37. Memorandum From the President’s Assistant for National Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Nixon 1

SUBJECT

  • Appointments with you for Foreign Chiefs of State coming to the 26th UN General Assembly

As of now, we have received seven specific requests to call upon you from foreign Chiefs of State/Heads of Government who are coming to the United States this fall in connection with the General Assembly. The Department of State and my staff have reviewed these requests. State recommends your seeing six; I believe that only four (including one you have already accepted) are justified in terms of the demands on your schedule.

In one case, where the visitor’s schedule is already precise, we are asking for a specific time. For any of the others we now need only an [Page 59]agreement in principle so that we can reply to the requests. We will work out specific times later, and it should be possible to spread these appointments out over several months.

1. President Ould Daddah—Mauritania. Ould Daddah is this year’s Chairman of the Organization of African Unity. As such, he has been instructed to explain African views on South Africa to the UN and to various Chiefs of State, including you. In view of the misunderstanding over the visit of last year’s OAU Chairman, President Kaunda of Zambia, a failure to see Ould Daddah would almost certainly be interpreted as a deliberate slight to the OAU. Ould Daddah has asked for an appointment between September 28 and October 3.2 I strongly recommend a 30-minute appointment.3

Approve

Disapprove

Date

Time

2. Prime Minister Bandaranaike—Ceylon. Whether Prime Minister Bandaranaike comes to the General Assembly will depend on whether she can see you. Ambassador Strausz-Hupe, who recommended against such an appointment last year, is encouraging a meeting this year. She is trying to establish a relationship with the US as an anchor at a time of instability in South Asia. While she has succumbed on a number of occasions to the temptation to take positions not in our interest, she has been rethinking her policy since our rapid response during her insurgency last spring. She has also asked the Soviet technicians who came then to leave. Ambassador Strausz-Hupe, conceding all her shortcomings, points out that he does not see a better leader on the horizon. As a secondary matter, he points out that she knows the leadership in Peking better than most Asian leaders. If she comes, it will be sometime in October. I strongly recommend a 30-minute appointment.

Approve

Disapprove

3. Prime Minister Souvanna Phouma—Laos. In view of the situation in Laos and Souvanna Phouma’s yearly visit to the General Assembly, [Page 60]this call has taken place almost every year. In view of the Indochina situation, I recommend a 30-minute meeting.

Approv

Disapprove

4. President Maga—Dahomey. Dahomey is a small but generally very helpful country both in her position on African issues and at the UN. Dahomey joined with us as a co-sponsor of the very helpful Prisoner of War Resolution passed by the General Assembly last fall. State believes this would be a good opportunity to acknowledge this kind of support. Maga is coming to the US on a private visit, primarily to encourage American private investment. His schedule is flexible and the meeting could be any time this fall. While seeing him would be a nice gesture, I do not believe the reasons are strong enough to justify putting him on your schedule. Thus I recommend against an appointment.

Approve (not seeing him)

No, will see him for 20 minutes

5. President Tombalbaye—Chad. Our relations with Chad are good and State recommends a brief courtesy call. I do not believe you need see him and recommend against an appointment.

Approve (not seeing him)

No, will see him for 20 minutes

6. President Amin—Uganda. Neither State nor I recommend this appointment. Amin took power in a military coup several months ago and so far, at least, has stirred up a great deal of difficulty with his neighbors. He is also certain to make a strong pitch for a great deal of military assistance which we are not interested in providing for a number of reasons including his open desire to use arms against his neighbors. Finally, two American citizens apparently were recently killed by Amin’s undisciplined troops and it is inappropriate for you to agree to receive him while that matter is still in flux. I recommend that we inform Ugandan authorities that your schedule will not permit a meeting this fall.

Approve (not seeing him)

No, will see him for 20 minutes

7. Prime Minister Razak—Malaysia. You have already agreed to this meeting.4

As of now we anticipate that only four other General Assembly visitors are likely to ask for meetings with you. They are New Zealand Prime Minister Holyoake, Tunisian Prime Minister Nouira, Foreign Minister Chou Shu-kai of the Republic of China and Philippine Foreign Minister Romulo. We will not make specific recommendations on these appointments until such time as firm requests have been received.

  1. Source: National Archives, Nixon Presidential Materials, NSC Files, Box 301, Agency Files, USUN, Vol. VII. Secret. Sent for action. A handwritten note reads: “Urgent return to Jeanne Davis. Action by telephone 8/30/71.” A covering memorandum from Davis, NSC Staff Secretary, to Executive Secretary Eliot is dated August 31.
  2. “October 3” was crossed out, and “September 30” added by hand.
  3. All of the approve options are checked below.
  4. “Oct 4 or 5” has been added by hand.