Alphabetical Index.

A.

  • Acheen or Atjih:
    • Revolt of natives of, against Dutch forces 442
  • Alcohol:
    • Increase of duty on, by Turkey. (See Turkey.)
  • Alexandria:
    • Assistance rendered British forces by admiral of American squadron for preservation of life and property in; thanks of Great Britain therefor. 325
  • Americans:
  • Argentine Republic:
    • Non-recognition by, of naturalization of its citizens in foreign countries; case of J. S. Rowe; declension of United States to admit such non-recognition 1, 3
    • Improvement in condition of Argentine Republic 2
    • Immigration to, in 1881; number of immigrants, 32,817 2
    • Boundary dispute of, with Brazil; threatening aspect 25
  • Arica:

B.

  • Belgium:
    • Political controversy in, between Liberal and Catholic parties; report on school question; elections have resulted in favor of the Liberals; political situation 11, 13, 15
    • Marriage law, amendment of, authorizing Belgian diplomatic and consular officers to perform marriage ceremony; interesting explanatory observations 13
    • Extradition treaty of, with Italy, amendment of. (See Extradition.)
    • Trade-marks and copyrights, proposed convention between France and Belgium for protection of; comments 7, 11
  • Blockade question. (See Mollendo.)
  • Boisselier, R. W. and C. R.:
    • Military service case, settlement of, by the brothers being released by Prussia from allegiance which they did not owe 164, 166, 168
  • Bolivar, Simon (founder of South American independence):
    • Centennial anniversary of birthday of. Celebration of, at Caracas to take place in July, 1883; foreign governments to be invited 539
  • Bolivia:
    • Commercial outlet for, through Brazil 28
    • Railway enterprise of George Earl Church 28
    • War with Chili. (See Peace negotations in South America.)
    • Separate peace with Chili. Opposition of United States minister to conclusion of; consequent complaint of Chili 67
    • Representation of, in Congress of American States 19
  • Border troubles. (See Canada and Mexico.)
  • Boundary disputes. (See Brazil, and Guatemalan-Mexican.)
  • Boyton, Michael:
    • Imprisonment of, in Ireland, under the coercion act 202
  • Brazil:
    • Difficulties of, with Uruguay. (See Uruguay.)
    • Representation of, in Congress of American States at Washington 20, 21, 22, 29
    • Boundary dispute of, with Argentine Republic, report on; threatening aspect of the dispute at present 25
    • Commercial outlet for Bolivia through 28
    • Railway enterprise of George Earl Church 28
  • Brophy, William:

C.

  • Calderon, Francisco Garcia, Provisional President of Peru:
    • Non-intention of Chili to give offense to the United States in arresting him 61, 83, 108, 111, 113
  • Canada:
  • Canal (interoceanic):
    • Nicaragua; bill before Congress of the United States for incorporation of Maritime Canal Company, amendment of, in deference to sovereign rights of Nicaragua 34
    • Nicaragua; extension of term allowed to American Company for commencement of work 34
    • Nicaragua; subsidiary contract granted French Company; no prejudice to interests of American Company 36
    • Exclusion of European powers from participation in control and maintenance of neutrality of; abrogation of Clayton-Bulwer treaty 271 283, 302 314
  • Cape Haytien:
    • Insurrectionary movement at. (See under Hayti.)
  • Cattle-stealing. (See Mexico.)
  • Clayton-Bulwer treaty:
  • Cedergren, C. M.:
    • Military service case in Sweden; satisfactory adjustment 488
  • Centennial anniversary of Bolivar’s birthday. (See under Venezuela.)
  • Central and South American Cable Company:
    • Copy of contract of, with Guatemala; inability of the company to comply with certain of its requirements 51
  • Chili:
  • China:
    • Telegraph monopoly scheme (Danish) 115, 116
    • Transit passes (outward) question 117 120, 134 137
    • Right of foreigners to engage in manufacturing enterprises at open ports in; discussion on subject between German minister and Chinese foreign office 117 120, 134 137
    • Duties properly leviable upon native produce bought by foreigners at treaty ports in, and resold or manufactured and not exported; discussion of question as to 117 120, 134 137
    • Right of foreigners to freely trade at open ports in native produce without exporting same; discussion of question 117 120, 134 137
    • Woosung Bar, steps taken by China to dredge it 121, 122, 123
    • Municipal regulations for the government of foreigners in; British order in council 123 132
    • Missionaries, admission by magistrate at Foochow of right of, to purchase and hold real estate at interior points 132, 133
    • Missionaries in, treaty rights of; policy of China regarding their residence in the interior and position of the United States in regard thereto 137 142
    • Opium, United States Treasury regulations for enforcement of treaty stipulations prohibiting importation of, into United States by Chinese 133, 134
  • Citizenship:
    • Question as to basis of claim to United States citizenship in the case of a person born in the United States of alien parents, who afterwards became naturalized; opinion of Mr. Sargent that the birth is sufficient, independently of the subsequent naturalization of parents 165, 167
    • Status of Americans who have taken oath of allegiance to Hawaii 344 346
  • Colombia (see Canal, Interoceanic):
    • Topography, climate, and inhabitants of Colombia described 142 148
  • Commerce (American):
    • Disposition of Eastern countries favorable to extension of our commence 5
    • Restrictions upon. (See under Spain and Venezuela.)
  • Commercial treaty of United States with Turkey.
    • Question of revision and abrogation of. (See Turkey.)
  • Congress of American States:
    • Proposed to be held at Washington for the purpose of substituting arbitration for war; project not a novel one, and is of doubtful expediency in opinion of the United States 58
    • Extension of invitation to Bolivia 19
    • Representation of Brazil in 20, 21, 22, 29
    • European influence exerted to defeat the project 22
    • Futility of, unless means be adopted for enforcing its conclusions, and hence arises objection that governments may become involved in international disputes in which they have no concern 22
    • Brazil would prefer that United States withdraw its call for such Congress 22
    • Discussion of project in Brazilian Senate 22
    • Guatemalan newspaper article on subject. Important utterances 32
    • Attitude of Central American governments in regard to representation in 35
    • Embarrassment of Mr. Trescot respecting extension of invitation to belligerent powers in South America 55, 64, 67
    • Declension of Chili to receive invitation on ground that project has been abandoned; subsequent presentation of the invitation and its reception 65, 67, 76
    • Representation of Mexico in; correspondence relative to 382 386
    • Representation of Venezuela in 527 530
    • Notice of postponement of meeting 4
    • Announcement to Central American governments of opostponement of; regret of Guatemala; its hopes for early revival of the project 47
  • Consular fees. (See under Spain.)
  • Copyright:
    • Proposed convention between France and Belgium on subject; comments 7, 11
  • Corea:
    • Trade and mineral resources of 379
  • Corporations (American):
    • Right of, to transact business in France 156
  • Cuba:
    • Restrictions imposed in, upon American commerce. (See under Spain.
  • Custody of ships’ papers. (See under Venezuela.)

D.

E.

  • Eastern countries:
    • Esteem for Americans in, favorable to extension of our commerce 5
    • Government of British subjects in; order in council; objectionable features of it 123 132, 372, 373
  • Egypt:
    • Assistance rendered British forces by admiral of American squadron for preservation of life and property in; thanks of Great Britain therefor 325
  • Egyptian question:
    • Attitude of European powers and public opinion in Europe; proceedings and success of England; their effects 159 161, 168 174
  • Ellie Knight (American vessel):
  • Emigrants. (See Paupers.)
  • Emigration (assisted). (See Paupers.)
  • Europe:
    • Peace of, seriously menaced 365, 366
    • Possibility of United States becoming involved in peace-disturbing complications with Europe 365
    • Attitude of powers of, regarding the Egyptian question, and their feelings towards one another 159 161, 168 174
    • Intervention of powers of, in South America for peace, likelihood of, in the event of mediation of United States being withdrawn 105
  • Extradition:
    • Treaty between Italy and Belgium, recent amendment of; punishment for crimes other than those for which fugitives are surrendered permitted; the party receiving a fugitive is permitted to surrender him to a third country; this provision due to question raised by United States in the case of the Collins brothers 6
  • Extraterritorial judicial privileges. (See under Japan.)

F.

  • Fees (consular):
    • Exorbitant and onerous fees collected by Spanish consuls in American ports. (See under Spain.)
  • Fish imported into Cuba from United States:
    • Discriminating duty upon. (See under Spain.)
  • Fishery regulations of Russia. (See under Russia.)
  • Fogarty, M. B.:
  • France:
    • Trade-marks and copyright convention with Belgium 7 11
    • Invasion of Tonquin by French troops 141
    • Exclusion of American pork from; measures taken in France for abolition of the exclusion and their failure 148 155
    • Right of American corporations to transact business in 156
    • Germany desires to give moral support to present administration of, with a view to preventing return of Gambetta to power 160, 169
    • Attitude of, respecting the Egyptian question; German views favorable thereto 160, 168, 169
    • Commercial treaty recently concluded with Italy; approval of, by Italian Parliament 367

G.

  • Gannon, John L.:
  • Garibaldi, Giuseppe:
  • Gartrell, Thomas R., and his wife:
    • Murder of, in Mexico; steps taken for punishment of murderers 390 392
  • George, Henry:
  • George W. Chase (American vessel):
  • Germany:
    • Policy of, respecting the Egyptian question, and her relations with and policy toward her neighbors 160, 168 174
    • Tobacco monopoly bill, a cherished measure of Prince Bismarck’s; overwhelming defeat of it in the Reichstag; comments 161 163
    • Railroad system of, admirableness of, as a means of offense and defense 169, 170
    • Exclusion from, of all kinds of American pork except hams and sides of bacon; pigs’ tongues shipped by Wm. Archdeacon & Co., and brawn shipped by Armor & Co. refused admission 157 159
    • Courts of law in, organization of 174 186
    • Naturalization cases disposed of, abstract of 186 192
    • Military service cases disposed of, abstract of (see also Boisselier, R. W. and C. R.) 186, 192
  • Great Britain:
  • Guatemala:
    • Attentions shown President Barrios in the United States; gratitude of Guatemala for; gratification of United States at being able to manifest its friendship for Guatemala 46, 48
    • Invasion of, by armed forces from Mexico 49
    • Boundary dispute with Mexico. (See infra, Guatemalan-Mexican boundary dispute.)
  • Guatemalan-Mexican boundary dispute:
    • Correspondence between Mexican minister and Guatemalan foreign office; President Barrios authorized by Guatemalan Assembly to arrange settlement on such terms as he may deem best 42
    • Attitude of United States; favorably regarded by Mexico; consent of President to act as arbitrator, if requested by both parties to do so 326 328, 330, 332, 398, 438
    • Argument of Guatemala against claim of Mexico to Chiapas and Socomisco 328, 329
    • Attitude of Mexico 387
    • Withdrawal of Guatemala’s claim to Chiapas and Socomisco dispute now reduced to mere demarcation of boundary line; President of the United States requested by Guatemala to consent to act as arbitrator in the event of the two disputants not being able to agree as to the line 330, 331
    • Settlement of; terms of settlement; President of the United States to be asked by both parties to arbitrate in the event of their being unable to agree upon a line 332, 333, 437, 439 441

H.

  • Hart, Michael:
  • Hawaii:
    • Immigration to, from Portugal 333
    • Immigration of American negroes to recommended as a means of preventing Hawaii from becoming an Asiatic or British dependency 336
    • Decadence of population of; leprosy and syphilis 334 336
    • Agricultural condition of 336, 337, 339, 341, 342
    • Labor question 337, 340
    • Farmlands 336
    • Onerous taxation of foreigners in; question as to protection of Americans against such taxation; protest of the United States; protest disre-disregarded by Hawaii; negotiation for a loan of two million dollars voted 336, 342 344, 348
    • Citizenship; status of Americans who have taken oath of allegiance to Hawaii; American citizenship not regarded by Department of State as forfeited 344 346
    • Immigration to, from Japan 348
    • Liquor law, repeal of 347
    • Good government in 348
    • Business prosperity 348
    • Coronation expenses 347
  • Hayti:
    • Insurrectionary movement at St. Marc and its suppression; many arrests; fugitives find asylum in United States consular agency; punishment of leaders; twenty-eight executed; this execution unprecedented, and apparently unconstitutional; official report of it 348 350, 352, 354, 359, 360
    • Insurrectionary movement at Cape Haytien; vigorous measures for suppression of it; remarkable and courageous speech of President Salomon, and subsequent address of his, evincing a determination to crush the spirit of rebellion; return of the President to Port au Prince; his cordial reception; profound but ominous tranquillity now prevailing 350 359, 360 363;
    • Maintenance of his government at any cost against revolutions seems determined upon by President Salomon 353, 354, 355, 361
    • Foreigners in Hayti; police instructed when arresting foreigners to subject them to no maltreatment nor abuse; reasons; recent case of maltreatment of a British subject by a commissary of police; punishment of the commissary 363

I.

J.

  • Japan:
    • British order in council for the government of British subjects in China and Japan; objectionable provisions of 372, 373
    • British consular courts in, American plaintiffs before, required to agree to give security for payment of fees, costs, &c., and for performance of decision of the courts; Minister Bingham regards this requirement inadmissible, but Department of State holds contrary view 374, 377
    • Commerce with; Japan willing to open all her ports to foreign commerce upon condition of renouncement by foreign powers of claim to extraterritorial judicial privileges; Sir James Bain, an emissary of the Glasgow Chamber of Commerce, favors acceptance of this condition; his views respecting commerce with Japan 377, 378
    • European powers indisposed to permit Japan to control her own affairs 377
    • Extraterritorial judicial privileges; abolition of, in exchange for opening of all of Japan’s ports to commerce, advocated 377
  • Jeannette expedition:
    • Kindness of Russia to survivors of; appreciation thereof by United States 443, 445
  • Jews:
    • Refugees from Russia; colonization of, in Turkey. (See Turkey.)
    • Restrictions upon, and persecution of, in Russia. (See Russia.)
  • Jones, P. C.:
    • Citizenship, status of; was born in United States and has taken oath or allegiance to Hawaii; Department of State holds that he has not lost American citizenship 344, 346
[Page 553]

L.

  • Lane, William:
  • Liberia:
    • German war vessel exacts payment from, of $5,375 as indemnity for piratical depredations by a native tribe upon German vessel Carlos. 380
    • Commencement exercises at Liberia College; speech of United States Minister Smyth advocating education as a means for attainment of national strength and prosperity 381
    • Anniversary of Liberia’s independence; celebration of; speeches on the occasion tended towards conciliation of the natives instead of their alienation, as heretofore 382
  • Lima, Peru:
    • Administration of finances and municipal government of, by the Chilians 112, 113, 114
  • Lynam, James:
    • Imprisonment of, in Ireland under the coercion act 270

M.

  • McCormack, John R.:
    • Imprisonment of, in Ireland under the coercion act 239, 240, 241
  • McInerny, or McEnery, John:
  • McSweeney, Daniel:
  • Madeira and Marmore Railway. (See Railways.)
  • Marriage:
    • Laws of Belgium and of various foreign countries relative to 13
  • Marsh, George P., United States minister to Italy:
    • Death of; expressions of eulogy and condolence; honors paid his remains by Italian authorities 370, 372
  • Matriculation law of Mexico:
  • Meany, Stephen J.:
  • Mediation of United States. (See Peace negotiations in South America.)
  • Mexico:
    • Representation of, in congress of American States, correspondence, relating to 382 386
    • Financial condition of 387, 398
    • Boundary dispute with Guatemala. (See Guatemalan-Mexican boundary dispute.)
    • Purchase of arms by 387
    • Matriculation law of Mexico; inadmissible hardship entailed on United States citizens by; protest of United States 391, 392, 394 396, 399 404
    • Messages of President of 387, 398
    • Railway construction in 398
    • Telegraphic communication, extension of 398
    • Marauders from, depredations by, in United States 408
    • Lynching of José Ordiña, a Mexican, in Arizona for horse-stealing 407
    • Lawlessness in Arizona detrimental to Mexico; measures for its suppression 408
    • Indians, cowboys, and other marauders from United States, depredations by, in Mexico; repressive and punitive measures; co-operation of United States and Mexican troops; results 392 394, 405, 406, 409 419, 420, 421, 422, 423, 434 437, 438
    • Crossing of frontier by troops of either United States or Mexico in pursuit of Indians; agreement for 388, 390, 396, 397, 405, 419, 421, 422, 425
    • Cattle-stealing from Mexico by American cowboys 424
    • Disarming of a sheriff’s posse from Arizona by Mexican troops, upon whose invitation, and to whose assistance against Indians, they had crossed the frontier, and compulsion of the posse to return unarmed to Arizona over a long and dangerous road; complaint of Department of State; vindication by Mexican minister at Washington; subsequent return of the arms taken from the posse 426 433, 434
  • Military service cases. (See Germany and Sweden and Norway.)
  • Missionaries. (See China and Turkey.)
  • Mollendo:
    • Peruvian port, blockaded by Chilians; opposition of United States minister at Lima to exportation of produce therefrom; consequent complaint of Chili 67
  • Monroe doctrine:
  • Moses, James G:
    • Being a Karaim Jew he is exempted from restrictions imposed by Russia upon Talmud Jews 444

N.

O.

P.

  • Panama Canal. (See Canal, Interoceanic.)
  • Paupers:
    • Deportation of, from Ireland to the United States; probability of; necessity for repressive legislation on the part of the United States 16
    • Russian, who emigrated to the United States; sending of them back to Russia; Belgian newspaper comments; observations of United States minister at Brussels 18
  • Peace congress. (See Congress of American States.)
  • Peace negotiations in South America:
    • Mission of Mr. Trescot and Mr. Walker Blaine; arrival at Panama; condition of affairs in Peru at that time; Mr. Hurlbut’s letter to the notables; embarrassment of Mr. Trescot in consequence of non-arrival of instructions for ministers of United States at Lima and Santiago and La Paz respecting his mission 54
    • Arrival of Mr. Trescot at Santiago, and presentation of his credentials; extravagant hope of Peruvians for intervention of United States; Chili desires to be relieved from prolonged occupation of Peru; friendly intervention of United States desired by each of the belligerents 58
    • Terms of peace offered by Chili; conditions upon which good offices of United States will be accepted by Chili; Mr. Trescot regards tender of good offices on those conditions as not warranted by his instructions 61, 83
    • Terms of peace offered by Chili, obtainment of modification of, possible, but cession of Tarapaca is unavoidable; Peru’s hopes in our mediation are so exaggerated that it will be difficult to gain her assent to cession 61
    • Arrest of President Calderon of Peru; non-intention of Chili to give offense to United States thereby 61, 83, 108 111, 113
    • Policy of Chili; alleged misrepresentation of, by Mr. Kilpatrick in his dispatches to the Department of State 63, 71, 85
    • Policy of United States; modification of Mr. Trescot’s original instructions; United States unwilling to take part in negotiations for peace on onerous terms proposed by Chili; assents to liberal war indemnity, but not to cession of territory; position of United States is that of a friendly counsellor, not dictator; deprecates territorial conquest; United States will not interpose armed intervention 56, 57, 73, 76, 83
    • Position of United States should, in opinion of Mr. Trescot and Mr. Walker Blaine, be defined, and belligerents informed of what United States will and will not do; our present undefined attitude obstructs negotiations between the belligerents 98, 105
    • Suspension of negotiations in consequence of statement made at foreign office that the telegraph had reported modification and publication of his instructions 67
    • Opposition of United States minister in Bolivia to conclusion of a separate peace between Chili and Bolivia; complaint of Chili in consequence 67
    • Terms of peace offered by Chili; declension of Chili to modify them; she will not yield to mere friendly persuasion; bad effect of publication, by department, of recent correspondence; cession of Tarapaca, Arica, and Tacna demanded by Chili in addition to money idemnity; inutility of Mr. Trescot’s remaining in Chili 77, 78, 79, 83
    • Protocol of conclusions reached by Mr. Trescot and the Chilian minister for foreign affairs in their various conferences; explanations thereof; bad impression created by it in Bolivia; correction thereof by Mr. Walker Blaine 79, 85, 97, 99
    • Complaint of Chili on account of opposition of United States minister in Peru to exportation of produce from blockaded port of Mollendo 67
    • Terms of peace; Chili willing to modify them; attainment of bases for negotiations between the belligerents seems possible 89
    • Proposed joint mediation of Argentine Republic and Brazil between the belligerents 85, 88
    • Peru’s attitude; correspondence of Mr. Trescot with Montero’s government; that government desirous of peace, but requests as preliminary to negotiations recognition by Chili, and an armistice which will permit meeting of Peruvian Congress; Mr. Trescot regards these requests very reasonable, and urges Chili to comply; Chili declines; unreasonableness of her declension 90 95, 103 105
    • Mr. Hurlbut’s letter to the notables of Peru as to policy of United States, and his letter to the guerilla chief Cáceres urging him to submit to Montero; criticism of, by Chilian minister at Washington 111, 114
    • If mediation of United States be withdrawn, European powers will probably intervene, at request of Peru 105
    • Bolivia’s attidude; recognizes right of Chili to war indemnity, and lacking pecuniary resources, is willing to make payment with territory; difficulty in the away of effecting such an arrangement; alliance with Peru renewed and strengthened; correction by Mr. Walker Blaine of bad impression created in Bolivia by the protocol between Mr. Trescot and the Chilian minister for foreign affairs 95 103
    • Excesses of Chilian forces in Peru; consequent request of Peru that United States increase its efforts for effectuation of peace 105 107
    • Expressions of Chilian minister at Washington regarding situation in Peru; war spirit and anarchy; presence of Chilian troops necessary; Peruvians responsible for consequences of their foolhardy obstinacy; administration of Montero a farce; management of finances and municipal government of Lima by the Chilians; rival factions in Peru; Minister Hurlbut’s letters to the notables and the guerilla chief Caceres; criticism thereof 107 111, 114
  • Peru:
  • Petroleum:
    • Increase of duty on. (See Turkey.)
  • Pork (American):
  • Proprietary rights:
    • Proposed convention between France and Belgium for protection of; comments 7, 11
[Page 556]

R.

  • Railways:
    • Madeira and Marmore Railway; probability of revival of abandoned enterprise of George Earl Church 28
  • Rowe, John S.:
    • Held to military service in Argentine Republic, where he was born; his naturalization in the United States disregarded by Argentine Republic. (See Argentine Republic.)
  • Russia:
    • Jews in; Karaim or reformed Jews are exempt from restrictions imposed on Talmud Jews 444
    • Jews in, riots against; hope of United States that Russian Government will put a stop thereto; no effort should be omitted by United States legation for protection of Jews who are Americans; difficult position of Russian Government: five million Jews, Russian subjects, clamoring for equal rights, and eighty-five million other subjects of Russia clamoring for expulsion of the Jews; steps taken by Russia for suppression of violence against Jews 446, 451, 452, 454
    • Relief of peasantry by the government, from financial trouble 444
    • Fishery regulations of; obligations, rights, and privileges of foreigners thereunder 447 451, 452 454
    • Jewish refugees from, colonization of, in Turkey. (See Turkey.)

S.

  • St. Marc:
    • Insurrectionary movement at. (See under Hayti.)
  • Santiago (American vessel):
  • Sea of Okotsk:
    • It is not a mare clausum 451
  • Ships’ papers, custody of. (See Venezuela.)
  • Sigbjornsen, Peter:
    • Military service case in Norway; satisfactory adjustment 489
  • Slattery, Patrick:
  • South America. (See Peace negotiations in South America.)
  • Spain:
    • Tariff of consular fees; onerous fees prescribed by, tantamount to an export duty; ten cents per ton on cargo find forty cents per head upon cattle; efforts of United States for modification. 455 459, 462 464, 467, 468, 470, 471, 473, 474, 478 481, 482 487.
    • Fines (harsh and unjust), imposition of, on American vessels in Cuba; matter aggravated by requirement that recourse must be had to Madrid for redress; application of United States for abolition of this requirement; its refusal 460, 461, 472
    • Fish imported into Cuba in American vessels; discriminating duties imposed on; efforts of United States to have them abolished. Spain refuses to abolish them except upon condition of general reciprocity 464 466, 469, 474 477, 482
  • Sweden and Norway:
    • Military service cases of C. M. Cedergren and Peder Sigbjornsen; released from obligation to perform military service and fines remitted upon representations of the United States minister 487, 490

T.

  • Tacna:
  • Tarapacá:
  • Telegraphic communication (see also China and Mexico):
    • Contract of the Central and South American Cable Company with Guatemala; inability of the company to comply with certain of its requirements 51
    • Communication with Guatemala opened on October 1, 1882 51
  • Tonquin:
    • Invasion of, by French troops; motives therefor 141
  • Trade (see also Commerce):
  • Trade-marks:
    • Proposed convention between France and Belgium for protection of; comments 7 11
  • Transit passes (outward). (See under China.)
  • Transhipped cargoes, additional duty on. (See under Venezuela.)
  • Turkey:
    • Protection of Americans in, by British consular officers 199, 314, 323, 495 497, 498, 501, 506, 515
    • Alcohol, increase of duty on, by Turkey, in violation of treaty; remonstrances of the United States; disregard thereof by Turkey 491 494, 497, 499, 504, 505 508
    • Missionaries in, cases of ill treatment of; reparation 494, 495
    • Commercial treaty of United States with; demand of Turkey for revision of the tariff provisions of it; question of its abrogation 502, 505
    • Pork (American), exclusion of, from Turkey; protest of United States minister 508, 509, 516
    • Jewish refugees from Russia, colonization of, in Turkey; good offices of United States legation exercised to obtain permission for; permission granted; settlement of Jews in Palestine, however, not permitted 516, 520
    • Petroleum, proposed scheme whereby duty on, will be increased in violation of treaty; protest of United States 509 515, 520 522

U.

  • Uruguay:
    • Dangers threatening its existence; difficulties with Brazil; possibility of partition of, between Brazil and Argentine Republic; probability of cession of territory to Brazil in settlement of claims; United States would look with disfavor upon such cession 30, 31, 32

V.

  • Vessels (American):
    • Fines imposed on, in Cuba. (See under Spain.)
  • Venezuela:
    • Custody of ships’ papers; endeavor of United States to have Venezuela change her law so that such custody shall pertain to consular officers instead of the local authorities; reasons therefor 532, 534, 539, 543 545
    • Centennial anniversary of Bolivar’s birth-day; celebration of, will take place at Caracas on 24th July, 1883; foreign governments to be invited to participate; statue to be erected to General Washington on the occasion 539
  • Discriminating duty of 30 per cent, additional on all goods coming from West Indies, and on all from America and Europe which shall have been transhipped at a West Indian port; Venezuelan law imposing same and decree for its enforcement; object of law is suppression of smuggling and revolutions; complaint of Holland; protest of Great Britain; remonstrances and efforts of the United States to induce repeal or modification of the law 441, 523 527, 531, 532, 534, 535 538, 541, 542

W.