No. 608.

Mr. Cramer to Mr. Frelinghuysen .

No. 183.]

Sir: The following statements are copied from the New Zug Gazette (Neue Zuger Zeitung) of November 22, 1884, viz:

[Translation.]

The petition for pardon of Joseph Binzegger, of Baar, who, in 1867, was sentenced to imprisonment for life on account of repeated incendiarism, together with the letters of recommendation from the director of the prison, the director of police, and the governing council, were read. By secret voting, that is, by 56 out of 66 votes, it was resolved to remit the remainder of the sentence to the petitioner upon the condition of his promised emigration to America.

These statements appeared among the proceedings of the sixth session of the grand council (legislature) of the canton of Zug, as published in the New Zug Gazette of November 22, 1884. I have no reason to doubt their corectness.

The discharge from prison of this Joseph Binzegger (a convict, who, in 1867, had been sentenced to imprisonment for life on account of repeated incendiarism), upon the condition of his emigration to the United States, appeared to me to be such a clear case of violation of the act of Congress entitled “An act to regulate immigration,” approved August 3, 1882, that I felt it my duty to address a note, of this day’s date, to the Federal Council, protesting against the action of the grand council of the canton of Zug, in this case.

A copy of this note is herewith inclosed.

I trust the Department will approve my action in this case.

I am, &c.,

M. J. CRAMER.
[Page 793]
[Inclosure in No. 183.]

Mr. Cramer to the President of the Swiss Confederation .

Sir: The undersigned, minister resident of the United States of America, near the Swiss Confederation, has the honor to inclose herewith a copy of the Neue Zuger Zeitung of Saturday, November 22, 1884, containing among other things an extract of the proceedings of the sixth session (November 20) of the cantonal council of the canton of Zug, in which it is stated that said council, by a secret vote of 56 out of 66 votes, resolved to discharge from the penitentiary one Joseph Binzegger upon the condition that he emigrate to America. Said J. Binzegger is reported in said proceedings to have been sentenced in 1867 to imprisonment for life on account of repeated incendiarism. The undersigned, having no reason to doubt the truth of these statements, takes the liberty, under standing instructions from his Government, to protest against the release from prison of such a man as Joseph Binzegger “upon the condition that he emigrates to the United States of America.” It is sincerely hoped that the High Federal Council will call the attention of the cantonal council of Zug to the laws of the United States, which prohibit the landing of such persons in the United States, and which, in case an attempt is made to land them, require their return by the same vessel that carried them.

The undersigned, &c.,

M. J. CRAMER.