711.50a12A/1: Telegram

The Secretary of State to the Ambassador in Belgium ( Gibson )

No. 148

Sir: The Department refers to your telegram No. 57, September 1, 1 p.m. and to its telegraphic reply thereto of September 4, 1928,2 on the subject of the inquiry of the Prime Minister of Luxemburg whether this Government would be disposed to sign a treaty of arbitration with the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg.

There are enclosed copies of draft texts of arbitration and conciliation treaties3 similar to those which have recently been proposed by this Government to about thirty and about twenty other countries, respectively. In order to preserve uniformity with the communications which have been addressed to representatives of other countries at Washington in transmitting similar proposals to them, it is suggested that, in sending the draft texts to the Government of Luxemburg, you make use of a note substantially as follows:

Under instructions from my Government I have the honor to transmit herewith for the consideration of Your Excellency’s Government and as a basis for negotiation, drafts of treaties of arbitration and of conciliation between the United States and Luxemburg.

Both of the proposed treaties are identical in effect with treaties of arbitration and of conciliation which were signed at Washington on May 5, 1928, by representatives of the United States and Germany,4 [Page 331] and with similar treaties which have recently been concluded between the United States and other countries. The draft arbitration treaty resembles in some respects the arbitration treaties concluded between the United States and many countries. The draft arbitration treaty resembles in some respects the arbitration treaties concluded between the United States and many countries beginning in 1908, but represents, in the opinion of this Government, a definite advance over the earlier formula. Substantially in the form submitted herewith, treaties have, during the last few months, been signed by the United States with France, Italy, Germany, Denmark, Finland, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Poland, respectively.

The draft conciliation treaty is in all respects similar to the conciliation treaties negotiated in 1913 and 1914 by this Government and made effective with many countries. During recent months such treaties have been signed by the United States with Germany, Finland, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Poland, respectively.

I feel that the Governments of the United States and Luxemburg have an opportunity, by adopting treaties such as those suggested herein, not only to promote friendly relations between the peoples of the two countries, but also to advance materially the cause of arbitration and the pacific settlement of international disputes. If the Government of Luxemburg concurs in this view and is prepared to negotiate treaties along the lines of the two drafts transmitted herewith, I shall be glad to enter at once upon such discussions as may be necessary.

Accept, Excellency, the renewed assurances of my highest consideration.

I am [etc.]

Frank B. Kellogg
  1. Not printed.
  2. Draft texts not printed.
  3. Foreign Relations, 1928, vol. ii, pp. 867, 869.