811.79612/71

The Chargé in Mexico ( Norweb ) to the Secretary of State

No. 1468

Sir: I have the honor to refer to the Embassy’s despatch No. 1153 of February 24, 1934,18 with which was enclosed a copy of a letter [Page 507] addressed by the Embassy on that date to the Foreign Office containing the substance of the Department’s instruction No. 268 of February 17, 1934,19 regarding the interpretation of Article IV of the Habana Convention on Commercial Aviation.20

There is transmitted herewith, in copy and translation, a letter from the Foreign Office dated May 24, 1934, on this subject, transcribing the views of the Ministry of Communications, in which the suggestion is made that in order to regulate private flights of an international character the most practicable means is to conclude an economic agreement between the two Governments which shall result in the publication by each country of identic regulations, this procedure being suggested in order to avoid a delay inherent in the conclusion of a convention or treaty.

The Mexican Foreign Office in its letter states that it will be glad to receive the opinion of the United States Government in the premises.

Respectfully yours,

R. Henry Norweb
[Enclosure—Translation]

The Chief of the Department of Political Relations ( Sierra ), Mexican Ministry for Foreign Affairs, to the Second Secretary of the American Embassy ( Hawks )

No. 3348

My Dear Mr. Hawks: At the request of the Ministry of Communications, and with reference to the question of touring flights brought up in various letters from you, especially the one dated February 24th last,19 I quote below the point of view of that Ministry in the premises:

“The provisions of the Pan American Convention on Commercial Aviation refer to and are applicable only to the regulation of international aerial commercial traffic.—As regards countries with whom Mexico has not concluded Conventions or Treaties relative to international aerial commerce, as well as in regard to internal aerial commerce and private aviation, the precepts of the Law of General Lines of Communication are applicable.—So that there are no provisions covering pleasure or touring flights, nor private flights of a business or other nature which may be made across the American border, flights which should be classified as private flights of an international character; and therefore, in order to set the procedure which should be followed in these cases, it is indispensable to legislate in the matter, the most practical means being to conclude an economic agreement between the two Governments which shall result in the publication in each country of identic regulations, so as to avoid having to conclude a Convention or Treaty, since the latter course would cause a great loss of time.”

[Page 508]

In accordance with the communication above quoted, I likewise beg to state that the Government of Mexico would be pleased to receive the opinion of that of the United States in the premises.

I am [etc.]

M. J. Sierra
  1. Not printed.
  2. Not printed.
  3. Foreign Relations, 1928, vol. i, p. 585.
  4. Not printed.