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Foreign Relations of the United States, 1969–1976, Volume XVII, China, 1969–1972

Questions Pertaining to Tibet, 1969–1972


Document 273: Editorial Note


Document 274: Editorial Note


Document 275: Memorandum From the President's Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Nixon

Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Country Files, Middle East, India, Box 600, Dalai Lama (possible 1971). Secret. Sent for action. Initialed by Kissinger. A notation on the first page reads: “To HAK.”


Document 276: Telegram From the Embassy in India to the Department of State

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970–73, POL 30 TIBET. Secret; Exdis. Also sent for the White House.


Document 277: Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in India

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970–73, POL 30 TIBET. Secret; Nodis. Drafted by Thayer on April 10; cleared by Kreisberg, Brown, Schneider (NEA/INC), and Getz (J); and approved by Rogers. This telegram reflects the advice of Green and Christopher Van Hollen (NEA), as explained in their April 10 memorandum to Rogers. (Ibid.)


Document 278: Memorandum Prepared for the 40 Committee

Source: National Security Council, Nixon Intelligence Files, Tibet. Secret; Eyes Only. A handwritten note on the first page reads: “Approved by the 40 Committee on 31 March 1971.” This issue was discussed briefly at the March 31 meeting of the 40 Committee held in San Clemente, California. According to the minutes of the meeting, Kissinger asked, “Does this have any direct benefit to us?” U. Alexis Johnson replied, “It keeps him [the Dalai Lama] alive.” David Blee of CIA added, “It helps in Buddhist countries.” Kissinger then asked what would happen if the Dalai Lama died. Blee replied that a committee of lamas would meet to find a new Dalai Lama. Kissinger asked, “He will be one of the people outside Tibet?” Blee replied, “Yes, They have lots of people outside. The program this year amounts to $363,000. It will go down to $263,000 in FY 72.” Johnson, representing the Department of State, said, “We have no problem with this.” Kissinger asked if everyone agreed on this item, and the minutes indicate that “All agreed.” The 40 Committee also discussed Tibetan paramilitary forces at this meeting and approved a CIA proposal to continue to reduce the forces from 1,800 to 300 over the next 3 years (see Document 273). (Minutes of the 40 Committee meeting, March 31; National Security Council, Nixon Intelligence Files, 303/40 Committee Files, 1971 Minutes) The CIA report on U.S.-supported paramilitary activities in the region is in Department of State, INR/IL Historical Files, 40 Committee Files, 1971.


Document 279: Editorial Note


Document 280: Memorandum From the Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs (Green) and the Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern and South Asian Affairs (Sisco) to the Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs (Johnson)

Source: Department of State, INR/IL Historical Files, Tibet, 1969–1976. Secret; Eyes Only. Sent through McAfee (INR). Concurred in by Van Hollen and Schneider (NEA) and Hummel and Jenkins (EA).