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Unless otherwise specified, the correspondence is from or to the Secretary of State or other official of the Department of State]

The World War: Participation of the United States

The Course of the War—Cooperation With the Allies—War Aims—Peace Negotiations

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Date and number Subject Page
1917 Apr. 7 To President Wilson
Discussion of the disposition to be made of German merchant ships in American ports.
1
Apr. 8 From President Wilson
Gravely concerned over the matter of disposition of German merchant ships.
2
Apr. 10 To President Wilson
Further discussion of the possibility of requisitioning German merchant ships for transportation uses or seizure of such vessels by way of reprisal.
3
Apr. 10 From President Wilson
Suggests sending to the Ambassador in Great Britain a message to be conveyed to the Prime Minister on the subject of self-government for Ireland.
4
Apr. 12 To President Wilson
Discussion of the attitude of Guatemala and Honduras in connection with the war.
5
Apr. 13 From President Wilson
Approves entering into an understanding with Guatemala. Expresses belief that the time is favorable for proceeding with the proposed Pan-American treaty.
5
Apr. 13 From the Secretary of State, the Secretary of War, and the Secretary of the Navy to President Wilson
Suggests the creation of a committee on public information.
6
Apr. 14 To the Chief of the British Special Mission
Extends greetings on arrival of the British Special Mission in the United States.
7
Apr. 18 From the Ambassador in Italy
Comments on the situation in Italy.
8
Apr. 19 To President Wilson
Suggests issuance of a list of contraband. Encloses draft list (text printed).
10
Apr. 20 From President Wilson
Agrees with Secretary Lansing’s suggestion for the issuance of a list of contraband. Requests further information.
11
Apr. 30 To President Wilson
Suggests the formulation of a plan for postal censorship.
11
1917 Apr, 30 To President Wilson
Suggests the possibility of German peace moves through Austria and of apparent concessions to democracy in Germany. Warns against deception by such actions on the part of Germany.
12
May 4 From the Chief of the British Special Mission
Expresses appreciation for the American destroyer force sent to assist in British naval operations.
13
May 5 To President Wilson
Discussion of the necessity for censorship of postal communication with Latin America.
13
May 5 To President Wilson
Discussion of Mr. Balfour’s suggestion that a person be designated to represent the United States in the War Trade Intelligence Department in London.
15
May 7 From President Wilson
Questions whether a suitable man for such a post would be available.
15
May 9 From the Chief of the British Special Mission
Transmits reports received from London regarding the European situation.
16
May 11 From President Wilson
Expresses the opinion that the American Socialists who might seek to take part in an international Socialist conference should be neither encouraged nor restrained.
17
May 17 To President Wilson
Reports conversations with Mr. Alsberg and Mr. Morgenthau regarding the situation in Turkey.
17
May 18 From the Chief of the British Special Mission
Encloses a copy (text printed) of his statement on foreign policy to the Imperial War Council.
19
May 19 To President Wilson
Requests instructions as to whether passports should be granted to persons proceeding abroad with the purpose of attending the Stockholm Conference.
32
May 19 To the Governor of New York
Directs attention to the effect which a pending bill regarding the use of telephone wires without authorization would have on the activities of Federal agents.
33
May 24 From the Governor of New York
Informs that the bill referred to by Secretary Lansing was vetoed.
34
May 28 To the Governor of New York
Commends the Governor’s action in vetoing the bill on the subject of unauthorized use of telephone wires.
34
June 3 To President Wilson
Reports a conversation with Senator Owen on the subject of Senate Joint Resolution 94, introduced by Senator Owen, dealing with terms of peace.
34
1917 June 21 To President Wilson
Discussion of the best methods of utilizing the desire of the Poles for the restoration of Poland as an independent nation.
35
July 31 From the Ambassador in Italy
Impressions gained on his visit to England. Comments on Baron Sonnino’s visit to London.
36
Aug. 7 From Professor Felix Frankfurter
A report on the situation in France.
38
Aug. 11 Memorandum by the British Ambassador
Requests the views of the Government of the United States regarding the attendance of its citizens at the Stockholm Conference.
42
Aug. 13 To President Wilson
Discussion of the Pope’s appeal to the belligerents.
43
Aug. 14 To President Wilson
Discussion of the British policy in the matter of restricting shipments to neutrals.
43
Aug. 20 To President Wilson
Further discussion of the Pope’s appeal to the belligerents.
44
Aug. 20 To the Secretary of the Treasury
Comments on Secretary McAdoo’s proposal that a communication be sent to the powers to whom money was being loaned regarding the national objectives of the various countries in the war.
45
Sept. 1 To President Wilson
Proposal for the selection of certain leading newspapermen to be organized into an advisory council on publicity.
46
Sept. 4 From President Wilson
Comments on Secretary Lansing’s proposal in the preceding document.
47
Oct. 1 From the Ambassador in Great Britain
Comments on situation in Great Britain.
47
Oct. 3 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Reply given to Senator Kellogg regarding Senator La Follette’s statements on the Lusitania case.
48
Oct. 3 To President Wilson
Reports a conversation with the French Ambassador, who referred to a French proposal to hold an inter-Allied conference on the Russian situation.
48
Oct. 9 From the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections
Encloses an extract from a speech made at St. Paul, Minn., on September 20, 1917, by Senator La Follette. Requests for the use of the Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections a complete statement of the facts concerning the Lusitania incident.
49
1917 Oct. 15 To the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections
Forwards replies to Senator Pomerene’s questions on the Lusitania case.
51
Oct. 16 From the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections
Requests that Secretary Lansing appear before the Committee to submit diplomatic correspondence and other documents relating to the cause of entry of the United States into the war.
53
Oct. 24 From President Wilson
Opinion that it would be a mistake for the British and French Governments to request that Japanese troops should be sent to the Western Front in the coming year.
55
Oct. 24 From President Wilson
Instruction that the Allied Governments be informed that the United States will be represented in the Allied Conference and that Mr. E. M. House has been designated as the representative of the United States.
55
Oct. 24 To the French Ambassador
Forwards the President’s acceptance of the invitation to be represented in the Allied Conference and the designation of Colonel House as his representative.
55
Oct. 24 To the French Ambassador
Formal note conveying the information contained in the preceding document.
56
Oct. 25 To President Wilson
Discussion of the proper form of credentials for Colonel House. Encloses a draft letter of designation (text printed).
56
Oct. 25 From President Wilson
Approves Secretary Lansing’s draft letter of designation for Colonel House.
57
Oct. 25 From the Acting Secretary of the Treasury
Discussion of the exchange operations conducted by the British and French Governments.
57
Nov. 12 (1214) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Reports that principal Italian need is for grain.
60
Nov. 20 To the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections
Declines to appear before the Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections in connection with the investigation being made of Senator La Follette’s statements.
60
Nov. 20 To President Wilson
Reports that the American case against Austria does not seem very strong so far as hostile acts are concerned.
60
Nov. 26 To the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections
Forwards certain statements and documents concerning German submarine warfare.
61
1917 Nov. 28 From President Wilson
Requests a memorandum regarding any legislation which should be considered at the coming session of Congress.
64
Dec. 1 To President Wilson
Encloses memoranda (texts printed) in response to President Wilson’s request in the preceding letter. Suggests the suspension of the Seaman’s Act for the period of the war. Suggests penalties for the presentation of false affidavits to departments of the Government by persons seeking action in support of their interests abroad.
64
Dec. 1 (901) From the Special Representative (tel.)
Reports the proceedings at the meeting of the Supreme War Council on December 1.
68
Dec. 5 To the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections
Indicates Secretary Lansing’s readiness to appear before the Committee if his presence is still desired.
70
Dec. 6 (1272) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Reports the return of Baron Sonnino from the Paris Conference.
70
Dec. 13 To President Wilson
Expresses opinion that the Government should be slow in declaring its attitude with regard to the disposition to be made of Palestine.
71
1918 Jan. 19 From the Representative of the Polish National Committee
Requests financial aid for the Polish National Committee.
71
Jan. 24 From Mr. Frank E. Anderson
Report of a visit to Austria and Hungary in December 1917.
73
Jan. 25 From the Representative of the Polish National Committee
Encloses a memorandum (text printed) proposing the organization of a Polish national military force in the United States.
86
Jan. 25 To President Wilson
Reports Italian dissatisfaction with the statement in President Wilson’s address of January 8 in regard to Austria-Hungary and its possible bearing on the Adriatic question.
89
Jan. 27 To President Wilson
Opinion that attention should be called to Germany’s failure to state war aims clearly.
90
Jan. 28 To President Wilson
Comments on the request for financial assistance to the Polish National Committee.
91
Jan. 29 From President Wilson
Feels it impossible to pledge a regular monthly sum to the Polish National Committee for an indefinite period.
93
Jan. 29 From President Wilson
Comments on the Italian opinion of his address of January 8.
94
1918 Feb. 16 To President Wilson
Expresses opinion that resolutions such as the one adopted by the Financial Section of the Inter-Allied Council on War Purchases and Finance on the subject of the Allied attitude toward Russia are unwise.
94
Feb. 16 From President Wilson
Informs that he was much disturbed by the report of the resolution referred to in the preceding document. Transmits a message to be communicated to the British, French, and Italian Governments referring to this resolution and to the action of the Supreme War Council with regard to conditions of peace.
95
Feb. 18 To President Wilson
Transmits a letter from the Ambassador in Italy (text printed) in which is recommended the sending of a military mission and other means to manifest American support of Italy.
95
Feb. 18 From the Ambassador in France
Comments on conditions in France.
99
Feb. 20 To President Wilson
Discussion of the reply to be made to the appeal from the International Committee of the Red Cross for the discontinuance of the use of poisonous gases by the countries at war.
102
Feb. 21 From President Wilson
Comments on the proposal for a joint reply to the appeal of the International Committee of the Red Cross for the discontinuance of the use of poisonous gases.
103
Feb. 22 To President Wilson
Description of interviews with the British, French, and Italian Ambassadors concerning the political activity of the Supreme War Council and the Inter-Allied Council on War Purchases and Finance.
103
Feb. 23 To President Wilson
Comments on the course to be pursued in dealing with peace proposals from Austria-Hungary.
104
Feb. 23 From the Ambassador in France
Comments on the situation in France.
105
Feb. 28 To President Wilson
Encloses a letter (text printed) from the Secretary of the Provisional Executive Committee for General Zionist Affairs which requests that passports be issued to representatives of the Committee intending to proceed to Palestine together with English Zionists, and that the Department recognize a Zionist medical unit intending to proceed to Palestine for service to the civilian population there. Expresses hesitation at acceding to these requests.
107
Mar. 1 To the British Ambassador on Special Mission
Informs that President Wilson has received a message from the Emperor of Austria expressing agreement with the President’s four principles of peace outlined in the President’s address of February 11.
109
1918 Mar. 12 From the Ambassador in Italy
Comments on conditions in Italy.
110
Mar. 12 From President Wilson
Requests a memorandum on the subject of Senate Resolution 178, which would provide for a revision of the rules of the Senate relating to the consideration of treaties with a view to their being taken up in open sessions of the Senate. Expresses belief that adoption of such a resolution would be unwise.
112
Mar. 23 To President Wilson
Encloses memorandum (text printed) containing objections to public discussion of treaties in the Senate.
113
Mar. 26 From the Ambassador in Italy
Comments on public opinion in Italy.
116
Apr. 8 To Colonel E. M. House
Expresses views on subject of a League of Nations.
118
Apr. 8 From the Governor of New York
Requests opinion as to whether the approval of a so-called wire-tapping bill would in any way embarrass the Federal Government.
120
Apr. 15 To the Governor of New York
Expresses the opinion that nothing should be done to obstruct the exercise of governmental powers in obtaining information in interest of national safety and defense.
120
May 2 To President Wilson
Reports a discussion with the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations with regard to the advisability of declaring war on Turkey and Bulgaria.
121
May 7 From the Ambassador in Italy
Comments on the visit of the King of Montenegro to Italy. Comments on the political situation in Italy.
122
May 8 To President Wilson
Discussion of courses with regard to the advisability of a declaration of war against Turkey and Bulgaria.
124
May 10 To President Wilson
Opinion that a definite policy should be adopted with regard to the various nationalities making up the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
126
May 13 To President Wilson
Encloses a proposed statement on American attitude toward the oppressed races of Austria-Hungary.
128
May 20 To President Wilson
Reports the opinion of the British, French, and Italian Governments and of the Supreme War Council on the advisability of a declaration of war on Turkey and Bulgaria.
128
May 21 To President Wilson
Discussion of the Italian attitude toward the Jugo-Slavs.
129
1918 June 14 To President Wilson
Encloses a draft (text printed) of a House resolution proposed by Representative Gallagher expressing the opinion that the House of Representatives consider the creation of an independent Polish state with access to the sea to be one of the objects for which the United States is fighting in the war.
130
June 27 From the Ambassador in France
Comments on the situation in France.
131
June 29 To President Wilson
Opinion that the declaration of sympathy for the Czecho-Slovaks and Jugo-Slavs was better issued independently than jointly with the Allies.
137
July 1 From President Wilson
Encloses a message (text printed) to be conveyed to Professor George D. Herron on the subject of a Society of Nations.
138
July 8 From President Wilson
Expresses the opinion that the adoption of Representative Gallagher’s resolution on the subject of an independent Polish state would be unwise and that action should not be taken piecemeal about the items of a final settlement.
138
July 11 To Representative Thomas Gallagher
Conveys the President’s views with regard to the proposed resolution on the subject of Poland.
139
Aug. 19 To President Wilson
Discussion of policy to be followed with regard to Austria-Hungary and its national elements and the question of the recognition of the Czecho-Slovaks as a sovereign nation.
139
Aug. 22 From President Wilson
Considerations governing his attitude toward the national elements of Austria-Hungary.
141
Aug. 29 From President Wilson
Instructs that there should be intimated to the British Government the hope and expectation that reciprocal arrangements may be made for the purchase of supplies in England upon the same terms as were available to the British Government and to the civilian population of Great Britain.
141
Aug. 30 To President Wilson
Reports discussion with the British Ambassador of proposed British action to raise the price of wheat.
142
Aug. 31 To President Wilson
Reports disposition among newspapermen to comment on the silence of the Government with regard to the Czechoslovak national movement.
143
Aug. 31 To President Wilson
Requests President Wilson’s opinion on the views of General Pershing as to political action desirable to hasten the conclusion of the war.
143
1918 Sept. 2 From President Wilson
Expresses surprise at General Pershing’s expression of views on political matters.
143
Sept. 2 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that there can be no objection to British action with regard to the price of wheat.
144
Sept. 2 From President Wilson
Encloses a suggested modification of the wording of the proposed declaration with regard to the belligerency of the Czecho-Slovaks.
144
Sept. 4 To President Wilson
Considerations on the question of whether the Associated Governments should give one another the benefit of governmental prices in the purchase of goods which are required for the conduct of military operations.
145
Sept. 5 From President Wilson
Expresses the opinion that the subject referred to in the preceding document should be allowed to rest for the present.
146
Sept. 14 From the Military Representative on the Supreme War Council
Forwards Joint Note No. 37 of the Military Representatives on the Supreme War Council on the subject of the general military policy of the Allies for the autumn of 1918 and for the year 1919.
146
Sept. 24 From the Ambassador in Italy
Comments on the Italian military situation.
154
Sept. 27 To President Wilson
Discussion of the advisability of threatening reprisals for German destruction of property in the occupied regions of France and Belgium.
156
Sept. 30 To President Wilson
Discussion of the advisability of insisting to the Allied Governments that a separate peace treaty should not be made with Bulgaria, but that all questions relating to territory in the Balkan region should be postponed for consideration in the general peace conference.
157
Sept. 30 To President Wilson
Reports an interview with the Bulgarian Minister regarding the conclusion of the armistice between the Allies and Bulgaria.
158
Undated [Rec’d Oct. 1] Memorandum by President Wilson
Expresses opinion that the American Government regards questions concerning any of the Balkan states to be essential parts of the general peace settlement and that treating peace with Bulgaria separately would make the final consideration of many matters very difficult.
158
1918 Oct. 1 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Reports an interview with the French Ambassador who stated that he was advised that the French Government considered it unwise to discuss terms of peace with Bulgaria separately and that settlement of the Balkan question should be postponed until the general peace conference.
158
Oct. 4 To President Wilson
Suggests the issuance of a statement on the subject of German destruction of property and removal of citizens from the occupied areas, to the effect that those found responsible for such acts would be held liable therefor and that, if such acts continued, it would be impossible to restrain the American troops from similar excesses in the event that German cities and villages should fall into their hands.
159
Oct. 7 To President Wilson
Encloses the Austro-Hungarian offer to conclude an armistice. Comments on the attitude to be taken toward the offer.
160
Oct. 9 From the Military Representative on the Supreme War Council
Comments on the attitude taken by him toward proposed joint notes of the Military Representatives on the Supreme War Council on the policy of the Allies with regard to intervention in Russia.
160
Oct. 22 From the Ambassador in Italy
Comments on conditions in Italy. Encloses a letter to Colonel House (text printed) containing further comments on the Italian situation.
163
Oct. 23 From President Wilson
Encloses proposed form in which correspondence between the United States and Germany should be submitted to the Allied Governments.
167
Oct. 26 To President Wilson
Discusses views of the Italian and French Ambassadors on the attitude to be taken by the United States in regard to the response to be made by the United States to the Turkish note requesting intervention in the matter of an armistice.
167
Oct. 30 From the Italian Ambassador
Sets forth Italian view that any armistice to Germany should be coupled with an Austro-Hungarian armistice.
168
Oct. 31 (14) From the Special Representative (tel.)
Transmits a communication submitted by General Pershing to the Supreme War Council regarding the desirability of granting an armistice to Germany.
169
Nov. 2 (36) From the Special Representative (tel.)
Reports that the subject mentioned in the preceding document has been adjusted satisfactorily.
171
Nov. 7 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Describes scenes in Washington at the time of the receipt of premature news of the conclusion of the Armistice.
171
1918 Nov. 10 From the German Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
Appeal to the President to use his influence with the Allied Powers in order to mitigate the conditions of the Armistice.
173

Conscription of Aliens by the United States

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Date and number Subject Page
1917 May 16 (186) To the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Forwards the text of a statement given to the press by the Department declaring that there is no intention on the part of the American Government to draft foreigners into military service.
174
Aug. 14 To President Wilson
Calls attention to difficulties arising out of provisions of the Draft Act as applied to various classes of citizens of foreign countries.
174
Aug. 20 To President Wilson
Requests President Wilson’s views on the position under the provisions of the Draft Act of Spanish subjects of military age who might be thought to be exempted from military service by the Treaty of 1902.
175
Aug. 27 To President Wilson
Reports embarrassment caused by the lack of a definite rule as to the drafting of aliens.
176
Sept. 4 To President Wilson
Encloses a letter (text printed) from the Secretary of War in which it is held that the Draft Act abrogates conflicting treaties of exemption by reason of its subsequent enactment.
176
Sept. 5 To President Wilson
Requests the President to make his position on the drafting of aliens a matter of record by sending a letter of approval of Secretary Baker’s position.
180
Sept. 24 Memorandum by the Assistant Solicitor for the Department of State
Records willingness of the President as Commander in Chief to consider requests for the discharge of Spanish subjects and nationals of other countries with treaties of exemption, who have been drafted into military service.
180
Dec. 22 To the Minister in Chile (tel.)
Outlines the American position with regard to the drafting of aliens who may have declared their intention to become citizens of the United States, and points out the willingness of the President as Commander in Chief to consider the discharge of any aliens who might have been drafted, if their Governments should request such action and if evidence of alien nationality be furnished. Declares that if such aliens have been conscripted, it was due to their inability or failure to establish their alien nationality.
181
1918 Feb. 7 To President Wilson
Further discussion of difficulties arising out of the application of the Selective Service Act to aliens in the United States. Encloses draft (text printed) of a proposed amendment to the Selective Service Act of May 18, 1917 (Draft Act), to eliminate some of these difficulties.
182
Mar. 18 To President Wilson
Discusses the discharge of neutral aliens (declarants and nondeclarants) who have been incorporated in the Army under the Draft Act. Expresses hope of the possibility of the release of subjects or citizens of neutral countries having no treaties of exemption with the United States.
185
Apr. 6 To President Wilson
Reports protests from diplomatic representatives of neutral countries over the incorporation of citizens of those countries in the Army under the provisions of the Draft Act.
187
Apr. 11 From President Wilson
Communicates the policy to be followed with regard to aliens drafted into the military service of the United States.
188
May 2 To President Wilson
Discussion of the distinction between treaty countries and nontreaty countries with regard to the discharge of their citizens who may have been drafted into the military service of the United States.
188
May 21 To President Wilson
Encloses correspondence (texts printed) with the Secretary of War in regard to the detention of neutral aliens pending the outcome of investigations preliminary to their discharge from the Army. Expresses belief that amendments to the Draft Act are necessary to clarify the situation.
190
May 22 To President Wilson
Encloses copy, received from the War Department, of an order issued by the Adjutant General of the Army to the effect that upon receipt through the Department of State of applications for the discharge from military service of citizens or subjects of foreign countries, steps will be taken to insure the retention of such persons in the United States pending the investigation necessary for a final decision upon their applications.
194
May 24 From President Wilson
Suggests that Secretary Lansing seek an opportunity to present to the military committees of the two Houses of Congress the necessity of amendments to the Draft Act.
195
July 29 To President Wilson
Raises the question of whether the amendment to the Draft Act should be applied to neutral aliens drafted into the Army before the passage of the amendment or merely to those who have been or are to be drafted since the amendment.
195
Oct. 5 To President Wilson
Raises the question of the release from the Army of Turkish declarants who have been inducted into the military service.
197
1918 Oct. 17 From President Wilson
Encloses a letter (text printed) from the Acting Secretary of War informing of his agreement with the Secretary of State that for the purposes of the administration of the Draft Act subjects of Turkey should be treated as though they were alien enemies.
198

Report of General Tasker H. Bliss, Military Representative of the United States on the Supreme War Council

Date and number Subject Page
1920 Feb. 19 From the Military Representative on the Supreme War Council
Encloses report on the work of the Supreme War Council (text printed).
199

RUSSIA

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Date and number Subject Page
1915 Undated Memorandum by the Counselor for the Department of State of Interviews With the Russian Ambassador, April 2 and April 6, 1915
Discussion of certain comments upon Russia and the Czar appearing in President Wilson’s book When a Man Comes to Himself.
307
Apr. 3 To President Wilson
Reports interview with the Russian Ambassador concerning comments upon Russia and the Czar in the reprint of President Wilson’s book.
307
Apr. 5 From President Wilson
Requests that the Russian Ambassador be told that the passages referred to did not express the President’s present opinion.
308
1916 Undated [Rec.’d May 2] (526) From the Ambassador in Russia (tel.)
Reports arrival in Russia. Comments on conditions there.
309
May 2 From the Ambassador in Russia
Comments on conditions in Russia.
310
May 7 From the Ambassador in Russia
Comments on conditions in Russia.
313
July 25 From the Ambassador in Russia
Comments on conditions in Russia.
315
Aug. 14 From the Ambassador in Russia
Comments on conditions in Russia.
318
1917 Feb. 11 From the Ambassador in Russia
Comments on conditions in Russia.
320
1917 Apr. 5 To President Wilson
Suggests a communication to the Russian Government congratulating the Russian people upon the establishment of democratic institutions in that country.
324
Apr. 11 To President Wilson
Suggests the sending of a commission to Russia. Encloses telegram of April 10 (text printed) from the Ambassador in Russia regarding the unsatisfactory military and naval situation there.
325
Apr. 12 From President Wilson
Approves of the suggestion of a commission to Russia. Discussion of possible personnel of such a commission.
326
Apr. 12 To President Wilson
Discussion of the personnel of the proposed commission to Russia.
326
Apr. 19 From President Wilson
Forwards a tentative list of the personnel of the proposed commission to Russia.
327
Apr. 20 To President Wilson
Suggests the sending of a message intended for the Russian people expressing the confidence of the American people in the success of democratic government there and the American desire to aid Russia in the struggle against Germany.
328
Apr. 30 To President Wilson
Suggests sending a message to the Ambassador in Russia intended to remove any erroneous impression that joint conferences were being held between the American Government and the Allies without Russia being a party thereto.
328
May 6 From the Ambassador on Special Mission to Russia
Suggests that the Railroad Commission to Russia be attached to the Root Mission.
329
May 7 To President Wilson
Forwards Mr. Root’s letter regarding the Railroad Commission. Encloses two drafts (texts printed) of a proposed letter to Mr. Stevens of the Railroad Commission outlining the relation intended to exist between the Root Mission and the Railroad Commission.
329
May 7 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that it would be undesirable to make the Railroad Commission subsidiary to the Root Mission.
331
May 8 From the Ambassador in Russia
Comments on conditions in Russia. Encloses editorial from the Petrograd Rjetch (text printed).
331
May 9 To the Ambassador on Special Mission to Russia
Conveys the President’s views with regard to the relationship between the Root Mission and the Railroad Commission.
336
May 10 From President Wilson
Forwards a further tentative list of the personnel of the Root Mission.
337
1917 May 17 To President Wilson
Reports that certain passages from the President’s addresses are being used by the radical socialists to promote a policy which would remove the incentive to Russian offensive military operations. Suggests the issuance of an interpretation of these passages to prevent such an effect.
338
June 1 From President Wilson
Expresses hope that the new forces in Russia may be guided by the democratic principles set forth in the recent statement by the Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs.
338
July 5 To President Wilson
Expresses the opinion that it would be unwise for Mr. Root or any members of the Root Mission to stop in Japan on their return to the United States.
339
Aug. 13 To President Wilson
Encloses a message (text printed) to the people of Russia from the United States Railway Advisory Commission issued by the Stevens Commission on July 4, 1917. Expresses belief that Mr. Stevens may be assuming unwarranted authority. Recommends that Stevens be told that the Commission is not a diplomatic one.
339
Aug. 14 From President Wilson
Encloses the text of a message to be sent to Mr. Stevens reminding him that the impression should not be created that he or his associates speak for the Government of the United States.
342
Sept. 10 To President Wilson
Encloses a message (text printed) from the Russian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Russian Ambassador in which gratification is expressed that the principles upon which the President’s answer to the Pope’s peace note was based fully agreed with Russian policy.
342
Dec. 10 To President Wilson
Discussion of whether support ought to be given to certain Russian elements opposed to the Bolsheviki.
343
Dec. 12 To President Wilson
Encloses the draft of a message (text printed) for the American representative on the Inter-Allied Council on War Purchases and Finance outlining the considerations governing possible assistance to the Kaledine group in Russia.
345
1918 Jan. 2 To President Wilson
Discussion of the Bolshevik communication of December 29, 1917, addressed to the peoples and governments of the Allied countries. Expresses opinion that no reply should be made.
346
Jan. 10 To President Wilson
Encloses draft statement (text printed) to be issued by the Secretary of State outlining the attitude of the United States Government toward the Russian situation.
349
Jan. 20 From President Wilson
Discussion of Japanese naval activity at Vladivostok.
351
1918 Jan. 24 To President Wilson
Inquires whether the telegram sent to the Ambassador in Japan on January 20 regarding proposals for Japanese action in Vladivostok and in Siberia would be sufficient for the time.
351
Jan. 28 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that the action referred to in the preceding document would be sufficient for the present.
352
Feb. 15 To President Wilson
Discussion of policy to be adopted toward revolutionary forces in Europe and toward the proposed Socialist meeting at Stockholm.
352
Feb. 27 To President Wilson
Reports interviews with the British and French Ambassadors regarding Japanese desire to occupy Siberia with a military force.
353
Undated Draft Telegram to the Ambassador in Japan
Intended to indicate the unwillingness of the United States to join the Allied Governments in asking the Japanese Government to act in Siberia.
(Footnote: This draft was handed to Secretary Lansing on March 1. It was shown to the British, French, and Italian Ambassadors but was not sent.)
355
Mar. 5 From the Counselor for the Department of State
Reports interviews with the British, French, Italian, and Japanese Ambassadors regarding the Siberian situation.
356
Mar. 21 To President Wilson
Transmits telegrams received by the British Ambassador from the Foreign Office dealing with the Siberian situation.
357
Mar. 22 From President Wilson
Does not regard the papers received from the British Ambassador as sufficient cause for altering the American position on Siberia.
357
Mar. 24 To President Wilson
Considerations regarding possible occupation of important points in Siberia by a German military force.
357
Undated [Rec’d May 18] From the Japanese Ambassador
Conveys the substance of a note exchanged between the Japanese and Chinese Governments on March 25, 1918, regarding consultation on the subject of the penetration of German influence into Russian territories in the Far East.
359
Apr. 8 From the British Embassy
Informs of the receipt of a telegram from the Foreign Office regarding employment of American railway experts in Russia.
359
Apr. 18 From President Wilson
Requests a memorandum containing information about nuclei of self-government in Siberia.
360
May 16 To President Wilson
Reports interviews with the British Ambassador, who presented two memoranda regarding intervention in Russia and Siberia.
360
1918 May 20 From President Wilson
Comments on the papers presented by the British Ambassador regarding intervention in Russia and Siberia.
361
June 13 To President Wilson
Suggests the creation of a “Commission for the Relief of Russia” to be headed by Mr. Hoover, and to be guided in all questions of foreign policy by the Department of State.
362
June 17 From President Wilson
Comments on the suggestion of the Minister in China that Czecho-Slovak troops might be organized to resist the Germans in Siberia.
363
June 19 To President Wilson
Forwards a report from the Consul at Moscow regarding the sentiments of the Russian Cooperative Societies.
363
June 19 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that the Russian Cooperative Societies may be useful forces in Siberia.
364
June 23 To President Wilson
Expresses belief that the Czecho-Slovak forces in Siberia might form a nucleus for military occupation of the Siberian railway.
364
June 26 From the Japanese Ambassador
Transmits paraphrased copy (text printed) of a telegram received from the Japanese Government regarding the Japanese reply to the proposal of the Allied Governments to undertake common action in Siberia.
365
July 1 From Lt. Col. Raymond Robins
Forwards a statement of recommendations concerning the Russian situation (text printed) containing suggestions for American economic cooperation with Russia.
365
July 8 To President Wilson
Inquires whether Chinese troops holding the Manchurian railway ought to be considered in connection with the guarding of the Siberian railway in aid of the Czecho-Slovaks and whether the Allied Governments, including the Chinese, ought to be advised of the proposed American policy with regard to Siberia.
372
July 10 To President Wilson
Reports a conversation with the Japanese Ambassador on the subject of the command of the combined forces in Siberia.
373
Aug. 16 From the British Charge
Informs that the British Government have accepted the view of the Japanese Government that the supreme command of the Allied forces in Siberia should be Japanese,
373
Aug. 18 To President Wilson
Discusses the extension of Japanese military activities in Siberia. Encloses a communication (text printed) from Japanese Foreign Office to Japanese Ambassador concerning the situation at Manchuli. Encloses a communication from the French Ambassador (text printed) conveying information received about the military situation in Siberia. Encloses a telegram (text printed) from Admiral Knight to the Secretary of the Navy requesting the extension of American assistance to the Czecho-Slovaks.
374
1918 Aug. 22 To President Wilson
Transmits a communication from the French Embassy proposing the sending of a High Commissioner to Siberia. Recommends that reply be made that the American Government does not intend to appoint a High Commissioner.
378
Aug. 23 From President Wilson
Approves Secretary Lansing’s proposed reply to the French Embassy indicating that the American Government does not intend to appoint a High Commissioner in Siberia.
378
Aug. 29 To President Wilson
Discussion of the question of supplies for the Czecho-Slovaks in Siberia.
379
Sept. 2 From President Wilson
Suggests a conference with Mr. Baruch on the question of supplies for the Czecho-Slovaks in Siberia. Comments on the relationship between the Japanese and Czecho-Slovak military forces.
380
Sept. 4 To President Wilson
Suggests the possibility of a loan to the Czecho-Slovak National Council for the purchase in this country of supplies for Czecho-Slovaks in Siberia.
380
Sept. 5 From President Wilson
Disapproves Secretary Lansing’s suggestion of a loan for the purchase of supplies for the Czecho-Slovaks in Siberia.
381
Sept. 5 To President Wilson
Reports a conversation with Mr. Baruch regarding Czechoslovak relief.
381
Sept. 9 To President Wilson
Discussion of the question of supplies for the Czecho-Slovak military forces in Siberia and Russia, relief of the civilian population in Siberia, and assistance to the civilian population on the Murman Coast and in the Archangel District.
381
Sept. 14 To the General Director of the Foreign Section of the Committee on Public Information
Requests the postponement of publication of documents attacking Lenin and Trotsky in order to insure the safety of Americans in Russia.
384
Sept. 14 From the General Director of the Foreign Section of the Committee on Public Information
Expresses belief that publication of the documents would not add to the peril of Americans in Russia.
385
Sept. 17 From President Wilson
Instructs that inquiry should be made of the British, French, and Italian Governments as to the nature and authority of the so-called Allied Military Council at Vladivostok and that intimation he given that the American Government does not recognize the authority of such a body.
385
Sept. 20 From President Wilson
Comments on a telegram from the Secretary of War regarding M. Clemenceau’s request that additional American troops be sent to Murmansk.
386
1918 Sept. 24 To President Wilson
Discussion of the position of the Czecho-Slovak force west of the Urals.
386
Sept. 27 To President Wilson
Informs that Secretary Lansing had been told by the Italian Ambassador that Italy would send no High Commissioner to Siberia and that the Italian Government desired to conform to the American policy in such matters.
388
Sept. 30 From the President of the Czecho-Slovak National Council
Encloses notes (text printed) on the American memorandum of September 27 on the subject of the military policy of the United States in Russia and Siberia. Comments on the military situation in Russia and Siberia.
388
1919 Dec. 4 To President Wilson
Expresses opinion that the question of American policy with regard to the Russian situation should be laid before Congress.
392
Dec. 23 To President Wilson
Encloses a memorandum to be read to the Japanese Ambassador discussing the withdrawal of American forces from Siberia.
392
1921 Oct. 3 Notes Prepared by Mr. Robert Lansing Concerning Certain Phases of the Negotiations and Conversations Relating to Military Intervention in Siberia in 1918 393

THE FAR EAST

Japanese in the United States

Date and number Subject Page
1915 Jan. 23 To President Wilson
Reports conversations with the Japanese Ambassador regarding the conclusion of a treaty which would guarantee to Japanese in the United States equal treatment with other aliens.
399
Jan. 27 From President Wilson
Expresses the opinion that such an agreement should be concluded at an opportune time, but that there should first be considered Japanese intentions in China and the Japanese attitude toward the open door in the Far East.
400
Mar. 8 To President Wilson
Discusses possible relief of the Japanese situation on the Pacific Coast by dispersion of the Japanese throughout the country.
400
Mar. 8 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that Secretary Bryan’s proposed solution might aggravate the situation.
402
1917 May 16 From Colonel E. M. House
Encloses correspondence (texts printed) with the Japanese Ambassador concerning plans for improving Japanese-American relations by adjustments in the treatment of Japanese resident in the United States.
402
[Page XXIV]

Attitude of the United States Toward Foreign Influence in China

[Page XXV][Page XXVI]
Date and number Subject Page
1915 Feb. 22 To President Wilson
Discussion of the 21 demands of Japan on China.
405
Feb. 25 From President Wilson
Approves of presenting very frankly to Japan the American views on the 21 demands.
407
Mar. 1 From the Counselor for the Department of State
Comments on the position to be taken by the United States with regard to the 21 demands.
407
Mar. 10 From President Wilson
Inquires whether the note to Japan on the 21 demands has been sent.
409
Mar. 12 From President Wilson
Approves the note to Japan on the 21 demands.
409
Mar. 22 To President Wilson
Discussion of a telegram of March 21, 1915, received from the Ambassador in Japan describing an interview with the Japanese Minister for Foreign Affairs in which various aspects of Japanese policy in China were discussed.
409
Mar. 24 From President Wilson
Comments on the telegram received from the Ambassador in Japan referred to in the preceding document.
411
Mar. 25 To President Wilson
Forwards a proposed telegram to the Ambassador in Japan in which he is instructed to inform the Japanese Government that the United States has no objection to an arrangement between Japan and China looking toward the withholding by China of any concession to any foreign power which might involve harbor improvement on the coast of Fukien or the establishment of a coaling station or naval base on that coast by any foreign power.
412
Mar. 25 To President Wilson
Forwards an additional proposed telegram in regard to the Japanese demands on the subject of advisers, arms, and police supervision in China.
413
Mar. 26 To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Outlines position to be taken with regard to the Japanese demands on the subject of advisers, arms, and police supervision in China.
414
Apr. 6 To President Wilson
Forwards a telegram (text printed) from the Ambassador in Japan conveying information which he had received from the Japanese Minister for Foreign Affairs regarding Japanese demands on the subject of the Han-yeh-p’ing works.
415
Apr. 14 From President Wilson
Approves the despatch of a telegram to the Minister in China indicating continued friendly interest on the part of the United States in the industrial and political welfare of China.
416
Apr. 15 To the Minister in China (tel.)
Conveys the text of a statement to be given out to the effect that the American Government has not surrendered any of its treaty rights in China and continues its friendly interest in everything concerning the industrial and political welfare of China.
417
1915 Apr. 27 From President Wilson
Discussion of the desirability of making public the Government’s position with regard to the Chinese situation.
417
May 3 To President Wilson
Comments on a memorandum left by the Japanese Ambassador on April 30, 1915, regarding the progress of negotiations between Japan and China.
418
May 6 To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to call upon the Foreign Office and urge that negotiations between China and Japan be conducted amicably.
422
May 6 To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Instructions to deliver to Count Okuma a personal and unofficial communication from Secretary Bryan containing an appeal for the use of his influence for the maintenance of peace between Japan and China.
422
May 6 (1519) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to inquire of the Foreign Office whether the British Government would join in an appeal to Japan and China to continue their negotiations in a spirit of friendship.
(Sent, mutatis mutandis, to the Ambassadors in France and Russia.)
423
May 6 To the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Forwards text of personal telegram to be delivered to Count Okuma and text of telegram to the Ambassadors in Great Britain, France, and Russia. Declares it to be of highest importance that friendly relations between Japan and China should not be interrupted.
423
May 7 From the Counselor for the Department of State
Forwards a note to be sent to Japan and China indicating that the United States Government cannot recognize any agreements between Japan and China which would impair the treaty rights of the United States in China, the political or territorial integrity of China, or the open-door policy.
424
May 8 To President Wilson
Encloses telegram from the Ambassador in Great Britain (text printed) giving the text of a memorandum from the British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs to the Japanese Ambassador in Great Britain, and a telegram (text printed) from the Chargé in Japan in which he reported the delivery of Secretary Bryan’s personal telegram to Count Okuma.
424
May 10 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that Sir Edward Grey’s action was wise and that Secretary Bryan’s personal message to Count Okuma would have more than a temporary effect.
426
May 10 From President Wilson
Approves Mr. Lansing’s suggestion contained in his letter of May 7.
426
Oct. 27 To President Wilson
Discussion of the possible restoration of a monarchy in China.
426
1915 Oct. 28 From the Minister in China (tel.)
Reports concern of Chinese Ministers over Japanese attitude toward possible restoration of monarchy in China.
427
Oct. 29 To President Wilson
Encloses a memorandum from the Chinese Minister regarding the establishment of a monarchical form of government in China.
428
Oct. 31 From President Wilson
Suggests that intimation be given to the Japanese and other Governments that it is the American point of view that a change in the form of government of China would be wholly a domestic question.
428
Dec. 4 From the Minister in China (tel.)
Comments on the attitude of Great Britain, Russia, and Japan toward the situation in China.
429
Dec. 5 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that a conversation should be had with the Japanese Ambassador about the Chinese situation and that Japan should be informed how the United States would look upon Japanese efforts to gain further control of China.
430
1917 June 22 From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Reports that the Japanese Minister for Foreign Affairs had handed him on June 18 a copy of a memorandum of the Japanese Ambassador to the Secretary of State of June 15, 1917. Reports that this copy contained the declaration, “Japan possesses paramount interests both political and economic in China”.
430
June 30 To President Wilson
Encloses copy of memorandum read to Secretary Lansing by the Japanese Ambassador on June 15, 1917, containing the request that the statement made by Secretary Bryan in his note of March 13, 1915, to the Japanese Ambassador, regarding American interest in China, should be confirmed. Suggests a form of reply.
430
July 3 From President Wilson
Approves Secretary Lansing’s proposed reply with certain alterations.
431

The Lansing-Ishii Negotiations

[Page XXVII][Page XXVIII]
Date and number Subject Page
1917 Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conference With the Japanese Ambassador on Special Mission, September 6, 1917
Discussion of cooperation between Japan and the Allies and the United States in the war. Reference to the disposition of the former German islands in the South Pacific. Secretary Lansing’s proposal that the co-belligerents against Germany should redeclare the open-door policy.
432
1917 Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conference With the Japanese Ambassador on Special Mission, September 22, 1917
Further discussion of the open door and the proposed redeclaration on that subject. Discussion of the nature of Japanese interest in China.
435
Sept. 25 To President Wilson
Encloses memoranda of two interviews with Viscount Ishii. Requests the President’s views.
437
Undated From. President Wilson
Acknowledges the receipt of the memoranda referred to in the preceding document. Mentions a conversation between himself and Viscount Ishii.
438
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conference with the Japanese Ambassador on Special Mission, September 26, 1917
Account of discussion with Viscount Ishii. Preparation of a draft (text printed) of a note setting forth the policies of the two Governments with regard to China.
438
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conference With the Japanese Ambassador on Special Mission, October 8, 1917
Submission by Viscount Ishii of a counterdraft of the proposed note relative to a redeclaration of the open-door policy.
441
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conference With the Japanese Ambassador on Special Mission, October 10, 1917
Account of a discussion with Viscount Ishii concerning textual changes in the proposed note relative to the open-door policy.
441
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conference With the Japanese Ambassador on Special Mission, October 20, 1917
Further discussion of textual changes in the proposed note.
443
Oct. 20 To President Wilson
Informs of intention to request Viscount Ishii to add to the notes exchanged a confidential memorandum. Encloses draft (text printed) of confidential memorandum intended to accompany the reply of the Japanese Government in the proposed exchange of notes.
444
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conference With the Japanese Ambassador on Special Mission, October 22, 1917
Submission to Viscount Ishii of Secretary Lansing’s proposed confidential memorandum to accompany the reply of the Japanese Government, and Secretary Lansing’s redraft (text printed) of the proposed notes.
445
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conference With the Japanese Ambassador on Special Mission, October 27, 1917
Information received from Viscount Ishii to the effect that the Japanese Government did not favor the confidential memorandum proposed by Secretary Lansing, but that instead he was instructed to propose a protocol in the nature of a joint memorandum.
447
1917 Oct. 27 To President Wilson
Reports the interview of October 27 with Viscount Ishii and refers to the Japanese proposal for a protocol to be retained confidentially.
448
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conference With the Japanese Ambassador on Special Mission, October 29, 1917
Discussion of textual changes in the proposed protocol.
448
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conference With the Japanese Ambassador on Special Mission, October 81, 1917
Information received from Viscount Ishii that the suggested amendments in the proposed protocol were acceptable to his Government. Discussion of arrangements for publication of the notes to be exchanged.
449
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conference With the Japanese Ambassador on Special Mission, November 2, 1917
Account of the exchange of notes and the signature of the protocol.
449
Nov. 2 Protocol to Accompany Exchange of Notes Between the Secretary of State and the Japanese Ambassador on Special Mission 450
Nov. 5 Memorandum by Mr. Hugh S. Gibson, Division of Foreign Intelligence, Department of State
Copies of the notes exchanged between Secretary Lansing and the Japanese Special Ambassador handed to the Chinese Minister.
451
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of Slate of an Interview With the Chinese Minister, November 12, 1917
Discussion of Chinese attitude toward the exchange of notes between Secretary Lansing and Viscount Ishii.
451

Shantung

Date and number Subject Page
1919 Aug. 4 To President Wilson
Encloses public statement of the Japanese Government in regard to Shantung. Suggests that the President prepare a statement of his understanding of the agreement reached at Paris with regard to Shantung. Encloses copy of a draft (text printed) of a proposed declaration to be made by Japan regarding the Shantung question which had been submitted to Baron Makino, Mr. Balfour, and M. Clemenceau at Paris.
454
Aug. 6 From President Wilson
Forwards statement to be given to the press with regard to Shantung.
455
[Page XXIX]

LATIN AMERICA

The Monroe Doctrine

Date and number Subject Page
1914 June 16 From the Counselor for the Department of State
Encloses a memorandum (text printed) entitled “Present Nature and Extent of the Monroe Doctrine, and Its Need of Restatement.”
459
1915 Feb. 25 To President Wilson
Forwards a communication received from the French Ambassador regarding French interests in Haiti in which the proposal was made that France should be taken into partnership in measures proposed for the financial reorganization of Haiti. Suggests that answer should be made that partnership with any-country in any political influence exerted in Haiti would be inconsistent with the Monroe Doctrine and that any American influence there would be exerted impartially for the protection of the interests of the nationals of all countries.
465
Feb. 26 From President Wilson
Indicates agreement with Secretary Bryan’s suggested answer to the French proposal with regard to Haiti.
466
Nov. 24 To President Wilson
Forwards a further memorandum on the “Present Nature and Extent of the Monroe Doctrine” (extract printed).
466
Nov. 29 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that Secretary Lansing’s argument in his memorandum on the Monroe Doctrine would appear to be unanswerable.
470

The Proposed Pan-American Treaty

[Page XXX][Page XXXI][Page XXXII]
Date and number Subject Page
1915 Jan. 28 From President Wilson
Encloses draft article (text printed) for a proposed Pan-American Treaty.
471
Jan. 29 From President Wilson
Encloses four draft articles of agreement (text printed) for proposed Pan-American Treaty.
472
Feb. 1 To the Chilean Ambassador
Encloses draft of Pan-American Treaty. Suggests that the Ambassador call to discuss the language of the proposed convention.
(Sent, mutatis mutandis, to the Argentine and Brazilian Ambassadors.)
473
Mar. 8 To President Wilson
Reports progress of negotiations with Brazil, Argentina, and Chile on the subject of the proposed Pan-American Treaty.
473
Mar. 8 From President Wilson
Directs that the treaty be drawn in such a way that those nations not accepting it at once would have an opportunity to ratify it at a future time.
475
1915 Apr. 3 To President Wilson
Reports that the Chilean Ambassador had understood from Colonel House that the proposed treaty would not be presented to other countries unless it had the approval of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile.
475
Apr. 5 From President Wilson
Suggests a conversation with the Argentine Ambassador to ascertain whether he received the same understanding from Colonel House as the Chilean Ambassador.
476
Apr. 21 To President Wilson
Forwards a communication from the Chilean Ambassador in which it was stated that he had understood that the matter was not to be proposed to other governments unless it was approved by Brazil, Argentina, and Chile, and also containing objections to the guarantee of a republican form of government and to the guarantee of territorial integrity.
476
Apr. 22 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that it would be best to draft an agreement to which Argentina and Brazil would subscribe, leaving Chile free to decide whether to adhere or not.
479
Apr. 23 From the Chargé in Uruguay (tel.)
Reports inquiry from the Uruguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs as to the attitude of the United States toward Uruguay’s associating herself with the proposed agreement between the A. B. C. countries.
479
Apr. 24 To President Wilson
Forwards the foregoing communication from the Chargé in Uruguay. Expresses opinion that the United States cannot undertake to decide who are to be included in the proposed agreement between the A. B. C. countries.
480
Apr. 26 From President Wilson
Recommends a talk with the Argentine Ambassador on the matter discussed in the preceding letter.
481
Apr. 27 From President Wilson
Approves of draft of letter to the Chilean Ambassador regarding the proposed Pan-American Treaty.
481
Apr. 29 To the Chilean Ambassador
Reply to the communication from the Chilean Ambassador discussed in Secretary Bryan’s letter of April 21. Discussion of the Ambassador’s impression that the treaty would not be presented to other governments unless it were first approved by Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. Discussion of the objections raised to the guarantee of a republican form of government and to the guarantee of territorial integrity.
482
May 19 To President Wilson
Forwards a memorandum received from the Brazilian Ambassador regarding the proposed treaty. Suggests that the plan be communicated confidentially to the representatives of other Latin American countries.
484.
1915 Sept. 10 To President Wilson
Forwards a telegram (text printed) from the Ambassador in Chile, who was of the opinion that the Chilean Government could be brought to accept substantially the President’s plan for the proposed treaty and suggested that negotiations be opened on the subject at Santiago.
485
Sept. 11 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that the Ambassador in Chile should be authorized to proceed with negotiations at Santiago,
486
Oct. 12 From Colonel E. M. House
Reviews his part in the negotiations for the proposed Pan-American Treaty.
486
Oct. 28 To President Wilson
Reports negotiations with the Argentine Ambassador, who suggested certain changes in the proposed treaty, including the removal of a time limit for the settlement of disputed territorial claims.
488
Oct. 27 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that, while alteration involving the removal of the time limit would be admissible, such concession should be the only one made.
489
Oct. 28 To Colonel E. M. House
Informs of Secretary Lansing’s conversations with the Argentine and Chilean Ambassadors. Expresses belief that the objection of the Chilean Ambassador to the guarantee of political independence had been overcome.
489
Oct. 30 From Colonel E. M. House
Expresses gratification at the rapid progress of negotiations on the subject of the Pan-American Treaty. Expresses opinion that the time limit for the settlement of boundary disputes could be safely omitted.
490
Nov. 3 To President Wilson
Discussion of the attitude of the Chilean Ambassador toward the proposed treaty.
490
Nov. 11 To President Wilson
Forwards a revised draft of the four propositions to be contained in the proposed Pan-American Treaty.
491
Dec. 30 To President Wilson
Reports that Secretary Lansing has seen the Ambassadors and nine of the Ministers of Latin American countries and has given them copies of the proposed treaty.
492
1916 Jan. 6 To President Wilson
Suggests that it be made clear that the proposed treaty does not contemplate a specific guarantee of republican forms of government.
493
Jan. 24 To President Wilson
Discussion of influences at work to defeat the proposed treaty.
493
1916 Mar. 9 To President Wilson
Forwards a memorandum from the Chilean Ambassador regarding the omission from the treaty of the article concerning the settlement of boundary disputes by arbitration or agreement.
494
Mar. 17 To President Wilson
Reports a conversation with the Argentine Ambassador, who suggested a compromise arrangement regarding the provisions of the treaty on the subject of the guarantee of territorial integrity.
494
Apr. 3 From President Wilson
Suggests that Colonel House be requested to inform Mr. Fletcher regarding the negotiations which he had conducted on the subject of the proposed treaty.
495
Apr. 13 To the Argentine Ambassador
Forwards draft articles (text printed) for the proposed Pan-American Treaty.
495
Aug. 9 From the Ambassador to Mexico
Reports that no progress has been made in the negotiation of the Pan-American Treaty during the absence of Secretary Lansing.
496
1917 Apr. 8 To President Wilson
Reports a conversation between the Brazilian Ambassador and the Counselor for the Department of State in which it was intimated that Brazil desired to proceed with the negotiation of the treaty.
498
Apr. 17 To President Wilson
Discussion of difficulties which might arise through signatories of the proposed treaty becoming involved on either side in the European war.
498
Apr. 19 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that the questions raised by Secretary Lansing do not constitute difficulties of practical importance.
499
May 24 To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Instructs that the Department does not desire that the proposed Pan-American Treaty be taken up with the Government of Brazil at the moment.
500

Purchase of the Danish West Indies

[Page XXXIII][Page XXXIV]
Date and number Subject Page
1915 June. 16 From President Wilson
Acknowledges receipt of papers dealing with previous negotiations with Denmark on the subject of the purchase of the Danish West Indies. Expresses hope that the matter may be taken up so that a treaty on the subject may be laid before the Senate at the next session.
501
Sept. 30 From President Wilson
Indicates deep interest in proposed purchase of the Danish West Indies.
501
1915 Nov. 15 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Danish Minister
Discussion of possible occupation of the islands by the United States in case a sale was not agreed upon.
501
Undated [Rec’d Dec. 1] From the Danish Minister
Forwards a communication received from the Danish Minister of Foreign Affairs indicating that under the circumstances Denmark would not be able to refuse a proposition from the United States.
502
Dec. 4 To President Wilson
Reports progress during October and November of negotiations with the Danish Minister on the subject of the purchase of the Danish West Indies.
503
Dec. 5 From President Wilson
Expresses gratification that the subject had been discussed with the Danish Minister in a frank and friendly manner.
504
Dec. 28 To President Wilson
Encloses a memorandum (text printed) of an interview with the Danish Minister on December 27, 1915, regarding the monetary consideration involved in the purchase of the islands, in which the Danish Minister had made an offer to negotiate for their sale on the basis of a purchase price of 27 million dollars.
505
Dec. 29 From President Wilson
Approves Secretary Lansing’s negotiations with the Danish Minister on the subject of the purchase.
506
1916 Jan. 5 To President Wilson
Indicates belief that the amount requested by Denmark is high, but that the negotiations should not be allowed to fail on account of disagreement over the price.
506
Jan. 7 From President Wilson
Expresses belief that the acquisition of the Danish West Indies is so important that the negotiations should not be broken off because of the question of price.
507
Jan. 22 From the Danish Minister
Reports that his Government has agreed to the sale for the sum of 25 million dollars.
507
Mar. 11 To President Wilson
Encloses draft of treaty providing for the cession of the Danish West Indies in consideration of 25 million dollars. Advises prompt action.
507
Aug. 28 To the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
Expresses opinion that the Senate should act on the Danish treaty at the earliest possible moment.
508
1917 Feb. 14 To President Wilson
Discusses plans of naval representatives in the West Indies for the formal transfer of the islands.
509
1917 Feb. 15 From President Wilson
Suggests a talk with the Secretary of the Navy with regard to the plans of naval representatives for the transfer of the islands.
510
Mar. 19 To President Wilson
Discussion of arrangements for the formal delivery of the islands and the question of a provisional government.
510
Mar. 26 To President Wilson
Discussion of formalities of the transfer of the islands.
511
Mar. 27 From President Wilson
Approves Secretary Lansing’s plans regarding the transfer of the islands.
511

Colombia

Date and number Subject Page
1915 July. 31 To President Wilson
Discussion of situation with regard to the Treaty of April 6, 1914, between the United States and Colombia and the objections which had been raised thereto.
512
Aug. 2 From President Wilson
Suggests an interview with Senator Stone regarding the obstacles in the Senate to the ratification of the treaty with Colombia.
513
Dec. 21 To President Wilson
Encloses a memorandum from the Colombian Minister emphasizing the importance attached by Colombia to prompt ratification of the treaty.
514
Dec. 27 From President Wilson
Expresses hope that early ratification of the treaty with Colombia may be brought about.
514
1916 Feb. 2 From the Minister in Colombia to President Wilson
Comments on German activities in Colombia.
514
Mar. 1 From President Wilson
Regards the adoption of the treaty with Colombia as of capital importance in view of German activities there.
516
1917 Mar. 23 To President Wilson
Reports belief that the treaty with Colombia could obtain the consent of the Senate only by the acceptance of several amendments.
516

Costa Rica

[Page XXXV]
Date and number Subject Page
1917 Feb. 7 From President Wilson
Directs that a telegram be sent to the Minister in Costa Rica instructing him to inform Tinoco that no government set up by him would be recognized.
518
1917 Feb. 19 To President Wilson
Reports a conversation with the deposed President of Costa Rica, who was informed by Secretary Lansing that the United States would not recognize the Tinoco government.
518
Feb. 20 From President Wilson
Comments on Secretary Lansing’s conversation with the ex-President of Costa Rica.
519
May. 23 To President Wilson
Regards the situation in Costa Rica as an increasing cause of concern. Points out that Tinoco is favorable to the Allies in the European war.
519
Dec. 29 From President Wilson
Admits difficulty of Costa Rican situation and comments on the projected revolution of Alfredo Volio.
521
Dec. 31 To President Wilson
Indicates difficulty of Costa Rican situation, as American policy of nonrecognition of Tinoco runs contrary to American interests in the prosecution of the war.
521
1918 Jan. 1 From President Wilson
Approves Secretary Lansing’s course with regard to projected revolution against the Tinoco government.
522

Haiti

Date and number Subject Page
1915 Aug. 7 To President Wilson
Forwards draft instructions (text printed) from the Acting Secretary of the Navy to Admiral Caperton. Reports an interview with the Haitian Minister, who stated that the Haitian people were doubtful of American motives.
523
Aug. 9 To President Wilson (tel.)
Proposes sending instructions to Admiral Caperton to allow the election of the President to take place whenever Haitians wish and containing, with specific mention of Mole St. Nicholas, an assurance that the United States desires no Haitian territory.
524
Aug. 9 From President Wilson (tel.)
Approves message to Admiral Caperton, but instructs that with regard to Mole St. Nicholas it be stated that the Government of the United States would take up the question of the cession of the Mole along with other questions to be submitted to the reorganized Haitian Government.
525
Aug. 10 To President Wilson
Encloses copy of instruction (text printed) sent by the Acting Secretary of the Navy to Admiral Caperton.
525
Aug. 13 To President Wilson
Encloses copy of telegram to the Legation in Haiti directing the Chargé to negotiate and sign a treaty with the Haitian Government. Considers that speedy action should be taken in regard to the negotiations for such a treaty.
526
[Page XXXVI]

Mexico

[Page XXXVII][Page XXXVIII][Page XXXIX][Page XL]
Date and number Subject Page
1915 Mar. 5 To President Wilson
Discussion of the Mexican situation and of language used by General Obregon which might arouse opposition to foreigners.
528
Mar. 6 From President Wilson
Indicates that recent despatches from Mexico have caused him anxiety. Directs that General Carranza be informed that the course of General Obregon has renewed talk of joint action in Mexico by other governments.
529
Mar. 8 From the Counselor for the Department of State
Discussion of results which would follow the employment of force in Mexico. Suggests that such consequences might be avoided by joint action by the United States and the A. B. C. powers. Discusses advantages and objections to such joint action.
529
Mar. 12 From President Wilson
Discussion of General Carranza’s action in closing the port of Progreso. Considers that General Carranza should be told that the United States cannot recognize his right to blockade the port to the exclusion of American commerce.
531
Mar. 13 To President Wilson
Forwards a copy of the message to be presented to General Carranza in regard to Progreso.
531
Mar. 18 From President Wilson
Comments on Mr. Lansing’s letter of March 8, 1915, regarding the employment of force and the suggestion of joint action by the United States and the A. B. C. powers in Mexico. Indicates his approval of Mr. Lansing’s suggestion.
532
June 2 From President Wilson
Forwards draft of a proposed statement by the President on the Mexican situation.
532
June 2 To President Wilson
Comments on President Wilson’s proposed statement on the Mexican situation. Suggests certain textual changes.
533
June 2 From President Wilson
Indicates his willingness to consider the recognition of Carranza should the latter develop the necessary influence.
534
June 2 To President Wilson
Reports conversation with the Argentine Ambassador on the Mexican situation. Further discussion of the textual changes suggested in the President’s proposed statement on the Mexican situation.
534
June 2 From President Wilson
Acknowledges Secretary Bryan’s suggestions with regard to the proposed statement.
535
June 17 From President Wilson
Suggests that General Carranza might be informed that American recognition would be possible should he make every effort at conciliation and conference with the other factions.
535
1915 June 18 From President Wilson
Approves of telegram to Special Agent Silliman instructing him to convey to General Carranza the information referred to in the preceding document.
535
June 22 From President Wilson
Directs that preliminary steps be taken with regard to the proposed conference of Latin American diplomatic representatives on the Mexican situation.
536
June 25 To President Wilson
Discussion concerning the Latin American diplomatic representatives who would take part in the conference on the Mexican situation.
537
July 2 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that the importance of attempting a settlement in Mexico was becoming more pressing and that the Latin American diplomatic representatives with whom it was intended to confer on the Mexican situation should be requested to come to Washington.
537
July 5 To President Wilson
Forwards an outline embodying the attitude of the Government on the Mexican situation. Expresses belief that the principal problem was the harmonizing of the factions representing the revolution.
538
July 7 From President Wilson
Suggests the designation of a person to keep in touch with the representatives in the United States of the several Mexican factions.
539
July 8 To President Wilson (tel.)
Reports that the six Latin American diplomats with whom it is proposed to confer regarding the Mexican situation are pleased at the plan for identical action.
540
July 8 From President Wilson
Approves of the suggestions contained in Secretary Lansing’s letter of July 5, 1915, as a foundation for the formulation of policy in regard to the Mexican situation.
540
July 29 From President Wilson
Indicates perplexity as to the immediate duty of the United States with regard to Mexico.
541
July 31 To President Wilson (tel.)
Reports that the six Latin American diplomats with whom it is proposed to confer regarding the Mexican situation have agreed to a meeting at Washington on August 5.
541
Aug. 1 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that the approach of the conference and its objects, in general terms, should be announced.
542
Aug. 2 To President Wilson
Agrees that announcement of the conference should be made as soon as possible.
542
1915 Aug. 5 To President Wilson (tel.)
Reports meeting with the six Latin American diplomats for conference on the Mexican situation. Expresses belief that the President’s immediate return to Washington is not necessary.
542
Aug. 6 To President Wilson
Reports progress of conference with Latin American diplomats on August 5 and 6. Encloses extract from proceedings of the conference (text printed).
543
Aug. 6 From President Wilson (tel.)
Expresses belief that actions of Villa need not interfere with the success of the conference.
545
Aug. 6 To President Wilson (tel.)
Encloses text of message to the Secretary of Agriculture recommending the admission of meat from the State of Chihuahua, Mexico, after an approved form of inspection.
545
Aug. 7 From President Wilson
Questions whether the proposed admission of Mexican meat might not assist Villa.
546
Aug. 7 To President Wilson
Reports that the establishment under military decree of cattle inspection upon the border would probably relieve Villa’s financial situation, which is believed to be responsible for his arbitrary conduct.
546
Aug. 8 From President Wilson (tel.)
Approves the proposed communication to Mexican factions drawn up by the conference of Latin American diplomats. Believes that the most essential step in Mexico is the establishment of a provisional government of revolutionary character, which should precede resumption of full constitutional forms.
547
Aug. 9 To President Wilson
Discussion of support to Villa as a possible offset to Carranza.
547
Aug. 10 To President Wilson
Encloses stenographic report of the two conferences with six Latin American diplomats in Washington.
548
Aug. 11 From President Wilson (tel.)
Expresses belief that the conference should not insist upon the elimination of Carranza and that the object of the revolution would in any event have to be conserved.
549
Aug. 14 To President Wilson
Encloses report dealing with shipment of arms and ammunition to Mexico. Considers the advisability of placing a general embargo on the export of arms and ammunition to Mexico.
549
Aug. 16 From President Wilson
Comments on the report of the proceedings of the conference with the six Latin American diplomats. Regards the legalistic attitude and cientifico leaning as unfortunate.
550
1915 Aug. 16 From President Wilson
Expresses opinion that the renewal of the arms embargo might be a very important weapon.
550
Sept. 12 To President Wilson
Encloses the reply of Carranza to the communication of the conference of Latin American diplomats. Reports the position of the Carranza faction as stronger than previously.
550
Sept. 13 From President Wilson
Outlines course of action to be taken, which is to consist of suggesting conference between the Latin American diplomats and representatives of Carranza at Washington and the calling of a conference of representatives of other factions to be held in Mexico.
552
Sept. 18 To President Wilson
Reports the conclusion of the conference of Latin American representatives. Encloses agreement reached at conference (text printed).
552
1916 Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With Mr. Arredondo, March 9, 1916, 4 p. m.
Discussion of the situation caused by the attack on Columbus, New Mexico.
554
Mar. 20 To President Wilson
Reports a conversation between the Acting Secretary of State and Mr. Arredondo regarding the proposed agreement between the United States and Mexico concerning the crossing of troops over the boundary line in pursuit of bandits.
555
May 8 From General Carranza to Mr. Arredondo (tel.)
Telegram received from General Carranza handed to the Secretary of State by Mr. Arredondo, concerning an agreement for reciprocal crossing of the boundary by forces in pursuit of organized bands endeavoring to provoke an international conflict.
556
June 15 To President Wilson
Encloses draft of a reply to the Mexican note of May 22, 1916, containing the Mexican demand for the withdrawal of American troops.
557
June 18 From President Wilson
Approves Secretary Lansing’s draft note to Mexico enclosed with the preceding letter. Encloses letter (text printed) from the Secretary of War to President Wilson discussing embargo upon shipments of arms and ammunition to Mexico.
557
June 21 To President Wilson
Expresses opinion that in dealing with the Mexican situation the use of the word “intervention” should be avoided and that it should be denied that any invasion of Mexico is for the sake of intervention. Suggests further that a communication be sent to the Latin American diplomatic representatives in Washington stating the attitude of the United States and denying any intention to intervene in Mexico.
558
June 21 From President Wilson
Agrees with Secretary Lansing’s suggestions in the preceding letter.
559
1916 Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State
A statement prepared for use in discussion with President Wilson regarding the American policy of nonintervention in Mexico.
560
July 3 To President Wilson
Suggests the naming of a joint American-Mexican commission to study questions relating to boundary troubles and the means to prevent them in the future.
560
July 5 To President Wilson
Reports a conversation with the Argentine Ambassador to discuss the Ambassador’s plan to visit Mexico and explain the attitude of the United States Government to General Carranza.
562
Sept. 5 To Colonel E. M. House
Discusses progress made by the American-Mexican Joint Commission.
563
Oct. 26 From President Wilson
Encloses copy of a letter (text printed) from the President to the Secretary of War in which the President informed the Secretary that rumors had reached him of the possibility of another raid by irregular Mexican forces into the territory of the United States. The President directed that General Funston should be instructed to take every precaution in the circumstances.
564
Oct. 27 To President Wilson
Reports that Secretary Lansing had conferred with the Secretary of War and that they were in agreement that publicity would have the effect of deterring those planning such raids and also of preventing the rise of sentiment hostile to the President politically in case such raids occurred.
564
1917 Apr. 25 To President Wilson
Discussion of the attitude to be taken by Ambassador Fletcher at the inauguration of General Carranza as President of Mexico. Discussion of the question of whether Fletcher’s presence would be formal recognition of the de jure character of the government. Encloses form of reservation (text printed).
565
Apr. 28 (145) To the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Instructions to attend the festivities in connection with the inauguration of President Carranza but to do nothing which would indicate recognition of his government as de jure in character.
567
1919 Dec. 5 To President Wilson
Informs the President that Secretary Lansing regards the issue between the United States and Mexico to be not the Jenkins case alone but to include the entire series of wrongs suffered by Americans in Mexico during the Carranza administration.
567