interest if the law were modified to enable American companies to cooperate with Chinese authorities.
(Footnote: No further results.)
652

Re-Registration of Title Deeds to Real Property of Americans in China

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Jan. 13 (163) From the Ambassador in China
Information from Canton relative to the unsatisfactory new title deeds which place restrictions upon the transfer of land.
653
Apr. 7 (353) From the Ambassador in China
Discussion of question of re-registration of land titles in Nanking; and request for opinion on Chinese interpretation of an article in the Treaty of October 8, 1903, between the United States and China, which is not satisfactory owing to restrictions placed upon the transfer of land.
654
Apr. 24 (404) From the Ambassador in China
Oral assurances by the Nanking municipal authorities regarding the right to transfer property by American title holders, and intention to await a basic clarification of such right from the Foreign Office.
659
May 29 (185) To the Ambassador in China
Reasons for advising the avoidance of further discussion of the question of re-registration of land titles at Nanking.
660
June 5 (494) From the Ambassador in China
Information regarding certain insufficient concessions by the Nanking Municipal Government relative to the new form of lease certificate.
662
June 19 (540) From the Ambassador in China
Further information concerning the revision of lease-certificate forms, and Embassy’s intention to maintain its original position, making no concessions which might admit an infringement of treaty and customary rights in the matter of land tenure on the part of American citizens.
664
July 8 (569) From the Ambassador in China
Efforts to effect a satisfactory settlement in regard to the re-registration of title deeds to property held by American missionary organizations at Nanking, this to establish basic precedents in subsequent negotiations regarding similar questions in other parts of the country.
665
Aug. 4 (625) From the Ambassador in China
Transmittal of correspondence which culminated in instructions to the Consulate General at Shanghai that American missionaries be informed that no objection is perceived to their applying for re-registration of their land titles.
666
[Page LXVII]Sept. 8 (438) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Request for instructions regarding policy to be adopted regarding collection of land value taxes on property at Nanking.
667
Sept. 12 (221) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Opinion that American-owned property in China should be subject to the Chinese land tax provided the tax is reasonable in amount, nondiscriminatory, and without violation of treaty right.
668
Sept. 15 (718) From the Ambassador in China
Reiteration to the Foreign Office of refusal to recognize validity of the imposition of any reregistration time limit as it might affect established land-tenure rights.
668
Oct. 27 (103) From the American Ambassador in China to the Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs
Refusal of the Shanghai Municipal Government to issue a lease in perpetuity to an American mission and request that appropriate instructions be issued to correct the misinterpretation of the perpetual lease clause and to secure issuance of the desired lease.
(Footnote: Later advice that perpetual lease was to be issued.)
669

Chinese Censorship Restrictions Upon American Moving Pictures in China

Date and number Subject Page
1936 July 9 (572) From the Ambassador in China
Refusal of National Censorship Committee to return two American-made motion picture films confiscated on the grounds that they were derogatory to the Chinese.
670
Aug. 14 (220) From the Ambassador in China
Representations to the Censorship Committee, which functions under the control of the National Party, and to the Foreign Office in attempt to secure reversal of confiscation order.
671
Sept. 29 (748) From the Ambassador in China
Information in regard to further unsuccessful efforts to secure the return of confiscated motion picture films, and request for instructions.
674
Nov. 11 (271) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions to investigate and make appropriate representations relative to a ban placed by the Chinese Government on Paramount motion pictures.
675
Nov. 16 (278) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Approval of action taken in regard to the confiscated film and instructions to inform the Chinese Government that such confiscation is in contravention of Sino-American treaties and to lodge formal protest if necessary.
676
Nov. 17 (553) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice from the Paramount sales manager of a compromise proposal made by the Censorship Committee.
677
[Page LXVIII]Nov. 18 (329) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Explanation of the compromise proposal and the attitude of Paramount, and request for instructions to make representations against the ban.
678
Nov. 18 (73) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Instructions to make appropriate representations as requested in No. 329 of November 18.
679
Nov. 19 (331) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Conversation with Foreign Office official who indicated that the Paramount film controversy is of long standing and volunteered to try to have the ban withdrawn until the film which precipitated the dispute can be inspected by the Censorship Committee.
679
Nov. 20 (562) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
To Nanking, November 19: Instructions to make strong representations to the Foreign Office against the arbitrary action of the Censorship Committee, indicating the unfavorable reaction in publicity it would receive in United States.
680
Nov. 21 (332) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Conversations with the Vice Foreign Minister, who apparently sympathizes entirely with the Censorship Committee which he believes is in a strong tactical position, but he may refrain from pressing his advantage because of the Sino-Japanese tension.
680
Nov. 25 (288) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Advice of information cabled from Paramount’s Shanghai office relative to the Chinese allotment of a 40-day period for distribution of films, during which time the disputed picture is to be shown to the censors and a possible solution concluded; instructions to withhold formal protest pending developments.
682
Dec. 1 (336) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Complications in temporary resumption of the censoring of Paramount films, and suggestion that the company be approached concerning the advisability of acceding to the Chinese request for withdrawal of the controversial film.
682
Dec. 3 (898) From the Ambassador in China
Foreign Office’s agreement with opinion that no legal provision authorized the Censorship Committee to confiscate films.
684
Dec. 7 (346) From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)
Release of two Paramount films held by the Censorship Committee, and involved situation regarding the matter of international withdrawal of another disputed film from circulation.
684
Dec. 30 (385) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Information that Paramount films are again being censored but whole matter will be reviewed when certain controversial films reach Nanking.
685
[Page LXIX]

American Interest in Problems Affecting the International Settlement at Shanghai

Date and number Subject Page
1936 May 6 (169) From the Consul General at Shanghai to the Ambassador in China
Dissatisfaction of the German community relative to non-representation in the consular group dealing with Settlement matters; and proposals for solution of the problem.
685
Aug. 13 (646) From the Ambassador in China
Establishment of Japanese patrols in certain American and British defense sectors at Shanghai without notification of authorities, and their withdrawal from American sector, following a letter of inquiry from Colonel Price of the Fourth Marines.
687
Aug. 20 (661) From the Ambassador in China
Views concerning the request of the Chinese Ratepayers’ Association for an increase in Chinese representation on the Shanghai Municipal Council of the International Settlement.
(Footnote: Consul General’s opinion that initiative for change, if general agreement exists, should not come from the American Consul General.)
688
Sept. 11 (701) From the Ambassador in China
Report of approval of proposals outlined by the Consul General at Shanghai in No. 169 of May 6.
689
Sept. 25 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Résumé of past and present situation in the Shanghai International Settlement, a quasi-international enterprise, and recommendation that American troops continue to be maintained therein.
690
Oct. 2 (475) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Summary of instructions sent to the Consul General relative to the activities of the Shanghai Volunteer Corps.
693
Oct. 14 (243) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Suggestions in regard to No. 475 of October 2.
694
Oct. 16 (504) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Report from the Consul General, who may inform the Chairman of the Shanghai Council orally that the matter of the activities of the Shanghai Volunteer Corps has been referred to the Department.
695
Oct. 17 (790) From the Ambassador in China
Comments relative to the proposed textual amendments of the Land Regulations.
695
Oct. 17 (791) From the Ambassador in China
Reply made, October 7, by interested consular representatives to request of Chinese Ratepayers’ Association for increased representation on Shanghai Municipal Council.
697
Oct. 29 (283) To the Ambassador in China
General concurrence with views of Consul General and agreement that the Consulate General not take initiative in matters such as that of increased Chinese representation on the Shanghai Municipal Council.
699
Nov. 11 (270) To the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Suggestion that reply to Council’s inquiry, in regard to the retention of the American Landing Force, be deferred until receipt of British Consul General’s views regarding the question of size and maintenance of the Shanghai Volunteer Corps.
700
[Page LXX]Nov. 21 (604) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Observations in regard to inadvisability of acceding to Japanese demands for control of police of the Hongkew and Yangtse Poo areas; and plan for discussing matter with Japanese Consul General.
701
Nov. 22 (565) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
To Shanghai: Approval of views and proposed action in No. 604 of November 21.
702
Nov. 25 (613) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Exchange of views between American, British, and Japanese Consuls General regarding Japanese representations to the Shanghai Municipal Council for increased policing participation, and the Japanese Consul General’s agreement to study the subject further.
702
Dec. 3 (507) From the Consul General at Shanghai
Information regarding a meeting of various British representatives with the Secretary General (an American) of the Shanghai Municipal Council, who reported a discussion of the situation which has arisen in connection with Japanese demands for control of the policing of the northern and eastern districts of the International Settlement.
704

JAPAN

Political Developments in Japan; the Assassinations of February 26

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Jan. 7 (1630) From the Ambassador in Japan
Summary of current economic, financial, and political trends in Japan.
706
Feb. 25 (64) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Advice of Litvinov’s satisfaction with results of the Japanese elections and Chinese Ambassador’s opinion that a more suave method of procedure in Sino-Japanese relations might ensue.
718
Feb. 26 (36) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Information that military has taken over partial possession of Government, and unconfirmed report of assassination of several prominent men.
719
Feb. 26 (37) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Further information relative to the uprising of the military against the Government.
719
Feb. 26 (25) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Message to be transmitted to the Foreign Minister extending condolences upon the death of distinguished officials of the Japanese Government.
721
Feb. 26 (38) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Confidential information relative to the coup d’état which appears to have been the work of junior officers.
721
Feb. 26 (39) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Appointment of a temporary acting Premier and report that Count Makino was not killed.
723
[Page LXXI]Feb. 27 (40) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Delivery of message of condolence as instructed on February 26.
723
Feb. 27 (41) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Observations relative to the emergency situation in Tokyo.
723
Feb. 27 (42) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Reaction of Chinese officials to the coup in Tokyo and unconfirmed reports of officials killed or wounded.
725
Feb. 27 (71) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Comments regarding the situation in Tokyo by a Soviet official, who said he expected the Japanese Army to make an immediate brutal advance against China and possibly against Outer Mongolia.
725
Feb. 27 (43) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Indications that a temporary compromise has been reached between the Government and the insurgents, and rumors of considerable movements of troops throughout the city. Information that Embassy is heavily guarded by Government troops.
726
Feb. 28 (44) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice of adequate protection for the Embassy in case of necessity; declination of offer of further special Japanese protection.
727
Feb. 28 (44) From the Ambassador in China (tel.)
Chinese expectation of a more drastic Japanese attitude toward China and the Soviet Union; and the Soviet Ambassador’s belief that Japan will concentrate its attack upon a weak and disunited China.
727
Feb. 28 (27) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Commendation for efforts in present emergency and reminder that the Embassy staff should not be exposed unnecessarily to danger.
728
Feb. 28 (73) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Comments by Litvinov relative to the situation in Tokyo; and the Chinese Ambassador’s opinion that increased pressure on China will not be felt for several weeks.
728
Feb. 28 (45) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Indications of a lessening in the tension in Tokyo; and a report that the insurgents have agreed to obey the Emperor’s commands to return to their barracks, but are negotiating as to conditions under which they will return.
729
Feb. 28 (46) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Imminence of fighting following insurgents’ refusal to obey order to disband and return to barracks.
730
Feb. 28 From the Consul at Dairen to the Ambassador in Japan
Summary of conversation between the Soviet Consul and the president of the South Manchuria Railway, who stated that the rebellion was actually against capitalism and for the purpose of ridding Japan of politicians and returning the country to the Emperor.
731
[Page LXXII]Feb. 29 (47) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Further information as to safety of Embassy, and of a radio announcement of surrender of some insurgents and plane-dropped leaflets stating that refusal to obey the Emperor would mean death.
732
Feb. 29 (49) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Announcement of surrender of all the revolting troops.
733
Feb. 29 (50) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice that no injury to American citizens has been reported during recent incident.
734
Feb. 29 (51) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Sudden return of Prime Minister Okada, presumed assassinated; and unknown fate of 20 officers involved in the insurgency.
734
Mar. 1 (52) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Retention of martial law although normal conditions prevail; the suicide of one insurgent officer and dismissal of other insurgents from army without trial.
734
Mar. 2 (53) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Information of conferences looking toward formation of a new Cabinet, and of letter of appreciation sent to the Foreign Minister for measures taken for the safety of Embassy during the recent uprising.
735
Mar. 3 (28) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Suggestions for preparation of a comprehensive account of last week’s coup.
735
Mar. 4 (56) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Functioning of the resigned Okada Cabinet pending formation of the next Cabinet which Japanese newspapers editorially demand be capable of stabilizing the situation.
736
Mar. 4 (57) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice that all available data requested in No. 28 of March 3 is being transmitted and will be supplemented as promptly as possible.
736
Mar. 4 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation relative to trade and international finance with the Japanese Ambassador, who called to express gratitude for message of condolence and said the Japanese uprising was reaction against discriminatory economic treatment of farmers and small businessmen.
737
Mar. 5 (1706) From the Ambassador in Japan
Evidence in support of opinion that the result of the Diet election on February 20 was one of the immediate causes of the recent uprising.
738
Mar. 5 (1707) From the Ambassador in Japan
Detailed report on the trial of Lt. Col. Aizawa for the 1935 murder of Maj. Gen. Nagata, with particular reference to its bearing on the recent uprising and on the political views of the discontented element in the Army.
742
[Page LXXIII]Mar. 6 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Criticism of Japanese Ambassador’s explanation of recent assassinations as altogether too “easy” and throwing matter out of perspective.
(Footnote: Transmittal of memorandum to the Ambassador in Japan.)
747
Mar. 6 (61) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice that Hirota is encountering difficulties, apparently with the army, in forming a Cabinet.
748
Mar. 6 (1718) From the Ambassador in Japan
Analysis of basic and immediate causes leading to the insurrection of February 26.
748
Mar. 7 (63) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Partial summary of a statement made to the Military Attaché by a General Staff officer who ostensibly unofficially explained the incident of February 26.
756
Mar. 8 (80) From the Ambassador in the Soviet Union (tel.)
Opposing Soviet views regarding the imminence of Japanese-instigated war in the Far East.
757
Mar. 9 (65) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice that Hirota has succeeded in forming a Cabinet and information relative to certain appointees.
757
Mar. 9 (66) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Opinion that Hirota’s selection as Prime Minister will tend to tranquilize Japan’s foreign relations.
758
Mar. 13 (74) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Conversation with the Prime Minister who said that Japanese foreign policy would continue unchanged, and made some further observations on policy in respect to certain areas.
759
Mar. 17 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Conversation with the Japanese Ambassador who expects that Arita, the present Japanese Ambassador in China, will be named Minister of Foreign Affairs.
761
Mar. 19 (1735) From the Ambassador in Japan
Report concerning the Government’s adoption of many reforms demanded by the insurgents in their insurrection of February 26, together with other information related to the outbreak.
761
Mar. 20 (1746) From the Ambassador in Japan
Developments in the Aizawa trial, with particular reference to the relation between the trial and the incident of February 26.
766
May 6 (95) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Speech before the House of Peers by Hirota, who stated that he would avoid extremes and adhere to constitutional government under the Emperor.
767
May 12 (1821) From the Ambassador in Japan
Advice of sentencing of Aizawa to death and his appeal; circumstances connected with trial.
768
[Page LXXIV]May 14 (1833) From the Ambassador in Japan
Developments in the situation resulting from the incident of February 26, and evidence that the Government has adopted a procrastinating policy in reform measures tending toward maintenance of the status quo which may lead to other incidents.
769
May 28 (1864) From the Ambassador in Japan
Transmittal of two ordinances which amend the regulations governing the organization of the Army and Navy Departments and limit the appointment to the posts of Minister and Vice Minister of the Departments to generals and admirals on the active list.
773
May 29 (1876) From the Ambassador in Japan
Report concerning opposition both within the Diet and among the public to regimentation and invasion of individual freedom by repressive legislation introduced by the Hirota Cabinet in the Seditious Literature and Mobilization Secrets Bills.
773
July 7 (149) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
War Office announcement of death or imprisonment sentences pronounced upon military personnel and civilians tried for complicity in the February 26 incident.
776
July 13 (154) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
War Office announcement of executions for participation in the February 26 incident.
777
July 18 (158) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Repeal of Tokyo martial law by Imperial ordinance.
777
July 23 (1955) From the Ambassador in Japan
Political consequences of the incident of February 26.
777
Aug. 1 (165) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Further War Office announcement of sentences in the trials for connection with the February incident.
781
Aug. 25 Memorandum by the Ambassador in Japan
Conversation, prior to departure, with Hirota, who gave assurance that Japan would not interfere with American trade in China and commented on the situation following the incident of February, with mention of the spread of the Communist menace.
781

Disapproval by the American Government of the Employment of American Citizens by a Foreign Government as Propaganda Agents

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Nov. 28 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Informal oral representations, accompanied by a written statement thereon (infra), to the Japanese Ambassador of U. S. views relative to the employment of Americans by foreign political authorities as propagandists in the United States.
782
Undated To the Japanese Embassy
Text of statement of U. S. position given to the Japanese Ambassador November 28.
784
[Page LXXV]Nov. 28 To the Ambassador in Japan
Transmittal of the November 28 informal statement given to the Japanese Ambassador covering the views discussed in conversation on that date, with suggestion that Department’s action be reenforced by appropriate observation to the Foreign Minister.
785

Representations on Establishment of Oil Monopolies in Japan and Manchuria

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Jan. 7 (3) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice that in discussion of the oil companies’ situation the Vice Foreign Minister stated that the Government does not intend to deprive foreign companies of a reasonable economic return.
786
Jan. 15 (12) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Japanese request that the oil companies propose definite terms upon which they will comply with the stockholding provisions of the law, and opinion that the authorities are endeavoring to find a solution to the problem.
786
Jan. 24 Memorandum by Mr. Raymond C. Mackay of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation With Mr. Claude A. Thompson, General Counsel of the Standard-Vacuum Oil Company, New York
Information regarding the oil situation in Japan and in Manchuria, and indication that for the moment no further assistance is required.
787
Feb. 24 (34) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Recommendation by foreign oil representatives to their head offices that the Vice Foreign Minister’s proposal regarding oil storage requirements be adopted.
788
Mar. 9 (64) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Suggestion from head officers of oil interests that a conference of representatives from the American and British Embassies and from the oil companies be arranged with Japanese officials; opinion that such Embassy participation would be inadvisable.
789
Mar. 10 (30) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Concurrence with opinion regarding direct participation in an oil conference; and suggestion for an oral and informal conversation with appropriate Japanese officials to make known the desire of foreign oil interests to present and discuss a plan to meet the needs of both parties.
789
Mar. 13 (73) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Oral and informal representations by American and British Embassies to Kurusu, a Foreign Office official, who seemed pessimistic following a conference between oil and Japanese officials to discuss the companies’ plan.
790
Mar. 20 (77) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice of Embassy’s informal request through Kurusu for suspension of oil storage regulations until the completion of current negotiations between American oil interests and the Mitsui interests, with indication of plan for further representations to the Vice Minister.
790
[Page LXXVI]Mar. 20 (33) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Approval of informal action and further representations, but suggestion of appropriateness of awaiting action of companies and avoiding getting out ahead of the interests or of the British Embassy in the matter of suspension of regulations.
791
Mar. 23 (78). From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Decision to withhold authorized official representations relative to suspension of regulations in view of the apparent Japanese acceptance of the oil representatives’ proposal for cooperation in the matter of quotas.
792
May 22 From the Consul at Dairen to the Ambassador in Japan
Report that the Texas Co. has abandoned its joint position with the two other foreign oil companies and has supplied gasoline to the Monopoly.
792
June 11 Memorandum by Mr. Raymond C. Mackay and Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Telephone discussion with President P. W. Parker of the Standard-Vacuum Co. of New York, who was told of Departmental conversations with Kurusu and who requested that Kurusu be urged to take steps to the end that representatives of Mitsui be sent to New York for oil negotiations.
794
June 23 (137) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Opinion that the authorized representations regarding the oil problem would be inadvisable in view of Vice Minister Yoshino’s statement that further postponement of the enforcement of the stock holding provisions of the law is impossible.
796
July 14 From the President of the Standard-Vacuum Oil Company of New York
Information concerning the allocation of third quarter oil quotas by the Japanese Government.
797
Oct. 20 From the President of the Standard-Vacuum Oil Company of New York
Report of progress in oil negotiations with the Japanese Government and expectation of early settlement of final details.
798
Nov. 6 (140) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Approval of proposed action relative to Japanese Government’s confirmation of assurances concerning the oil interests and suggestion that written confirmation would be preferable to oral.
(Footnote: Information that note is in reply to an unprinted despatch wherein the Embassy suggested request for an oral or written confirmation.)
798
Dec. 14 (259) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice of impasse in oil company negotiations with Japanese Government; British Ambassador’s recommendation to his Government that strong representations be made to the Japanese Ambassador at London and suggestion that similar representations be made at Washington.
799
Dec. 17 (261) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Report that Japanese oil companies are agitating against any increase in gasoline sales quotas for foreign oil companies.
800
[Page LXXVII]Dec. 17 (160) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Inquiry whether any action has been taken under authorization in No. 140, November 6; belief that, instead of procedure mentioned in No. 259, December 14, conversations should be held at Tokyo by American and British Ambassadors with the Japanese Prime Minister.
800
Dec. 18 (452) To the Ambassador in the United Kingdom (tel.)
Views relative to the expediency of a direct approach at Tokyo in making representations in regard to the Japanese assurances in the oil situation.
801
Dec. 19 (264) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Discussion of advisability of further diplomatic approaches, with tendency to favor representations from both ends of the line, and suggestion of informal approach to the Prime Minister only after formal approach to the Foreign Minister; the British Ambassador’s position; and advice that no action has been taken under authorization referred to.
802
Dec. 22 (265) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Necessity for some preliminary diplomatic approach to the Japanese Government before the holidays to protect the oil companies in the matter of the 1937 quotas and the pending tariff revision.
803
Dec. 23 (266) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Request for authorization to send to the Foreign Minister a simultaneous and substantially identical memorandum to that which the British are planning to send.
804
Dec. 23 (164) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Authorization as requested in No. 266 of December 23, and further explanation of Department’s position.
805
Dec. 24 (268) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice that Department’s instructions in No. 164 of December 23 were carried out in an interview with the Foreign Minister, who agreed to study the oil situation, with which he stated he was unfamiliar, and that the British Ambassador made similar representations.
805

Trade Relations Between the United States and Japan; Further Discussion of Voluntary Restriction by the Japanese of Exports to the United States and the Philippines

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Jan. 7 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser of a Conversation With the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy
Discussion of means for an adjustment of the agreement covering imports into the Philippines of Japanese cotton piece goods.
806
Jan. 9 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Conversation between Assistant Secretary Sayre and the Japanese Ambassador relative to cotton quotas and rayon shipments to the Philippines, and nonobjection by the Japanese to a press release (infra) concerning Japanese intention to withhold cotton shipments to the Philippines until after February 1.
808
[Page LXXVIII]Undated [Rec’d Jan. 9] From the Japanese Embassy
Memorandum setting forth Japanese interpretation of the Gentlemen’s Agreement governing Japanese imports of cotton piece goods into the Philippines.
812
Jan. 9 Press Release Issued by the Department of State
Statement regarding current conversations with the Japanese Ambassador, who reports that no cotton piece goods will be shipped from Japan to the Philippines until after February 1.
813
Jan. 10 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser of a Conversation With the Attaché of the Japanese Embassy
Discussion of control of cotton rug exports by manufacturers who are not members of the Export Association.
814
Jan. 23 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Conversation between Assistant Secretary Sayre and the Japanese Ambassador relative to imports into the United States of wool-knit gloves and cotton velveteens manufactured in Japan and the proposed adjustment of the Philippine cotton textile agreement; U. S. intention not to transfer detailed negotiations on these matters to Tokyo.
815
Undated To the Japanese Embassy
Advance indication of findings in the Tariff Commission’s investigation of manufacturing costs of wool-knit gloves and mittens to ascertain what protective duty should be applied to imports of such items.
(Footnote: Handed to the Japanese Ambassador January 23.)
818
Jan. 29 (12) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Appraisal of difficulties in connection with the working and interpretation of the agreement with Japan restricting amounts of Philippine imports of Japanese cotton textiles for 2 years, and instructions to explain the U. S. position to the Foreign Minister.
819
Jan. 30 (13) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to seek an immediate agreement with Japan for the definite limitation of cotton goods exported to the Philippines during January.
822
Jan. 31 (20) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Representations to the Foreign Minister as instructed in Nos. 12 and 13 of January 29 and 30. Counterproposal, subject to the approval of Osaka cotton exporters, made by Kurusu, Foreign Office official.
823
Jan. 31 (15) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Desirability of an early agreement with the Japanese Government and of including in the announcement thereof a statement that the two Governments will negotiate a mutually satisfactory rayon agreement.
824
[Page LXXIX]Feb. 1 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Discussion with Yoshizawa, Counselor of the Japanese Embassy, who, in explanation of the wool-knit glove situation, stated that the industry had been created largely to supply the American market and that shipment restrictions would bring great losses to the manufacturers.
825
Undated [Rec’d Feb. 1] From the Japanese Embassy
Statement of prices fixed and possible quantity control by the Association of Exporters over wool-knit gloves and mittens.
826
Feb. 3 (72) From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
From Kobe, January 30: Report of agreement between the Rug Export Association and the Consulate to control shipments of cotton rugs.
827
Feb. 3 (23) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Kurusu “s proposal conditionally accepted by Osaka cotton textile exporters; Department’s proposals only partially accepted by Kurusu, who refused to negotiate on rayon question.
828
Feb. 4 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Discussion with Yoshizawa regarding the Philippine textile agreement and U. S. imports of wool-knit gloves.
829
Undated To the Japanese Embassy
Statement setting forth the terms under which shipments of wool-knit gloves may be made from Japan to the United States which must be accepted by February 8.
(Footnote: Handed to the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy February 4.)
832
Feb. 7 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Discussion with Yoshizawa, who presented the need for further time in securing a final decision with respect to the Department’s proposals regarding wool-knit glove imports; statement of extension of time to February 13 telephoned to Yoshizawa following consultation with Tariff Commission members.
833
Feb. 7 (18) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Information to be given Kurusu relative to this Government’s position in the matter of the importation into the Philippines of cotton piece goods.
835
Feb. 8 (25) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Discussion with Kurusu of points brought out in No. 18 of February 7.
836
Feb. 13 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser of a Conversation With the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy
Decision by Japanese wool-knit gloves exporters that it was technically impossible to comply with U. S. request and submission of alternative offer by Japan.
837
[Page LXXX]Feb. 14 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Discussion with Yoshizawa of various points in the American proposal for solution of the wool-knit glove problem and his plan to cable the information to Tokyo.
838
Feb. 14 (28) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Discussion with Kurusu of points relative to the Department’s position on the cotton piece goods exports to the Philippines,
839
Feb. 15 To the Japanese Embassy
Statement of final suggestion for the regulation of wool-knit glove shipments from Japan to United States.
840
Feb. 15 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Presentation of the U. S. statement (supra) to Hayama, Third Secretary of the Japanese Embassy.
842
Feb. 18 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Presentation by Hayama of Japanese counterproposals regarding wool-knit glove shipments.
843
Feb. 18 To the Japanese Embassy
Reiteration of earlier position in reply to Japanese counterproposals.
845
Feb. 19 (1690) From the Ambassador in Japan
Summaries of conversation with Kurusu and of two press articles indicating growing resentment in Japan against continued requests from United States that Japanese exporters voluntarily restrict their shipments to the United States.
846
Feb. 20 To President Roosevelt
Summary of U. S. Tariff Commission findings relative to duty on knit gloves and knit mittens, with recommendation that they be approved.
849
Feb. 26 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Discussion with Yoshizawa, who stressed the transshipment problem in the proposed adjustment of the Philippine textile agreement.
850
Mar. 3 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Conversation between Assistant Secretary Sayre and Japanese Ambassador and Yoshizawa regarding proposed readjustment of textile agreement; Sayre’s presentation of draft memorandum of conversation (infra), apparently unsatisfactory to Japanese without clear understanding on transshipment problem.
854
Mar. 3 To the Japanese Embassy
Draft memorandum of conversation (supra), for initialing.
(Footnote: Handed to the Japanese Ambassador for reference to the Japanese Government.)
859
[Page LXXXI]Mar. 9 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Discussion between Feis, Economic Adviser, and Yoshizawa regarding the rapid increase during January of U. S. imports of cotton piece goods from Japan.
860
Mar. 13 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Confidential information from Yoshizawa, who stated that the Japanese exporters agreed to the proposed quota reduction provided the American Government or the Philippines did something about transshipments.
862
Mar. 23 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser of a Conversation With the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy
Discussion of certain points regarding the Philippine textile agreement and the increase of U. S. imports of cotton piece goods from Japan.
862
Mar. 25 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Conversation between Assistant Secretary Sayre and Japanese Ambassador and Yoshizawa regarding the Philippine textile agreement, U. S. imports of cotton piece goods from Japan, and general questions of Japanese-American trade relations.
866
Mar. 25 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Telephone conversation with Yoshizawa reporting a seeming evasion of the textile agreement and Yoshizawa’s intention to include the information in cable to Tokyo.
872
Apr. 3 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Discussion with Yoshizawa concerning discrepancy between United States and Japanese cotton piece goods statistics and information regarding agitation by the U. S. cotton industry for restrictive action.
873
Apr. 14 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Japanese request for another year’s extension of the existing agreement governing the export of cotton rugs from Japan to the United States.
877
Apr. 27 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State and Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Japanese Ambassador, during which the Secretary of State explained U. S. triangular trade policy and Assistant Secretary Sayre presented reasons for U. S. desire for a gentlemen’s agreement with Japan to help remedy U. S.-Japanese trade situation, particularly in respect to cotton piece goods; memorandum (text printed) read to the Ambassador.
878
[Page LXXXII]May 1 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation between Assistant Secretary Sayre and the Japanese Ambassador and Yoshizawa, who reported that Japan would prefer that a gentlemen’s agreement in the matter of textile import regulation be concluded rather than an increase in tariff as recommended by the Tariff Commission.
883
May 4 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation With the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy
Presentation of Japanese proposal as the Government’s final position in the matter of restriction of imports of Japanese cotton textiles.
885
May 5 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation With the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy
Explanation of U. S. position in probable rejection of the Japanese proposal of May 4.
886
May 5 From the Consul General at Hong Kong (tel.)
Report by local manufacturers of collusion between the Hong Kong shippers and Customs employees in Manila in reshipment of large quantities of Japanese cotton textiles.
887
May 8 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation between Assistant Secretary Sayre, Ryder of Tariff Commission, Japanese Ambassador and Yoshizawa regarding the unfavorable Japanese reply to U. S. proposal for restricting imports of Japanese cotton textiles.
888
May 9 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with Yoshizawa, who presented a further proposal from the Japanese Government.
Conference with the Secretary, who secured the President’s approval for giving consideration to the latest Japanese proposals and postponement of action during the week-end on the duty increase on cotton textiles.
890
May 12 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Endorsement by the president of the Cotton Textile Institute of the proposed agreement with Japan limiting cotton imports into the United States.
891
May 21 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Telephone conversation with Yoshizawa who regretfully stated that the Japanese Government could not proceed toward the conclusion of a gentlemen’s agreement covering cotton piece goods imports into the United States.
892
May 21 (63) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Presidential proclamation increasing rates of duty recommended by the Tariff Commission on certain types of cotton textiles, following Japan’s inability to conclude the proposed gentlemen’s agreement.
893
[Page LXXXIII]May 22 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Agreement with Japanese Embassy officials regarding a forthcoming press release covering the extension of the existing agreement for the export of cotton rugs from Japan to the United States.
893
May 26 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation With the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy
Discussion of a New York Times article which attributed the recent tariff action on Japanese cotton textiles to retaliation for the smuggling situation in North China; and oral statement (infra) of the Department’s position thereon.
895
Undated To the Japanese Embassy
Oral statement denying basis of fact in a recent New York Times article regarding the tariff action on Japanese cotton textiles.
(Footnote: Handed to the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy and released to the press by the Department May 26.)
896
June 10 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Lengthy conversation between Assistant Secretary Sayre and Kurusu, Japanese Ambassador to Belgium, concerning certain current problems created by Japanese practices counter to various American interests.
897
June 11 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Discussion with Japanese Embassy officials, who presented details of a possible joint Japanese-American committee to advise upon the solution of problems arising out of Japanese competition in the United States; Japanese attitude regarding the expected Presidential action increasing rates of duty on importations of slide fasteners.
903
June 13 (127) From the Japanese Ambassador
Request that rapeseed and perilla oils be eliminated from the list of proposed new duties to avoid an adverse effect on such oil importations.
906
June 20 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation between assistant Secretary Sayre and the Japanese Ambassador and Yoshizawa regarding the circumstances governing the necessity for restricting imports of Japanese-manufactured zippers.
906
June 26 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation between Assistant Secretary Sayre and the Japanese Ambassador and Yoshizawa regarding the possible conclusion of a gentlemen’s agreement on slide fasteners and consideration of Kurusu’s suggestion for a joint Japanese-American committee.
909
[Page lXXXIV]June 29 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Discussion with Hayama, who presented a Foreign Office cable reporting that the Japanese perilla and rapeseed cultivating and oil industry were thrown into confusion because of fear that the new excise taxes will prove to be prohibitive on imports of these oils from Japan.
911
July 6 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Views of Japanese Embassy officials concerning a possible private textile agreement, the proposed joint committee on Japanese-American trade, and other matters relative to solution of trade problems affecting the two countries.
912
July 13 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Conversation with Yoshizawa, who expressed appreciation for memoranda covering growth of an unusual competitive situation in the American market of cotton hosiery and cotton velveteens imported from Japan.
916
July 15 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Presentation to Hayama of a statement on arrivals of Japanese cotton goods in the Philippines during eleven months of agreement and expressing Assistant Secretary Sayre’s great concern over situation.
918
July 17 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Conversation between Assistant Secretary Sayre and Yoshizawa regarding the cotton goods statistics for the first eleven months of the Philippine agreement, and Yoshizawa’s emphasis of the problem of controlling shipments via Hong Kong.
918
July 28 From the Acting Secretary of the Treasury
Information for use in reply to Japanese Government’s protest that taxes on perilla and rapeseed oil will militate against the industry.
923
Aug. 12 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser of a Conversation With the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy
Yoshizawa’s intention to cable his Government relative to the readiness of American cotton textile leaders for an invitation to a conference with Japanese leaders; Mr. Veatch’s mention of two articles regarding the problem of Japanese-American competition in cotton textiles.
924
Aug. 12 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Discussion with Mr. Hayama regarding potential difficulties in the question of shipment to the Philippines of short length cotton piece goods which are not covered by the Cotton Association’s export control.
926
[Page LXXXV]Undated To the Japanese Embassy
Report of arrival of cotton piece goods in the Philippines in excess of the agreement quota.
(Footnote: Handed to the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy on August 13.)
927
Aug. 27 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs to the Assistant Secretary of State
Information regarding various informal conversations with Yoshizawa, who agreed to urge his Government to give assurance that total imports of Japanese goods into the Philippines would be held down to a reasonable figure.
927
Sept. 2 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Telephone conversation with Yoshizawa, who said he would again cable his Government immediately and expressed concern that it had not answered several cabled inquiries regarding a reply to U. S. representations respecting the Philippine textile agreement.
928
Sept. 3 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the Japanese Ambassador, who expressed interest in the U. S. program to restore normal world trade.
929
Sept. 5 Memorandum by Mr. William T. Turner of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation between Assistant Secretary Sayre and Yoshizawa, who presented a memorandum (infra) containing the proposals of the Japanese Government, in reply to repeated requests that action be taken in the matter of transshipment at Hong Kong of Japanese textiles.
930
Undated [Rec’d Sept. 5] From the Japanese Embassy
Proposed restrictive measures to govern the exportation of cotton piece goods from Japan to Hong Kong and the transshipment of such goods to the Philippines.
931
Sept. 10 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Telephone conversation with Yoshizawa who stated that he understood the Japanese proposals of September 5 would be put into effect only if the Philippine textile agreement is to continue and indicated belief that question of application of the agreement to transshipped goods should not be pressed at present.
932
Sept. 16 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Yoshizawa’s approval, following certain revisions, of a draft press statement regarding statistics of Philippine importation of Japanese cotton piece goods covering the first year of voluntary restrictions by Japanese exporters.
933
Undated To the Japanese Embassy
Advice that arrangements have been made to furnish to Japanese representatives the names and addresses of trans-shippers of Japanese cotton piece goods from Hong Kong to the Philippines, and proposal to shift basis of Philippine statistics to statistics of clearances rather than arrivals.
(Footnote: Handed to the Japanese Counselor September 28.)
934
[Page LXXXVI]Nov. 2 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with Yoshizawa, who reported some progress in discussions between American and Japanese velveteen industry representatives and stated that the Japanese Government wondered whether interposition by the two Governments would promote a speedy and satisfactory conclusion to the negotiations.
935
Dec. 5 (154) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Information that a private committee representing American cotton textile industry will proceed to Japan to confer with representatives of Japanese industry; approval of general purpose of project; names of textile group.
936
Dec. 7 Memorandum by Mr. Roy Veatch of the Office of the Economic Adviser
Discussion between the textile group and Department representatives regarding desirable approach to the Japanese in the forthcoming negotiations in Japan.
937
Dec. 12 (1160) To the Ambassador in Japan
Detailed information regarding the private project of the American cotton textile industry to send a committee to Japan to confer with Japanese leaders of the industry, and suggestion that appropriate courtesies and assistance be extended to the committee.
940

Disinclination of Japan To Negotiate a Convention With the United States Regulating Fisheries off the Coast of Alaska

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Feb. 21 (1698) From the Ambassador in Japan
Opinion that Japanese will not undertake negotiations in regard to fishing in northern waters until present Russo-Japanese fishing difficulties are straightened out; and speculation that ultimately the Japanese may propose modification of the present fur seal treaty and offer restriction of salmon fishing off the coast of Alaska as an inducement.
942
Mar. 28 (37) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain whether the Foreign Office objects to Japanese assurances being made known to Alaskan fishery interests to prevent the circulation of unofficial reports of licensing of Japanese vessels for salmon fishing off the coast of Alaska.
942
Mar. 31 (82) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Compliance with No. 37 of March 28 and oral reply from the Foreign Office that earlier assurances hold.
943
June 3 (67) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Request for comment on Tokyo news despatch to New York Times that a Japanese trawler with experts aboard will be sent to Alaska to investigate open sea fishing enterprises there.
943
June 11 (124) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Information from the Foreign Office regarding fishing expedition scheduled to investigate conditions in the North Pacific, but not to enter American waters.
944
[Page LXXXVII]July 3 (87) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Report of Japanese fishing vessel in Bristol Bay and request for comment.
944
July 7 (1930) From the Ambassador in Japan
Transmittal of memorandum (text printed) of a conversation pertaining to Japanese fishing in Bristol Bay and problem of revision of the fur seal treaty.
944
July 21 (159) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Information regarding the movements of the Japanese fishing vessel referred to in No. 87 of July 3.
946
Oct. 9 (546) To the Minister in Canada
Information regarding the Japanese fishing operations in nonterritorial waters of Bristol Bay and expectation that informal views will shortly be exchanged with the Canadian Government.
946
Dec. 16 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Discussion by officials of the Department and of the Canadian Legation pertaining to the problem of Japanese fishing vessels operating along the coast of North America and possibility of a three-power fishing convention.
947

Settlement of Case Presented by the Japanese Government on Behalf of Japanese Steamship Companies Subject to United States War Profits Tax for the Years 1918 and 1919

Date and number Subject Page
1935 Dec. 20 From the Ambassador in Japan
Promise of the President regarding the question of the war profits tax assessed by the Treasury Department against certain Japanese steamship companies, and suggestion that the matter be followed up.
950
1936 Apr. 27 To the Japanese Embassy
Detailed outline of Treasury Department proposal to Japanese steamship companies which would reduce the amount of settlement to approximately $650,000. American Government’s opinion that the proposal is equitable and recommendation that it receive the careful consideration of the Japanese Government.
951
May 7 (1030) To the Ambassador in Japan
Transmittal of copy of the memorandum of April 27 to the Japanese Ambassador.
957
June 10 Memorandum by Mr. Eugene H. Dooman of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs of a Conversation With the Japanese Ambassador to Belgium
Detailed discussion regarding settlement of tax assessments against the three Japanese shipping companies and informal inquiry from Kurusu as to probability of Treasury Department’s acceptance of a flat payment of $650,000.
(Footnote: Willingness of Bureau of Internal Revenue to consider Japanese counterproposal.)
958
[Page LXXXVIII]Sept. 19 From the Japanese Embassy
Japanese steamship companies’ counterproposal to settle for flat sum of $650,000.
960
Sept. 19 From the Japanese Embassy
Understanding regarding return of certain bonds and monies to Japanese shipping companies at time of final settlement.
961
Oct. 20 To the Japanese Embassy
Acceptance of the Japanese counterproposal of a $650,000 payment as the balance of the deficiencies assessed against three shipping companies; and assumption that, since no interest will be included, the payment will be in cash at the time of the consummation of agreement between the Treasury Department and representatives of the steamship companies.
961
Oct. 20 To the Japanese Embassy
Treasury Department’s confirmation of understanding regarding the return of certain bonds and monies to Japanese shipping companies.
962
Oct. 31 From the Japanese Embassy
Concurrence with stipulations contained in memorandum of October 20, and readiness of steamship companies to make final arrangements.
963

Japan’s Proposal That Perpetual Leases in Former Foreign Settlements in Japan Be Canceled in Favor of Ownership Rights

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Apr. 30 (1018) To the Ambassador in Japan
Detailed review of the perpetual lease question in Japan and of the American position; instructions to submit comments thereon.
964
June 10 (1884) From the Ambassador in Japan
Compliance with instruction in No. 1018 of April 30 and indication of difference in views regarding suggestions for the solution of the problem of perpetual leasehold.
973
Oct. 5 (1114) To the Chargé in Japan
Consideration of points presented in No. 1884 of June 10 and instructions to discuss with the British Embassy possible action to be initiated as soon as possible toward seeking some final solution of the perpetual leasehold problem.
976
Nov. 3 (138) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to submit informally to the Foreign Office an outline, based on information in No. 1018 of April 30, of a proposal toward an equitable settlement of the leasehold question, in line with a British proposal submitted to Foreign Office September 29.
979
Nov. 11 (230) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Delay in submitting proposal authorized in No. 138 of November 3 pending clarification of British leaseholders’ attitude toward a Japanese counterproposal received by the British Embassy.
980
[Page LXXXIX]Jan. 9 (6) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice that the Counselor of Embassy has presented informally and orally to Vice Foreign Minister the American Government’s representations regarding a proposed Japanese law to control automobile manufacturing, as in contravention of the treaty of 1911.
981
Jan. 31 (14) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Interpretation of use of word “manufactories” in articles I and II of the Treaty of 1911.
981
Feb. 1 (22) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Conversation between Counselor of Embassy and Vice Foreign Minister, who stated that the Japanese Government admits no inconsistencies with the Treaty of 1911 in the proposed automobile law.
(Footnote: Passage of automobile industry law by the Diet May 23.)
982
July 10 (152) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Issuance of ordinance for enforcement of the law.
982
Oct. 5 (1115) To the Chargé in Japan
Transmittal of Yokohama Consul’s report of developments adversely affecting American automobile interests and request for comments thereon and for opinion as to whether any action is called for at present juncture.
(Footnote: Information that Department in 1937 took the position that in the absence of new and changed factors, it was not desirable to restate its views.)
983

Refusal of Japanese Government To Authorize Visit by United States Navy Vessel to Ports on Islands Under Mandate to Japan

Date and number Subject Page
1936 June 13 (75) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Views for presentation to the Foreign Minister reminding him of the two Japanese vessels which for several years have been permitted to enter ordinarily closed harbors in Alaska and the Aleutian Islands and suggesting that the Navy Department’s Alden be extended similar courtesies at unopened and opened ports of the Japanese Mandated Islands.
984
June 16 (127) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Opinion that proposal outlined in No. 75 of June 13 would meet with almost certain rebuff by Japan.
985
June 18 (79) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Further considerations bearing out the desirability of approaching the Foreign Minister as suggested in No. 75 of June 13.
986
June 20 (130) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Concurrence with No. 79 of June 18 and inquiry regarding urgency in presenting the suggestion to the Foreign Minister.
987
June 25 (83) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to proceed along lines indicated in No. 79 of June 18, with developments to be reported by July 10.
988
[Page XC]July 3 (146) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Appointment with the Foreign Minister on July 8 and suggestion that at this interview the Minister’s attention be called to American Consul’s difficulty in Japan in obtaining customary commercial information due to restrictive measures by the military.
(Footnote: Department’s approval of plan mentioned in No. 146 of July 3.)
988
July 8 (150) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Informal suggestion to the Foreign Minister, who professed to know nothing relative to vessels visiting unopened ports but said he would see what could be done and report before July 20.
989
July 13 (153) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Advice that without instructions from the Department a further interview will not be sought for an answer to the suggestion of an invitation for the destroyer Alden to visit closed ports in the Japanese Mandated Islands.
989
July 16 (94) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Authorization to mention the matter of an invitation for the Alden only in the event a suitable opportunity arises.
990
July 28 (163) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Conversation between the Counselor of Embassy and the Vice Foreign Minister, who mentioned among other matters that the Overseas Ministry had not replied to the Foreign Minister’s inquiry regarding the proposed visit of the Alden to Mandated Islands.
990
Aug. 7 (102) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Assumption that there is no prospect of favorable action by Japanese authorities with regard to suggestion in regard to the Alden and advice that an adverse reply is being given to the Japanese Embassy regarding a request for a Japanese training ship to enter a harbor in Hawaii not listed as a port of entry.
990
Aug. 11 (225) To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
For the American Embassy at Tokyo: Instructions to request permission for the U. S. S. Gold Star to visit certain ports including some in the Japanese Mandate.
991
Sept. 4 (177) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Japanese refusal of permission for the Gold Star to visit ports in Japanese Mandate.
991
Sept. 19 (121) To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to notify the Japanese Government of the Navy Department’s change of schedule in the proposed visits of the Gold Star to certain Japanese Mandated Islands, and to state orally that this Government assumes the earlier objection to the proposed visits was because the dates indicated were inconvenient, since the ports have been designated by ordinance as open ports.
991
Oct. 13 (210) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Foreign Office note which states that for various reasons consent cannot be given for the proposed informal visits of the Gold Star to certain Japanese ports; and advice that the British have been given a similar reply to a similar request.
992
[Page XCI]Nov. 13 (2133) From the Chargé in Japan
Foreign Office information regarding the flight of a silver-painted plane over one of the Marianas administered by Japan under mandate and request that if the plane were a Pan American clipper the Pan American Airways be warned against repetition of such flight.
(Footnote: Answered by Department’s instruction No. 1351 of October 12, 1937.)
992

SIAM

Proposed Revision of the Treaty of Friendship and Commerce Between the United States and Siam, Signed December 16, 1920

Date and number Subject Page
1936 Apr. 23 From the Siamese Ministry for Foreign Affairs to the American Legation in Siam
Résumé of negotiations begun in 1933 for the revision of the Treaty of 1920; possible resumption of negotiations in June.
994
Oct. 14 (432) From the Chargé in Siam
Information of the intention of the Siamese Government to present the draft of a new treaty shortly.
996
Oct. 19 (7150/2479) From the Siamese State Councilor for Foreign Affairs to the American Chargé in Siam
Intention of his Government to communicate the draft of a new treaty after notice at an early date of their wish to terminate the present one.
997
Nov. 5 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Siamese Minister, who left a note (infra) terminating the Treaty of 1920 and stated that his Government hoped to negotiate a new treaty at Bangkok.
(Footnote: Acknowledgment of Siamese note was made on November 17.)
998
Nov. 5 From the Siamese Minister
Notice of termination of the Treaty of 1920.
999
Nov. 6 (16) From the Chargé in Siam (tel.)
Receipt of draft of proposed treaty and advice that all treaties with other countries have been simultaneously renounced.
1000