List of papers, with their contents.

1. PAPERS RELATING TO THE FRANCO–GERMAN WAR.

No. Proclamations by the President of the United States. Page.
1 Proclamation of August 22, 1870, enjoining neutrality 45
2 Proclamation of October 8, 1870, regulating the conduct of vessels of war of either belligerent in waters within the jurisdiction of the United States. 48

AUSTRIA.

No. From whom and to whom. Date. Subject. Page.
1870.
3 Mr. Jay to Mr. Fish. Aug. 8 Austria declines French alliance. War preparations precautionary only. 49
4 do Aug. 21 Austria will not join neutral league unless efforts for peace are to be made jointly. 50
5 do Oct. 3 Mr. Thiers’s mission to Austria. Growing importance of American opinion. 50
BELGIUM.
1870.
6 Mr. Jones to Mr. Fish. Aug. 11 Generals Sheridan and Forsyth will be welcome at German headquarters. 51
7 do Sept. 1 General Sheridan’s account of the battles of August 16 and 18. Belgian precautions to preserve neutrality. 51
8 do Sept. 23 Belgian war measure. Probability of continuance of war. 52
9 do Oct. 14 Escape of the Empress of the French 52
10 do Nov. 14 Inclosing Count Bismarck’s and M. Jules Favre’s circulars in regard to M. Thiers’s negotiations for an armistice. 53
11 do Nov. 15 Inclosing a copy of Count Bismarck’s circular as to the claim of the diplomatic corps to send messengers through the German lines. 56
DENMARK.
1870.
12 Mr. Yeaman to Mr. Fish. July 26 Danish neutrality. Relations between Denmark and Prussia. Inclosure: Danish proclamation of neutrality, July 25, 1870. 57
13 do July 29 Danish neutrality. Inclosures: 1. Baron Rosenörn-Lehn to Mr. Yeaman, July 28, 1870. 2. Royal ordinance of May 4, 1803. 58
[Page 24] 1870.
14 Mr. Yeaman to Mr. Fish. Aug. 4 Revocation of the permission to foreign ships of war to enter the interior harbor of Copenhagen. Inclosure: Baron Rosenörn-Lehn to Mr. Yeaman, August 3, 1870. 62
15 do Aug. 5 Danish neutrality. Visit of the Marquis of Cadore to Copenhagen. 62
16 do Aug. 9 Same subjects 63
17 do Aug. 13 Same subjects 64
FRANCE.
The Department of State to the United States legation in Paris.
1870.
18 Mr. Fish to Mr. Hoffman. July 16 Protection of North Germans in France 64
19 Mr. Fish to Mr. Washburne. July 16 As to North German steamers between Bremen and Hamburg and New York. 64
20 do July 19 Instructions to take North Germans in France under his protection, if France consents. 65
21 Mr. Davis to Mr. Washburne. July 25 Protection of subjects of Saxony, Hesse, &c. 65
22 do Aug. 14 Prussian credit for removal of Germans 65
23 do Aug. 16 Expulsion of Germans from Paris—approval of Mr. Washburne’s course. Continue to do what he can to mitigate severity of order of expulsion. 65
24 do Aug. 16 Approving course as to subjects of Saxony and Hesse. 66
25 do Aug. 17 Correction of telegram of previous day 66
26 do Aug. 30 Mr. Bancroft will be instructed to ask to have American property in France respected by German forces. 66
27 do Sept. 6 To recognize provisional government if a de facto government. 67
28 do Sept. 6 Same subject 67
29 do Sept. 6 To tender the congratulations of the President and people of the United States on the establishment of a republic. 67
30 do Sept. 7 Conversation with Mr. Berthemy on the state of public opinion in the United States 67
31 do Sept. 8 His course in protecting Germans approved by North German legation here. Explanation of mistake in telegram of August 16. 68
32 Mr. Fish to Mr. Washburne. Sept. 9 Not the policy or interest of United States to act jointly with European powers in European questions. Mr. Bancroft instructed to ascertain whether Germany desires good offices of the United States. 68
33 do Sept. 13 Satisfaction of the government of North Germany with Mr. Washburne’s course in regard to the subjects of North Germany. 69
34 do Sept. 15 Approval of his course as to North Germans. 69
35 do Sept. 27 Approval of his course 69
36 do Sept. 27 Same subject 70
[Page 25] 1870.
37 Mr. Fish to Mr. Washburne. Oct. 4 Course of French vessels of war at and near New York 70
38 do Oct. 11 Inclosing the proclamation of October 8 71
39 do Oct. 18 Protection of American property in Paris 71
40 do Oct. 21 Approval of his course as to naturalized citizens. 72
41 do Nov. 22 The course of the Germans in obstructing communication with the United States legation at Paris. 72
The United States legation in Paris to the Department of State.
1870.
42 Mr. Hoffman to Mr. Fish. July 15 Protection of Prussian subjects 73
43 do July 18 Same subject 73
44 do July 18 North German steamers. Protection of North German subjects in France. Neutrality of Belgium. 73
45 Mr. Washburne to Mr. Fish. July 19 Declaration of war. Prussian archives in United States protection. Saxony asks same. 74
46 do July 21 Refusal to exempt North German steamers from capture. 74
47 do July 22 Same subject. Inclosures: 1. Mr. Hoffman to the Duc de Gramont, July 17, 1870. 2. Duc de Gramont to Mr. Hoffman, July 21, 1870. 74
48 do July 22 Protection of North German archives. North Germans leaving France, correspondence as to. In closures: A. Mr. Washburne to the Duc de Gramont, July 21, 1870. B. Mr. Hoffman to the Duc de Gramont, July 17, 1870. C. Duc de Gramont to Mr. Hoffman, July 18, 1870. 76
49 do July 24 Protection of North Germans and Saxons. Hesse Grand-Ducal and Saxe-Coburg-Gotha ask same. 78
50 do July 26 Same subject. Inclosures: 1. Baron de Lüttichau to Mr. Washburne, July 20, 1870. 2. Mr. Washburne to Duc de Gramont, July 20, 1870. 3. Mr. Desprez to Mr. Washburne, July 21, 1870. 78
51 do July 26 Same subject. Inclosures: 1. Count d’Euzenberg to Mr. Washburne, July 23, 1870. 2. Mr. Washburne to the Duc de Gramont, July 23, 1870. 3. Duc de Gramont to Mr. Washburne, July 25, 1870. 79
52 do July 29 Further correspondence as to departure of North Germans from France. Inclosures: 1. Duc de Gramont to Mr. Washburne, July 23, 1870. 2. Mr. Washburne to the Duc de Gramont, July 25, 1870. 80
53 do July 29 United States consuls in France to assume the care of North German consulates. In closure: Circular from the legation July 28, 1870. 83
54 do July 29 General news. The secret treaty. Inclosures: 1. Decree making the Empress regent. 2. Extracts from the Journal Officiel. 84
[Page 26] 1870.
55 Mr. Washburne to Mr. Fish. July 29 Subjects of Bavaria, Würtemberg, and Baden under Swiss protection. 86
56 do Aug. 5 The secret treaty. Inclosure: Circular dispatch of the Duc de Gramont, August 3, 1870. 86
57 do Aug. 8 General. Effect of the news of the battles of Worth and Wissembourg on Paris. 88
58 do Aug. 11 Subjects of North Germany desire certificates of protection. Inclosures: 1. Mr. Washburne to the Duc de Gramont, July 30, 1870. 2. Duc de Gramont to Mr. Washburne, August 5, 1870. 91
59 do Aug. 12 Expulsion of North Germans from France. Many too poor to leave without aid—asking for a credit to aid such. 92
60 do Aug. 12 Protection of North German subjects. Concerted action of Mr. Washburne with the Swiss and Russian ministers. 92
61 do Aug. 12 The new ministry. Inclosure of names 93
62 do Aug. 15 Condition of North Germans in Paris. Receipt of credit of 50,000 thalers. Mode of disposing of it. 94
63 do Aug. 16 The detention of the persons of North Germans in France. Inclosures: 1. The Duc de Gramont to Mr. Washburne, August 3, 1870. 2. Mr. Washburne to the Duc de Gramont, August 9, 1870. 94
64 do Aug. 19 Blockade of the North German coast. Inclosure: Official notice August 17, 1870. 98
65 do Aug. 22 Protection of North Germans; their expulsion from France. Narrative of steps taken by Mr. Washburne. Inclosures: 1. Debate in the Corps Législatif August 12, 1870. 2. Mr. Washburne to the Prince de la Tour d’Auvergne, August 17, 1870. 99
66 do Aug. 26 German complaints of violations of flags of truce. Inclosures: 1. Mr. Washburne to the Prince de la Tour d’Auvergne, August 23, 1870, transmitting a copy of a dispatch from Mr. Motley dated July 22, 1870. 2. Prince de la Tour d’Auvergne to Mr. Washburne, August 23, 1870. 105
67 do Aug. 26 Americans leaving Paris. Germans pressing upon the legation in consequence of General Trochu’s proclamation. Inclosure: Copy of that proclamation August 24, 1870. 106
68 do Aug. 29 Excitement of Germans. Legation crowded. Mr. Washburne acting in concert with Bavarian minister. Their interview with Mr. Chevereau. Mr. Washburne’s interview with the Prince de la Tour d’Auvergne. Inclosure: General Trochu’s proclamation, August 28, 1870. 107
69 do Aug. 31 Blockade. Inclosing notice from the Journal Officiel of August 30, 1870. 108
70 do Sept. 2 Franc-tireurs not considered soldiers. Violations of flags of truce. Inclosures: Mr. Washburne to Prince de la Tour d’Auvergne. Two notes transmitting dispatches from Count Bismarck to Count Bernstorff, received through Mr. Motley. 109
[Page 27] 1870.
71 Mr. Washburne to Mr. Fish. Sept. 2 Most of the Germans have left Paris. Number of passports issued, and of persons forwarded. 110
72 do Sept. 3 Defeat of McMahon 110
73 do Sept. 5 Provisional government to be appointed 111
74 do Sept. 5 Proclamation of republic 111
75 do Sept. 5 Names of the members of the provisional government. Paris quiet. Instructions asked for. 111
76 do Sept. 5 New government installed. Paris tranquil. 111
77 do Sept. 5 Description of the events that had taken place in Paris since the surrender of McMahon. 112
78 do Sept. 9 His recognition of the republic. Interview with M. Jules Favre. Telegram to Department. In closures: 1. Mr. Washburne to M. Favre, September 7, 1870. 2. M. Favre to Mr. Washburne, September 8, 1870. 115
79 do Sept. 9 A tribute of the French to Mr. Washburne. Inclosures: 1. Address to Mr. Washburne. 2. Mr. Washburne’s reply. 118
80 do Sept. 9 Election ordered for a constituent assembly. Inclosure: Decree by the provisional government September 8, 1870. 118
81 do Sept. 12 Mr. Washburne asked by France to interpose his good offices unofficially. Instructions asked for. 119
82 do Sept. 13 Mr. Washburne asked to interfere, unofficially, to ascertain the views of the Prussian government as to peace. He declines, under instructions. 119
83 do Sept. 13 Government to remain in Paris. Mr. Washburne will remain. 120
84 do Sept. 14 Stupendous preparations for defense 120
85 do Sept. 20 Communication with Paris cut. Some of the diplomatic corps gone to Tours without consultation with the other members. 120
86 do Sept. 21 Protection of naturalized German citizens. Inclosures: 1. Messrs. Hecht, &c., to Mr. Washburne, August 29, 1870. 2. Mr. Washburne to Messrs. Hecht, &c., August 31, 1870. 121
87 do Sept. 26 Proceedings of the diplomatic corps. Inclosure: Meeting of the diplomatic corps September 23, 1870. 122
88 do Sept. 30 Mr. Washburne requested to accord the protection of the United States to the arms, flags, residences, &c., of the consulates of Uruguay, Dominica, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Chili, Paraguay, and Venezuela. He accepts the trust. Inclosures: 1. Consuls of those countries to Mr. Washburne, September 22. 2. Mr. Washburne to the minister for foreign affairs, September 24. 3. The minister for foreign affairs to Mr. Washburne, September 26. 4. Mr. Washburne to the consuls, September 30. 123
89 do Oct. 3 Visit of General Burnside and Mr. Forbes. Change of things in Paris. No decision of diplomatic corps as to remaining. Mr. Washburne will remain. 126
[Page 28] 1870.
90 Mr. Washburne to Mr. Fish. Oct. 4 Prussian authorities’ reply to request of diplomatic corps that couriers may pass the lines, that it will be granted only on condition that the dispatches are unsealed and subject to inspection. The diplomatic corps unanimously refuse to accept the condition. 126
91 do Oct. 8 Same subject. Inclosure: Account of the proceedings of the diplomatic corps at a meeting held October 6. 127
92 do Oct. 18 Americans desiring to leave Paris. Inclosure: Mr. Favre to Mr. Washburne, October 18, 1870. 129
93 do Oct. 24 United States protection extended to citizens of Colombia and of Portugal. 130
94 do Oct. 24 Permission granted to Americans to leave Paris. Inclosure: Form of passport. 131
95 do Oct. 31 Forty-eight Americans have left Paris. Inclosures: 1. Mr. Ward to Mr. Washburne, October 27, 1870. 2. List of Americans who left Paris October 27, 1870. 132
96 do Oct. 31 Inclosing a note from Count Bismarck to Mr. Washburne upon the situation of Paris. 133
97 do Oct. 31 Attempted revolution in Paris. “Government of the commune.” 133
Correspondence between the Department of State and the French legation in Washington.
1870.
98 Mr. Berthemy to Mr. Davis. Aug. 3 Inclosing the declaration made to the Senate and Corps Legislatif July 20, 1870, by the minister of foreign affairs. 134
99 Mr. Davis to Mr. Berthemy. Aug. 6 Acknowledging the receipt of the declaration made July 20 to the Senate and Corps Legislatif. 135
100 Mr. Berthemy to Mr. Fish. Aug. 3 Informing this government of the declaration of war, and that it will be conducted, as to the United States, conformably to the principles set forth in the declaration of the congress of Paris of April 16, 1856. 135
101 Mr. Davis to Mr. Berthemy. Aug. 6 Acknowledging the receipt of the declaration of war. Satisfaction of the President at learning that the principles for which the United States have contended are to be observed. The United States will observe a strict neutrality. 136
102 Duc de Gramont to Mr. Berthemy. July 24 [Communicated August 17, 1870, by Mr. Berthemy.] Comments upon the published North German accounts of the candidacy of the Prince of Hohenzollern. 137
103 M. Jules Favre to Mr. Berthemy. [Communicated by the French legation September 8, 1870.] Circular upon the causes of the war and the policy to be pursued by France. 139
[Page 29] 1870.
104 Mr. Berthemy to to Mr. Fish. Sept. 16 In refutation of the charge that the French have voluntarily set aside, in the present war, the rules of international law. Inclosures: 1. Prince de la Tour d’Auvergne to Mr. Berthemy, August 31, 1870. 2. Same to same, August 31, 1870. 3. Same to same, September 2, 1870. 140
105 Mr, Fish to Mr. Berthemy. Sept. 19 Acknowledging receipt of communication in refutation of the charge that the French had voluntarily disregarded the rules of international law in the war. A copy will be transmitted to the North German minister at Washington. 143
Correspondence between the Department of State and the United States consulate general in Paris
1870.
106 Mr. Read to Mr. Fish. Aug. 15 Paper money depreciating. Asks instructions. 143
107 Mr. Davis to Mr. Read. Aug. 16 Secretary Treasury says take gold 144
108 Mr. Read to Mr. Davis. Aug. 17 No gold to be had 144
109 do Aug. 18 Same subject. Advises taking silver. Asks leave to bank with Hottinguer. 144
110 do Aug. 18 The treasury regulations produce great inconvenience and are unpopular with the French. Applications made by French to receive property for protection and declined. 144
111 Mr. Davis to Mr. Read. Aug. 18 Treasury decides to require money as heretofore or its equivalent in currency. So instruct consuls. 146
112 Mr. Read to Mr. Davis. Aug. 19 Telegram satisfactory. Can he bank with Rothchilds or Hottinguer. 146
113 Mr. Davis to Mr. Read. Aug. 20 Bank with Munroe & Co. Instructions as to funds. 146
114 Mr. Read to Mr. Davis. Aug. 24 Same subject. North German consulates 146
115 Mr. Davis to Mr. Read. Aug. 31 Authorized to employ additional clerks. Refusal to receive French property for protection approved. If private property is received it must be without liability on the part of the Government. 147
116 Mr. Read to Mr. Fish. Sept. 16 Reply to the Department’s instructions of August 31. Government exempted from liability for property received for safekeeping. Americans have been invited to register themselves at the consulate, and branch offices have been opened at consul’s residence, &c. 148
117 Mr. Davis to Mr. Read. Oct. 4 Approval of his energy and zeal. Doubtful whether branch offices of a consulate can be established in the same city. 149
[Page 30]GREAT BRITAIN.
1870.
118 Mr. Fish to Mr. Motley. July 16 Telegram for Mr. Bancroft about protection of North Germans in France. 150
119 Mr. Motley to Mr. Fish. July 21 Inclosing British neutrality proclamation. Inclosure: The Queen’s proclamation, July 19, 1870. 150
120 do Aug. 3 Inclosing debate on the foreign enlistment bill. Inclosure: Report of debate in the Times of August 2. 152
121 do Aug. 9 Copy of the British foreign enlistment act 158
122 do Aug. 11 Employment of General Lee by the French. 164
123 do Aug. 18 Views of British government as to contraband of war. Inclosure: Lord Granville’s circular of August 11, 1870. 164
124 do Oct. 1 French report of interview between M. Favre and Count Bismarck. Inclosure: Translation of M. Favre’s account of same, September 21, 1870. 166
125 do Oct. 6 British neutrality; contraband of war. Inclosures: Count Bernstorff to Lord Granville, September 1, 1870; Lord Granville to Count Bernstorff, September 15, 1870. 170
126 do Oct. 13 Forwarding telegram from Mr. Washburne. 176
127 do Oct. 15 British neutrality. Inclosure: Count Bernstorff to Lord Granville, October 8, 1870. 177
128 do Oct. 23 British efforts for an armistice 183
129 do Nov. 1 British neutrality. Inclosure: Lord Granville to Count Bernstorff, October 21, 1870. 183
130 do Nov. 15 Send word to Washburne that he and Read can leave Paris when they choose. Write Bancroft to same effect. 187
JAPAN.
1870.
131 Mr. De Long to Mr. Fish. Oct. 10 Neutrality of Japan. Inclosures: 1. The Japanese ministers to Mr. De Long. 2. Japanese proclamation of neutrality. 181
NORTH GERMANY.
The Department of State to the United States legation at Berlin.
1870.
132 Mr. Davis to Mr. Bancroft. Aug. 9 North German mail steamships 189
133 do Aug. 13 Expulsion of Germans from France. Will Prussia place credit at Washburne’s disposal. 189
134 do Aug. 14 Same subject. News of credit sent to Washburne. 190
135 do Aug. 16 Same subject 190
136 do Aug. 17 Same subject. Inclosing a copy of Mr. Washburne’s No. 238, and saying that his course has been approved. 191
[Page 31]137 Mr. Davis to Mr. Bancroft. 1870. Aug. 23 Mr. Washburne has been instructed to employ such additional clerical force as may be necessary. The offer of the Prussian government to bear the expense is declined. 191
138 do Aug. 23 Acknowledging the receipt of Mr. Bancroft’s No. 118, with the secret treaty. He will inquire when the proposition was made and why it was not sooner made known. 191
139 do Aug. 23 Inclosing a copy of Mr. Washburne’s No. 253, as to the steps taken for the protection of North Germans in France. 192
140 do Aug. 25 Inclosing Mr. Washburne’s No. 251, relative to a certificate of protection desired by Germans resident in France. 192
141 do Aug. 30 Protection of American property in Paris in event of capture. 192
142 Mr. Fish to Mr. Bancroft. Sept. 9 France asks good offices of United States jointly with other powers. Not the policy or interest of United States to act jointly. Ascertain if North Germany desires good offices of United States, but without tendering same unless they will be accepted. 193
143 do Sept. 16 Inclosing Mr. Washburne’s No. 266, on the expulsion of Germans from Paris. 193
144 do Sept. 22 The French reply to the charge that France has disregarded the rules of international law in the present war. 193
145 do Sept. 23 Communication between the belligerents through the legations of the United States is approved. 194
146 do Sept. 30 Reasons for non-intervention. President hopes for peace. Will not express an opinion as to terms. Hopes there will be no extreme demands. 194
147 do Oct. 28 Authorized to obtain recognition of the principle of exemption of private property on high seas from capture. 194
148 do Nov. 11 The refusal to permit couriers to carry unsealed dispatches through the German lines not acquiesced in by this Government. Discussion of the question. 195
149 do Nov. 22 Inclosing a copy of a note (November 21, 1870) to Baron Gerolt on obstructions to intercourse with the United States legation at Paris. 196
The United States legation at Berlin to the Department of State.
1870.
150 Mr. Bancroft to Mr. Fish. July 16 Declaration of war. No excuse for it. North German mail steamships. Enthusiasm in Germany. 197
151 do July 27 The secret treaty. It is in the handwriting of Mr. Benedetti. In closure: Copy of the treaty. 198
[Page 32] 1870.
152 Mr. Bancroft to Mr. Fish. July 28 Prussian government desires to pay for such assistance as Mr. Washburne may be obliged to employ. 200
153 do Aug. 2 Count Bismarck’s circular as to the Benedetti project. Great Britain to protect French in Germany. Inclosure: Circular, Berlin, July 29, 1870. 200
154 Mr. Bancroft to Mr. Davis. Aug. 14 Prussian credit for Washburne. War news. 202
155 Mr. Bancroft to Mr. Fish. Aug. 15 Expulsion of Germans from France. Prussian credit for Washburne. Inclosure: Mr. Bancroft to Mr. Washburne, August 14, 1870. 203
156 do Aug. 22 Same subject. Satisfaction in Germany with Mr. Washburne’s course. Inclosure: Mr. Yon Thile to Mr. Bancroft, August 20, 1870. 203
157 do Sept. 1 French blockade ineffectual. Inclosure: Mr. Broelkmann to Mr. Bancroft, August 31, 1870. 204
158 Mr. Bancroft to Mr. Davis. Sept. 3 Surrender of McMahon 205
159 Mr. Bancroft to Mr. Fish. Sept. 6 Correspondence between French and Germans through the American legations. How conducted. Inclosures: 1. Mr. Yon Thile to Mr. Bancroft, September 5, 1870. 2. Mr. Bancroft to Mr. Motley, September 5, 1870. 205
160 do Sept. 11 Not the time for American intervention 206
161 do Sept. 16 The French blockade 207
162 do Sept. 21 Views entertained by allied governments as to peace 207
163 do Sept. 22 The French blockade a paper one. Inclosures: 1. Affidavit of Captain Filts, September 21, 1870. 2. Certificate of Commander Claassen, September 17, 1870. 508
164 do Sept. 24 Conditions of peace. Progress of the war. Negotiations with M. Favre. Reconstruction of government in France and Germany. Number of German troops in France. Inclosure: Count Bismarck’s circular September 23, 1870. 209
165 do Sept. 29 Protection of American property in Paris. Inclosure: Mr. Yon Thile to Mr. Bancroft, September 28, 1870. 213
166 do Sept. 29 Terms of truce offered by Bismarck 214
167 do Oct. 3 Count Bismarck’s interview with M. Favre 215
168 do Oct. 5 Germany will make exemption from capture of private property on high seas a condition of peace. Asks authority to negotiate on the part of the United States for the recognition of the principle by North Germany. 215
169 do Nov. 10 Causes of delay in the operations against Paris. 215
[Page 33]Correspondence between the Department of State and the North German legation in Washington.
1870.
170 Baron Gerolt to Mr. Fish. July 18 Asking that United States legation at Paris may be authorized to protect Germans in France. 216
171 do July 19 Communicating determination of North German government to exempt private property on the high seas from seizure. 216
172 Mr. Fish to Baron Gerolt. July 22 Satisfaction at receipt of news in above note. 217
173 Mr. Davis to Baron Gerolt. July 25 Inclosing copy of a dispatch from Mr. Washburne concerning the position of France as to the declaration of Paris. 218
174 Baron Gerolt to Mr. Fish. July 25 Acknowledging receipt of intelligence of refusal by French government to exempt German vessels from capture. 218
175 do Aug. 11 The motives and causes of the war. Inclosures: 1. A statement of what took place at Ems. 2. Official report of aides-de-camp of King of Prussia. 3. Count Bismarck to Baron Gerolt, July 19, 1870. 4. Declaration of war by France. 219
176 do Aug. 26 Alleged violation of flags of truce. Inclosures: 1. M. Von Thile to Baron Gerolt, August 26, 1870. 2. M. Von Thile to Baron Gerolt, August 22, 1870. 221
177 do Aug. 29 Alleged secret treaty between Count Bismarck and Mr. Benedetti. Efforts of the Pope in behalf of peace. Inclosures: 1. M. Von Thile to Baron Gerolt, August 10, 1870, and inclosures. 2. The Pope to the King of Prussia, July 22, 1870. 3. The King of Prussia to the Pope, July 30, 1870. 222
178 Mr. Davis to Baron Gerolt. Sept. 8 Acknowledging receipt of note of August 29 224
179 Mr. Fish to Baron Gerolt. Sept. 16 Transmitting copy of Mr. Washburne’s No. 266 Relative to the protection of North Germans in Paris. 225
180 Baron Alvensleben to Mr. Fish. Sept. 16 The North German government will gratefully see with what earnestness and zeal Mr. Washburne has exerted himself in behalf of distressed Germans. 225
181 Baron Gerolt to Mr. Fish. Oct. 12 Alleged violations of international law by French troops. Inclosure: Mr. Von Thile to Baron Gerolt, September 27, 1870. 226
182 do Oct. 15 Alleged violations of international law by German troops. In closure: Mr. Von Thile to Baron Gerolt, September 27, 1870. 227
183 do Oct. 17 Negotiations between Count Bismarck and Mr. Favre. Inclosure: Count Bismarck to Baron Gerolt, September 27, 1870. 228
184 Mr. Fish to Baron Gerolt. Oct. 19 Acknowledging the note of October 12 230
185 do Oct. 22 Acknowledging the note of October 15 231
186 do Oct. 22 Acknowledging the note of October 17 231
187 Baron Gerolt to Mr. Fish. Oct. 29 Fatal consequences to the people of Paris from a continuance of the siege. Inclosure: Official memorial relating thereto, forwarded to Baron Gerolt by Count Bismarck. 231
188 Mr. Fish to Baron Gerolt. Nov. 1 Acknowledging the note of October 29 232
[Page 34]PERU.
1870.
189 Mr. Brent to Mr. Fish. Oct. 27 Neutrality of Peru 223
RUSSIA.
1870.
190 Mr. Schuyler to Mr. Fish. Aug. 17 Views entertained in Russia as to the war. Russian neutrality. 233
191 do Aug. 26 Same subjects. Armament of Russia 235
SWITZERLAND.
1870.
192 Mr. Rublee to Mr. Fish. July 25 Swiss neutrality. Arming of Switzerland. The occupation of the Chablais. 235
SPAIN.
1870.
193 Mr. Sickles to Mr. Fish. Sept. 16 Effect of the Prussian successes and of the proclamation of the republic on Spain. The influence of the United States. 236
TURKEY.
1870.
194 Mr. Morris to Mr. Fish. Sept. 2 Turkish neutrality a necessity. Policy of Russia. The Viceroy of Egypt. Roumania. Republics in Europe. Increasing influence of the United States. 237
II.—CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO THE PROPOSED UNIFICATION OF GOLD COINAGE.
1870.
195 Mr. Fish to Mr. Motley, Mr. Washburne, Mr. Bancroft, &c. (Circular.) The adoption of a common unit and standard of international gold coinage. 240
196 Mr. Bancroft to Mr. Fish. July 2 The Germans strongly incline to the five and twenty franc gold piece with decimal variations. Inclosure: A paper, without date or signature, received by Mr. Bancroft from the North German government in reply to the American circular. 251
[Page 35]III.—CORRESPONDENCE CONCERNING THE CONDITION OF THE COMMERCIAL RELATIONS BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE SPANISH AMERICAN STATES AND BRAZIL.
1870.
197 Circular from the Department of State to ministers and consuls in the Spanish-American States and Brazil. Aug. 19 Inclosing copy of a report from the Secretary of State to the Senate, July 14, 1870, on the political causes of the decline of the commerce of the United States with the Spanish-American States, and instructing them to communicate any facts or suggestions on the subject which they may deem useful. 254
198 Mr. Long to Mr. Fish. Sept. 12 Report as to the consulate at Panama 261
199 Mr. Columbus to Mr. Fish. Sept. 24 Report as to the consulate at Payta, Peru 263
200 Mr. Moreau to Mr. Hunter. Sept. 25 Report as to the consulate at San Luis Potosí, Mexico. 264
201 Mr. Moye to Mr. Fish. Sept. 30 Report as to the consulate at Chihuahua, Mexico. 265
202 Mr. Band to Mr. Fish. Sept. 30 Report as to the consulate at La Paz, Bolivia. 268
203 Mr. Trowbridge to Mr. Hunter. Oct. 3 Report as to the consulate at Vera Cruz 274
204 Mr. Stevens to Mr. Fish. Oct. 5 Report as to the countries of the Rio de la Plata. 278
205 Mr. Torbert to Mr. Fish. Oct. 6 Report as to the republic of San Salvador 280
206 Mr. Smith to Mr. Fish. Oct. 9 Report as to the consulate at Tumbez, Peru 282
207 Mr. Blow to Mr. Fish. Oct. 20 Report as to the empire of Brazil 283
208 Mr. Hoyt to Mr. Hunter. Oct. 21 Report as to the consulate at Minatitlan, Mexico. 288
209 Mr. Bragdon to Mr. Fish. Oct. 25 Report as to the consulate at Guayaquil 289
210 Mr. Nelson to Mr. Fish. Oct. 28 Transmitting report of acting consul at Aguas Calientes. 290
211 Mr. Bond to Mr. Fish. Nov. 3 Report as to the consulate at Para, Brazil 291
212 Mr. Nelson to Mr. Fish. Nov. 4 Report as to the republic of Mexico 295
IV.—MISCELLANEOUS CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO FOREIGN AFFAIRS.
AUSTRIA.
1870.
213 Mr. Jay to Mr. Fish. Internal condition of the Austro-Hungarian empire. Criticism upon Mr. Bancroft’s dispatch No. 80, dated April 18, 1870. 298
[Page 36]CHILI.
1870.
214 Gen. Kilpatrick to Mr. Fish. April 9 Reason for the delay in sending a minister from Chili to Washington. 302
CHINA.
1869.
215 Mr. Fish to Mr. Low. Dec. 3 Policy of the United States toward China explained in a dispatch to Mr. Bancroft last summer. Policy of 1868 adhered to. The rights acquired by treaty to be insisted on. American citizens and property to be protected. Inclosures: Mr. Fish to Mr. Bancroft, August 31, 1869, in which the relations between the United States and China are reviewed at length. (Several inclosures in that dispatch.) 303
1870.
216 Baron Gerolt to Mr. Fish. Feb. 19 Proposing combined action of the maritime powers for the extermination of piracy. Inclosure: Count Bismarck to Baron Gerolt, January 29, 1870. 329
217 do Feb. 25 Same subject 330
218 do Mar. 28 Same subject. The British forces will cooperate. 331
219 Mr. Fish to Baron Gerolt. Mar. 31 President takes pleasure in complying with Count Bismarck’s request. Cooperation to be limited to cases of recognized piracy. 331
220 Mr. Fish to the Secretary of the Navy. April 4 Requesting instructions to be given to Admiral Rogers to coöperate with the other maritime powers for the suppression of piracy. Objects of the cooperation and how it is to be carried out. Expedition to Corea for the negotiation of a treaty for the protection of shipwrecked sailors of the United States. 331
221 Mr. Fish to Mr. Low. April 20 Cooperative action of the maritime powers for the suppression of piracy. 334
222 do April 20 Instructions for proceeding to Corea for the purpose of negotiating a treaty for the protection of American seamen. Inclosure: Five dispatches of Mr. George F. Seward to Mr. W. H. Seward, numbered respectively 281, 282, 292, 294, and 317. 334
223 Mr. George F. Seward to Mr. Fish. April 22 A comprehensive review of the political and commercial relations between the United States and China. 339
224 Mr. Low to Mr. Fish. June 27 The riot at Tientsin; causes thereof. Inclosures: A. Joint dispatch of the representatives of the treaty powers to Prince Kung, June 24, 1870. B. Prince Kung to Mr. Low, June 25, 1870. C. An imperial decree, June 26. D. Mr. Meadows to Mr. Low, June 22, 1870. E. Mr. Meadows to Mr. Low, June 24, 1870. 355
225 do July 16 Relations between China and Corea 362
[Page 37] 1870.
226 Mr. Low to Mr. Fish. July 27 The riot at Tientsin; further accounts of the same. Inclosures: A. Mr. Fontainier to Count Rochechouart, June 21, 1870. B. Ma Sin to the foreign office. C. Prince Kung to the representatives of foreign powers, June 26, 1870. D. Prince Kung to Mr. Low, June 29, 1870. E. Mr. Low to Prince Kung, June 30, 1870. F. Prince Kung to Mr. Low, June 29, 1870. G. Proclamation of Tsang-Kwoh-fau, July 10, 1870. Report of Tsang-Kwoh-fau respecting the Tientsin riot, July 14, 1870. 363
227 do Aug. 18 Same subject. Views of the Protestant missionaries. Criticism on the same. Inclosures: 1. Mr. Stanley to Mr. Low, July 9, 1870. 2. Mr. Stanley to Captain Taylor, August 12, 1870. 3. Extract from Shanghai Courier of July 29, 1870. 371
228 do Aug. 22 The same subject. Demands of the French chargé d’affaires. The condition of things unsatisfactory. 377
229 do Aug. 24 Same subject. Excitement continues. Condition at Swatow. Importance of an official denial of the stories that caused the riots. Offensive proclamation of the magistrate of Tientsin. Delay in punishing offenders does not promise well for the future. Fans sold in Tientsin with pictures of the riots. Mr. Low’s continued efforts with the Chinese government. Inclosures: A. Mr. Ashman to Mr. Low, July 25, 1870. B. Prince Kung to Mr. Low, July 29, 1870. C. Proclamation of the prefect of Tientsin, June 10, 1870. D. Prince Kung, August 10, 1870. 378
230 do Sept. 17 Departure of the missionaries from Chefa. Mr. Low thinks it precipitate and uncalled for. Inclosures: A. Mr. Capp to Mr. Low, September 2, 1870. B. Mr. Nevins to Mr. Holmes, August 29, 1870. C. Report of the British consul, September 2, 1870. D. Mr. Holmes to Admiral Kellett, August 31, 1870. E. Admiral Kellett to Mr. Holmes, August 31, 1870. F. Mr. Holmes to Admiral Kellett, August 31, 1870. G. Admiral Kellett to Mr. Holmes, August 31, 1870. H. Mr. Mateer to Mr. Hollwill, August 30, 1870. I. Mr. Low to Mr. Capp, &c., September 14, 1870. J. Mr. Low to Mr. Wade, September 17, 1870. K. Proclamation of the prefect of Tung-Chow, September 2, 1870. L. Proclamation of chief military mandarin of Tung-Chow, September 2, 1870. 383
231 do Sept. 26 Withdrawal of the missionaries from Tung-Chow. General views on the situation. Effect of the news of the surrender of Sedan. Meeting of the diplomatic corps. Inclosures: A. Mr. Low to Prince Kung, September 3, 1870. B. Prince Kung to Mr. Low, September 24, 1870. C. Prince Kung to Mr. Low, September 11, 1870. 391
[Page 38] 1870.
232 Mr. Fish to Mr. Motley. Nov. 1 Instructions to telegraph to Bancroft to ascertain whether hostilities would be suspended in Chinese waters and cooperative action had for protection of lives and property; and if answer favorable to communicate Washburne, who would make same proposals to French government. Also, to inform Lord Granville, verbally, of his action. 396
233 Mr. Motley to Mr. Fish. Nov. 2 Lord Granville says what is proposed has already been done. 396
234 do Nov. 3 Modifying telegram of the day before 396
235 Mr. Davis to Mr. Bancroft. Nov. 8 Further instructions on same subject 397
236 Mr. Bancroft to Mr. Fish. Nov. 2 North German government accepts the policy of this government. Mr. Bancroft will communicate with Mr. Washburne. 398
237 Mr. Fish to Mr. Low. Nov. 29 His representations to Prince Kung are regarded as too strong an assurance of forbearance. 398
238 Admiral Rogers to Mr. Robeson. Oct. 8 He proposes to send the missionaries back to Tung-Chow in the Benicia. 398
239 Mr. Fish to Mr. Low. Dec. 1 Mr. Moran will be instructed to thank the British government for the removal of the American residents from Tung-Chow. 399
GREAT BRITAIN.
A.—The northwestern boundary.
1870.
240 Secretary of War to Secretary of State. Nov. 18. Inclosing copies of the reports asked for, which show that, by a series of observations, the true line is 4,763 feet north of the recognized line. Inclosure: Captain Heap to Major General Hancock, July 9, 1870. 399
241 Mr. Boutwell to Mr. Fish. July 19 The collector at Pembina informs the Treasury Department of the result of the observations taken as above. Inclosure: Mr. Storer to the Secretary of the Treasury, June 23, 1870. 401
242 Mr. Davis to Mr. Richardson. Aug. 13 Acknowledging receipt of the foregoing. Suggesting that no steps be taken until British government can be informed. 401
243 Mr. Davis to Mr. Motley. Aug. 15 Instructing him to inform the British government of the result of the observations. 402
244 Mr. Motley to Mr. Fish. Oct. 17 Has so informed the British government. Inclosure: Mr. Motley to Lord Granville, October 17, 1870. 402
245 Sir Edw’d Thornton to Mr. Davis. Nov. 4 Proposing that both governments shall continue to recognize the old line. The occupation of the fort a necessity for the Canadian government. 403
246 Mr. Davis to Sir Edward Thornton. Nov. 7 Assenting to the occupation of the fort for the present. A commission to fix the line thought advisable. An appropriation will be asked for that purpose. 404
247 Mr. Davis to the Secretary of War. Nov. 7 Asking for an estimate of the probable expense of completing the survey of the boundary from the Lake of the’ Woods to the Rocky Mountains. 405
[Page 39] 1870.
248 General Belknap to Mr. Fish. Nov. 25 Transmitting the estimate. Inclosure: General Humphreys to General Belknap, November 23, 1870. 405
B.—The fisheries.
1870.
249 Mr. Fish to Mr. Thornton. April 1 Asking information as to the purposes of the government of Canada with reference to licenses. 407
250 Mr. Thornton to Mr. Fish. April 2 Acknowledging the foregoing 407
251 do April 14 In further reply. Inclosure: Sir John Young to Mr. Thornton, April 11, 1870, and inclosures. 408
252 Mr. Fish to Mr. Thornton. April 21 Calling attention to the purpose of the Canadian authorities to interfere with rights vested in the United States by treaty. 410
253 Mr. Thornton to Air. Fish. April 22 Acknowledging receipt of the foregoing 411
254 Circular May 16 Treasury Department circular relating to the in-shore fisheries. 411
255 Mr. Thornton to Mr. Davis. May 18 Discontinuance of fishing license. The boundaries of Canada. Inclosing: Sir John Young to Mr. Thornton, May 14, 1870, with its inclosures. 413
256 do May 20 Inclosing copy of the Canadian act of May 12, 1870. 414
257 Mr. Thornton to Mr. Fish. May 26 Instructions to the British naval forces. In closures: 1. Mr. Wolley to Vice-Admiral Wellesley, April 9, 1870. 2. Mr. Lushington to Mr. Hammond, May 9, 1870. 3. Mr. Rogers to the secretary of the admiralty, April 30, 1870. 4. Mr. Wobley to Vice-Admiral Wellesley, May 5, 1870. 5. Mr. Holland to the under-secretary of state for foreign affairs, May 13, 1870. 6. Lord Granville to Sir John Young, April 30, 1870. 415
258 Mr. Fish to Mr. Thornton. May 31 As to the boundaries of Canada and the rights in the shore fisheries secured to United States fishermen by the treaty of 1818. 417
259 Mr. Thornton to Mr. Fish. June 2 Acknowledging the receipt of the above; is inclined to think that Mr. Fish is right.
260 do June 3 Instructions to commanders of British vessels. Inclosure: Confidential letter from the colonial secretary to the admiralty, dated April 12, 1866. 420
261 Mr. Fish to Mr. Thornton. June 8 Pointing out a discrepancy in the instructions inclosed in the note of May 26, and those inclosed in the note of June 8, as to the waters between headlands. 421
262 Mr. Thornton to Mr. Fish. June 11 The vice-admiral will undoubtedly modify the instructions of 1866, in conformity with the instructions of 1870. The American circular of May 16. 421
263 Mr. Fish to Mr. Thornton. June 30 In reply to the foregoing 421
[Page 40] 1870.
264 Mr. Dart to Mr. Mr. Davis. Aug. 25 Closing of the ports in Prince Edward Island against American fishermen. Inclosure: Mr. Hall to Mr. Dart, August 19, 1870. 422
265 Mr. Jackson to Mr. Fish. Aug. 25 Same subject 423
266 Mr. Malmros to Mr. Davis. Aug. 28 Same subject. Fishing vessels of the United States about to return. Voyages broken up. 424
267 Mr. Jackson to Mr. Fish. Sept. 5 Correspondence with the British admiral respecting furnishing supplies to American fishermen in colonial ports. Mr. Jackson’s views of the treaty of 1818. Inclosures: 1. Mr. Jackson to Vice-Admiral Wellesley, August 30, 1870. 2. Vice-Admiral Wellesley to Mr. Jackson, August 31, 1870. 3. Mr. Jackson to Vice-Admiral Wellesley, September 1, 1870. 4. Vice-Admiral Wellesley to Mr. Jackson, September 3, 1870. 424
268 Mr. Davis to Mr. Jackson. Sept. 13 Asking information as to the practice of the Nova Scotian authorities. 427
269 Mr. Malmros to Mr. Davis. Sept. 26 Laws and course of trade with fishing vessels prior to the reciprocity treaty in his district. 427
270 Mr. Jackson to Mr. Davis. Oct. 3 Same subject as to Halifax district. General abstract of the colonial, dominion, and imperial laws on this subject. 428
271 Mr. Fish to Mr. Dart. Oct. 29 Calling attention to the enforcement of the laws in Canada, and containing general instructions for the guidance of the consuls. 431
272 Mr. Dart to Mr. Fish. Nov. 3 The discourteous way in which the Canadian laws have been enforced. The purpose is to force a reciprocity treaty. 433
C.—Naturalization law.
1870.
273 Mr. Motley to Mr. Fish. May 14 New naturalization bill has received the royal assent. Inclosure: An act to amend the law relating to the legal condition of aliens and British subjects. [May 12, 1870.] 434
GREECE.
1870.
274 Mr. Tuckerman to Mr. Fish. May 14 The causes of brigandage in Greece 439
GUATEMALA.
1870.
275 Mr. Hudson to Mr. Fish May 18 Asylum afforded to political exiles by the British minister. Inclosure: Translation from Gazette of Guatemala, February 26, 1870. 443
276 .do Aug. 31 Relative to misunderstanding between Guatemala and Mexico. Inclosures: A. Mr. Hudson to Mr. Nelson, August 31, 1870. B. Memorandum from the government of Guatemala of the causes of complaint against Mexico. 446
ITALY
[Page 41] 1870
277 Mr. Marsh to Mr. Fish. Sept. 6 Political condition of Italy 448
278 .do Sept. 9 Relations between the kingdom of Italy and the Roman State. 449
279 .do Sept. 12 The Roman question 450
280 .do Sept. 21 Occupation of Rome by the Italian troops 451
281 .do Nov. 3 The Roman question. Removal of the capital to Rome. 452
JAPAN.
Deportation of native Christians.
1869.
282 Mr. Van Valkenburgh to Mr. Fish. May 21 Persecution of native Christians in Japan. Inclosures: 1. Account of the persecution of native Christians in the island of Lote. 2. Yan Valkenburgh to the Japanese government, May 18, 1869. 453
1870
283 Mr. De Long to Mr. Fish. Jan. 17 Apprehended punishment of native Christians. Steps taken to prevent it. Inclosures: 1. Japanese government to Mr. De Long, January 1, 1870. 2. Same to same, January 7. 3. Consuls of the treaty powers at Nagasaki protest, January 2, 1870. 4. Mr. De Long to the Japanese government, January 10, 1870. 5. The British minister to the Japanese government, January 7, 1870. 6. The French minister to the Japanese government, January 11, 1870. 7. The treaty powers to the Japanese government, January 17, 1870. 8. The Japanese government to Mr. De Long, January 16, 1870. 455
284 do Jan. 22 Deportation of native Christians and separation of families. Inclosures: 1. Protocol of a conference, January 19, 1870. 2. The consul of the Netherlands, Nagasaki, January 14, 1870. 460
285 do Jan. 22 General views of the political condition of Japan. Connection between it and the persecution of the Christians. 468
286 do Jan. 23 The number of native Christians transported. Inclosure: Two reports made by the governor of Nagasaki. 471
287 do Feb. 10 The Japanese claim to regard Christianity from a political point of view. Inclosures: 1. The Japanese government to Mr. De Long, January 28, 1870. 2. Memorandum of a conference held February 9, 1870. 472
288 do April 12 Inclosing a copy of the report of the native officers who executed the decree of deportation. 475
289 Mr. Fish to Mr. De Long. April 18 His course approved. Views of the cabinets of London, Paris, and Berlin will be ascertained and further instructions given, if necessary. 478
[Page 42] 1870.
290 Mr. Fish to Mr. Motley. April 18 States the facts, and instructs him to ascertain what is proposed to be done, if anything. [Identical instructions to Mr. Washburne and Mr. Bancroft.] 479
291 Mr. Motley to Mr. Fish. June 2 In reply to Mr. Fish’s letter. Inclosures: 1. Mr. Motley to Lord Clarendon, May 21, 1870. 2. Lord Clarendon to Mr. Motley, May 27. 3. Lord Clarendon to Sir H. J. Parkes, April 20. 4. Lord Clarendon to Lord Lyons, April 20. 5. Lord Clarendon to Lord Lyons, April 30. 6. Lord Clarendon to Lord Lyons, May 23. 7. Mr. Roche to Mr. Lègues. 8. Mr. Roche to Monseigneur Petit-Jean. 9. Mr. Roche to Monseigneur Petit-Jean. 10. Mr. Motley to Lord Clarendon, June 2. 480
292 Mr. Fish to Mr. De Long. June 18 The views of the cabinets of London and Paris being identical with those entertained by this Government, no further instructions are necessary. 486
MEXICO.
1870.
293 Mr. Nelson to Mr. Fish. Nov. 4 The free zone. Inclosing a speech by Mr. Romero in opposition to it, and a speech by Mr. Gusman in favor of it. 486
294 .do Nov. 10 Same subject. Extension of the limits of the free zone by the Mexican congress. Inclosures: 1. Abstract of a speech by Mr. Romero. 2. Abstract of a speech by Mr. Velasco. 497
NICARAGUA.
1870
295 Mr. Riotti to Mr. Fish. March 2 The importance of the acquisition of Tigre Island or some other naval station on the western coast of Central America. 502
PERU.
1870.
296 Mr. Hovey to Mr. Fish. Aug. 22 Review of his services during his mission Pleasant relations between the United States and Peru. 504
297 do Sept. 14 Coolie insurrection 510
298 do Sept. 18 Threatened detention of Mr. Farrand, bearer of dispatches from the legation to the Department, by legal process. A violation of international law. Inclosures: 1. Mr. Hovey to Mr. Loyaza, September 3, 1870. 2. Mr. Loayza to Mr. Hovey, September 13. 3. Mr. Hovey to Mr. Loayza, September 13. 4. Mr. Elmore to Mr. Hovey, September 14. 5. Mr. Loayza to Mr. Hovey, September 16. 6. Mr. Hovey to Mr. Loayza, September 17, 510
[Page 43] 1870.
299 Mr. Brent to Mr. Fish. Sept. 29 Same subject. Inclosure: Mr. Loayza to Mr. Brent, September 23, 1870. 517
300 Mr. Fish to Mr. Brent. Oct. 19 Same subject. Review of the law. Mr. Hovey sustained. 519
301 Mr. Davis to Mr. Brent. Nov. 1 Acknowledging his dispatch of September 29, 1870. 520
RUSSIA.
1870.
302 Mr. Schuyler to Mr. Fish. July 17 The appointment of an archbishop of the Aleutian Isles and Alsaska. 520
303 .do Aug. 31 Municipal reforms in the Russian empire. Inclosure: Abstract of the law of such reforms. 521
[Page ] [Page [45]]