Mr. Lincoln to Mr. Foster.

No. 751.]

Sir: With reference to your instruction No. 787, of June 16, ultimo, in regard to the landing here without slaughter of sheep from the United States, and the continuance, of the discrimination against our cattle, I have the honor to acquaint you that I arrived at a time of such political engrossment of all members of the Government that it was not till the 30th of July that I was able to have an interview with Mr. Chaplin, then the president of the board of agriculture, to make some inquiries before addressing a formal communication to the Marquis of Salisbury.

At my interview I opened a discussion of the propriety of the conclusions as to the contagious character of the disease found in the five cattle which have been condemned in the past two years, and found that neither Mr. Chaplin nor his advisors would admit the possibility of any error in the diagnosis of these cases. They said they had been examined by experts whom they named, I think six or seven in number, and that in the face of their reports it was useless to contend that the disease was not of the contagious type. Upon my referring to the fact that all these animals had been traced to healthy origins, and that I supposed it was admitted that the disease could only spring from infection, the answer was made that they had no confidence that the tag used in tracing was in any case the tag belonging to the animal in question; that they knew that the butchers were utterly careless in the distribution of the tags to the lungs after slaughter, and that the system of tagging was rendered worthless at that point, and that it was a difficulty that could only be got over by an amount of supervision which was practically impossible. I may say here that I had, a day or two later, a conference with Dr. Wray, our chief inspector, and he assured me there was no such trouble in fact.

I said to Mr. Chaplin that we could not help feeling that there is a discrimination against our cattle, and that common colds were called contagious diseases, while Canadian cattle were not even examined, and that we would like to see an end put to it. He said that most positively he was against letting United States cattle in free until at least eighteen months had passed without a case of infectious diseases being discovered.

On the 3d instant I addressed to the Marquis of Salisbury the note of which a copy is inclosed, and am to-day in receipt of the note from the Earl of Rosebery, dated the 22d instant, of which a copy is also inclosed herewith, in which I am informed that on and after the 1st proximo our sheep will be admitted without being subject to slaughter under certain conditions which are set forth in the inclosures of this note.

It will be observed that no reference is made to the subject of the admission of cattle.

I have to-day addressed to you a telegram of which a copy is contained herein.

I have, etc.,

Robert T. Lincoln.
[Page 332]
[Inclosure 1 to No. 751.]

Mr. Lincoln to the Marquis of Salisbury.

My Lord: With further reference to your lordship’s note of May 14, ultimo, in which it was stated that the hoard of agriculture would be willing, if desired by my Government, to admit into the United Kingdom sheep coming from the United States without subjecting them to slaughter at the place of landing, upon certain conditions as to their separate debarkation, I have now the honor to acquaint you that I am now instructed to express to your lordship the wish of my Government for such admission of sheep, and to request that the necessary steps may be taken to carry out the proposition of the board of agriculture.

I should be gratified if I were at an early day enabled to notify my Government of the removal of the existing regulations requiring the slaughter of such sheep upon their arrival, and as to the places where they should be landed.

With regard to the continuance of the restrictions upon the landing of cattle from the United States, my Government feels assured that the disease of contagious pleuro-pneumonia has been completely eradicated in the United States by the destruction of all diseased and exposed animals, and that the few animals stated to have been affected in the last eighteen months were suffering only from ordinary pneumonia caused by exposure to inclement weather on their voyage. They believe it impossible to guard against the occurrence of occasional cases of pneumonia from exposure in severe weather; and I am authorized to express to your lordship the feeling of my Government that, under these circumstances, the maintenance of the existing restrictions upon the entry of American cattle is a regrettable discrimination against them.

I have, etc.,

Robert T. Lincoln.
[Inclosure 2 to No. 751.]

The Earl of Rosebery to Mr. Lincoln.

Sir: With reference to your note of the 3d instant, addressed to the Marquis of Salisbury, I have the honor to transmit to you a copy of an order passed on the 16th instant by the board of agriculture, which allows from the 31st instant sheep from the United States to be landed in Great Britain without being subject to slaughter. I also inclose a copy of a memorandum prepared for your information, setting out the conditions under which foreign animals are admitted to Great Britain when allowed to be landed without being subject to slaughter, as will now be the case with sheep from the United States.

I have, etc.,

E. Grey.
(For the Earl of Rosebery)
.
[Inclosure 3 to No. 751—Telegram.]

Mr. Lincoln to Mr. Foster.

United States sheep will be admitted without slaughter on and after the 1st next September at fifteen ports of Great Britain under conditions guarding against infectious and requiring bond on each cargo. I think conditions could be communicated by telegraph substantially within 200 ciphers. Shall I do so?

Lincoln.
[Inclosure 4 to No. 751.]

Memorandum as to landing foreign animals without being subject to slaughter.

Animals which are admitted without being subject to slaughter must be landed at a landing place for foreign animals approved by the board of agriculture.

Such landing places have been approved at the following places: Aberdeen, Bristol, Dundee, Glasgow, Granton, Hartleford, Harwich, Hull, Leith, Liverpool, London (Thames Haven), Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Plymouth, Southampton, Weymouth.

The landing of the animals is subject to the conditions specified in article 3 of the [Page 333]animals (amendment) order of 1892, No. 7 (of which copy is annexed), as to the animals imported not having been in contact with animals from suspected countries, and as to the vessel not having entered any ports in any such country; and the owner, charterer, or agent has to enter into a bond conditioned for the observance of those conditions.

After being landed they are subject to supervision of the commissioners of customs and remain so subject until the arrival of an inspector of the board of agriculture. They must be detained for at least twelve hours, and must be kept separate and not moved until examined by the inspector.

If on examination they are found free from disease they can be moved. If disease is found, all the animals are detained and slaughtered.

T. H. E.

[Inclosure 5 to No. 751.]

The animals (amendment) order of 1892, No. 7.—By the board of agriculture.

The board of agriculture, by virtue and in exercise of the powers in them vested under the board of agriculture act, 1889, and the contagious diseases (animals) acts, 1878 to 1892, and of every other power enabling them in this behalf, do order, and it is hereby ordered, as follows:

revocation.

1. The order described in the schedule to this order, to the extent described in that schedule, is hereby, from and after the commencement of this order, revoked; provided that such revocation shall not invalidate or make unlawful anything done under the part of the said order hereby revoked before the commencement of this order, or interfere with the institution or prosecution of any proceeding in respect of any offence committed against, or any penalty incurred under, the part of the said order hereby revoked before the commencement of this order.

the united states of america declared a free country as regards sheep.

2. From and after the commencement of this order, unless and until the board of agriculture otherwise order, sheep brought from the United States of America are allowed to be landed without being subject under the fifth schedule to the act of 1878, or under the animals order of 1886, to slaughter or to quarantine, and subject to the provisions of this order, chapter 32 and Part I of the fifth schedule of that order shall be read and have effect as if the United States of America were as regards sheep included in the list of free countries named in that part of the schedule.

amendment of article 151 of the animals order of 1886.

3. The following provisions of this article shall be read in the place of article 151 of the animals order of 1886, and shall be deemed to be article 151 of that order, namely:

conditions of landing.

151. (1) The landing of foreign animals at a landing place for foreign animals under the provisions of this chapter is subject to the following conditions:

  • First. That the vessel in which they are imported has not, within twenty-eight days before taking them on board, had on board any animal exported or carried coastwise from a port or place in any country other than Her Majesty’s possessions in North America, or Iceland, or New Zealand, or the Channel Islands, or the United States of America (provision as to which country is made by the second condition of this article), or the Isle of Man.
  • Second. That the vessel in which they are imported has not, within twenty-one days before taking them on board, had on board any animal (other than a sheep) exported or carried coastwise from a port or place in the United States of America.
  • Third. That the vessel in which they are imported has not, within twenty-one days before taking them on board or at any time since taking on board the animals imported, entered any port or place in any country other than Her Majesty’s possessions in North America, or Iceland, or New Zealand, or the Channel Islands, or the United States of America, or the Isle of Man.
  • Fourth. That the animals imported have not while on board the vessel been in contact with any animal exported or carried coastwise from any port or place in any country other than Her Majesty’s possessions in North America, or Iceland, or New [Page 334]Zealand, or the Channel Islands, or the United States of America (provision as to which country is made by the fifth condition of this article), or the Isle of Man.
  • Fifth. That the animals imported have not while on board the vessel been in contact with any animal (other than a sheep) exported or carried coastwise from any port or place in the United States of America.

(2) And the animals imported shall not be landed at a landing place for foreign animals unless and until—

(a)
The owner or charterer of the vessel in which they are imported, or his agent in England, or Wales, or Scotland, has entered into a bond to Her Majesty, the Queen, in a sum not exceeding one thousand pounds, with or without a surety or sureties, to the satisfaction of the commissioners of customs, conditioned for the observance of the foregoing conditions; and
(b)
The master of the vessel has on each occasion of importation of foreign animals therein satisfied the commissioners of customs, or their proper officer, by declaration made and signed or otherwise, that all the animals then imported therein are properly imported according to the provisions of this article.

interpretation.

4. In this order terms have the same meaning as in the animals order of 1886.

short title.

5. The order may be cited as the animals (amendment) order of 1892, No. 7.

commencement.

6. This order shall commence and take effect from and immediately after the thirty-first day of August, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two.


[l. s.]
T. H. Elliott, Secretary.

schedule.

(Part of order revoked.)

No. Date. Short title. Extent of revocation.
4947 6th May, 1892. The animals (amendment) order of 1892, No. 5. The whole of article 4.