811.42793/1833

The Secretary of War (Stimson) to the Secretary of State

Dear Mr. Secretary: Reference is made to your letter of 12 June 1944,40 File S. E. A., in which it is requested that War Department consideration be given to the program involving the training in this country of certain Chinese technicians as arranged for by the Foreign Economic Administration. This program necessitates that these technicians be assigned to U. S. industrial facilities in order to learn our methods of production.

The War Department appreciates the post-war value of these assignments in that trained personnel can greatly assist China in her reconstruction period. This post-war planning is of an industrial nature and in connection therewith the War Department has authorized, wherever possible, the training of Chinese students in commercial production.

The Military Intelligence Division, War Department General Staff, has endeavored to aid this educational program in all respects. This is indicated by the fact that since 1 January 1944, 28 requests have been received for attachments of individuals to industrial facilities for periods of from one to three months. Only one request has been disapproved. The over-all picture on the training of Chinese in the industrial facilities of this country represents over 400 requests in the past two years for attachments or visits in connection therewith. Of these only five have been disapproved. Such attachments or visits as were disapproved were done so on the basis of security considerations as certain of the manufacturing plants for which approval [Page 1146]for entrance was requested, were engaged in highly classified work.

In this connection the Combined Chiefs of Staff have stated in part, that,

“As a general over-all policy military information given to the Chinese should be limited strictly to that which will assist the Chinese to resist Japan in the immediate prosecution of the war.”

In implementing this policy certain information available in particular plants has been interpreted as falling within the field of military information.

The War Department, within the limitations of this policy adopted by the Combined Chiefs of Staff, will continue to aid the program arranged for by the Foreign Economic Administration by authorizing attachments of Chinese nationals to industrial facilities for training wherever possible, provided, of course, that all security measures may be maintained and that the companies to which attachments are desired are willing to accept the individuals for training.

Sincerely yours,

Henry L. Stimson
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