90. Memorandum From the Representative to the United Nations (Yost) to Secretary of State Rogers 1

SUBJECT

  • Content of U.S. Statement at Opening of the 25th General Assembly

Pursuant to our conversation last week,2 I transmit herewith a list of subjects to be considered for inclusion in the U.S. statement in the G.A. general debate, probably September 17. It might be delivered by the President or, if he prefers to come to the U.N. later, by you. In the latter event the President might choose to address the Assembly during the “commemorative session” in the week ending October 24. He would then speak more briefly and in more general terms, but would perhaps wish to include some points of substance, perhaps reserved from among the items below.

There are no major surprises in this list, but it does cover—and includes some constructive proposals on—the major issues with which the U.S., as the world’s leading power, would be expected to comment in this forum. It is in keeping with the philosophy of the Nixon Doctrine that we will not shirk our world responsibilities but we do expect others to share the burden in a spirit of partnership. In addition to certain points which would be welcome to (and whose absence would be missed by) the majority in the U.N. audience, the list includes a number of points that the American public will recognize as serving our interests and our prestige as a world leader.

These suggestions have been worked out with IO and have Mr. De Palma’s concurrence.

Charles W. Yost
[Page 148]

Attachment

SUGGESTED MAIN POINTS FOR THE U.S. STATEMENT AT OPENING OF THE 25TH GENERAL ASSEMBLY

Critical World Issues—Moving toward International Stability

1. Arms control—SALT and key issues at CCD
2. Southeast Asia peace efforts } U.N. role in implementing settlements
3. Middle East peace effort
4. Major concerns of Europe, Africa, Asia, Latin America—brief mention

Keeping Globe Habitable

1.
Securing the peace—in context of Nixon Doctrine (less by ourselves, more in partnership)—devise more reliable peacekeeping methods to share security responsibilities effectively. Proposals in peacekeeping and peaceful settlement (e.g., better organization and financing of peacekeeping, U.S. logistical support, fact-finding/conciliation panels, ICJ reform).
2.
Sharing World’s Resources and Benefits of Technology
a.
Development Decade—pronouncement re U.S. position on multilateral aid; need to improve performance of UN Development Program.
b.
Seabeds—orderly and equitable exploitation, stress benefits to all nations from cooperative use (take account of U.S. economic and security interests).
c.
Cooperation in scientific/technological advances—with stress on benefits to all, including America.
3.
Making World Safer
a.
Human rights—Genocide Convention, Southern Africa, spotlighting violations everywhere through Human Rights Commissioner.
b.
Population—UN efforts in services and research.
c.
Environment—monitoring pollution and safeguarding ecology.
d.
Narcotics—World Plan of Action.
e.
Measures against hijacking and diplomatic kidnappings.

Conclusion:

We need to do more through international institutions—let’s make them effective.

  1. Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Files 1970–73, UN 3 GA. Confidential. A typed note on the memorandum indicates that it was received on June 24.
  2. No other record of this conversation has been found.