893.01 Inner Mongolia/45: Telegram

The Minister in China (Johnson) to the Secretary of State

415. Prince Teh’s Peiping representative has informed a reliable source that three important Japanese Army officers including Chief of Staff of Kwantung Army called on Prince Teh some weeks ago and told him that if he would declare his independence the Japanese would (1) supply him with arms and money; (2) give him Hsingan Province; (3) train one Mongol division and (4) supply him with additional troops to fight Outer Mongolia. (This appears to be a program for the unification of all Mongols under a Mongol subservient [Page 335]to Japanese direction). The informant stated that Teh told the Japanese he would like to be treated as the Russians treat the Outer Mongols, that is, money and arms are supplied without political interference. Teh has temporarily put off the Japanese by saying that he wishes first to consolidate under him the Mongols of Inner Mongolia in China who are at present unfriendly to him. Teh feels that he can obtain no help from China as the National Government has never treated the Mongols sincerely and as it cannot adequately care for the Peiping-Tientsin area. Meanwhile according to this source the Japanese have informed Fu Tso-yi and Yen Hsi-shan of their intention and although they object they can do nothing.

2.
The present situation in North China appears to render probable the loss by China of Inner Mongolia and the increasing ascendancy of Japan in that area. It seems inadvisable that if and when North China breaks from Nanking, if not before, the Mongols will declare their independence as they can expect no help from China and as they will be in a better position to bargain with the Japanese to meet their present wishes instead of waiting to be conquered by a force which they cannot possibly resist with success.
3.
Definition of the extent of North China in some recent Japanese press reports fail include mention of Chahar which indicates a changing attitude of the Japanese with respect to that area.

By mail to Toyko and Nanking in paraphrase.

Johnson