Alphabetical index.

A.

  • ALASKA:
    • appointment of Russian archbishops therefor 520
  • ALCOCK, SIR RUTHERFORD:
    • to Prince Rung on revision of Chinese treaties 311
  • AMERICANS:
    • in Belgium 56
    • in Paris, and their stay therein 106 107 129
    • Favre declines to allow them to leave 129
    • permission granted to leave 131 132
    • list of Americans leaving Paris 132
    • if they stay in Paris: Bismarck disavows responsibility for their suffering 133 231 232
    • consul general, measures for their protection 148 149
    • Department requests consul general to confer with Mr. Washburne 149
  • ARCHIVES OF NORTH GERMAN LEGATION:
    • in France in charge of United States minister 74 76
  • ARMISTICE, NEGOTIATIONS FOR:
  • ASSISTANT SECRETARY:
    • communications as to protection of Germans in France 65, 66, 68 189, 190, 191, 192
    • communications as to recognition of French republic 67, 68
    • communication relative to adoption of declaration of Paris by France 136, 218
    • communication relative to exemption of German steamships from capture 189
    • communications relative to settlement of northwest boundary near Pembina 401, 402, 404, 405
    • communication as to practice of furnishing supplies in colonial ports to American fishing vessels 427
    • communication as to employment of clerical force in United States consulate and legation in France 191, 147
    • communication inquiring why Benedetti’s secret treaty was not sooner published 191
    • communication as to protection of American property in Paris 66, 192
    • communications relative to medium in which consular fees in France shall be paid 144, 146, 147, 149
    • communications relative to suspension of hostilities between Germany and France in Chinese waters 397
    • communication as to state of public opinion in United States as to France. 67
  • AUSTRIA:
    • conditional assent to neutral league 50
    • visit of Thiers to Vienna 49
    • internal condition Austro-Hungarian empire 298
  • AUVERGNE, PRINCE DE LA TOUR, D’:
    • denies French violation of international law 141
    • accuses Germany of similar violation 141
    • status of franc-tireurs 142
    • expulsion of Germans from France 142

B.

  • BANCROFT, GEORGE, UNITED STATES MINISTER AT BERLIN:
    • to Mr. Motley, correspondence between French and Germans through American legation 206
    • to Mr. Washburne, will not France recede from expulsion of Germans, credit opened for him: (See NORTH GERMANY, NORTH GERMANS) 203
  • BELGIUM:
    • neutrality of 51
    • refuses to allow wounded to pass over her territory 51
    • votes money for war purposes 52
  • BELLIGERENTS:
    • France and Germany, rights and duties in United States ports 48
    • alleged violation of international law by firing on flags of truce and ambulances 105, 206, 222, 141, 143, 193, 226, 227, 231
    • status of franc-tireurs 109, 142
    • rights as to contraband of war 171
    • rights as to neutrals 177 183
    • facilities as to communications between belligerent powers 194 206
  • BENEDETTI:
    • draught of secret treaty between France and Prussia 198
    • newspaper discussion thereof 85
    • Gramont’s circular, relative to 86
    • Bismarck’s circular, relative to 200
    • United States inquire when proposition was made, and why not sooner published 191
    • above question answered 223, 224
    • the treaty is in the handwriting of Benedetti 198
    • remarks on Hohenzollern candidacy 138
    • interview with King William at Ems 219
  • BERNSTORFF, COUNT:
    • memorandum upon Lord Granville’s definition of contraband of war 171
    • notes to Lord Granville on British neutrality 171 177
  • BISMARCK, COUNT:
    • telegram, exemption of private property from capture at sea 217
    • circular of November 8, relative to Thiers’s negotiation for an armistice 54
    • circular of October 10, relative to claim of diplomatic corps in Paris to send messengers through German lines 56
  • circular declining responsibility for suffering of inhabitants of Paris by
    • siege 133, 232
    • circular of July 29, on Benedetti’s treaty project 200
    • circulars of September 13 and 16, as to conditions of peace 211
    • circulars describing interview with Favre 229 231
    • reply to reasons of France for declaring war 220
    • relative to King William’s treatment of French ambassador 221
    • note as to coöperation of maritime powers for suppression of piracy in Chinese waters 330
  • BLOCKADE OF GERMAN PORTS:
    • French proclamation of blockade 98
    • date of its commencement 109
    • its imperfect character 204 208
    • of Elbe and Weser raised by the French 207
    • only a paper blockade 208
    • evidence thereof 208, 209
  • BRAZIL:
    • commercial relations of United States therewith 283
  • BRIGANDAGE:
    • in Greece—its causes 440
  • BROWNE, J. ROSS:
    • note to Prince Kung; relations of United States with China 316
    • note to Sir Rutherford Alcock, same subject 321
  • BURNSIDE, GENERAL A. E.:
    • leaves Brussels for Sedan 52
    • enters Paris with dispatches through German lines 126

C.

  • CADORE, MARQUIS, French minister:
  • CHILI:
    • reasons for delay in sending minister to Washington 302
  • CHINA:
    • policy of United States toward China defined 303
    • policy of 1868 adhered to 303 304 307
    • treaty rights to be insisted on 303 304
    • American citizens and property to be protected 303
    • proposed revision of treaties 305
    • report of Toang on revision of treaties 308
    • Sir Rutherford Alcock to Prince Kung 311
    • Same to the Yamen 313
    • Prince Kung to the British minister 315
    • Mr. Browne to Prince Kung 316
    • Chinese base for revision 320
    • Prince Kung to Mr. Browne. 321
    • Mr. Browne to Mr. Rutherford Alcock 321
    • Board of Trade to Mr. Hammond 323
    • joint action of maritime powers for suppression of piracy in Chinese waters 329 330, 331
    • accession of United States to German proposition therefor 331 334
    • British accession 331
    • expedition to Corea to negotiate treaty for protection of American seamen 333 334 336
    • relations between China and Corea 362
    • Mr. G. F. Seward’s review of political and commercial relations between United States and China 339
    • Tien-tsin riot 355 363 371 377, 378, 383, 391, 398, 399
    • Mr. Low’s assurance of forbearance of United States too strong 398
    • suspension of hostilities between France and Germany in Chinese waters 396, 397, 398
  • CHRISTIANS, NATIVE, IN JAPAN:
    • their persecution in the Island of Soto 453
    • Mr. Van Valkenburgh to the Department 453
    • Mr. Van Valkenburgh to the Japanese government, May 18, 1869 454
    • apprehended punishment of native Christians 455
    • steps taken to prevent it 455 456
    • Japanese government to Mr. De Long, January 1 and 7, 1870 455 456
    • protest of consuls of treaty powers at Nagasaki, January 2, 1870 456
    • British minister to Japanese government, January 7, 1870 457
    • French minister to Japanese government, January 11, 1870 458
    • treaty powers to Japanese government, January 17, 1870 459
    • Japanese government in reply, January 16, 1870 459
    • deportation and separation of families 460
    • protocol of a conference with Japanese authorities, January 19, 1870 462
    • consul of Netherlands, Nagasaki 468
    • connection between political condition of Japan and persecution of Christians 468
    • number of Christians transported 471
    • two reports of the governor of Nagasaki thereon 472
    • Japanese regard Christianity from apolitical point of view 472
    • Japan to Mr. De Long, January 28, 1870 473
    • memorandum of conference of February 9, 1870, as to Christianity 473
    • memorandum, restraint of foreign missionaries promised 474
    • report of native officers who executed decree of deportation. 475
    • Mr. Fish approve s Mr. De Long’s course 478
    • views of Great Britain, France, and Prussia will be ascertained, and further instructions given 478
    • Mr. Fish asks Mr. Motley, Mr. Bancroft, and Mr. Washburne as to action of British, Prussian, and French governments. 479
    • Mr. Motley reports views and sends correspondence with British and French governments 480
    • Mr. Motley asks Lord Clarendon if British government will make deportation of Christians a subject of instructions. 480
    • Lord Clarendon incloses instructions to British Minister in Japan, and says British government do not intend to press the Mikado, or issue new instructions 481
    • [Page 528]Lord Clarendon to Mr. Harry S. Parkes, April 20, 1870. Moderation in proceedings to remove prejudices against Christians in Japan 482
    • Lord Clarendon to Lord Lyons, April 20 and 30, 1870. Distribution of converts advantageous to spread of Christian religion. Conciliatory policy commended to France 483
    • Lord Clarendon to Lord Lyons, May 23, 1870. Propriety of restraining Roman Catholic propagandism 484
    • Mr. Leon Roche’s communications to consular agents and to apostolic vicar in Japan to refrain from propagandising in violation of Japanese laws 484, 485
    • views of Great Britain, France, and United States are identical. No further instructions to Mr. De Long necessary 486
  • CITIZENS NATURALIZED:
    • in United States, of German birth, status in France during war 72, 121
  • CLARENDON, LORD:
    • deportation of native Christians from Japan. Policy of Great Britain and France in relation thereto 480
    • to Mr. Motley, May 27. 481
    • to Sir H. S. Parkes, April 20. 482
    • to Lord Lyons, April 20 and 30 483
    • to Lord Lyons, May 23 484
  • CLERKS, EXTRA:
    • employment authorized in legation in Paris 191
    • North Germany authorizes payment of expense of assistants in United States legation 200
    • Prussian offer to pay expenses declined 191
    • employment in Paris consulate authorized 147
  • COINAGE, INTERNATIONAL, GOLD:
    • adoption of common unit and standard of international gold coinage. Circular 240
    • resolution of the Senate 247
    • reports of monetary conference, 8th sitting 247
    • action of government of North Germany 251
  • COMMERCIAL RELATIONS:
    • with Spanish America and Brazil, Department report. 254
    • Mr. Fish’s circular requesting information 254
    • consular reports 261 to 297
  • CONSULS IN FRANCE:
    • fees, receipts of, in Paris consulate, and medium in which they shall be paid 143, 144, 146
    • their daily deposit 146
    • Mr. Read’s proceedings 144, 146, 148
    • clerks, extra assistants allowed during protection of German interests 147, 148
    • duty as to protection of American property in Paris during siege 145, 148, 149
    • instructions to United States consuls charged with German interests 83
  • CONTRABAND OF WAR:
    • British government views thereon, Lord Granville’s circular. 164
    • correspondence between Count Bernstorff and Lord Granville 171 177
  • COREA. (See CHINA.)
  • CORRESPONDENCE, OFFICIAL, OF FOREIGN MINISTERS IN PARIS:
    • cannot be sent sealed through German lines 127 128 56
    • proceedings of diplomatic corps 122, 126, 127
    • Bismarck’s circular, relative to 56
    • views of United States Government, Mr. Fish to Mr. Bancroft 72 195 196
    • Mr. Fish to Baron Gerolt, protesting 196
    • Between French and Germany Governments:
      • United States to afford every facility 194
      • to be sent through United States legations 205, 206

D.

  • DE LONG, C. E., UNITED STATES MINISTER IN JAPAN:
    • to Japanese government, January 10, 1870 456
    • deportation of Christians. (See Christians.)
  • DENMARK:
    • proclamation of Danish neutrality 57
    • [Page 529]relations with Prussia 57
    • royal ordinance relative to neutral obligations 59
    • interior harbor at Copenhagen closed to foreign ships 62
    • Danish neutrality 62
  • DIPLOMATIC CORPS IN PARIS:
    • meet to consider rights and duties as inmates of besieged city 122 127
    • some depart for Tours. 121
    • not decided whether they will remain 126

E.

  • ELMORE, MR.:
    • to Mr. Hovey relative to immunity of Mr. Farrand, bearer of dispatches, from arrest 513
  • EVANS, DOCTOR:
    • assists flight of Empress of the French 52

F.

  • FARRAND, W. D.:
    • United States bearer of dispatches; attempt of Peruvian authorities to detain him through legal process 510
  • FAVRE, JULES:
    • circular. Causes of war, and French policy 139
    • letter September 8, 1870, to Mr. Washburne, recognition of republic 117
    • letter October 18, 1870, to Mr. Washburne, Americans leaving Paris 129
    • circular of September 21, 1870, interview with Bismarck. 166
    • German accounts 211, 212, 229, 231
    • circular of November 7, 1870. Thiers’s failure to negotiate armistice 53
  • FISHERIES:
    • Canadian Licenses:
      • United States asks purpose of Canada as to licenses 407
      • Mr. Thornton’s acknowledgment 407, 408, 413
      • Sir John Young’s reply 408
      • Sir John Young’s further reply. Discontinuance of licenses 413
    • Canadian Policy:
      • to interfere with vested fishing rights of United States 410 411
      • purpose to enforce reciprocity treaty 433
    • In-shore Fishing:
      • Treasury Department circular 411
      • rights of United States under treaty of 1818 417
      • discrepancy in British instructions to vice-admiral in Canadian waters as to waters between head-lands 420
      • Mr. Thornton on American circular 421
      • Mr. Fish’s reply 421
    • Canadian Law:
      • as to fisheries by foreign vessels 414
      • abstract thereof 428
      • discourteous manner of its enforcement 433
      • Mr. Fish calls attention to its enforcement and his instructions for guidance of consuls 431
    • Canada, Boundaries of:
      • Mr. Fish’s views as to their present location, and their location when the treaty of 1818 was concluded 417
      • the operation of Canadian regulations as to American fishing vessels controlled thereby 418
      • Mr. Thornton thinks Mr. Fish is right 419
    • Instructions of British Admiralty:
      • to naval force in Canadian waters, as to the situation arising from suspension of in-shore fishing-licenses by Canadian government 415
      • the seizure, without warning, of United States fishing vessels violating Canadian law 416
      • Mr. Wolley to Vice-Admiral Wellesley, April 9, 1870 415
      • Mr. Lushington to Mr. Hammond, May 9, 1870 415
      • Mr. Rogers to secretary of admiralty, April 30, 1870 416
      • Mr. Wolley to Vice-Admiral Wellesley, May 5, 1870 416
      • Mr. Holland to under-secretary of state for foreign affairs, May 13, 1870 416
      • Lord Granville to Sir John Young, April 30, 1870 417
      • Mr. Thornton, on June 3, 1870, communicates letter of 419
    • [Page 530]Closing Colonial Ports against American Fishermen:
      • colonial secretary to the admiralty, April 12, 1866, as to rights of United States to in-shore fishing 419
      • Mr. Fish points out discrepancies between instructions, with note of May 26, and those with note of June 3, as to waters between head-lands 420
      • Mr. Thornton says Vice-Admiral Wellesley will make instructions of 1866 conform to those of 1870 421
      • Mr. Fish’s reply. Discussion of interpretation of treaty of 1818 not at present renewed 421
    • Closing Colonial Ports against American Fishermen:
      • closing ports in Prince Edward Island 422, 423
      • United States fishing vessels return; voyages broken up 424
      • correspondence with British admiral relative to supplies for American fishermen in colonial ports 424
      • Mr. Jackson to Vice-Admiral Wellesley, August 30, 1870 425
      • Vice-Admiral Wellesley to Mr. Jackson, August 31, 1870 426
      • Mr. Jackson to Vice-Admiral Wellesley, September 1, 1870 426
      • Vice-Admiral Wellesley to Mr. Jackson; is of opinion that terms of treaty exclude United States fishermen from obtaining supplies 426
      • information as to practice of Nova Scotian authorities requested 427
      • laws and trade with fishing vessels prior to reciprocity treaty in Pictou district 427
      • same subject as to Halifax district 428
      • abstract of colonial, dominion, and imperial laws on the subject 428
  • FORBES, PAUL:
    • bears dispatches into Pans through German lines 126
  • FOREIGN ENLISTMENT BILL:
    • debate in British Parliament 153
    • the act 158
  • FRANCE:
  • [Page 531]FRANC-TIREURS:
    • Bismarck as to status 109
    • Prince de la Tour d’Auvergne’s reply 142
  • FREE ZONE. (See MEXICO.)

G.

  • GENEVA CONVENTION:
    • its violation. (See INTERNATIONAL LAW.)
  • GERMANS:
    • North Germans in France, protected by United States. (See NORTH GERMANS.)
    • South Germans, Bavaria and Baden, protected by Switzerland. (See SWITZERLAND.)
    • South Germans, Würtemberg, protected by Russia. (See RUSSIA.)
  • GOOD OFFICES:
    • of Mr. Washburne requested by France in its negotiations with Germany. 119
    • views of United States 68
    • Germany asked if good offices will be acceptable 193
    • President awaits request of both warring powers 194
    • Germany would reject good offices 206
  • GRAMONT, DUKE DE:
    • North German steamers. Note relative to. 75
    • protection of Germans in France. Notes relative to 77, 80, 81, 91 94
    • circular relative to Benedetti’s secret treaty 86
    • circular as to published German accounts of candidacy of Prince Hohenzollern 137
  • GRANVILLE, LORD:
    • circular defining contraband of war 164
    • correspondence with Count Bernstorff on same subject 173 183
    • to Sir John Young, April 30, 1870, as to proceedings of British naval forces touching Canadian fisheries 417
  • GREAT BRITAIN:
    • proclamation of neutrality 151
    • foreign enlistment bill 153 158
    • Lord Granville’s circular defining contraband of war 164
    • correspondence with Count Bernstorff on British neutrality 171 177
    • Lord Granville’s effort for an armistice and eventual peace. 183
    • Great Britain to protect French in Germany 200
    • Purchases arms in Switzerland. 236
    • Coöperation with United States and North Germany in suppression of piracy in Chinese waters 331, 332 334
    • Suspension of hostilities in Chinese waters between France and Germany 396, 397, 398
    • fishery question. (See FISHERIES.)
    • northwestern boundary. (See NORTHWESTERN BOUNDARY.)
    • naturalization law. (See NATURALIZATION.)
  • GREECE:
    • causes of brigandage, Mr. Tuckerman’s views thereon 439, 440
  • GUATEMALA:
    • British minister affords asylum to political exiles 443
    • publication in Gazette relative thereto 444
    • misunderstanding between Guatemala and Mexico as to latter’s protection of political exiles 446
    • memorandum of Guatemalan government, thereon 447
    • Mr. Hudson to Mr. Nelson 447
  • GUSMAN, MR.:
    • speech in Mexican Congress in favor of Free Zone 496

H.

  • HAZEN, GENERAL:
    • leaves Brussels for King William’s headquarters 52
  • HOFFMAN, WICKHAM:
    • to Duke de Gramont, July 17, 1870, exemption of North German steamers from capture 74
    • to Duke de Gramont, July 17, 1870, protection of North German archives 76
  • HOHENZOLLERN, PRINCE:
    • his candidacy to Spanish throne. Duke de Gramont relative to 137
    • North German government, relative to 219, 220
  • [Page 532]HOVEY, A. P.:
    • review of his services as United States minister to Peru 504
    • Coolie insurrection 510
    • immunity of Mr. Farrand, United States bearer of dispatches, from arrest. 510
    • to Mr. Loayza, September 3, 1870 511
    • to Mr. Loayza, September 13, 1870 513
    • to Mr. Loayza, September 17, 1870 514

I.

J.

  • JACKSON, MR.:
    • United States consul at Halifax relative to furnishing supplies to American fishermen in colonial ports 423
    • views of treaty of 1818 424
    • to Vice-Admiral Wellesley, August 30, 1870 425
    • September 1, 1870 426
  • JAPAN:
    • proclamation of neutrality 188
    • deportation of native Christians. (See CHRISTIANS.),

K.

  • KELLET, ADMIRAL:
    • commanding British navy in Chinese waters.
    • departure of the missionaries from Tung-chow during Tien-tsin riot 383
    • to Mr. Holmes, August 31, 1870 387, 388
  • KUNG, PRINCE:
    • note to Sir Rutherford Alcock, revision of treaties with China 315
    • note to J. Ross Browne, same subject 321
    • notes relative to Tien-tsin riots, to Mr. Lorr and others 359, 367, 368, 369, 381, 383, 394, 395

L.

  • LEE, GENERAL:
    • his employment by the French 164
  • LEGATION OF UNITED STATES:
    • additional clerks employed in Paris 191, 200
  • LEGATION, RIGHTS OF:
    • discussion of right of diplomatic corps in Paris to send sealed dispatches by courier through German lines 56, 72, 122, 326, 127, 195, 196
    • bearers of dispatches—case of Mr. Farrand—threatened with detention by legal process in Peru 510 520
    • as an asylum: case of Gomados protected by British minister in Guatemala 443
  • LOW, F. F., UNITED STATES MINISTER IN CHINA:
    • to Prince Kung relative to Tien-tsin riot.
    • joint note of June 24, 1870 359
    • June 30, 1870 368
    • September 13, 1870 392
    • to Mr. Wade, departure of missionaries from Tung-chow, September 17, 3870 390
    • to Mr. Capp, same subject, September 14, 1870 389
  • LOAYZA, MR.:
    • immunity of Mr. Farrand, United States bearer of dispatches, from arrest. 510
    • to Mr. Hovey, United States minister, September 13, 1870 512
    • to Mr. Hovey, United States minister, September 16, 1870 513
    • to Mr. Brent, September 23, 1870 517

M.

  • EADOWS, MR.:
    • Tien tsin riot. To Mr. Low, June 22, 1870 360
    • to Mr. Low, June 24, 1870 361
  • [Page 533]MEXICO:
    • misunderstanding between Guatemala and Mexico as to latter’s protection of political exiles 446
    • Free Zone: Mr. Romero’s speech in opposition to it 456 487
    • Mr. Gusman’s speech in favor of it 496
    • Free Zone. Extension of its limits by Mexican Congress 497
    • Mr. Romero’s speech thereon 498
    • Mr. Velasco’s speech thereon 500
  • MOTLEY, J. L.:
    • to Lord Granville, informing British government that true line of northwestern boundary is 4, 763 feet north of recognised line 402
    • to Lord Clarendon as to British and French policy relating to deportation of Christians from Japan, May 21, 1870, June 2, 1870 480 486

N.

  • NATURALIZED CITIZENS OF UNITED STATES OF GERMAN BIRTH:
    • status in France 121
    • Department approves Mr. Washburne’s action 72
  • NATURALIZATION LAW:
    • of Great Britain, passed in British Parliament May 12, 1870 434
  • NEUTRALITY:
    • of Austria 50
    • of Belgium 51
    • of Denmark, proclamation. 57 58
    • Danish ordinances as to neutral obligations 59
    • Danish neutrality 57
    • of England, Italy, and Russia, a neutral league 50
    • of Great Britain, proclamation. 151
    • foreign enlistment act. 158
    • British definition of contraband of war 164
    • British neutrality, correspondence relative to 171 177 180
    • of Japan, proclamation 188
    • of Peru 233
    • of Russia 233 235
    • of Switzerland 235
    • of Turkey 237
  • NEUTRAL RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS:
    • right of legations to transmit sealed official correspondence through lines of besieged city 56 72 122 126 127 195 196
    • as defined by declaration of Paris; adhesion of Denmark; adhesion of France, 58 135 136 218
    • North Germany declares private property at sea exempt from capture 116 217
    • above principle condition of peace with France 194 215
  • NICARAGUA:
    • Mr. Riotti’s views as to the importance of United States naval station on western coast of Central America. Tigre Island suggested 502
  • NORTH GERMANY:
    • consulates in France in charge of United States consul general 145 83 147
    • effect of declaration of war in Germany, Mr. Bancroft’s views 197
    • will pay expenses of Mr. Washburne’s assistants 200
    • Mr. Bancroft relative to reconstruction of German government with view to United Germany 210
    • progress of reconstruction 216
    • private property at sea exempt from capture 217
    • its views as to causes and motives of war 219
    • reply to French declaration of war 220
    • protests against French violation of Geneva convention in firing on flags of truce and ambulances 109 222 226 231 206
    • proposition as to piracy in Chinese waters 329, 330, 331
    • United States proposition to suspend hostilities in Chinese waters, and to coöperate with maritime powers for protection of western residents 396, 397, 398
  • NORTH GERMANS IN FRANCE:
    • can they be protected by United States legation in France 73
    • protection requires request of Prussia and assent of France 64, 150
    • North Germany requests United States to protect Germans 216
    • United States minister asks France 65 73
    • [Page 534]France assents 73 77
    • subjects of Saxony, Hesse, and Coburg included 65 78 79
    • Mr. Washburne’s proceedings approved by Department. 66 69 191
    • approved by North German government 68 204 225
  • Their Departure Forbidden:
    • will Germans be allowed to leave France 76 77
    • Gramont declines to allow Germans liable to military duty to leave 81
    • Mr. Washburne’s protest 82
    • Gramont communicates final French regulations as to departure of Germans 94
    • Mr. Washburne’s protest as to doctrine of Duke de Gramont’s notes 96
    • they ask certificate of protection from United States 91
    • Expulsion of Germans from France; condition thereof 92
    • debate in Corps Legislatif 103
    • efforts to obtain mitigation of order 65 92 99
    • Prussian credit to pay expenses of Germans 65 92 94 189 190 202 203
    • dispatches of Department communicating Washburne’s action to Bancroft 190 192 193
    • Germans and General Trochu’s proclamation of expulsion 106 107 108
    • number of passports issued and Germans forwarded 110
  • NORTH GERMAN STEAMERS:
    • New York, Bremen, and Hamburg.
    • are they exempt from capture? 64 150
    • French government consulted 73
    • France refuses exemption 74
    • correspondence with French government relative to 74 75
    • determination of France sent to Germany 189 218
  • NORTHWESTERN BOUNDARY:
    • true line is 4, 763 feet north of recognized line; Secretary of War’s letter. 399 400
    • same information from Secretary of Treasury 401
    • acknowledgments of Department 401
    • British government informed 402
    • Mr. Thornton proposes that situation shall remain undisturbed for present, and Canada occupy fort 403
    • United States assents until commission can fix line; appropriation will be asked for 404
    • Secretary of War asks for estimate of expense of completing survey of boundary from Lake of Woods to Rocky Mountains 405
    • Secretary of War sends estimate 405 406

P.

  • PARIS:
    • provisioning of, in view of siege. 108
    • government will remain. 120
    • military preparation for defense 120
    • military situation therein 126 176
    • Mr. Bancroft relative to delay in German operations before. 215
    • some of diplomatic corps leave Paris 121
    • communications with Paris cut 120 147
    • Bismarck’s circular declining responsibility for suffering during siege 133 231 232
    • revolution of reds attempted 133 134
    • Washburne and Read may leave Paris when they choose 187
    • operations of Germans besieging city 215
  • PARIS DECLARATION OF RIGHTS OF NEUTRALS:
    • adhesion of Denmark 58
    • adhesion of France 135
  • PEACE NEGOTIATIONS:
    • United States cannot act with European powers 68
    • Mr. Bancroft to ask Germany if the good offices of the United States would be acceptable 193
    • tender of good offices would be declined 206
    • President’s hope as to peace 194
    • Delbrück states that exemption of private property from capture at sea will be one of the conditions of peace 215 194
    • Mr. Bancroft on German view of conditions of peace 209
    • Bismarck’s circulars relative to 211 212
    • Pope’s letter to King William in interest of peace 224
  • [Page 535]PERU:
    • neutrality of, in Franco-German war 233
    • pleasant relations between United States and Peru 504
    • proceedings of Spanish fleet before Callao. 505
    • coolie insurrection 510
    • threatened detention of Mr. Farrand, United States bearer of dispatches, by legal process; Mr. Hovey’s protest, and release of Mr. Farrand 510
  • Correspondence:
    • Mr. Hovey to Mr. Loayza, September 3, 1870 511
    • Mr. Loayza to Mr. Hovey, September 13, 1870 512
    • Mi. Hovey to Mr. Loayza, September 13 513
    • Mr. Elmore to Mr. Hovey, September 14 513
    • Mr. Loayza to Mr. Hovey, September 16 513
    • Mr. Hovey to Mr. Loayza, September 17 514
    • Mr. Brent to Department, September 29 517
    • Mr. Loayza to Mr. Brent, September 23 517
    • Mr. Fish to Mr. Brent, reviews the law and sustains Mr. Hovey 519
    • Department acknowledges Mr. Brent’s dispatch. 520
  • PIRACY IN CHINESE WATERS:
    • German proposition for coöperation of maritime powers 329
    • action of United States 330 331 334
  • POPE PIUS IX:
    • correspondence with King William 224
  • PORT REGULATIONS:
    • United States proclamation of 48
    • Denmark, foreign ships forbidden to enter interior harbor at Copenhagen. 62
    • United States to French government, communicates its disapproval of presence of French vessels on United States coasts 70
  • PROCLAMATIONS:
  • PROPERTY OF AMERICANS IN PARIS:
    • will it be respected by North German authorities? 66 192
    • Mr. Bancroft’s report of determination of North German government 213
    • above report sent to Washburne 71
    • instructions to consul general as to his protection of American property 147
    • consul general’s proceedings 148
  • Of French in Paris:
    • consul general’s proceedings in relation thereto 145 148
    • Department approves 148
  • PROTECTION OF UNITED STATES MINISTER IN FRANCE:
    • accorded to arms, flags, and residences of consuls of Southern and Central America 323
    • accorded to citizens of Colombia and Portugal 130
    • accorded to Germans. (See NORTH GERMANS.)

R.

  • READ, J. M., UNITED STATES CONSUL GENERAL, PARIS:
    • telegrams and dispatches relative to medium in which consul’s fees shall be paid 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148
    • where they shall be banked 344
    • declines to give storage to French property 145 148
    • may leave Paris for Tours when he chooses 187
  • REDS:
    • attempted revolution in Paris 133
  • REMINGTON GUNS:
    • on French steamers bound to Havre 207
  • REPUBLIC, FRENCH:
    • its establishment, and recognition by United States. (See FRANCE.)
    • its influence on Spanish politics 236, 237
  • ROMAN QUESTION:
  • ROMERO, M.:
    • speeches in Mexican Congress against Free Zone 487 498
  • RUSSIA:
    • protects Wurtemberg subjects in France 92
    • neutrality and views of the Franco-German war 233
    • Russian armament 235
    • appoints archbishops for Aleutian Isles and Alaska 520
    • municipal reforms in Russian empire 521
    • abstract of law 522

S.

  • SECRETARY OF STATE:
    • communications as to protection of Germans in France 64, 65, 69, 150, 193, 225
    • communications as to tender of good offices of United States 68 193, 194
    • communication as to exemption of North German steamers from capture 64
    • approves letter to Jules Favre recognizing republic 69, 70
    • communication as to introduction of the principle that private property is exempt from capture at sea into German treaty with United States 194
    • communications on obstruction of intercourse with legation in Paris 195, 196
    • circular on common unit and standard of international gold coinage 240
    • circular on commercial relations of United States with Spanish American States and Brazil 254
    • dispatch to Mr. Bancroft on Chinese policy of the United States. 304
    • note to Baron Gerolt. as to coöperation of maritime powers to suppress piracy in the Chinese waters 331
    • dispatch to Mr. Low, same subject 334
    • letter to Secretary of Navy, same subject 331
    • instructions as to Corea expedition 334
    • instructions as to suspension of hostilities between France and Germany in Chinese waters 396
    • to Mr. Low on his assurance to Prince Kung, relating to Tien-tsin riot 398
    • removal of American residents from Tung-chow 399
    • communication relative to rights of United States fishermen under treaty of 1818 with Great Britain 407, 410, 415, 417, 420, 421, 431
    • communications relative to deportation of Christians in Japan 478, 479, 486
    • communications relative to immunity of bearer of dispatches from arrest. Far rand’s case in Peru. 519, 520
  • SEWARD GEORGE F.:
    • dispatches as to condition of affairs in Corea 336
    • review of political and commercial relations between the United States and China 339
  • SHERIDAN GENERAL P.E.:
    • visit to German headquarters 51
    • account of battles of August 16 and 18 51
  • SPAIN:
    • Spanish politics 29
    • her position as to French republic 236
  • SPANISH AMERICAN STATES:
    • commercial relations of United States therewith
  • SWITZERLAND:
    • protects subjects of Bavaria and Baden in France 86
    • neutrality of 235
    • arming of and occupation of Chablais 236

T.

  • THIERS’S MISSION TO EUROPEAN COURTS:
    • visit to Vienna 59
    • his presence in Paris 133
    • his interview with Bismarck 54 215
    • Mr. Bancroft’s observations thereon 216
    • Favre’s circular relative to failure to negotiate an armistice 53
  • TIEN-TSIN RIOT:
    • causes thereof 355
    • further accounts thereof. 263
    • [Page 537]views of Protestant missionaries 371
    • demands of French charge 377
    • excitement in Tien-tsin after the riot 378
    • dilatory and offensive action of Tien-tsin authorities 378
    • condition of affairs at Swatow 379
    • withdrawal of missionaries from Tung-chow on British vessels of war 383 391
    • withdrawal of missionaries from Tung-chow on British vessels of war 383- 391
    • return thereof by Admiral Rogers 398
    • British thanked for removal of American residents from Tung-chow 399
    • invitation to France and Germany to suspend hostilities in Chinese waters 396, 397
    • Lord Granville says it has been done 396
    • North Germany accepts policy of United States 398
    • Mr. Low has too strongly assured Prince Kung of the forbearance of the United States 398
  • TIGRE ISLAND:
    • its importance to the United States as a naval station 502
  • TREATY, CONSULAR, WITH NORTH GERMAN UNION:
    • United States desires introduction of clause exempting, private property from capture at sea 194, 215
  • TREATY SECRET, BETWEEN FRANCE AND GERMANY:
    • the Benedetti project. (See BENEDETTI.)
  • TROCHU, GENERAL:
    • order expelling “useless mouths ‘‘from Pans 106
    • order expelling foreigners from Paris 108
    • president of government of national defense 111
  • TURKEY:

U.

  • UNITED STATES:
    • its neutrality in Franco-German war 45
    • United States consuls in France charged with protection of German consulates 83, 145, 147
    • United States ministers in France protect German subjects 73
    • disapproves presence of French vessels on seaboard of United States 70
    • good offices of, requested by France to negotiate peace with Germany. 68, 119, 193, 194, 206
    • declines to allow Germany to pay for extra clerks in United States legation in Paris 191
    • public opinion in United States as to France. 67
    • position in Europe as first-class power 200
    • United States view with satisfaction German declaration that private property at sea shall be exempt from capture 217
    • influence of United States in Spain 237
    • Japanese policy relative to deportation of native Christians. (See CHRISTIANS. )
    • its views as to fishery question 407
    • as to immunity of bearer of dispatches. (See PERU.)

V.

  • VELASCO, MR:
    • speecch in Mexican Congress relative to extension of limits of Free Zone 500

W.

  • WAR BETWEEN FRANCE AND GERMANY:
    • its declaration 134, 197, 269
    • Germans on the Rhine 144
    • Wissembourg battle, situation in Pans 38
    • Germans will turn French army north and south 202
    • French abandon line of the Moselle 202
    • Paris declared in state of siege 90
    • McMahon and Bazaine defeated—Sedan captured, Emperor prisoner 110, 205
    • Emperor surrendered without prejudice to Paris Regency 205
    • military defense of Paris 120, 177
    • communications with Paris cut 121
    • [Page 538]German troops on French soil 211
    • French prisoners in Germany 211
    • French loss by death and wounds 211
    • fall of Strasburg 214
    • operations of Germans before Paris 215
  • WASHBURNE, E. B., UNITED STATES MINISTER IN FRANCE:
    • protection of Germans in France.
    • to Duke de Gramont, July 20, 1870 79
    • to Duke de Gramont, July 23, 1870 80
    • to Duke de Gramont, July 25, 1870 82
    • to Duke de Gramont, July 30, 1870 91
    • to Duke de Gramont, August 9, 1870 96
    • to Prince de la Tour d’Auvergne, August 17, 1870 104
    • violations of flags of truce.
    • to Prince de la Tour d’Auvergne, August 23, 1870 105
    • recognition of the republic. 116
    • to Jules Favre, September 7, 1870 116
    • to delegation of Frenchmen 118
    • to Messrs. Hecht & Co., as to protection of United States naturalized citizens, August 31 121
    • protection of South and Central American consulates.
    • to French minister for foreign affairs, September 24, 1870 124
    • to consuls, September 30 125
  • WELLESLEY, VICE-ADMIRAL:
    • commanding British vessels of war in Canadian waters.
    • his views as to closing colonial ports against American fishermen.
    • to Mr. Jackson, August 31, 1870 426
    • to Mr. Jackson, September 3, 1870 426
  • WOLLEY, Mr.:
    • Instruction as to Canadian Fisheries;
    • to Vice-Admiral Wellesley, April 9, 1870, 415
    • May 5, 1870 416
  • WOUNDED:

Y.

  • YOUNG, SIR JOHN:
    • Governor General of Canada: communications relative to fisheries, April 11, 1870, to Mr. Thornton 408
    • May 14, 1870, to Mr. Thornton 413
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