List of Papers

(Unless otherwise specified, the correspondence is from or to officials in the Department of State.)

POSTPONEMENT OF THE SEVENTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF AMERICAN STATES

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Feb. 27 To the Diplomatic Representatives in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, and Uruguay (circ. tel.)
Information that the Brazilian Ambassador, at the request of Uruguay, inquired as to U. S. opinion on a postponement of the Seventh Pan American Conference, and the Secretary replied that the United States would be guided by the wishes of the other American Governments.
1
Mar. 1 (98) From the Uruguayan Chargé
Advice from the Foreign Minister that no change in date of the Pan American Conference is contemplated; that it will be held in Montevideo in December 1932 or January 1933.
1
Apr. 1 (20) From the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Opinion that Uruguay will not oppose the temporary postponement of the Conference, but will object to an indefinite postponement.
2
Apr. 6 From the Director General of the Pan American Union
Discussion, at Governing Board meeting, of the possibility of postponing the Conference; and submission of a resolution to inquire if Uruguay has any objections.
2
Apr. 7 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with the Argentine Ambassador, who stated that his Government advised against postponing the Conference in view of the situation in the Chaco; Assistant Secretary’s comment that he did not see how the Conference could help the situation.
3
Apr. 12 From the Director General of the Pan American Union
Transmittal of the resolution adopted by the Governing Board (text printed) requesting Uruguay to consider postponement of the Conference.
4
June 4 To the Diplomatic Representatives in Latin America
Resolution adopted by the Governing Board of the Pan American Union (text printed) postponing the Conference.
5

THE CHACO DISPUTE BETWEEN BOLIVIA AND PARAGUAY

I. Good Offices of the Commission of Neutrals

Date and number Subject Page
1932 May 6 Draft Pact of Non-Aggression of May 6, 1932
Draft text of non-aggression pact between Bolivia and Paraguay.
8
June 2 (445) From the Minister in Paraguay
Memorandum (text printed) from Arbo, Paraguayan Foreign Minister, expressing certain objections to the draft Pact of Non-Aggression. Report of various individual opinions and press comments.
13
[Page XX]June 3 (27) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s announcement of Bolivia’s acceptance of the draft Pact of Non-Aggression with certain modifications.
18
July 6 (15) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to mention informally to Arbo that the United States hopes that after further study the pact will be received more favorably.
19
July 6 (41) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Information that the Paraguayan delegation is being instructed to retire from the conference at Washington (relative to nonaggression pact) because of the surprise Bolivian capture of Fortin Carlos Antonio Lopez, June 15.
20
July 7 (16) To the Minister of Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to counsel moderation and patience to the Paraguayan authorities, as the Neutrals may be able to suggest a solution of the situation.
21
July 7 (17) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Information that Paraguay’s note of withdrawal from the conference will not be made public. Instructions to advise the Government to ask the Neutrals to protest to Bolivia on Paraguay’s behalf, instead of presenting the note.
22
July 8 (44) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Information that a statement on the Chaco situation was issued by the Ministry of the Interior, and that Arbo stated in a press interview that Paragauy would withdraw from the conference.
23
July 8 (18) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to point out to the Paraguayan Government the danger of breaking off negotiations and to endeavor to learn the real motives behind this action.
24
July 9 (46) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Advice to Arbo to consider the withdrawal of the delegates as a temporary suspension of pact conversations pending examination and adjudication of the Fortin incident; Arbo’s promise to report the Government’s decision July 12.
25
July 10 (47) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Opinion of certain Government officials that the political situation and the Cabinet’s firm position for the delegation’s withdrawal are hindering a solution. Indications of Paraguay’s interest in a non-aggression pact with an arbitration proviso.
26
July 11 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Request that Paraguay modify its intention to withdraw from the conference and send complete details of the Chaco incidents to the Commission. Information that Bolivia is being requested to furnish similar information.
27
July 15 (22) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to remind Arbo that his action in terminating negotiations contradicts his statements made before the House of Deputies June 15; and to explain that the proposed pact is composed of both Bolivian and Paraguayan suggestions.
28
[Page XXI]July 16 (53) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Transmittal of Paraguayan note (text printed) refusing to revoke the decision to withdraw from the conference.
29
July 18 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Request that Paraguay remain in the conference in view of Bolivia’s promise to furnish the Neutrals with complete information regarding the incidents of June 15 and 29.
32
July 19 (37) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Information that a Bolivian fortin has been attacked by Paraguayan troops, and public demonstrations demand drastic action.
33
July 19 (54) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Transmittal of a communiqué from the Paraguayan Ministry of War (text printed) announcing the retaking of Fortin Carlos Antonio Lopez.
34
July 20 (39) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Indications that the press and public of La Paz believe a state of war with Paraguay now exists.
34
July 21 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Note requesting information regarding the incidents subsequent to June 15, and the suspension of all armed hostilities. Information that identic representations are being addressed to Paraguay.
35
July 22 From the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Reply to the Neutrals’ note of July 21 advising that the Paraguayan delegates have been ordered to return to Washington, and that no act of armed hostility is being nor will be committed against Bolivia except in self-defense.
(Footnote: Copy transmitted to the Bolivian Foreign Minister by the Commission of Neutrals in telegram dated July 22.)
36
July 24 (840) From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Reply to the Neutrals’ note of July 21 explaining instructions to the Bolivian delegates to withdraw from the conference.
36
July 25 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Request that Bolivia follow Paraguay’s example in stating that no acts of armed hostility are being, nor will be, committed; and that the Bolivian delegates be authorized to continue negotiations.
37
July 27 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Petition that instructions be issued to refrain from hostile acts in the Chaco which might nullify the good offices of the Neutrals. Information that the same request is being addressed to Bolivia.
40
July 27 From the Paraguayan Delegate to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals
Note disclaiming responsibility for co-authorship of the draft pact of non-aggression, which was received solely for information of the Paraguayan Government.
40
July 28 From the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals to the Paraguayan Delegate
Account of the history of the non-aggression pact negotiations.
41
[Page XXII]July 28 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign A fairs (tel.)
Reply to the Neutrals’ note of July 25 explaining Bolivia’s attitude and reaffirming its decision to discontinue conversations.
46
July 28 From the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Reply to the Neutrals’ petition of July 27 reaffirming Paraguay’s promise not to commit hostile acts in the Chaco, and requesting that it be informed of Bolivia’s response.
(Footnote: Copy transmitted to the Bolivian Foreign Minister, July 28, by the Commission of Neutrals.)
47
July 29 From the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals to the Paraguayan Delegate
Acknowledgment of Paraguay’s reply to the Neutrals’ petition and request that the report of the incidents be forwarded promptly.
48
Aug. 1 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Reiteration of Bolivia’s intention to maintain an aggressive campaign in the Chaco so long as Paraguay does.
49
Aug. 1 (46) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Suggestion that the Neutrals propose that Bolivia and Paraguay accept an immediate armistice on the basis of present possessions.
50
Aug. 2 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Request that Bolivia state whether it will agree to an armistice on the basis of possessions maintained on June 1, and to immediate negotiation of a settlement of the controversy by arbitration or other amicable means.
51
Aug. 3 (23) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Information that an immediate armistice was suggested to Bolivia August 2.
52
Aug. 4 From the Paraguayan Delegate
View of the progress of the non-aggression pact negotiations.
52
Aug. 4 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign A fairs (tel.)
Agreement to suspend hostilities in the Chaco on the basis of present possessions, and request that the Neutrals’ proposal be modified accordingly.
57
Aug. 5 (49) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s request that attempt be made to obtain a modification of the Neutrals’ proposal in view of the danger of internal disturbances.
58
Aug. 5 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Refusal to modify the proposal, since recognition of acts of force in the settlement of controversies is contrary to the Declaration of Principles signed August 3; request that Bolivia reconsider its decision.
58
Aug. 5 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Request that hostilities be immediately suspended on the basis of positions held by Bolivia and Paraguay on June 1, and that arbitration or other friendly means of settlement be essayed.
60
[Page XXIII]Aug. 5 From the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Acceptance of the Neutrals’ proposal.
60
Aug. 8 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Request that hostilities be suspended at daybreak August 10 in view of Paraguay’s acceptance of an armistice and Bolivia’s statement that its attitude would depend on Paraguay’s.
61
Aug. 8 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Repudiation of Paraguay’s accusation that Bolivian forces have resumed hostilities.
61
Aug. 8 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Reiteration of counterproposal to suspend hostilities on the basis of present possessions, and disposition to open negotiations, but not under pressure of force.
62
Aug. 9 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Request for the decisions of Paraguay and the Neutrals on Bolivia’s counterproposal.
63
Aug. 9 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Reasons for using the June 1st basis for the cessation of hostilities. Request for Bolivian statement agreeing to certain conditions for negotiation proceedings.
63
Aug. 10 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Information that Bolivia has advised the Commission that hostilities have been temporarily suspended.
65
Aug. 12 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Bolivia’s refusal to agree to the conditions specified by the Neutrals for negotiation proceedings.
65
Aug. 13 (52) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Suggestion that an immediate proposal for arbitration, or for an arbitrary fine such as the Ichazo-Benitez fine, would eliminate the question of a basis for suspension of hostilities.
66
Aug. 13 (26) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Advice that the Neutrals can suggest no arbitrary fine without prejudging the case, but could transmit a proposal to Paraguay on Bolivia’s behalf.
67
Aug. 15 (32) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to discuss the Chaco situation with President Ayala and report his views and suggestions.
67
Aug. 17 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs
Examination of the status of negotiations and request that a concrete proposal be submitted.
68
Aug. 17 (89) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Ayala’s decision to withhold a suggestion for mutual retirement from the most advanced positions, as Bolivia’s acceptance of the June 1 basis is expected.
71
[Page XXIV]Aug. 18 (34) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Request for the immediate submission of the suggestion mentioned in telegram supra.
72
Aug. 19 (93) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Information that the General Staff refuses to consider the alternative suggestion because of a new Bolivian attack.
72
Aug. 20 (30) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Instructions to advise the Department when a reply may be expected to the Neutrals’ telegram of August 17, and whether Bolivia might suggest the formation of a neutral zone to be observed by neutral representatives.
73
Aug. 20 (35) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain Paraguay’s attitude toward the establishment of a neutral zone overseen by neutral representatives.
74
Aug. 21 (95) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
President Ayala’s statement that it is too late to consider a neutral zone; that all field commanders have been instructed to refrain from hostilities as long as possible. Transmittal of the President’s statement (text printed) attesting to Paraguay’s desire for a fair agreement.
75
Aug. 22 (60) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s reluctance to discuss the Chaco situation because of popular feeling against so-called Neutral partisanship in favor of Paraguay.
76
Aug. 22 (61) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Information that an appointment has been made with the Foreign Minister.
77
Aug. 27 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Reply to the Neutrals’ telegram of August 17 recapitulating Bolivia’s position in regard to negotiations for a non-aggression pact.
77
Aug. 29 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Request that an agreement for a 60-day total suspension of hostilities, which will not alter the present legal position of the parties, be signed in Washington on September 1.
(Footnote: The same telegram sent to the Paraguayan Foreign Minister, August 29.)
80
Aug. 29 From the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Refusal to sign an agreement for the temporary suspension of hostilities on the basis of Bolivian retention of Paraguayan fortines.
81
Aug. 30 (136) From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Acceptance of the Neutrals’ proposal for a suspension of hostilities on the basis of present positions, modified to extend for 30 days only.
82
[Page XXV]Aug. 31 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs
Acknowledgment of Bolivia’s acceptance of a 30-day suspension of hostilities.
82
Aug. 31 (104) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Information that President Ayala regrets that Paraguay cannot change its decision as to the truce; that field commanders have been instructed to oppose any Bolivian advance.
83
Aug. 31 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Plea for the reconsideration of Paraguay’s decision in view of Bolivia’s acceptance of a 30-day truce.
83
Sept. 1 From the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Explanation that a truce cannot be accepted unless non-mobilization of Bolivian troops is guaranteed.
84
Sept. 2 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Request that Bolivia agree to the suspension of mobilization and troop movements during the truce.
85
Sept. 4 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Refusal to agree to non-mobilization during the truce, since Paraguayan forces have already been mobilized in the danger area.
86
Sept. 10 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Inquiry whether Bolivia and Paraguay are disposed to suspend hostilities immediately and begin arbitration negotiations, and if these are unsuccessful to submit the matter for arbitration to the Seventh Pan American Conference or the Permanent Court of International Justice.
(Footnote: The same telegram, September 10, to the Paraguayan Foreign Minister.)
86
Sept. 12 From the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Acceptance of the proposal for the suspension of hostilities with security guarantees, and for juridical proceedings for arbitration of the boundary controversy.
87
Sept. 13 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Reaffirmation of Bolivia’s acceptance of a truce with the understanding that immobilization will be a consequence thereof, and of negotiations for a direct arrangement or the establishment of the bases of arbitration.
88
Sept. 14 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Transmittal of Paraguay’s reply to the Neutrals’ telegram of September 10. Proposal for the immediate cessation of hostilities and the establishment of a demilitarized zone certified by representatives of the Commission of Neutrals.
(Footnote: The same telegram, mutatis mutandis, September 15, to the Paraguayan Foreign Minister.)
88
[Page XXVI]Sept. 16 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Refusal to withdraw troops, as it would compromise Bolivia’s situation.
89
Sept. 17 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Proposal that a delegation of neutral military men be appointed to oversee the fulfillment of the nonaggression and nonmobilization agreement with powers to move to a distance any future aggressor.
(Footnote: The same telegram, September 17, to the Paraguayan Foreign Minister.)
90
Undated (Rec’d Sept. 18) (166) From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Belief that a civil, rather than a military, commission of neutrals would be more efficacious; that nonmobilization should be agreed upon on the basis of equality of the terrain’s conditions.
91
Sept. 21 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Transmittal of Paraguay’s 5-point proposal (text printed) for the cessation of hostilities.
91
Sept. 22 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Comments on Paraguay’s 5-point proposal, and confirmation of Bolivia’s prior suggestions.
92
Sept. 22 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Request for acceptance of an unconditional armistice and immediate arbitration without reservations. Information that a Commission delegation will verify the truce and will suggest that all diplomatic representatives be withdrawn from the country which violates it.
(Footnote: The same telegram, mutatis mutandis, to the Paraguayan Foreign Minister, September 22.)
93
Sept. 23 (185) From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Agreement to suspend fire in the Boquerón sector of the Chaco at 12 o’clock, September 24, provided prior notification of Paraguay’s acceptance is received.
94
Sept. 23 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Information that the Neutrals’ proposal referred to the termination of hostilities in all the Chaco, and included the acceptance of immediate arbitration without reservations.
95
Sept. 26 From the Paraguayan Delegate to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals
Paraguay’s reply (text printed) to the Neutrals’ telegram of September 22 accepting the proposal with certain conditions.
95
Sept. 26 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Advice that Paraguay’s conditions for the termination of hostilities in the Chaco will be considered. Request that a statement be made of unconditional acceptance of the Neutrals’ proposal.
96
[Page XXVII]Sept. 26 (198) From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Explanation of Bolivia’s mention of the Boquerón sector in accepting the truce since other sectors were free of hostilities; that, as the Minister in Washington had stated, the armistice would include the whole Chaco.
97
Sept. 28 From the Paraguayan Delegate to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals
Paraguay’s reply (text printed) to the Neutrals’ telegram of September 26, refusing to agree to the unconditional acceptance of the proposal.
98
Sept. 30 (122) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Conversation with President Ayala, who stated that the taking of Boquerón, Toledo, and probably Samaklay could not be delayed, but that a truce might be arranged thereafter.
98
Oct. 3 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Telephone conversation with the Paraguayan Minister, who gave his Government’s delimitation of the Chaco and stated that Paraguay is unable to arrest hostilities, as Bolivia is attacking.
99
Oct. 6 From the Paraguayan Delegate to the Commission of Neutrals
Paraguay’s contention that the question to be submitted to arbitration without reservation is one of boundaries, not of territory.
100
Oct. 7 (126) From the Minister of Paraguay (tel.)
Paraguay’s reasons for insistence on demilitarization of the Chaco.
100
Oct. 9 From the Bolivian Legation to the Commission of Neutrals
Bolivia’s delimitation of the controversial area of the Chaco.
101
Oct. 15 (104) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Opinion that the Bolivian Government is anxious to extricate itself from its unfavorable position.
102
Oct. 17 (39) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Suggestion that Bolivia’s acceptance of a proposal for a conference made by the Neutrals October 12 would seem to offer the relief mentioned in telegram No. 104 of October 15.
103
Oct. 26 From the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Notification of Bolivia’s acceptance of the Neutrals’ proposal for a conference which had already received Paraguay’s approval.
104
Nov. 1 From the Paraguayan Delegate to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals
Paraguay’s insistence on total withdrawal of the Bolivian army from the Chaco and on guarantees against further aggression.
104
Nov. 4 From the Bolivian Legation to the Commission of Neutrals
Bolivia’s proposal for withdrawal of troops; rejection of the proposed reduction of military effectives.
105
Nov. 4 (145) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Report of public demand that conversations with the Neutrals be discontinued, and President Ayala’s warning that he may even be forced to refuse arbitration.
106
[Page XXVIII]Nov. 5 (46) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to advise the Paraguayan authorities that withdrawal from the conference at its inception appears unreasonable; also to ascertain the minimum withdrawal of Bolivian troops acceptable to Paraguay and the minimum effectives desired for both countries.
107
Nov. 5 (47) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain the maximum distance Bolivia will agree to withdraw in the Chaco and the minimum number of troops which will be acceptable.
109
Nov. 7 (116) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Postponement of compliance with Department’s instructions in telegram No. 47 until a new Cabinet has been formed.
110
Nov. 8 (148) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Paraguay’s insistence on virtual demilitarization of the entire Chaco, but willingness thereafter to accept any estimate the Neutrals may determine for effective forces.
110
Nov. 9 (47) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain the specific minimum Bolivian withdrawal acceptable to Paraguay.
111
Nov. 9 (117) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Information that Vice President Tejada’s efforts to organize a coalition Cabinet have failed.
111
Dec. 2 (53) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to try to obtain President Ayala’s acceptance of a proposal for arbitration negotiations.
112
Dec. 3 (54) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Information that the proposal made in Department’s telegram No. 53, December 2, will have no effect upon the juridical status of either party.
114
Dec. 3 (52) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Instructions to contact Bolivian officials concerning a proposal for an agreement on which to base arbitration negotiations.
114
Dec. 4 (166) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Paraguay’s refusal to consider the proposal suggested in the Department’s telegram No. 53 of December 2.
115
Dec. 5 (55) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain the minimum Bolivian withdrawal Paraguay demands, referring to the Paraguayan delegate’s letter of September 16 proposing withdrawal to parallel 62°30ʹ; also whether the other terms of the proposal are acceptable.
117
Dec. 6 (132) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Probable Bolivian reaction to the proposal suggested in the Department’s telegram No. 52 of December 3.
119
Dec. 7 (55) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Request that endeavors be continued to obtain Bolivian acceptance of the proposal.
120
[Page XXIX]Dec. 7 (168) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Interpretation of the Paraguayan delegate’s letter of September 16 to mean that easternmost point of Bolivian occupation should lie west of parallel 62°30ʹ. Ayala’s comments on remainder of proposal, including refusal to accept a neutral zone.
120
Dec. 8 (56) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Request for clarification of statement that Paraguay refuses to accept a neutral zone.
121
Dec. 9 (169) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Information that Paraguay’s nonacceptance of a neutral zone refers to point 3 of the proposal; that Paraguay will not consent to Bolivia’s policing any portion of the Chaco.
122
Dec. 10 (57) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to explain to President Ayala that the agreement will contain a provision that juridical positions or legal rights will not be affected, and to attempt to obtain his acceptance of the Ballivian–Vitriones fine and the policing suggested.
123
Dec. 10 (138) From the Minister in Bolivia
Bolivia’s attitude toward the proposed agreement and suggestion that the zone established in the Tamayo–Aceval Treaty might be considered as a basis of arbitration.
124
Dec. 11 (171) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
President Ayala’s continued refusal to accept the Ballivian–Vitriones fine as a basis for arbitration.
125
Dec. 15 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Proposed agreement (text printed) to be signed by the representatives of Bolivia and Paraguay in Washington.
(Footnote: The same telegram, December 15, to the Paraguayan Foreign Minister.)
126
Dec. 17 From the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals
Paraguay’s refusal to accept the Neutrals’ proposed agreement.
129
Dec. 19 (142) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Conversation with the Bolivian President, who asked if the United States would support Bolivia’s withdrawal from the League of Nations in the event that Paraguay withdrew its delegate from Washington with the intention of transferring negotiations to Geneva.
130
Dec. 19 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Confirmation of Bolivia’s acceptance in principle of the main points of the Neutrals’ proposal, but decision not to submit comments, in view of its rejection by Paraguay.
131
Dec. 20 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Request that Bolivia submit the observations mentioned in its communication of December 19.
131
[Page XXX]Dec. 20 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Acknowledgment of Paraguay’s rejection of the Neutrals’ proposal and withdrawal of delegate Soler, and request that Mr. Soler be authorized to continue discussions.
132
Dec. 21 From the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Explanation of Paraguay’s rejection of the Neutrals’ proposed agreement, and repetition of willingness to accept arbitration of the boundary controversy if conditions of security are obtained.
134
Dec. 21 (61) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Information that the Commission of Neutrals has been advised of the Paraguayan delegate’s temporary withdrawal, but is endeavoring to have his instructions reversed.
134
Dec. 22 From the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
President Ayala’s advice that the conditions proposed by the Neutrals (in an attempt to obtain permission for Soler to remain) could not serve as the basis of negotiation.
135
Dec. 23 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Reaffirmation of Bolivia’s telegram of December 19, in view of Paraguay’s reiterated rejection of the proposed agreement.
135
Dec. 31 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Expression of regret at Paraguay’s decision to withdraw from the conference. Information that, pending the return of a Paraguayan representative, the Commission will communicate directly with the two Governments.
136

II. Efforts of the Commission of Neutrals To Obtain the Cooperation of the ABCP Republics

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Apr. 13 To the Diplomatic Representatives in Certain American Republics (circ. tel.)
Information that copies of statements to Bolivia and Paraguay expressing the Neutrals’ concern at military preparations in the Chaco were given to the Ambassadors of the limitrophe countries who attended a meeting of the Commission of Neutrals.
136
Apr. 14 (31) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s statement that Chile would cooperate with the Neutrals in the interests of peace; that Cruchaga, the Chilean Ambassador in Washington, would express agreement with the Neutrals’ statement.
137
Apr. 15 (35) From the Chargé in Argentina (tel.)
Receipt of information that Espil, Argentine Ambassador in Washington, has been instructed to cooperate with the Neutrals.
138
Apr. 15 (14) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s request that U. S. Minister in Bolivia use his influence to prevent the “intervention” of the four neighboring countries.
138
[Page XXXI]Apr. 15 (52) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s statement that the Peruvian Ambassador in Washington has orders to cooperate with the other border states.
139
Apr. 16 (29) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Conversation with the Foreign Minister, who said that he fully supports the Neutrals’ statement.
140
Apr. 16 (11) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Information that the neighboring countries have not been invited to join the Neutral Commission, but that Argentina and Chile associate themselves with the Neutrals’ statement, and that Peru and Brazil are expected to do so.
140
Apr. 21 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with the delegates of Bolivia and Paraguay, who were informed of the adherence of the four bordering countries to the Neutrals’ statement.
141
June 5 (447) From the Minister in Paraguay
Conversation with the Brazilian Minister, who, in reply to Paraguay’s request that he submit to his Government a proposal that Brazil and Argentina take possession of the Chaco and impose an arbitration, suggested that they might consent to police the zone pending arbitration.
141
July 9 (37) To the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Request for information concerning a rumor that Paraguay is inquiring what the reactions of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile would be if Paraguay rejected the nonaggression pact.
142
July 12 (38) To the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Telegram from Bolivia (text printed) indicating prevalent opinion that Argentina could prevent Paraguay’s withdrawal from the conference. Instructions to ascertain what action Argentina is taking.
142
July 13 (54) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Statement by the Foreign Minister, Saavedra Lamas, that the Paraguayan Minister has been advised that every effort should be made to reach an agreement in Washington; that Argentina would be neutral if hostilities were declared. Paraguayan Minister’s denial of the action queried in Department’s telegram No. 37, July 9.
142
July 22 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Peruvian inquiry about the Chaco matter, and about the possibility of enlarging the Neutral Commission.
143
July 25 (148) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Conference of ABCP representatives, who agreed that action should be taken to prevent war, and informed the Ambassador that U. S. cooperation is considered the basis of any contemplated action.
143
July 25 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Receipt of information that Saavedra Lamas, in reply to the Brazilian Ambassador’s suggestion of joint action to prevent war between Bolivia and Paraguay, stated that insistence on the continuation of the Washington negotiations would be the most effective action.
144
[Page XXXII]July 26 (54) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that the Department will welcome recommendations to Paraguay and Bolivia by neighboring countries that negotiations in Washington be continued.
145
July 26 (149) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Conversation with the Foreign Minister, who stated that the ABCP Powers might act with the United States alone, or with all the Neutrals.
145
July 26 (35) To the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Information that the United States would welcome representations to Paraguay and Bolivia from the neighboring states advising that negotiations in Washington be continued.
(Footnote: The same telegram, July 26, to the diplomatic representatives in Argentina and Brazil.)
145
July 26 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with the Chilean Ambassador, who suggested enlarging the Commission of Neutrals; the Assistant Secretary’s countersuggestion that action by the Neutrals could be sustained by the independent action of the ABCP Republics.
146
July 27 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Suggestion to Espil that Argentina initiate a statement from the American nations to Bolivia and Paraguay asserting that territorial settlement by force will not be recognized, and that the boundary controversy should be submitted to arbitration.
147
July 27 (66) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Conversation with Saavedra Lamas, who advises that he is awaiting Brazil’s approval of a manifesto which he has proposed in support of the Neutral Commission.
148
July 28 (70) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Conversation with the Foreign Minister whose recent telegraphic instructions to representatives at Washington, Buenos Aires, Asunción, and La Paz indicate that Brazil is supporting the Washington Conference.
149
July 28 (67) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Indications that the American Governments are looking to the United States to take the initiative in a vigorous admonition to Bolivia and Paraguay, to be followed by investigation by the Neutral Commission.
149
July 28 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Telephone instructions to the Ambassador in Argentina to ascertain whether Saavedra Lamas would authorize Espil to take the initiative suggested to him July 27. Later conversation in which the Ambassador read the ABCP manifesto.
149
July 29 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with Espil, who requested that the Commission of Neutrals urge Brazil to join in the ABCP manifesto, and who stated that Argentina was in favor of the action suggested in the conversation of July 27 but hesitated to take the initiative.
150
[Page XXXIII]Undated Draft of Manifesto From the Governments of Argentina, of Brazil, of Chile and of Peru to the Governments of Bolivia and of Paraguay, and to the Commission of Neutrals in Washington
Draft text of the ABCP manifesto.
151
July 29 (55) To the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Instructions to inform the Government of Brazil that the Commission of Neutrals would be pleased if Brazil would authorize signature of the ABCP manifesto.
152
July 29 (111) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Receipt of the Foreign Minister’s note to the effect that Peru favors cooperation with the Commission of Neutrals, and that the ABCP manifesto soon to be signed is in accord with the Department’s views and suggestions.
153
July 30 (73) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Information that the Brazilian Ambassador has been instructed to return to Washington immediately; that Brazil is not in favor of the entire manifesto and has made a counterproposal.
(Telegram repeated to Argentina.)
154
Undated Minutes of Meeting of July 30, 1932, Between Representatives of the Neutral Countries and Representatives of Countries Neighboring on Bolivia and Paraguay
Formulation of a telegram to the American countries requesting that they join in a statement to Paraguay and Bolivia opposing war and requesting that hostilities be terminated.
154
Aug. 2 (160) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Conversation with Zalles, Bolivian Foreign Minister, who admitted that his purpose in visiting Chile is to secure Chile’s neutrality, the transportation of war materials through Chilean ports, and the purchase of war supplies, although he denied that Bolivia is resolved to go to war.
156
Aug. 3 From the Representatives of Nineteen American Republics Assembled in Washington to the Ministers for Foreign Affairs of Bolivia and Paraguay (tel.)
Declaration of the American Republics renouncing force as a solution of controversies, and requesting Paraguay and Bolivia to stop troop movements in the Chaco and submit to arbitration.
159
Aug. 4 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Statement to Espil, who was concerned about Uruguay’s suggestion that Argentina be included in the Commission of Neutrals, that the inexpediency of such action had been pointed out to the Uruguayan Chargé.
161
Aug. 5 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Acknowledgment of the declaration of the American Republics, and agreement with the doctrine that force does not confer rights; refusal to halt mobilization.
161
Aug. 5 From the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Confirmation of Paraguay’s adherence to the declaration of the American Republics, and willingness to comply with all suggestions.
163
[Page XXXIV]Aug. 6 (61) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Receipt of information that Zalles is attempting to wreck the work of the Commission of Neutrals. Attestation to Commission’s cooperation with the states bordering Bolivia and Paraguay.
(Footnote: Substantially the same telegram, August 6, to the diplomatic representatives in Argentina, Brazil, and Peru.)
163
Aug. 8 (70) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Information that the signing of the ABCP manifesto should prevent possibility of playing off the neutral group against the group of neighboring countries.
164
Aug. 8 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with Espil, who said that Argentina feared the political effects in Bolivia of insistence on the June 1 basis for cessation of hostilities. Assistant Secretary White’s emphasis on the importance of maintaining the August 3d declaration.
165
Aug. 8 To the Diplomatic Representatives in Certain American Republics (circ. tel.)
Explanation, for discussion with Foreign Ministers, of the Neutrals’ insistence on the June 1 basis for cessation of hostilities in the Chaco.
166
Aug. 9 From the Argentine Ambassador to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals
Transmittal of the ABCP manifesto, signed August 6 (text printed), and request that it be communicated to other members of the Commission.
167
Aug. 9 (162) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Anxiety of Chilean officials at the possibility of war resulting from insistence on the June 1 date for cessation of hostilities.
169
Aug. 10 (82) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Foreign Office reiteration of Brazilian support of the Neutral Commission, and information that the ABCP Republics are suggesting that a 30-day renewable truce, on the basis of present positions, be proposed to Paraguay and Bolivia.
170
Aug. 10 (115) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s statement that the ABCP Republics must cooperate fully with the Commission of Neutrals, whose suggestions to Bolivia and Paraguay, however, require some modification.
171
Aug. 11 To the Diplomatic Representatives in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Peru (circ. tel.)
Information that the representatives of the ABCP Republics met with the Neutral Commission, were brought up to date on the Paraguay-Bolivia matter (including a proposal made to Bolivia on August 9 along fines of the August 3 declaration) and were requested to keep the Neutrals advised of any action.
172
Aug. 12 To the Diplomatic Representatives in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Peru (circ. tel.)
Information that Argentina has proposed to Paraguay and Bolivia a 30–day renewable truce, on the basis of present positions. Instructions to request support of the Neutral Commission, especially of its proposal to Bolivia of August 9 (outlined in the telegram supra).
175
[Page XXXV]Aug. 12 (71) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Conversation with Saavedra Lamas, who stated that Argentina is not negotiating independently with Bolivia and Paraguay; that his advice to other neighboring countries is to avoid going counter to the actions of the Neutral Commission.
176
Aug. 12 (164) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s statement that no independent negotiations are in progress, but rather that all conversations have advocated the furtherance of a peaceful settlement through the Neutrals.
177
Aug. 13 (72) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Conversation with Saavedra Lamas, who states that no definite proposal has been made to Paraguay or Bolivia, althought he has suggested a one-month’s suspension of hostilities as the best way to avoid war.
178
Aug. 13 (116) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s statement that Peru will five up to the declaration of August 3 and cooperate with the Commission, and that there have been no separate negotiations since the signing of the ABCP manifesto.
179
Aug. 13 (52) To the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Instructions to investigate an Argentine suggestion to Paraguay for a direct settlement, or an agreement that any arbitration settlement will provide a port on the river for Bolivia.
180
Aug. 13 (63) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Instructions to suggest to the Foreign Minister that cooperation with the Neutrals can best be accomplished by keeping them fully informed of conversations with Zalles.
181
Aug. 13 (87) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s indication that several proposals for joint action in the Chaco question have been advanced, to which Brazil, favoring full support of the Neutral Commission, declined to adhere.
181
Aug. 15 (73) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Indications that Argentina has endeavored to obtain Paraguayan acceptance of the status quo in order to overcome Bolivian suspicion of Argentine mediation.
182
Aug. 18 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Explanation that the wording of the declaration of August 3 is intended to prevent a retroactive interpretation.
182
Aug. 18 To the Diplomatic Representatives in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Peru (circ. tel.)
Instructions to investigate a rumored Argentine proposal for Bolivian evacuation of positions occupied since June 1 and the possibility of its representing joint action of the ABCP Republics.
184
Aug. 18 (175) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Chile is not a party to, and was ignorant of, the proposal referred to in the Department’s circular telegram of August 18.
184
[Page XXXVI]Aug. 18 (77) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Information that Argentina did not make the proposal mentioned in the circular telegram of August 18, but that the Bolivian Minister indicated it would be acceptable to his Government; that Saavedra Lamas will attempt to determine Paraguay’s attitude if the Neutral Commission desires.
184
Aug. 19 (121) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Information that Peru initiated the proposal mentioned in the Department’s circular telegram of August 18, and the Peruvian Ambassador in Washington was directed to inform the U. S. Government and the Commission of Neutrals.
185
Aug. 19 (78) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Conversation with Saavedra Lamas, who promised to study the Neutrals’ telegram of August 17 to Bolivia (printed on page 68) in an attempt to find the best method of supporting the Neutrals.
186
Aug. 20 (55) To the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Instructions to express the Department’s appreciation of Argentina’s offer of cooperation. Information that the Chilean Foreign Minister advised Zalles to comply with the Neutrals’ request.
187
Aug. 25 (187) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Receipt of a memorandum from the Foreign Minister enclosing a draft proposal to Bolivia and Paraguay to be forwarded by the Commission of Neutrals after approval by the other neighboring countries.
187
Aug. 26 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with Espil in which White stated that the Neutrals do not favor Peru’s proposal for a conference from which all but one of the Neutrals would be excluded, and outlined the Neutrals’ program.
189
Aug. 31 (76) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Instructions not to discuss Chile’s draft proposal with the Government, since it has been decided not to forward it through the Commission of Neutrals.
192
Sept. 3 (196) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that a new draft note presented by the Foreign Minister proposes a conference of all the Neutrals and the neighboring countries, and is intended to be forwarded to Paraguay and Bolivia by the Neutral Commission.
193
Sept. 3 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs
Report from the Minister in Argentina that Saavedra Lamas is making a proposal to Paraguay and Bolivia, which, if agreeable to both countries, will be transmitted to the Neutral Commission for submission to the two Governments.
194
Sept. 3 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs
Telephone conversation with the Minister in Argentina, who was informed of White’s disapproval of Saavedra Lamas’ independent action.
195
[Page XXXVII]Sept. 5 (197) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that the ABCP Republics have delayed transmitting the new draft note to the Neutrals, because of Brazil’s objection to having the proposed conference in South America.
196
Sept. 6 (73) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Receipt of information that Bolivia disapproves of the proposed conference and resents the implied threat of other measures should Bolivia not accept the plan.
196
Sept. 7 (51) From the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s opinion that the proposed conference would result in duplicate negotiations.
197
Sept. 10 (201) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Transmittal of a telegram (text printed) from the representatives of the Neutrals to their Governments suggesting that the Neutral Commission request that the limitrophe countries adopt measures necessary to avert war.
198
Sept. 10 (89) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Saavedra Lamas’ intention to inform the Senate that Argentina will abide by its traditional policy of nonintervention.
198
Sept. 12 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Explanation to representative of the Chilean Embassy, in reply to information that airplanes are being shipped from the United States to Bolivia via Chile, that the United States have no legal authority to stop private shipments, but should the Chilean Government decide to hold them no complaint would be made.
199
Sept. 13 To the Diplomatic Representatives in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Peru (circ. tel.)
Report of a meeting of the Neutral Commission with the ABCP Republics wherein a memorandum was formulated inviting collaboration of the limitrophe countries.
199
Sept. 13 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Suggestion at the Neutral Commission meeting that it might be possible to extend the U. S. arms embargo, intended for use in the case of domestic upheavals in Latin America, to the Paraguay-Bolivia situation if an embargo is used by other American countries.
200
Sept. 14 (42) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Information that the Chilean representative was informed of the U. S. attitude on the shipment of arms and munitions to Bolivia.
202
Sept. 14 (162) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Receipt of information that Peru will accept the Neutrals’ invitation to collaborate.
202
Sept. 14 (106) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s approval of the Neutrals’ memorandum.
203
Oct. 18 From the Argentine Ambassador to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals.
Argentina’s disapproval of employing diplomatic intervention in the Bolivian-Paraguayan conflict.
203
[Page XXXVIII]Oct. 20 (44) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Receipt of information (1) that Argentina is representing to Paraguay that the Neutral Commission, which has been ineffective, should be relieved of the Chaco controversy, and (2) that Paraguay’s delegation may be withdrawn.
(Footnote: Telegram sent also to the Minister in Bolivia.)
206
Oct. 21 (135) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Scepticism concerning alleged Argentine representations to Paraguay, and Government assurance that the delegation will not be recalled. Information that the prevalent opinion is that the Neutrals are impotent and should no longer be consulted.
207
Oct. 22 Memorandum by the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals
Exhibition by Espil of cables indicating Argentina’s uneasiness over the reception given its note of October 18 and instructing Espil to avoid the Neutrals’ resentment.
208
Nov. 4 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Argentine Ambassador
Explanation that the Neutrals’ proposal of September 22 (printed on page 93) was not a threat of intervention because the action suggested depended upon the acceptance of the proposal by the disputing countries.
209
Nov. 17 (122) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Receipt of information that Saavedra Lamas has intimated that his Government would be glad to mediate in direct negotiations at Buenos Aires and that Bolivia would be assured of a port on the Paraguay River.
213
Nov. 19 From the Argentine Ambassador to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals
Acknowledgment of the Neutrals’ explanation of the proposal of September 22 and further explanation of Argentina’s attitude.
213
Dec. 15 To the Diplomatic Representatives in Certain American Republics (circ. tel.)
Instructions to request the Foreign Ministers to send telegrams to Paraguay and Bolivia supporting a new proposal of the Commission of Neutrals.
216
Dec. 19 (97) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Inquiry as to action being taken by the Brazilian Government concerning the Neutrals’ proposal.
217
Dec. 19 (59) To the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Inquiry as to action being taken by the Honduran Government concerning the Neutrals’ proposal.
217
Dec. 20 (114) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Information that the Foreign Minister telegraphed the Bolivian and Paraguayan Governments in support of the Neutrals’ proposal.
217
Dec. 20 (128) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Information that the Brazilian Government telegraphed the Bolivian and Paraguayan Foreign Ministers in support of the Neutrals’ proposal.
217
Dec. 29 (556) From the Minister in Paraguay
Brazilian Minister’s regret that instructions to support the Neutrals’ proposal arrived after Paraguay had replied.
218
[Page XXXIX]Dec. 31 From the Commission of Neutrals to the Ministers for Foreign A fairs of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Peru (tel.)
Report of Bolivian and Paraguayan replies to the Neutrals’ proposal, and request that the ABCP Republics outline the steps they are prepared to take in order to reestablish peace.
218

III. Cooperation of the League of Nations With the Commission of Neutrals

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Aug. 1 (225) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Outline of League action concerning the Paraguay-Bolivia dispute and request of the Acting Secretary General for information relative to measures being taken by the American states.
220
Aug. 3 (228) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
League opposition to intervention in the Chaco dispute in view of mediatory action by American states; advice that should Paraguay or Bolivia invoke the Covenant, however, the Council would be required to act.
221
Aug. 15 To the Minister in Switzerland
Background information on the Chaco situation for discussion with Drummond, Secretary General of the League.
222
Sept. 14 (81) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Drummond’s suggestion that the Council of the League might cable the disputing countries pointing out obligations under the Covenant and urging acceptance of the Neutrals’ recommendations and decisions.
228
Sept. 15 (62) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Approval of Drummond’s suggested cable to Bolivia and Paraguay.
229
Sept. 17 (84) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Drummond’s request for further information concerning the Chaco situation.
229
Sept. 19 (64) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Outline of the Neutrals’ plan for cessation of hostilities and negotiation for a settlement of the Chaco controversy.
230
Sept. 21 (74) From the Minister in Colombia (tel.)
Colombian inquiry in regard to action to be taken regarding Argentine plans to refer the Chaco question to Geneva.
230
Sept. 22 (42) To the Minister in Colombia (tel.)
Information that the Commission of Neutrals has suggested that the representatives of the neutral countries at the League be kept fully informed in case the Chaco situation is discussed.
231
Sept. 23 (263) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Council meeting report containing the suggestion that a declaration of readiness to further the efforts of the American Republics be made, and that a rapporteur or special committee be appointed to follow the matter.
231
[Page XL]Sept. 26 (269) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Conversation with De Valera, President of the Council, who said that a Council committee will be appointed to consider the Bolivia-Paraguay situation and that he would appreciate information on action taken in Washington.
232
Sept. 26 (5) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation to the General Disarmament Conference (tel.)
For Wilson. Bolivian and Paraguayan reception of the Neutrals’ proposal of September 22 (printed on page 93).
234
Sept. 27 (141) To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Instructions to advise Wilson of conversation with De Valera reported in telegram No. 269, September 26.
234
Sept. 28 (7) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Drummond’s opinion that regular reports of the Neutrals’ activities should enable him to limit League action to cooperation with the Neutrals.
234
Sept. 29 (12) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information that replies from Bolivia and Paraguay to the Council’s cable may be referred to the Commission of Neutrals for action. De Valera’s inquiry on the status of the Committee of Neighboring States.
235
Sept. 30 (14) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Receipt of information that the action referred to in Wilson’s telegram supra is being taken.
235
Sept. 30 (13) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation to the General Disarmament Conference (tel.)
For Wilson. Information that the neighboring states have not agreed on any independent action, but desire to cooperate with the Commission of Neutrals.
236
Sept. 30 (14) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation to the General Disarmament Conference (tel.)
For Wilson. Information for Drummond and De Valera bringing them up to date on action in the Chaco affair.
236
Oct. 1 From the President of the Council of the League of Nations to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Council’s suggestion for a military commission to oversee withdrawal of forces in the Chaco.
238
Oct. 13 From the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals to the President of the Council of the League of Nations (tel.)
Information that a proposal such as suggested by the Council in telegram supra has been made to the contending parties, and that the commission will proceed when the situation seems appropriate.
239
Oct. 17 From the Minister in Switzerland
Possibility that the Council may be forced to take action in the Chaco dispute when it reconvenes in November unless real progress has been made toward a solution.
240
Oct. 26 (25) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation to the General Disarmament Conference (tel.)
For Wilson from White. Information that Paraguay and Bolivia have accepted the Neutrals’ proposal for a conference.
241
[Page XLI]Oct. 27 (28) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Drummond’s request that the information contained in the Department’s telegram supra be communicated formally to De Valera so that it may be imparted to the Council and its committee.
241
Nov. 1 (26) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation to the General Disarmament Conference (tel.)
Opinion that the Commission of Neutrals will prefer to communicate the information requested in telegram supra informally to the League.
242
Nov. 1 (30) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Request for formal notification to De Valera of the acceptance of the Neutrals’ proposal by Paraguay and Bolivia.
242
Nov. 2 (32) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
For White. Opinion that the Council committee may be inclined to take independent action under the Covenant unless the Neutral Commission furnishes information freely.
242
Nov. 2 (28) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation to the General Disarmament Conference (tel.)
For Wilson. Decision of the Commission of Neutrals to send a telegram to the President of the Council containing the desired information.
243
Nov. 3 (33) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information from Drummond that prevention of independent action by the committee is difficult, since information promised by the Commission of Neutrals is not being furnished.
243
Nov. 5 From the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals to the President of the Council of the League of Nations (tel.)
Text of telegram informing the Council of Bolivia’s and Paraguay’s acceptance of the Commission’s proposal for a conference.
244
Nov. 5 To the Minister in Switzerland, at Geneva
Information concerning Saavedra Lamas’ efforts to discredit the Commission of Neutrals and assume leadership in the negotiations.
244
Nov. 9 From the President of the Council of the League of Nations to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Acknowledgment of the Neutrals’ telegram of November 5, and concern for continued warlike action in the Chaco.
246
Nov. 14 (39) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
For Francis White. De Valera’s request for more complete and frequent information from the Commission of Neutrals. Council committee’s conviction of the importance of the military commission’s prompt arrival in the Chaco.
246
Nov. 15 (32) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation to the General Disarmament Conference (tel.)
For Wilson. Explanation of the Neutral Commission’s deliberate action in the Chaco situation.
247
Nov. 17 (42) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Conversation with Drummond, who outlined a possible message to be sent by the League to Paraguay and Bolivia, and invited criticism or suggestions from the Secretary.
248
[Page XLII]Nov. 17 (34) To the Acting Chairman of the American Delegation to the General Disarmament Conference (tel.)
For Wilson from White. Approval of the action proposed by Drummond, and explanation of the Neutral Commission’s proposal for a military commission.
249
Nov. 18 (44) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information that De Valera will be made cognizant of Drummond’s suggestion for a message to be sent to Paraguay and Bolivia.
251
Nov. 25 (337) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Information that the Council of the League approved the texts of telegrams to be sent to Bolivia and Paraguay, and to the Commission of Neutrals, and urged support of the Commission.
251
Nov. 25 From the President of the Council of the League of Nations to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Information that a telegram (text printed) is being sent to the Governments of Paraguay and Bolivia in support of the Neutral Commission.
252
Dec. 3 From the Secretary General of the League of Nations to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Telegrams (texts printed) from Paraguay and Bolivia in reply to the League’s telegram urging compliance with the Neutrals’ proposals.
253
Dec. 3 From the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals to the President of the Council of the League of Nations (tel.)
Appreciation of the Council’s support of the Neutral Commission, and acknowledgment of the League’s telegram of December 3.
253
Undated [Rec’d Dec. 6] From the Secretary General of the League of Nations to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
De Valera’s statement (text printed) that the Council of the League attaches great importance to the immediate departure of an advisory commission to the Chaco, since Bolivia and Paraguay have indicated acceptance in principle of this action.
254
Dec. 7 Memorandum by the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals
Presentation by the Irish Minister of De Valera’s cable (text printed) suggesting the immediate despatch of a commission to the Chaco; White’s comment that neither Paraguay nor Bolivia have indicated a willingness to receive such a commission.
254
Dec. 10 From the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals to the President of the Council of the League of Nations (tel.)
Acknowledgment of the League’s telegram of December 6.
256
Dec. 15 From the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals to the President of the Council of the League of Nations (tel.)
Transmittal of the Neutrals’ proposal of December 15 to Bolivia and Paraguay (printed on page 126) and suggestion that the League support it in telegrams to the contending Governments.
256
Dec. 17 From the Secretary General of the League of Nations to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals (tel.)
Telegram (text printed) to be sent to the Governments of Paraguay and Bolivia in support of the Neutrals’ proposal of December 15.
257
[Page XLIII]Dec. 17 From the Irish Minister to the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals
Transmittal of the League Council’s despatch (text printed) suggesting the prompt departure of the commission to be set up under the Neutrals’ proposal of December 15.
257
Dec. 20 From the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals to the President of the Council of the League of Nations (tel.)
Appreciation of the Council’s support of the Neutrals’ proposal of December 15.
258
Dec. 23 From the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals to the Irish Minister
Position taken by the Commission that the despatch of a commission to the Chaco without the consent of both parties would be futile.
258
Dec. 31 From the Chairman of the Commission of Neutrals to the Secretary General of the League of Nations (tel.)
Report of Bolivia’s acceptance of the Neutrals’ proposal in principle, and Paraguay’s objection to the lack of guarantees and withdrawal from the conference.
258

PROPOSAL BY THE ARGENTINE GOVERNMENT FOR AN ANTI-WAR TREATY

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Aug. 22 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with Espil, the Argentine Ambassador, who stated that he had received a message from the Foreign Minister, Saavedra Lamas, outlining a proposal to supplement and extend the Kellogg-Briand Pact.
260
Aug. 30 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Information from Espil that a copy of an Argentine pact along the lines of the Kellogg Pact and the Locarno Treaty is being forwarded to the Department.
260
Sept. 21 (D.E. No. 66) From the Argentine Ambassador
Transmittal of the draft text of a South American anti-war treaty (text printed).
261
Sept. 22 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Espil’s presentation of the anti-war treaty, and the Secretary’s suggestion that Argentina might adhere to the already existing Kellogg-Briand Pact.
266
Oct. 5 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Opinion, in response to an inquiry from Espil, that the treaty would require modification; that the United States might wish to consult other American Governments before replying.
268
Dec. 22 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Reply to Espil’s request that action be taken on the anti-war pact, that if Argentina supports the Neutrals’ efforts in the Chaco situation until a settlement is reached, modification of the pact might be considered.
268
[Page XLIV]

THE LETICIA DISPUTE BETWEEN COLOMBIA AND PERU

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Sept. 2 (131) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Information that the Apristas have seized Leticia; that President Sanchez Cerro called it a political plot intended to embarrass the Government, and said he would cooperate with Colombia to prevent serious consequences.
270
Sept. 3 (50) To the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Instructions to advise President Sanchez Cerro that the Peruvian Government should disavow the attack on Leticia and take measures to prevent assistance to its captors.
271
Sept. 3 (134) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Report of an unsatisfactory conversation with Sanchez Cerro. Information that, after discussion with the Colombian Minister, the Foreign Minister agreed to send a commissioner to Leticia to handle the situation.
272
Sept. 9 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with the Colombian Minister, who requested that the Secretary talk with the Peruvian Ambassador regarding the violation of the boundary treaty.
275
Sept. 13 (160) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Opinion of Manzanilla, President of the Diplomatic Commission, that the United States could assist in solving the Leticia problem by influencing Colombia to negotiate a revision of the Salomon-Lozano treaty.
276
Sept. 15 (55) To the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Explanation of the U. S. position in regard to Manzanilla’s suggestion supra, which would have the effect of nullifying all international treaties, and would be contrary to the declaration of the American Republics of August 3.
277
Sept. 15 (167) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Suggestion that the Department’s telegram No. 55 of September 15 be communicated to the Foreign Minister.
279
Sept. 17 (39) To the Minister in Colombia (tel.)
Information that President Olaya contemplated sending a note to the signatories of the August 3 declaration, but that the United States advised asking the other American countries to make representations to the Peruvian Government.
279
Sept. 17 (56) To the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Approval of suggestion to communicate the Department’s telegram No. 55 of September 15 to the Peruvian Foreign Minister.
280
Sept. 23 (59) To the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Information that President Olaya proposes to request other American countries to make representations to the Peruvian Government.
281
Oct. 4 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with the Chairman of the Investigation Committee set up by the Gondra Treaty, who read a note from the Peruvian Ambassador requesting that the Committee undertake conciliation of the Leticia difference.
281
Oct. 5 (80) From the Minister in Colombia (tel.)
Information that President Olaya has refused to accept the Peruvian conciliation proposal.
282
[Page XLV]Oct. 14 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Assistant Secretary White’s suggestion to the Peruvian Ambassador that Peru acknowledge Colombia’s right to Leticia, but suggest to the Commission of Conciliation the negotiation of economic and commercial questions there.
282
Oct. 26 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Discussion of the Leticia case with members of the Commission of Conciliation, who seem in favor of White’s suggestion in regard to the negotiation of a supplementary commercial treaty.
284
Oct. 27 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with the Brazilian Ambassador to whom White explained the U. S. position in the Leticia matter, and suggested that Brazil might take the initiative in attempting to reach a peaceful solution.
285
Oct. 31 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Discussion with the Peruvian Ambassador who explained Peru’s position in the Leticia matter but was unable to outline a definite plan of negotiation.
286
Nov. 1 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Brazilian Ambassador’s explanation that his Government refuses to take the initiative in the Leticia matter, since some American countries are not represented in Brazil; White’s suggestion that the matter be taken up directly with the Foreign Ministers of those countries.
290
Nov. 3 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
White’s suggestion that Colombia could go before the Conciliation Commission with the violation of the Treaty of Caracas, and that later the economic or commercial questions under the Salomon-Lozano treaty could be discussed.
290
Nov. 10 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Brazilian Ambassador’s advice that he has been instructed to cooperate with others but to take no initiative in the Leticia matter.
291
Nov. 12 From the Ecuadoran Minister
Transmittal of a memorandum (text printed) setting forth Ecuador’s rights and interests in the Amazon region, in view of the Colombian-Peruvian dispute.
292
Nov. 15 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs Conversation between the Ecuadoran Minister and Secretary Stimson in which the Secretary promised to support the principle of maintaining the sanctity of treaties. 294
Nov. 16 (49) To the Minister in Colombia (tel.)
Instructions to discuss the Leticia situation with President Olaya and suggest that Colombia call Peru before a conciliation commission for treaty violations.
295
Nov. 19 (4757) From the Minister in Colombia
Information that President Olaya refused to consider the Department’s suggestion for a possible solution of the Leticia controversy.
297
Dec. 6 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with Guzman, Colombian Representative before the Permanent Investigating Commission, to whom White suggested a conference with the Peruvian Representative, Maúrtua.
298
[Page XLVI]Dec. 7 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Guzman’s opinion, after receipt of information that the Peruvian authorities would not interfere with the reestablishment of Colombian authority in Leticia, that negotiations could be materially advanced by conversations in Washington.
300
Dec. 7 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with the Peruvian Ambassador, who stated that previous Colombian-Peruvian talks had been inconclusive, but that he would discuss the matter with Maúrtua.
300
Dec. 7 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Guzman’s advice that the Chilean Ambassador, Cruchaga, had made one suggestion unacceptable to Colombia, and that an answer to another proposal was being forwarded to him at Callao.
301
Dec. 8 (167) From the Minister in Panama (tel.)
For White: Cruchaga’s proposal of a commission to study the Leticia situation, and his request for U. S. cooperation.
302
Dec. 8 (168) From the Minister in Panama (tel.)
For White: Information that the first act of the proposed commission would be to order the return of Leticia.
302
Dec. 9 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with Guzman who stated that Colombia was unable to accept Cruchaga’s proposal, and had so informed him.
303
Dec. 10 To the Consul at Guayaquil (tel.)
Message for Cruchaga informing him of White’s conversation with Guzman.
303
Dec. 14 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with Zaldumbide, the Ecuadoran Minister, who reaffirmed Ecuador’s interest in the Colombian-Peruvian boundary controversy.
304
Dec. 20 (84) To the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Maúrtua’s proposal for a Colombian-Peruvian protocol reestablshing Colombian authority in Leticia, to be followed by negotiations regarding upper Putumayo territory; information that Peruvian Government has not yet authorized this proposal.
306
Dec. 20 (54) To the Minister in Colombia (tel.)
Instructions to discuss Maúrtua’s proposal confidentially with President Olaya.
307
Dec. 21 (86) From the Minister in Colombia (tel.)
President Olaya’s favorable first reaction to Maúrtua’s proposal.
308
Dec. 21 (238) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Information that Maúrtua has apparently not informed his Government of his proposal; that the Peruvian President is reportedly more aggressive as news concerning a Colombian punitive expedition is received.
308
Dec. 22 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Maúrtua’s agreement to submit in writing his statement covering certain verbal differences in White’s memorandum of their conversation of December 20 concerning the proposal reported in telegram No. 84 of December 20.
309
[Page XLVII]Dec. 23 (88) From the Minister in Colombia (tel.)
Olaya’s acceptance of Maúrtua’s proposal with certain modifications.
311
Dec. 23 (55) To the Minister in Colombia (tel.)
Information that Maúrtua is putting his proposal in writing, and that Lozano will be given a copy.
311
Dec. 29 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with Cohen, the Chilean Counselor, who was in receipt of information that all negotiations with the Peruvian Government had broken down.
312
Dec. 29 (243) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Information that strenuous efforts are being made by Peru to induce Brazil to stop the Colombian flotilla on the Amazon.
312
Dec. 30 (130) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Brazilian proposal that Leticia be ceded to Brazil for restoration to Colombia on the understanding that the territorial dispute would be settled by conversations at the Brazilian Foreign Office.
313
Dec. 30 (100) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Instructions to inform the Government that any solution of the Leticia matter which is acceptable to Colombia and Peru will be pleasing to the United States.
313
Dec. 30 (244) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
For White: Request for permission to show Manzanilla the record of White’s conversation with Maúrtua, who has been asserting that White favors the neutralization of Leticia and its temporary control by a third country.
314
Dec. 30 (88) To the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Information that White told Maúrtua that he did not believe his suggestion for neutralization would be acceptable to Colombia. Instructions not to show Manzanilla White’s memorandum of his conversation with Maúrtua.
314

EXTENSION OF GOOD OFFICES OF THE UNITED STATES IN CONCILIATING DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ARGENTINA AND URUGUAY

Date and number Subject Page
1932 July 13 (55) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Information that Uruguay has severed diplomatic relations with Argentina because of the extraordinary surveillance of an Uruguayan warship at Buenos Aires; Argentina’s opinion that Uruguay fears Argentina’s protest of the transportation of a political refugee on the Uruguayan vessel.
316
July 14 (37) From the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Information that a note severing diplomatic relations was sent to the Argentine Ambassador by the Uruguayan Government.
317
July 14 (56) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Uruguay’s request that the U. S. Embassy assume temporary chargé of Uruguayan interests in Argentina. Information that Argentine interests in Uruguay have been entrusted to the British Legation.
317
[Page XLVIII]July 14 (57) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Colombian opinion that Argentine action in selecting a European country to represent her in Uruguay was a grave breach of Pan-Americanism.
318
July 14 (58) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Conversation with the Under Secretary for Foreign Affairs who said that Argentina would welcome a U. S. offer of good offices.
318
July 14 (59) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Information that the Colombian Minister had mentioned his conversation with the U. S. Ambassador only to the Spanish Ambassador.
319
July 15 (13) To the Minister in Uruguay-(tel.)
Instructions to ascertain Uruguay’s attitude toward a U. S. offer of good offices to assist in restoring Argentine-Uruguayan relations.
319
July 16 (38) From the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Information that no country has offered its good offices although the Paraguayan Foreign Minister has intimated that Paraguay might do so.
320
July 16 (40) From the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s acceptance of the good offices of the United States.
320
July 16 (14) To the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Request for an early reply to the Department’s telegram No. 13 of July 15.
321
July 16 (41) From the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s desire that negotiations for the resumption of diplomatic relations with Argentina proceed with all possible speed. Information that the Government’s action has proved unpopular in Uruguay.
321
July 17 (42) From the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Suggestion for an Argentine-Uruguyan conference to be held on board a U. S. Coast Guard vessel.
322
July 17 (15) To the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Approval of the use of a U.S.C.G. vessel for an Argentine-Uruguayan conference, if the ship is available.
322
July 17 (61) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Information that Argentina now desires Uruguay’s disavowal of the action in breaking off diplomatic relations before accepting the U. S. offer of good offices.
323
July 18 (62) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Receipt of information that overtures have been made by the Presidents of Argentina and Uruguay for the direct settlement of their countries’ differences.
323
July 19 (44) To the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Information from the Commandant of the Coast Guard that vessels will be available at Montevideo for another week or 10 days, if required.
(Footnote: The same, mutatis mutandis, July 19, to the Minister in Uruguay.)
324
[Page XLIX]July 20 (43) From the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Uruguayan President’s opinion that personal conversations between the chiefs of state would be the best method of solving the difficulty, and that he is prepared to accept the offer of the U.S.C.G. vessel for such conversations.
324
July 20 (44) From the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Information that the U. S. offer of good offices was announced in the Uruguayan press; that the U. S. Minister has replied to press inquiries that he has no official information on the matter.
325
July 20 (63) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s statement that the suggestion for conversations between the chiefs of state is under consideration. Information that the Foreign Minister published a denial of the acceptance of the U. S. offer of good offices.
325
July 22 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Explanation to the Argentine Ambassador that the initiative for the U. S. offer of good offices came from Argentina; that if the situation has changed, the United States would revoke the offer.
326
July 22 (46) To the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Instructions to refrain from further action in the Argentine-Uruguayan controversy, and, should Argentina later indicate a desire for U. S. assistance, to inform the Legation in Montevideo in order that Uruguay’s opinion may be ascertained.
327
July 28 (1733) From the Ambassador in Argentina
Transmittal of a note to the Foreign Minister (text printed) advising him that no further action will be taken in the Argentine-Uruguayan controversy unless requested by him.
328
Sept. 12 (53) From the Minister in Uruguay (tel.)
Information that diplomatic relations between Argentina and Uruguay have been resumed.
329

EFFORTS OF COSTA RICA TO EFFECT THE DENUNCIATION OF THE GENERAL TREATY OF PEACE AND AMITY, SIGNED FEBRUARY 7, 1923

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Nov. 11 (37) To the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Instructions to verify a report that President Jiménez will denounce the Treaty of Peace and Amity of 1923.
330
Nov. 12 (69) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Confirmation of President Jimenez’ intention to denounce the Treaty of 1923.
330
Nov. 14 (826) From the Minister in Guatemala
Foreign Minister’s inquiry regarding Jiménez’ intended action and suggestion that a conference of Central American Republics be convoked to discuss the treaties.
330
Nov. 15 (70) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s advice that permission is being sought for a conference with the Guatemalan President for the purpose of discussing the denunciation of the Treaty of 1923 and recognition of the Martinez regime in El Salvador.
332
[Page L]Nov. 15 (1194) From the Minister in Costa Rica
Transmittal of memoranda (texts printed) of conversations with Foreign Minister Pacheco and President Jiménez regarding the denunciation of the Treaty of Peace and Amity.
332
Nov. 16 (38) To the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Instructions to furnish information of further developments in connection with the Treaty of 1923.
334
Nov. 17 (78) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Request for instructions relative to the suggested conference of Central American Republics.
334
Nov. 18 (79) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Receipt of information that Pacheco is en route to Guatemala.
335
Nov. 19 (82) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Guatemalan surprise at Pacheco’s announcement of his visit without previous inquiry as to whether it would be agreeable.
335
Nov. 22 (44) To the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
U. S. opinion on the Central American Treaty, and position in regard to the Guatemalan suggestion for the convocation of a conference of Central American Republics.
336
Nov. 23 (218) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that Nicaragua is opposed to denouncing the 1923 treaties.
338
Nov. 23 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Assistant Secretary White’s opinion, in reply to the Guatemalan Minister’s inquiry, that the Central American Treaties of 1907 and 1923 have been beneficial and that before abrogating them consideration should be given to the probable consequences.
338
Nov. 29 (225) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that the Guatemalan Minister discussed the Costa Rican proposal with Nicaraguan officials who expressed complete accord with the Guatemalan viewpoint.
339
Nov. 30 (834) From the Minister in Guatemala
Conversation with Pacheco who stated that his mission to Guatemala was for the purpose of discussing modification of the Treaties of 1923 rather than their denunciation.
339
Dec. 5 (83) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Information that President Ubico told Pacheco the treaty modifications he suggested were impossible.
341
Dec. 5 (839) From the Minister in Guatemala
Information that the Foreign Minister suggested that a commission of inquiry under the Treaty of 1923 might examine Martínez’ case.
341
Dec. 8 (84) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Information that Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua refused to sign an agreement, suggested by Pacheco, to recognize Martinez, and that the suggestion for a committee of inquiry had been discussed.
343
[Page LI]Dec. 10 (45) To the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Request for further information concerning the suggestion for a committee of inquiry.
344
Dec. 12 (86) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Information that the suggestion for a commission of inquiry has been abandoned, and that Pacheco now proposes postponement of discussion of the treaties until April.
344
Dec. 16 (850) From the Minister in Guatemala
Pacheco’s announcement to the press (translation printed), on his departure for Costa Rica, that a conference will be called in April for the purpose of revising the treaties of 1923.
344
Dec. 27 (109) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Report of the publication of an Executive Decree of the de facto regime denouncing the Central American General Treaty of Peace and Amity of 1923.
345
Dec. 27 (1242) From the Minister in Costa Rica
Transmittal of a note (text printed) containing the texts of the Executive Decree renouncing the 1923 treaty and the notification to the other signatories of Costa Rica’s action.
345
Dec. 29 (248) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that the Nicaraguan Government intends to take no action in regard to El Salvador’s denunciation of the Treaty of 1923 other than acknowledging the receipt of the communication.
348
Dec. 29 (88) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Information that the Foreign Minister advised that El Salvador’s denunciation of the Treaty of 1923 would have no effect on Guatemalan policy.
348
1933 Jan. 5 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the Guatemalan Minister wherein Secretary Stimson declared that, although the Treaty of 1923 had been renounced by Costa Rica and Salvador, the United States would support it so long as the other signatories did.
349

BOUNDARY DISPUTES

Ecuador and Peru

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Oct. 13 (712) From the Minister in Ecuador
Foreign Minister’s denial of the importance of an incident on the Ecuadoran-Peruvian border.
350
Oct. 17 (2242) From the Ambassador in Peru
Further information on the border incident, the settlement of which is to be arranged by the Foreign Offices of the two countries; mention of a rapprochement between Ecuador and Colombia.
351
Oct. 24 (2270) From the Ambassador in Peru
Information that troops have been removed from the Ecuadoran-Peruvian border; that there is speculation on the course Ecuador will take should the Leticia incident lead to war.
355
[Page LII]Oct. 31 (2291) From the Ambassador in Peru
Information that border conditions between Peru and Ecuador remain disturbed, and that no progress has been made by diplomatic negotiation.
357
Nov. 5 (736) From the Minister in Ecuador
Foreign Minister’s opinion that press reports of incidents on the Peruvian-Ecuadoran border refer to earlier events.
358
Nov. 7 (2315) From the Ambassador in Peru
Report of Ecuadoran press despatches to the effect that Peruvian forces do not occupy Pocitos; and of further rumors of possible Ecuadoran collaboration with Colombia.
359
Nov. 10 (2331) From the Ambassador in Peru
Receipt of information that Ecuador has threatened to join Colombia unless Peru is prepared to sign a treaty formulated and rejected during the Leguía regime, and that the Foreign Minister is prepared to sign the treaty.
360
Nov. 16 (21) To the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Information that the Ecuadoran Government is serving notice, in a memorandum to all American governments, of Ecuador’s interest in the situation arising from the Leticia incident.
361
Nov. 16 (50) To the Minister in Colombia (tel.)
Probable explanation for Ecuador’s memorandum concerning the Leticia incident.
361
Nov. 16 (757) From the Minister in Ecuador
Conversation with Garcia, the Peruvian Minister, who stated that Peru had consented to resume negotiations with Ecuador for the settlement of the boundary dispute.
362
Nov. 17 (50) From the Minister in Ecuador (tel.)
Information that Ecuador’s memorandum was well received in Quito; that it was also transmitted to the Pan American Union and the League of Nations.
363
Nov. 18 (2360) From the Ambassador in Peru
Explanation of Peru’s position, and the possibility of a compromise which will recognize a frontier more favorable to Ecuador.
363
Nov. 19 (2371) From the Ambassador in Peru
Peruvian President’s statement that no boundary treaty with Ecuador will be signed, nor is being considered.
366
Nov. 23 (2387) From the Ambassador in Peru
Conversation with Aparicio, the Ecuadoran Minister, who recounted conversations with the Foreign Minister in regard to various methods of reaching an agreement, such as the renegotiation of the treaty formulated during the Leguía regime.
368
Nov. 29 (778) From the Minister in Ecuador
Receipt of information that Chile would not undertake mediation of the Peruvian-Ecuadoran controversy.
370
Dec. 23 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with Zaldumbide, the Ecuadoran Minister, who advised confidentially that Ecuador has opened negotiations with Peru for the settlement of its boundary.
371
[Page LIII]

Guatemala and Honduras

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Undated Memorandum by Mr. Richard M. de Lambert of the Division of Latin American Affairs
Information that the Guatemalan and Honduran delegations to the arbitration tribunal for the settlement of the boundary controversy have arrived in the United States.
372
Oct. 15 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Information that ratifications of the treaty and convention regarding the arbitration of the boundary dispute have been exchanged by Guatemala and Honduras.
373
1932 July 7 From the Secretary of the Special Boundary Tribunal, Guatemala-Honduras
Transmittal of a ruling of the tribunal (text printed) that an aerial survey of the disputed territory is required, and request for State Department assistance in securing the necessary facilities.
374
July 15 (31) To the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Instructions to give all appropriate assistance to the members of the survey party now en route to the disputed territory.
(Footnote: A similar telegram was sent to the Minister in Honduras.)
375
July 25 From the Chief of Staff of the United States Army
Information that the aerial photography required by the Guatemala-Honduras Special Boundary Tribunal can be accomplished by the Army Air Corps, provided the Air Corps is reimbursed for necessary costs.
376
July 28 From the Secretary of the Special Boundary Tribunal, Guatemala-Honduras
Tribunal’s acceptance of the responsibility for the cost of the Army Air Corps aerial survey unit, and request for information as to its personnel and equipment.
376
July 28 (716) From the Chargé in Guatemala
Receipt of information that the Guatemalan, Honduran and American engineers for the aerial survey have arrived in Puerto Barrios.
377
Aug. 10 From the Secretary of the Special Boundary Tribunal, Guatemala-Honduras
Expression of the Tribunal’s appreciation for assistance in securing the facilities necessary for the aerial survey.
378
Oct. 25 From the Secretary of the Special Boundary Tribunal, Guatemala-Honduras
Information that the field operations of the aerial survey have been completed, and that the Honduran and Guatemalan delegations have requested that the sincere thanks of their Governments be conveyed to the Government of the United States.
378
Nov. 8 From the Secretary of the Special Boundary Tribunal, Guatemala-Honduras
Transmittal of a certified copy of the survey report (not printed) and of the Tribunal’s request that its appreciation be conveyed to the Secretary of War.
379
[Page LIV]

ARGENTINA

Representations Against Apparent Violation by Argentina of Most-Favored-Nation Clauses in the Treaty of July 27, 1853

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Nov. 13 (517) To the Chargé in Argentina
Instructions to notify the Argentine authorities of the apparent violation of the Treaty of Friendship, Commerce and Navigation of 1853, and to inquire whether the early removal of the discrimination against American lumber may be obtained.
380
Dec. 23 (1463) From the Chargé in Argentina
Information that a memorandum concerning Argentina’s violation of the treaty of 1853 was given to the Foreign Minister. Explanation of Argentina’s action.
381
Dec. 30 (1478) 1932 From the Chargé in Argentina
Further information on Argentina’s position in regard to the most-favored-nation clauses of the treaties of commerce and amity.
383
Jan. 15 (1502) From the Chargé in Argentina
Receipt of information that a commission is considering the matter of the treaty violation, and that an expert has been called in with a view to establishing whether South American Pine differs in quality from the U.S. variety.
384
Jan. 28 (1512) From the Chargé in Argentina
Transmittal of Argentina’s reply (text printed) to the U. S. memorandum on the violation of the treaty of 1853, stating that, South and North American white pine being dissimilar, the treaty of commerce is not applicable. Request for instructions.
385
Feb. 5 (13) To the Chargé in Argentina (tel.)
Instructions not to confuse the unilateral tariff concessions granted by Argentina to South American white pine with the bilateral agreement on Finnish birch plywood in representations to Argentine authorities, and to refrain from making representations on the former pending further instructions.
386
Apr. 20 (569) To the Chargé in Argentina
Instructions to make no further representations concerning discrimination on lumber imports, unless it appears that North and South American white pine are highly competitive.
387
[May 20?] (1630) From the Ambassador in Argentina
Clarification of the Embassy’s action in connection with the Argentine-Finnish agreement on birch plywood, and agreement with the Department’s decision to discontinue representations on lumber discrimination.
388

BRAZIL

Insurrection in Brazil

Date and number Subject Page
1932 July 10 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Report of revolution in São Paulo.
390
July 10 (51) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Information that the revolution includes three southern States and Minas Geraes as well as São Paulo, but that Rio is quiet.
390
[Page LV]July 11 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Further report of the revolutionary movement in São Paulo, the object of which is purported to be the reconstitutionalization of Brazil.
390
July 12 (53) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Information that all ports in São Paulo are temporarily closed; that a cruiser has been sent to Santos, which is in the hands of São Paulo forces.
391
July 12 (55) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Information that a Presidential manifesto asserts that the Government is supported by the Navy, local Federal troops, and all the states, and refutes the constitutionalization character of the revolutionary movement.
391
July 12 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Explanation of the Paulistas action, and further information on the situation in São Paulo.
392
July 12 To the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Acknowledgment of telegrams, and instructions to continue communications.
392
July 12 (59) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s statement that the revolutionary movement is confined to São Paulo and a section of Matto Grosso; that the Government intends to surround São Paulo and bring it to terms without bloodshed, if possible.
393
July 13 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Report of military movements of the Paulistas.
393
July 13 (220) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
From Ambassador Morgan: Information that the Ambassador will return to Brazil at once, if desired.
393
July 13 (60) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Advice that the cable has been disconnected at Montevideo at the request of the Brazilian Government.
394
July 13 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Press report of a Government mediation proposal and São Paulo’s refusal; Paulista proclamation explaining the purpose of the movement.
394
July 13 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Information that a movement in Minas Geraes favorable to São Paulo has deposed President Olegario Maciel.
395
July 14 (62) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Information that the Foreign Minister has protested the entrance of an American vessel in the port of Santos; request for instructions in regard to clearance of American ships at Santos.
395
July 14 (193) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Ambassador Morgan: Appreciation of Ambassador’s offer to return to Brazil; information as to situation in Minas Geraes.
395
July 15 (65) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Information that clearance was granted to American vessels at Santos.
396
[Page LVI]July 15 (66) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Transmittal of telegram from the Consul at Porto Alegre containing information that an attempt has been made to initiate a church movement for peace at São Paulo.
396
July 15 (3894) From the Chargé in Brazil
Report of events leading up to the São Paulo revolution and further information on the revolutionary movement.
397
July 16 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Information that a decree has been published declaring all financial acts of the Provisional Government null and void in order to prevent the entire nation being obligated for resources with which to fight the constitutionalists.
400
July 16 (49) To the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain, if any future attempt is made to interfere with American ships entering or leaving Santos, whether an effective blockade is maintained in order to determine whether an occasion for protest may have arisen.
400
July 17 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Report of Government bombing of aviation field at São Paulo without damage.
401
July 18 (67) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Further information concerning the situation in Brazil.
401
July 19 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Report that São Paulo is quiet; that the revolutionary movement is not communistic.
403
July 19 (197) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Ambassador Morgan: Instructions to return to Brazil as soon as possible.
403
July 21 From the Ambassador in Brazil, Temporarily at Paris (tel.)
Advice concerning immediate return to Brazil.
403
July 21 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Advice that all of Brazil except Matto Grosso is aligned with the Government. Suggestion that a statement be published that all American citizens and property in São Paulo are uninjured.
404
July 22 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Report of conditions in São Paulo.
404
July 22 (3901) From the Chargé in Brazil
Explanation for the severing of the cable at Montevideo.
405
July 23 (69) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Report of Government victories; possible discussions of peace measures by Rio Grande do Sul and Minas Geraes; Government decree that financial transactions with the insurrectionists will not be recognized.
406
Aug. 1 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Request for instructions as to receiving officially a communication from the Governor of São Paulo requesting recognition of a state of belligerency between the State of São Paulo and the Dictatorship.
407
[Page LVII]Aug. 2 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Information that the various Consuls are attempting to secure permission for the transmission of the text of the request for recognition of belligerency to the Italian Ambassador in Rio de Janeiro for distribution to the various Embassies.
408
Aug. 2 To the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Instructions not to receive officially the Paulistas’ request for recognition of belligerency.
408
Aug. 3 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Information that the request for recognition of belligerency was transmitted to the Embassy at Rio de Janeiro.
408
Aug. 3 (79) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Résumé of the São Paulo petition for recognition of belligerency, and outline of the situation.
409
Aug. 12 (84) From the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Information that transportation of American citizens to and from Santos by airplane has been effected, but that efforts for ship transport have failed; request for instructions in the event that arrangements may be made for an American vessel to stop at Santos.
411
Aug. 12 (62) To the Chargé in Brazil (tel.)
Department’s approval of necessary assistance for American citizens attempting to leave Santos by boat.
412
Aug. 15 (88) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Information that the Ambassador has resumed his duties.
412
Aug. 16 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Press report of a note from the Italian Ambassador to the Brazilian Government with reference to a Federal proclamation regarding the confiscation of private property in São Paulo.
412
Aug. 21 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Information concerning the situation in São Paulo.
413
Aug. 22 (90) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Information that the Federal proclamation states that persons aiding the rebels or interfering with Federal operations will be held criminally liable and that private munitions factories, whether belonging to nationals or foreigners, will be destroyed and the properties confiscated.
413
Aug. 26 (69) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Instructions to report any case which may arise under the proclamation involving an American citizen or interest.
414
Aug. 30 Memorandum by the Assistant Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs of a Conversation With the Second Secretary of the French Embassy
French suggestion for an embargo of arms to Brazil, and U. S. reply that prevention of arms export to the Federal Government would be contrary to practice, but that shipment of arms to the revolutionists is forbidden under a convention signed at Habana.
414
Aug. 31 Memorandum by the Assistant Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs
Negative reply to a French inquiry as to whether any U. S. Government arms were being sold to the Federal Government of Brazil.
415
[Page LVIII]Sept. 10 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Information that peace negotiations through the President of Minas Geraes have been broken because of Vargas’ insistence on surrender as a preliminary condition.
415
Sept. 20 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Report of the bombing of Campinas.
416
Sept. 21 (110) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Information that protest of the Campinas bombing has been made, and that an audience with Vargas has been requested in order to represent the gravity of bombarding an open town.
416
Sept. 22 (111) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Information that, in response to a protest at the bombardment of Campinas, Vargas has promised to confer with the Minister of War.
416
Sept. 24 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Transmittal of a resolution of the American Chamber of Commerce of São Paulo to ask the U. S. Government to protest the closing of the port of Santos, and to take such steps as will guarantee full rights to American interests.
417
Sept. 26 (83) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Approval of Embassy’s action reported in telegrams 110 of September 21 and 111 of September 22.
417
Sept. 27 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Suggestion that American warships be within call in case of necessity to aid Americans in São Paulo.
418
Sept. 27 (115) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Disapproval of Consul’s recommendation regarding a U. S. warship.
418
Sept. 27 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Information that a British warship is anchored at San Sebastian.
418
Sept. 27 To the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Department’s decision against protesting the closing of the port of Santos.
419
Sept. 28 To the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Disapproval of Consul’s suggestion that an American warship be sent to Brazilian waters.
419
Sept. 28 (3954) From the Ambassador in Brazil
Foreign Office memorandum denying that Federal airplanes bombed Campinas. Information that Consul General at São Paulo has been advised to continue investigation of bombing, but not to associate himself with the Consular Corps in such investigation.
419
Sept. 29 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Receipt of information that the military commander at São Paulo, General Klinger, has requested an armistice.
421
Sept. 29 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
British Naval Attaché’s opinion that a British warship will go to Santos if necessary.
422
[Page LIX]Sept. 30 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Report of General Klinger’s request for an armistice and Vargas’ reply directing negotiations with General Gões Monteiro.
422
Oct. 1 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Information that Klinger is accused of bungling or disloyalty; that fighting has recommenced and the Paulistas have been driven back; that British warship has anchored near the entrance to Santos Harbor.
423
Oct. 1 To the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Department’s advice that the Consul General make such plans as seem advisable for the protection of Americans in case of disorders.
423
Oct. 2 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Information that tentative arrangements have been made to accommodate American families who might desire to take refuge.
423
Oct. 2 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Information that São Paulo is apparently being demobilized notwithstanding Klinger’s assertions that armistice only has been arranged; that some disorders are probable should popular suspicions of unconditional surrender be confirmed.
423
Oct. 3 (118) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Government’s announcement that an armistice has been arranged, and that all São Paulo military equipment will be surrendered.
424
Oct. 4 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Information that General Klinger and his staff are surrendering at Cruzeiro; that the city is calm, probably because of threat of military occupation if public order is disturbed.
424
Oct. 7 (3958) From the Ambassador in Brazil
Report of armistice negotiations and the subsequent situation in São Paulo.
425
Oct. 13 From the Consul General at São Paulo (tel.)
Information that rioting has broken out in São Paulo but there is no expectation of serious disorders.
427
Nov. 4 (3978) From the Ambassador in Brazil
Report of deportation of revolutionists and preparations for the meeting of the Constitutional Assembly.
427
Dec. 1 (3989) From the Ambassador in Brazil
Information that the Brazilian political scene is quiet; and that a constitution is being drafted for presentation to the Constitutional Assembly.
428

CHILE

Revolutions in Chile

Date and number Subject Page
1932 June 4 (48) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that a subversive movement in the air force reached a crisis June 3; that the Government is expected to fall and be replaced by a socialist junta.
430
[Page LX]June 4 (49) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Revolutionist demand for President Montero’s resignation (text printed), and Montero’s refusal.
430
June 5 (51) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Montero has retired from the Government, although he has not resigned, and therefore remains constitutional President of Chile; that a Junta has been established by force.
431
June 5 (53) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Junta’s program for immediate action (text printed).
432
June 5 (54) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
United Press interview with Dávila, a member of the Junta, who stated that foreign interests would not be molested, and that the debt situation would remain unchanged. Request for instructions as to communication with the Government during the period of non-recognition.
433
June 6 (25) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that recognition of the de facto Government of Chile must be delayed until the usual requirements of international practice have been satisfied; that necessary communications should be in the form of third person notes, memorandums, or personal communications.
435
June 6 (57) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Conversation with Dávila who declared that the Junta agrees that foreign interests, with the possible exception of Cosach, are not to be molested.
435
June 8 (63) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that the largest Chilean sugar refinery has been notified that it would be taken over by the Government, and that the same policy will apparently be followed in other fields.
436
June 9 (67) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Conversion of Central Bank into State Bank by Junta decree.
437
June 9 (70) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that a new foreign currency decree (text printed) virtually confiscates American dollar deposits and attacks the gold deposit trusteeship of the National City Bank; that protest will be made.
437
June 10 (28) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Request that an estimate of the amount held by Americans in Chilean banks which would be affected by the decree be cabled to the Department.
438
June 10 (73) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Estimate that American foreign currency balances in Chile amount to about $800,000, three-fourths of which is held by one company.
438
June 10 (75) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Finance Minister’s statement that the decree against foreign currency deposits will be enforced.
439
[Page LXI]June 11 (76) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Grove, the Minister of War, has declared that the Junta guarantees tranquillity in the country; that Communists seeking to overthrow the Government will be dealt with severely.
440
June 13 (82) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report of Communist agitation in Santiago and the resignation of Dávila from the Junta.
440
June 13 (32) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether the decree on foreign currency covers deposits of American companies and American-owned companies operating in Chile but held in banks in foreign countries.
441
June 13 (83) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Protest of the manager of the Central Bank at the refusal of American banks to honor drawings by the Bank and threat of retaliatory measures unless payments are resumed.
441
June 13 (84) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Text of communication to the Foreign Minister concerning the decree against foreign currency.
442
June 13 (86) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Ambassador’s opinion that the foreign currency decree affects only deposits in banks in Chile.
443
June 14 (87) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel)
Report of new members of the Junta. Finance Minister’s statement that the Central Bank will continue operating in accordance with the laws establishing it, and that the Cosach question demands detailed study.
444
June 14 (89) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Decree law concerning the Central Bank (text printed) which has not been promulgated; indications that the institution will be left unchanged in order to avoid difficulties with foreign banks.
445
June 14 (92) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Declaration of the Finance Minister that the Central Bank will continue to be governed by its own laws and statutes and will be independent of fiscal resources and resources of the State Bank.
446
June 15 (36) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice to continue trying orally to persuade the Chileans that their own best interests he in cooperating with foreign governments.
446
June 15 (37) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that the National City Bank is meeting drawings of the Central Bank; that the Guaranty Trust Company requires further information as to the organization and control of the Central Bank.
447
June 16 (93) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information as to organization and control of the Central Bank.
447
June 16 (94) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that the authorities now in power give prompt attention to requests of the Ambassador and are trying to avoid antagonizing the American Government.
449
[Page LXII]June 16 (95) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Establishment of a new Junta by military coup d’état.
449
June 17 (96) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report of various provisos of the act constituting the new Junta under the Presidency of Dávila, and of a proclamation of the armed forces that adherence to the movement depended on communism being outlawed.
450
June 17 (41) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether the decrees concerning the Central Bank have been promulgated.
451
June 18 (99) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Composition of the Junta and of the Cabinet, and information that the Junta has declared the country temporarily under martial law.
452
June 18 (100) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Signature and promulgation of decree law No. 38 (text printed) which modifies the laws establishing the Central Bank. Information that the Finance Minister stated that it was intended to permit the Central Bank to continue operating without interference from the Government.
452
June 22 (106) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Further information on the position of the Central Bank.
453
June 23 (42) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Request for further information on the political situation in Chile.
454
June 24 (107) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Ambassador’s opinion that, although personalities will probably change in the present regime, there will be no violent transformations and Dávila will remain a dominant factor in the Government.
454
June 27 (111) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that a decree law repealing decree law No. 38 has been signed and will be promulgated immediately.
455
June 30 (112) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report of a change in the membership of the Junta.
456
July 5 (120) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Promulgation of decree law No. 98, dated June 25 (text printed) repealing decree law No. 38. Information that certain officers of the Central Bank resigned because of disagreement with the Junta’s financial policy.
456
July 6 (121) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that Barriga accepted appointment as Foreign Minister.
456
July 7 (125) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that the return of ex-President Ibañez has complicated the political situation; that the Junta, except Dávila and the Cabinet, has resigned; and that it is understood that the present regime will last only a few days.
457
[Page LXIII]July 8 (126) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Dávila is Provisional President; that Ibañez’ support is increasing and that public opinion will soon demand his return to power.
458
July 9 (127) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report of Cabinet changes.
458
July 11 (129) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Ibañez has retired, thereby strengthening Dávila’s position; that Dávila has announced the holding of a constitutional convention followed by elections, and has formulated a plan for obtaining money from abroad.
458
July 13 (131) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Postponement until August 1 of the effectiveness of the decree law concerning foreign currency deposits.
459
July 14 (132) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s note (text printed) implying that since the transfer of authority in the Government has followed the Constitution there should be no question about recognition.
460
July 15 (133) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report of Diplomatic Corps discussion of recognition of the Dávila regime. Conversation with the President of the Credit Mortgage Bank who stated that Dávila hopes to achieve his socialistic program gradually by education; that the law expropriating bank deposits will be annulled and all other foreign rights respected.
463
July 16 (49) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Instructions not to reply to the Foreign Minister’s note of July 14 since the Department is disposed to delay recognition.
463
July 16 (134) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Receipt of communication from the Foreign Minister explaining that foreign currency bank deposits of American citizens will be respected.
464
July 17 (135) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Conversation with Dávila who stated that he had opposed requesting recognition until he felt secure.
465
July 18 (136) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Request for permission to send an informal acknowledgment of the Foreign Minister’s note stating merely that it has been transmitted to the Department.
466
July 19 (50) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information as to the attitude of certain governments concerning recognition of the Dávila regime.
466
July 19 (51) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Authorization to acknowledge informally the Foreign Minister’s note of July 14.
467
July 20 (137) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Foreign Office belief that all assurances required by international practice have been made, and should be accepted as made in good faith.
467
[Page LXIV]July 20 (53) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Request for further information concerning the decree laws on foreign currency deposits.
468
July 22 (140) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s statement that it is his intention to annul decree laws on foreign currency deposits as soon as some solution for the liquidation of pending transactions can be found; assurance that deposits of American citizens will be respected.
468
July 22 From the Brazilian Ambassador
Note explaining that the Brazilian Government has been obliged to hasten recognition of the Chilean Government in view of the present situation in South America.
469
July 23 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Second Secretary of the Argentine Embassy
Presentation of a note verbale to the effect that Argentina is recognizing the Government of Chile.
469
July 26 (150) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Receipt of assurances from Dávila and the Foreign Minister that international obligations will be respected.
470
July 27 (55) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Instructions to address a personal letter to the Foreign Minister (text printed) requesting a written confirmation of his assurances of respect for international obligations.
471
July 29 (156) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Suggestion that the request for a confirmatory letter be withheld, since a satisfactory reply cannot be expected.
472
July 29 (58) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Instructions not to transmit the letter requesting confirmation of respect for international obligations, and information that recognition will be delayed.
473
Aug. 2 (159) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report of Cabinet changes.
474
Aug. 3 (1217) From the Ambassador in Chile
Transmittal of decree law annulling foreign currency deposit decree laws except law No. 5107. Information that the Foreign Minister has been asked for definite assurance that the foreign currency deposits of American citizens in Chile will be respected.
474
Aug. 12 (62) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Instructions to endeavor to obtain Foreign Minister’s approval of memoranda of conversations covering equitable treatment of American interests in Chile; also, to secure safeguarding of American foreign currency holdings by informal efforts, rather than strictly legal approach.
474
Aug.12 (1385) To the Ambassador in Chile
Department’s views as to most desirable course of action for protection of American interests in regard to action taken and possible prospective action by the Chilean Government on foreign currency deposits.
476
[Page LXV]Aug. 13 (165) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report of the suppression of a revolt centering at the University; and of the Finance Minister’s resignation.
478
Aug. 17 (170) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Ernesto Barros Jarpa, President of the Mortgage Credit Bank, has assumed the office of Finance Minister.
479
Aug. 18 (173) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Foreign Office concern for the status of the new Chilean Chargé in Washington.
479
Aug. 20 (67) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that arrangements were made for an exchange of letters between Cruchaga and Acting Secretary White in connection with the unofficial acceptance of the new Chilean Chargé.
(Footnote: Exchange of personal letters by Señor Cruchaga, and Mr. White, August 15 and August 24.)
479
Aug. 20 (178) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Request for Department’s opinion on the Foreign Minister’s reply to the request for assurance that American foreign currency deposits in Chile will be respected. Information that instructions were carried out in accordance with the Department’s telegram No. 62, August 12.
480
Aug. 26 (72) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain what constitutional guarantees or laws were referred to in the Foreign Minister’s reply mentioned in Ambassador’s telegram No. 178, August 20.
481
Aug. 27 (190) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information requested in the Department’s telegram No. 72, August 26. Request for instructions to clarify U. S. attitude toward recognition of the present Chilean regime.
481
Aug. 29 (194) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that discussions on the reorganization of Cosach will begin next week, and that an organized attack on American interests is being planned.
482
Sept. 1 (79) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice not to take action in support of American interests without cabling the Department complete information on which to base instructions.
482
Sept. 2 From the Chargé in Cuba
Communication from Cuban Foreign Office to Cuban diplomatic representatives abroad (text printed) explaining Cuba’s recognition of Chile.
482
Sept. 7 (199) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Comments relative to U. S. recognition of the present Chilean regime.
487
Sept. 12 (202) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Conversation with Dávila who said that he may be compelled to retire, if pressure is put on him by the armed forces and the Conservatives to force his acceptance of conditions inconsistent with his principles.
488
[Page LXVI]Sept. 13 (204) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Chile is virtually without a government, although Dávila is still in the Moneda.
489
Sept. 13 (205) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Dávila has resigned and delivered the power to General Blanche, Minister of the Interior and provisional Vice President.
489
Sept. 14 (207) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Blanche has assumed the Provisional Presidency and has appointed Lagos Minister of War.
489
Sept. 15 (208) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Blanche’s Cabinet has been appointed, that the section of the armed forces in revolt has surrendered, and that countries which recognized Dávila will continue relations with the new regime.
490
Undated (Rec’d Sept. 25) (209) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Suggestion that the Department discuss re-export and bank deposit questions with the Chilean Chargé in Washington, intimating that American cooperation in the purchase of wheat and further financing for Cosach cannot be expected unless a reciprocal attitude is adopted.
490
Sept. 27 (82) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Disapproval of Ambassador Culbertson’s suggestion, in telegram supra, as it would imply favorable U. S. action on wheat purchases and Cosach financing, which is uncertain in the former case and impossible in the latter.
491
Oct. 2 (214) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Blanche has resigned and Oyanedel, who was appointed president of the Supreme Court by Dávila, is temporarily in power.
491
Oct. 3 (215) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that the principal political parties have agreed to support Oyanedel and to hold elections October 30; that an effort is being made to form a coalition Cabinet.
492
Oct. 6 (216) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Communication from the new Chilean regime attesting to its constitutional succession; Ambassador’s suggestion that recognition be withheld until assurances are received that international obligations will be respected.
493
Oct. 11 (217) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Suggestion that, prior to recognition, letters be exchanged simultaneously stating U. S. expectations of respect for international obligations and Chile’s acceptance.
494
Oct. 12 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with Cruchaga who asked for recognition of his Government. Assistant Secretary White’s reply that the requirements for recognition were still unfulfilled.
495
Oct. 12 (83) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Comment on the question of recognition of the Chilean Government, and instructions to report on its apparent stability.
500
[Page LXVII]Oct. 16 (218) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Transmittal of (1) memorandum summarizing views of the Foreign Minister and his Under Secretary (text printed); (2) letters exchanged with the Foreign Minister (texts printed) with reference to respect for international obligations; and (3) report requested in Department’s telegram No. 83, October 12.
501
Oct. 17 (219) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Suggestion that it might be well to withhold decision as to recognition temporarily.
503
Oct. 17 (84) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Acceptance of Foreign Minister’s assurances of respect for international obligations. Agreement to await further report on stability before reaching a decision on the question of recognition.
503
Oct. 19 (220) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Public declaration of the Chilean Government that elections will not be postponed, thereby removing the last serious impediment to its stability.
504
Oct. 19 (221) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Opinion that the time has now arrived to renew official relations with the Government.
504
Oct. 20 (85) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Authorization to extend recognition to the Chilean Government.
505
Oct. 21 (222) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that the United States and Great Britain presented official notes of recognition to the Foreign Minister.
505

Representations Against Petroleum Bill of May 17, 1932

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Feb. 23 (9) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Department’s attitude toward the proposed Government petroleum monopoly, and suggestion that the matter be discussed informally with the Chilean Government.
505
Feb. 24 (12) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Satisfaction with Department’s attitude toward the petroleum monopoly, and opinion that it would be beneficial if the British Ambassador were to receive similar instructions.
507
May 18 (1163) From the Ambassador in Chile
Transmittal of the law establishing a state petroleum monopoly (text printed) which is permissive rather than mandatory and probably will be postponed for an indefinite period.
507
May 28 (24) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Authorization to inform the Chilean Government that the U. S. Government will support a claim for compensation for expropriated American interests.
511
June 6 (1172) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that a formal note on the proposed oil monopoly was submitted to the Foreign Minister in accordance with the Department’s telegram No. 24, May 28.
511
[Page LXVIII]

COSTA RICA

Insurrection in Costa Rica

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Feb. 15 (12) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information that a revolt was instigated by Manuel Castro Quesada, presidential candidate, following indications that he had failed to receive a majority of the electoral votes.
512
Feb. 15 (13) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Further report of the insurrection.
513
Feb. 15 (9) To the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Request that the Department be kept fully informed of developments.
514
Feb. 12 [16] (14) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information that a proposal has been transmitted by Castro Quesada to the rival candidate, Jimenez, but is not expected to be accepted by him.
514
Feb. 16 [17] (15) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information that sentiment against President Gonzales and the Government’s dilatory attitude is growing; that an attack on the Castristas is said to be imminent. Suggestion that U.S. cruisers in the vicinity might have a salutary effect.
515
Feb. 17 (10) To the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
U.S. policy applicable to the situation in Costa Rica. Instructions to inform the Department and await advice before embarking on any action requiring a departure from this policy.
516
Feb. 17 From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information that all buildings surrounding the Legation have been occupied by insurrectionists; that the Minister has been cut off from the Legation.
517
Feb. 17 (16) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Report of fighting, and information that the Government has ordered all civilians from the city.
517
Feb. 18 (17) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information that preparations for bombardment have been made, and that the Minister will visit the President to request a parley.
518
Feb. 18 (11) To the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Disapproval of suggestion that U.S. war vessels be dispatched to Costa Rica.
519
Feb. 18 From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information that the Government and the Castristas are conferring at the U. S. Legation; that the insurrection is believed to be over.
519
Feb. 19 (796) From the Minister in Costa Rica
Full report of the insurrection and its outcome, the signing of the Act of Capitulation the original of which is now in the Legation archives. Transmittal of an exchange of letters (texts printed) with the Foreign Minister relative to the American Minister’s impartiality throughout the uprising.
520
Feb. 23 (20) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information that a vote count indicates that Jiménez failed to get a majority, but that opinion is prevalent that he will assume the Presidency May 8.
529
[Page LXIX]Mar. 1 (12) To the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Instructions to transmit the original of the Act of Capitulation to the Costa Rican Government.
530
Mar. 7 (23) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information that Congress adjourned after voting that no run-off election for President be held; that selection of the new President will be deferred until convocation of the new Congress, May 1.
530
Apr. 27 (34) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Report of increasingly tense situation in Costa Rica, and possibility of disorganization unless Jiménez’ opponents can be influenced by a drastic statement made through the American press.
530
Apr. 29 (19) To the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Disapproval of action suggested in telegram supra.
531
May 1 (35) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information that Jiménez has been called upon by the new Congress to exercise the Executive power as Constitutional President of the Republic.
531
May 4 (37) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Advice that the Minister will participate in the inaugural ceremonies as Dean of the Diplomatic Corps, unless the Department disapproves.
531
May 5 (20) To the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Authorization to participate in the inaugural ceremonies.
532
May 8 (38) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information that Ricardo Jiménez has been inaugurated President.
532

CUBA

Political Unrest in Cuba

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Jan. 25 (1005) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Report on the political situation in Cuba, and recommendation that the U. S. policy of noninterference in Cuba’s internal affairs be continued, but that Ferrara, the Cuban Ambassador, be advised that the United States is not in sympathy with President Machado’s present policies.
533
Feb. 18 (1048) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Advice that jurisdiction of the limitary courts has been substantially extended.
538
Mar. 1 (1061) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Information that municipal elections have been held.
540
Mar. 22 (1089) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Explanation of the U. S. policy of nonintervention to Cuban opposition leaders who had stated that they were prepared to instigate a revolution unless the United States undertook settlement of Cuba’s chaotic conditions.
541
[Page LXX]Mar. 26 (529) To the Ambassador in Cuba
Disapproval of the recommendations made in the Ambassador’s despatch No. 1005, January 25.
543
May 19 (1169) From the Chargé in Cuba
Information that the law extending the jurisdiction of the military courts has been declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court.
547
May 25 (1178) From the Chargé in Cuba
Information that unexplained government arrests have caused political conditions in Cuba to deteriorate.
548
June 22 (78) From the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Machado Government action suspending constitutional guarantees for a year and giving the Executive authority to extend the suspension for another year if necessary.
550
July 6 (1240) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Report of the departure of General Menocal and his nephew from Cuba, after asylum for 39 days in the Brazilian Legation.
551
July 25 (1282) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Continued deterioration of the political situation.
552
Aug. 1 From the Cuban Chargé
Cuban concern at General Menocal’s embarkation from France for the United States and expectation that measures will be taken to prevent direction and organization from the United States of hostile movements and armed expeditions.
554
Aug. 3 To the Cuban Chargé
Measures taken by the United States to prevent any violation by General Menocal of the neutrality laws or the U. S.-Cuban convention against smuggling.
555
Sept. 15 (1358) From the Chargé in Cuba
Opinion of the Secretary of State, Ferrara, that the reenactment of the Law of Military Jurisdiction will not delay the early restoration of civilian offenses to civil court jurisdiction.
556
Sept. 29 (1375) From the Chargé in Cuba
Information that assassinations of four opposition leaders are believed to be acts of reprisal and that the administration’s connection with the murders is questioned.
557
Oct. 7 (1391) From the Chargé in Cuba
Report that the situation in Cuba continues tense, and that requests for asylum in the Chargé’s home or in the chancery have been consistently refused.
558
Oct. 14 (1394) From the Chargé in Cuba
Information that suspended constitutional guarantees will be restored for the fortnight preceding the elections.
559
Oct. 19 (658) To the Chargé in Cuba
Approval of the Chargé’s refusal to grant Cuban requests for shelter.
560
Oct. 28 (1411) From the Chargé in Cuba
Report of progress of election campaigns in Cuba.
560
[Page LXXI]Nov. 2 (110) From the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Indications from early election returns of little change in the political complexion of the country.
562
Nov. 5 (1416) From the Chargé in Cuba
Further report on election returns.
562
Nov. 29 (121) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Information that Mendieta and Méndez Peñate have been released from prison and that orders are being issued for the release of others.
563
Dec. 1 (126) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Signature of decree restoring constitutional guarantees and rescinding the martial law proclamation in all provinces except Habana.
563
Dec. 8 (1441) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Possibility that the attempted assassination of Major Ortiz, former military supervisor at Santiago, may be used by the Government as an excuse for delaying restoration of constitutional guarantees in Habana.
564

EL SALVADOR

Refusal of the United States to Recognize the Martinez Regime in El Salvador

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Jan. 5 (1) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Proposal by Arrieta, former Salvadoran Foreign Minister, that Martinez, de facto President, and Araujo, de jure President, both resign and submit the names of designates from which to choose a Constitutional President.
566
Jan. 13 (6) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Principles to govern the Chargé’s actions in the situation in Salvador.
566
Jan. 15 (3) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Information that agreement will be reached on Gomez Zarate as successor to Martinez.
567
Jan. 18 (5) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Request for Department’s opinion as to the candidacy of Colonel Menendez, Under Secretary of War.
568
Jan. 19 (6) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Information that, against the Chargé’s advice, arrangements are being made to send Luis Anderson, former Costa Rican Minister to the United States, to Washington to seek recognition for Martinez.
568
Jan. 21 (8) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Request for further information about Menendez.
569
Jan. 23 (10) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Department’s opinion, based on information received, that Menendez would not come under any of the categories debarred by the Central American Treaty of Peace and Amity of 1923.
570
[Page LXXII]Jan. 28 (7) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information that Luis Anderson expects to arrive in New York February 7, and is concerned at the possibility of not being received by State Department officials.
571
Jan. 29 (5) To the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Instructions to advise Anderson that he will not be received by any official of the Department of State in connection with the recognition of Martínez.
571
Jan. 30 (24) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Indications that Martinez still has hopes of obtaining recognition and will most likely endeavor to have Congress confirm him as Constitutional President.
572
Feb. 1 (9) From the Minister in Costa Rical (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s inquiry as to the Department’s opinion of a conference of Central American states for the purpose of discussing ways and means of curbing communist activities in Central America, but with the added motive of securing recognition for Martinez.
573
Feb. 2 (6) To the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Instructions to inform the Foreign Minister, if the occasion arises, that the Salvadoran authorities have the communist situation under control. Department’s perplexity at the grounds on which the Foreign Minister believes it possible to grant recognition to Martinez.
573
Feb. 5 (30) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Information that Martinez has been declared Constitutional President by the Legislative Assembly.
574
Feb. 9 (6) To the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Instructions to explain to the Foreign Minister that the United States has made it plain to Martinez and other Salvadoran officials that the de facto regime cannot be recognized under the Treaty of 1923. Query as to what definite steps the Foreign Minister feels should be taken.
574
Feb. 10 (15) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Information that the definite steps the Foreign Minister had in mind were refusal to honor passports issued by the Martinez regime and withholding of revenues; that he agrees that the latter step would be impracticable.
575
Feb. 12 (38) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Legislative Assembly’s list of designates, none of whom appear to be barred from recognition by the 1923 treaty.
576
Feb. 13 (41) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Further information attesting to the qualifications of the designates.
576
Feb. 17 (46) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Request for advice as to whether the First Designate, Garay, could be recognized if he took office as President.
577
[Page LXXIII]Feb. 17 (28) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Department’s opinion, according to the information at hand, that Garay would not fall within any of the categories debarred by the 1923 treaty.
577
Feb. 18 (48) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Receipt of information that Martinez is willing to retire from the Presidency but is apprehensive about his personal safety; that it has been suggested that he might protect himself by accepting the post of Minister of War.
578
Feb. 19 (49) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Legislative Assembly’s approval of the recent declaration of martial law.
579
Feb. 20 (52) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Martínez’ proposal that he “deposit the power” in the First Designate, explaining that, should the First Designate resign, there would be no question of recognition should he, as Vice President, resume the Presidency.
579
Feb. 27 (31) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Department’s opinion that Martínez’ proposal would be unconstitutional and therefore recognition could not be extended to the First Designate.
581
Mar. 7 (32) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Request for information concerning developments in connection with Martínez’ proposal, and concerning steps being taken to put the government of Salvador on a basis where recognition could be extended.
582
Mar. 7 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs of a Conversation With the British Ambassador
Ambassador’s advice that the British Government had informed other European governments that recognition would be extended to Martinez whenever he had consolidated his position and appeared able to maintain himself in power.
582
Mar. 8 (9) To the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Permission to advise Araujo that his life might be endangered if he should attempt to return to Salvador.
584
Mar. 8 (57) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Receipt of information that Martinez has decided to resign the Presidency, but will require time to persuade the military to support Garay. Request for Department’s opinion of the possible assumption of the war ministry by Martinez in order to guarantee his future protection.
584
[Page LXXIV]Mar. 9 (34) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Advice that the Department does not care to express an opinion in regard to a question of internal order, but that the appointment of Martinez in the Cabinet of the new President would not seem to constitute any bar to recognition under the terms of the 1923 treaty.
586
Mar. 10 (38) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Conversation with the Foreign Minister, who stated that two of Martínez’ representatives who requested permission to call on President Moncada, had confided to him that Martinez was determined not to resign.
586
Mar. 11 (58) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Conversation with the Guatemalan Minister, who had been instructed to endeavor to have Gomez Zarate named President of Salvador and requested the opinion of the Chargé, who advised against interference in the internal affairs of Salvador.
587
Mar. 12 (36) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Approval of position taken in discussion with the Guatemalan Minister.
588
Mar. 12 (10) To the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Department’s opinion that interference in Salvadoran affairs would be both unjustifiable and contrary to the Treaty of 1923.
588
Mar. 14 (24) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s explanation that the Minister in Salvador had been instructed merely to report on the possibility of Gomez Zarate’s candidacy; that the Guatemalan Government will not interfere.
589
Mar. 15 (43) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that Martínez’ representatives returned to San Salvador without being received by President Moncada or encouraged in their mission.
589
Mar. 16 (66) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Opinion, given in response to an inquiry by government officials, that nothing in the 1923 treaty would bar Garay from recognition.
589
Mar. 17 (14) To the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Explanation given to the Costa Rican Chargé of the Department’s policy against intervention in the internal political affairs of any Central American State.
590
Mar. 31 (41) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Inquiry as to the validity of an AP despatch from San Salvador to the effect that Martínez has been petitioned to remain in power as long as the present difficult economic situation exists, the effect of this on the de facto authorities, and the progress of the government reorganization.
591
[Page LXXV]Apr. 1 (71) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Confirmation of the petition mentioned in the Department’s telegram No. 41, March 31, and its pernicious effect on the government’s plan to reorganize.
592
Apr. 2 (72) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Conversation with Martinez whose government, the Chargé reminded, solemnly pledged a reorganization after Easter. Martínez’ suggestion that the younger military officers needed to be assured that, if Garay assumed the Presidency, he would be recognized.
593
Apr. 4 (73) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Discussion with the younger military officers, who requested a written statement that Gar ay would be recognized, but seemed satisfied when the Chargé read them the pertinent parts of the Department’s telegram No. 28, February 17.
594
Apr. 5 From the Minister in El Salvador, Temporarily in the United States, to the Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs
Minister’s refutation of a statement by Salvadoran military officers that he had lead them to believe that the new regime would be recognized if Vice President Martínez assumed the Presidency.
596
Apr. 6 (42) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Instructions to maintain conversations on the subject of government reorganization on an informal and personal basis.
597
May 11 (41) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s inquiry as to the Department’s attitude in case of Costa Rican recognition of the Martinez regime.
597
May 13 (23) To the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Department’s regret that the Minister in Costa Rica did not immediately clarify the U. S. position for the Foreign Minister.
598
May 19 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with the British Ambassador, who displayed a letter indicating that the British could not much longer feel justified in withholding recognition of the Martinez regime.
599
June 1 (86) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Conversation with government officials, who stated that the military officers were insisting that none of the designates would be permitted to assume the Presidency.
600
June 7 (113) From the Chargé in El Salvador
Opinion that British recognition of the Martinez regime might result in similar action by other European countries, thereby encouraging Martinez to continue in office.
601
June 10 (116) From the Chargé in El Salvador
Transmittal of Martínez’ public manifesto declaring that, in accordance with the wishes of the majority, he will continue as President for the remainder of the constitutional term.
602
June 17 To the Diplomatic Representatives in Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama (circ. tel.)
Instructions to cable reaction to Martínez’ manifesto and his declaration that other countries were maintaining friendly relations with his government in spite of lack of recognition.
603
[Page LXXVI]June 18 (46) From the Minister in Costa Rica (tel.)
Information that little or no comment was occasioned by the publication of the Martinez manifesto.
604
June 18 (50) From the Chargé in Guatemala (tel.)
Guatemalan concern over the situation resulting from Martínez’ manifesto, and belief that a stronger policy is advisable.
604
June 18 (54) From the Chargé in Honduras (tel.)
Report of lack of surprise at Martínez’ action and feeling of elation at his determination and success.
604
June 18 (95) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that little attention was given to the Martínez manifesto in the local press.
605
June 20 (82) From the Chargé in Panama (tel.)
Panaman indifference to the manifesto and the question of recognition of the de facto regime.
605
Aug. 11 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State of a Conversation With the French Chargé
French Chargé’s statement that his Government could not long delay recognition of Salvador, and inquiry as to U. S. opinion.
605
Aug. 16 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs
Reply to the German Chargé’s inquiry as to the effect of European recognition of Salvador on the U. S. attitude, that it would remain unchanged, since it was taken on principle and in furtherance of the policy of promoting stability in Central America.
606
Sept. 17 (168) From the Chargé in El Salvador
Information that the British Chargé has been authorized to deal officially with the Martínez government, although no official note of recognition has been sent.
607
Sept. 20 (109) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Receipt of information that Argentina wishes Brazil to recognize the de facto government in Salvador simultaneously.
608
Sept. 21 (101) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Information that France has recognized the Martínez government and that two commercial treaties have been signed.
609
Sept. 22 (79) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Explanation of U. S. policy in connection with recognition of the Martínez regime, and opinion that all American states should support the Central American position taken in an effort to promote stability and discourage revolutions.
609
Sept. 23 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Argentine Ambassador
Explanation of U. S. policy in the question of recognition of the Martínez regime, and expression of regret that Argentina seems to be embarking on a different course.
610
Sept. 24 (103) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Information that Spain has recognized the Martínez regime.
611
[Page LXXVII]Sept. 28 (117) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Brazil’s reply to Argentina’s request that the two countries recognize the Martínez government simultaneously, that Brazil does not intend to recognize the present government of Salvador.
611
Oct. 1 (86) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Reference to Ambassador’s telegram No. 117, September 28, and instructions to express appreciation to the Foreign Minister.
611
Nov. 25 (105) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Announcement by the Italian Consul General of Italy’s recognition of the Martínez regime.
611
Nov. 30 (691) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Conversation with the Foreign Minister, who stated that President Trujillo did not intend to recognize the Martínez regime as long as the other Central American governments and the United States do not do so.
612
Dec. 6 (107) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Information that the Martínez regime has been recognized by Germany.
612
Dec. 14 From Dr. Carlos Leiva to the Secretary of State
Notification of the Salvadoran Minister’s resignation and the closing of the offices of the Legation.
612

Communist Uprising in El Salvador

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Jan. 20 (9) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Report of communist activities in Salvador.
613
Jan. 21 (10) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Information that martial law has been declared in part of Salvador due to communistic disturbances.
614
Jan. 23 (14) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Opinion of Italian, British, and U. S. diplomatic agents that the presence of war vessels in La Libertad would be beneficial.
614
Jan. 23 (12) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Report of the increasing gravity of the situation in Salvador.
614
Jan. 23 (7) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Information that the Communists have taken possession of Sonsonate.
615
Jan. 23 (9) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Information that British, Canadian, and U. S. warships are proceeding to Salvadoran waters.
615
Jan. 23 (16) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Arrival of British destroyers at Acajutla.
616
Jan. 23 (13) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Information that the Rochester and two destroyers have been ordered to Salvador.
616
[Page LXXVIII]Jan. 23 (8) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s request that the danger of the spread of the communist movement to Honduras and the possibility of Martínez attempting to profit by the present conditions be pointed out.
616
Jan. 23 Memorandum by the Assistant Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs of a Conversation With the First Secretary of the British Embassy.
British inquiry as to what the United States plans to do in the light of alarming reports from El Salvador, and the reply that, on the basis of present information, the United States has no plans other than to watch the situation carefully.
617
Jan. 24 (17) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Report of continued disturbance in Salvador and the declaration of martial law in the entire country.
618
Jan. 25 (19) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Report of improved situation and continued safety of American lives and interests. Suggestion that U. S. war vessels stand by in La Libertad rather than in Acajutla.
618
Jan. 26 (21) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Information that American destroyers arrived at La Libertad; that the situation has noticeably improved.
619
Jan. 29 (23) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Information that the government has issued a decree providing for the temporary collection of all import and export revenues for the purpose of maintaining order.
619
Jan. 29 (17) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Approval of a Navy Department order for the withdrawal of U. S. warships to Corinto in view of reports that the authorities have the situation under control.
620
Jan. 31 (25) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Opinion that one American destroyer should remain at La Libertad.
620
Feb. 1 (26) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Information that three communist leaders were publicly executed after condemnation by court martial.
621
Feb. 1 (18) To the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Department’s opinion that, in the absence of actual danger to American lives, it would be preferable that no American war vessels be in Salvadoran waters at the time of the meeting of the Congress in order to avoid criticism that pressure is being exerted.
621
Feb. 6 (32) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Opinion that it is no longer necessary for destroyers to stand by in Corinto.
622
[Page LXXIX]

HAITI

Unperfected Treaty Between the United States and Haiti for the Further Haitianization of the Treaty Services

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Oct. 22 (124) From the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Proposed reply to a Haitian note suggesting new financial arrangements that the United States would be disinclined to discuss changes until the budgetary difficulties have been solved.
623
Oct. 23 (79) To the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Approval of Minister’s proposed reply to the Haitian note.
623
1932 Mar. 22 (171) To the Minister in Haiti
Transmittal of a note in reply to a note from the Haitian Government dated December 22, 1931, discussing certain questions relating to Haitian finances.
624
Mar. 28 (175) To the Minister in Haiti
Transmittal of note (text printed) replying to a Haitian note of March 15, and reiterating the U. S. position concerning the Haitian loan and the office of the Financial Adviser.
625
Mar. 30 (38) From the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Request for permission to make certain changes in the note transmitted with the Department’s No. 171, March 22, in order to reply also to the Haitian note of March 15.
626
Apr. 1 (16) To the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Instructions to transmit to the Haitian Government the note enclosed in the Department’s No. 171, March 22, and a short time later the note transmitted with the Department’s No. 175, March 28.
627
Apr. 6 (42) From the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Receipt of a note proposing negotiation of a new agreement for Haitianization of the Garde, the establishment of a Military Mission, and the early withdrawal of the American Scientific Mission and the U. S. Marines.
627
Apr. 12 (46) From the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Haitian request that a phrase referring to refunding operation difficulties be omitted from the U. S. note delivered in accordance with the Department’s No. 171, March 22, which it is desired to quote to Congress.
628
Apr. 13 (21) To the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Authorization to make the revision requested by the Haitian Government but to inform the Foreign Minister orally of the Department’s views.
628
Apr. 14 (47) From the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Information that the changes requested by the Haitian Government in the note have been made in accordance with the Department’s authorization.
629
Apr. 21 (381) From the Minister in Haiti
Transmittal of the Haitian note (text printed) referred to in the Legation’s telegram No. 42, April 6, and a draft modus operandi (text printed). Recommendations for the establishment of an American Military Mission.
629
[Page LXXX]May 12 (26) To the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Department’s opinion that an agreement should be reached concerning financial control before discussing other changes. Suggestion that the Minister return to Washington for consultation when a suitable draft arrangement has been prepared.
635
May 17 (55) From the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Information that a detailed study of the financial control problem is near completion and that a draft agreement will be prepared. Suggestion that the Department authorize the Minister to proceed to Washington on American ship leaving June 8.
(Footnote: By Department’s telegram No. 27, May 19, the Minister was instructed to proceed to Washington June 8.)
636
June 6 (418) From the Minister in Haiti
Transmittal of the draft agreement regarding financial control (text printed) and recommendations in connection with the negotiation of the agreement.
637
June 27 (204) To the Minister in Haiti, Temporarily in the United States
Transmittal of the Department’s modification of the draft agreement regarding financial control (text printed), and instructions for discussion with the Haitian Government.
646
June 27 (205) To the Minister in Haiti, Temporarily in the United States
Transmittal of the Department’s modification of Haiti’s proposed agreement providing for the further Haitianization of the Garde (text printed) and instructions for its negotiation.
657
July 28 (80) From the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Request for the Department’s views regarding the Foreign Minister’s proposal for the abrogation of the treaty of 1915 and the substitution of a fiscal representative for the Financial-Adviser General-Receiver.
661
Aug. 6 (45) To the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Department’s opinion that the Foreign Minister’s proposal for the abrogation of the 1915 treaty might be considered, provided the new agreement would embody the Department’s draft of the financial agreement and afford adequate safeguards for other U. S. interests.
662
Aug. 13 (471) From the Minister in Haiti
Transmittal of the draft of the financial agreement modified by the Foreign Minister (text printed).
663
Aug. 19 (91) From the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s suggestion that the agreement regarding Haitianization of the Garde be dealt with as a treaty protocol. Request for instructions.
669
Aug. 19 (92) From the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Recommendations for changes in the draft financial agreement. Request for instructions.
670
Aug. 20 (51) To the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Approval of the Foreign Minister’s suggestion that the Garde agreement be dealt with as a treaty protocol. Approval of the Minister’s recommendations in his telegram No. 92, August 19.
670
[Page LXXXI]Sept. 14 (490) From the Minister in Haiti
Transmittal of the text of the Treaty between the United States and Haiti for the Further Haitianization of the Treaty Services, signed September 3, 1932, and notes exchanged by the American Minister and the Haitian Foreign Minister covering certain questions connected with the treaty (texts printed).
(Footnote: Rejection of the treaty by the Haitian Congress.)
671
Sept. 15 (107) From the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
Report of the rejection of the new treaty by the Haitian legislative body.
680
Sept. 16 (108) From the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
Information that the Haitian President issued a proclamation defending the treaty and pointing out the disadvantages to Haiti of its nonratification.
680
Sept. 19 (109) From the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
Recommendation that Haitianization of the Military Department of the South be carried out by December 31, as planned.
680
Sept. 21 (110) From the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s inquiry relative to further Haitianization and the possibility of negotiating a new treaty. Recommendation that the Department’s reply state that all possible concessions were contained in the convention signed September 3.
681
Sept. 22 (62) To the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
Text of note for communication to the Foreign Minister following the recommendation in the Legation’s telegram No. 110, September 21.
(Footnote: Note addressed to the Haitian Foreign Minister September 23, 1932.)
682
Sept. 23 (63) To the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
Approval of the recommendation contained in the Legation’s telegram No. 109, September 19.
683
Sept. 27 (116) From the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
Information that the Foreign Minister desires to publish the Legation’s note of September 23 and the Haitian reply, which contains many inaccuracies. Recommendation against publication of the Haitian note; request for instructions.
684
Sept. 29 (117) From the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
Haitian President’s request that objections to the Haitian note mentioned in Legation’s telegram No. 116, September 27, be presented in a note which would also be published. Request for instructions.
685
Sept. 30 (118) From the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
Report of status of possible renegotiation of the treaty of September 3.
686
Oct. 4 (228) To the Chargé in Haiti
Transmittal of a note (text printed) for communication to the Foreign Minister in reply to his note of September 26, and authorization to agree to the publication of the three notes.
688
[Page LXXXII]Oct. 26 (1) To the Appointed Minister in Haiti
Instructions for Mr. Armour, the new American Minister in Haiti.
(Footnote: Mr. Armour’s presentation of his credentials on November 7, 1932.)
692
Nov. 28 (12) From the Minister in Haiti
Report of conversation with the President concerning the treaty of September 3, and opinion that any new Haitian proposals will probably follow the lines set forth in the Haitian note of September 26.
696

Agreement Between the United States and Haiti Amending the Garde Agreement of August 24, 1916; Amended March 23, 1920, and February 28, 1925

Date and number Subject Page
1932 June 3 (60) From the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Request for authorization to sign an agreement modifying the Garde agreement to provide for one additional First Lieutenant in the Garde to cover a special commission for a Haitian national hero.
697
June 4 (30) To the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Instructions to submit proposed text of agreement to the Department before signing.
698
June 6 (61) From the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Transmittal of text modifying the Garde agreement.
698
June 7 (31) To the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Approval of the proposed modification of the Garde agreement and authorization to sign.
698
June 9 (419) From the Chargé in Haiti
Transmittal of the agreement, signed June 9, 1932, (text printed) amending the Garde Agreement of August 24, 1916, and amended on March 23, 1920, and February 28, 1925.
699

Representations Against Arrest of Collector of Customs Without Prior Reference to Garde Headquarters

Date and number Subject Page
1932 May 7 (397) From the Minister in Haiti
Report of the arrest of the Collector of Customs at Glore and his release by order of the Minister. Transmittal of letter to the Commandant of the Garde (text printed) requesting him to instruct Garde officers not to execute orders of arrest against Customs Collectors without prior consultation with Garde headquarters at Port au Prince.
700
May 19 (194) To the Minister in Haiti
Approval of action reported by the Minister in his despatch No. 397 of May 7.
703
[Page LXXXIII]

Reservation by the United States of Rights to Navassa Island

Date and number Subject Page
1932 June 15 (422) From the Chargé in Haiti
Information that Navassa Island is claimed as Haitian territory in a proposed amendment to the Haitian Constitution, and that the Foreign Minister has been informed that the island belongs to the United States.
704
July 5 (207) To the Chargé in Haiti
Information relative to the U. S. claim to Navassa Island for communication to the Haitian Government.
704
July 25 (455) From the Minister in Haiti
Advice that the information contained in the Department’s instruction No. 207, July 5, was received after action had been taken by the Constituent Assembly; recommendation that a formal reservation of U. S. rights to the island be made.
706
Aug. 13 (218) To the Minister in Haiti
Authorization to make a formal reservation of U. S. rights to Navassa Island as suggested in the Minister’s despatch No. 455, July 25.
706
Sept. 12 (489) From the Minister in Haiti
Transmittal of note to the Haitian Foreign Minister (text printed) in accordance with the Department’s instructions.
707

HONDURAS

Insurrection in Honduras

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Apr. 28 (467) From the Minister in Honduras
Report of election campaigns and possibility of a coup d’état instigated by the Liberal candidate, Zuñiga Huete, if he fears defeat, or a Nationalist uprising should Huete win through a dishonest election.
709
May 20 (483) From the Minister in Honduras
Further report of the political situation in Honduras and opinion that a serious revolt is unlikely before the elections.
710
June 11 (62) From the Vice Consul at Tela
Report of border unrest and the declaration of martial law in the frontier provinces; also of the nomination of a Labor Party candidate for President.
712
Sept. 14 (613) From the Minister in Honduras
Report of unusually quiet election campaigns, but expectation of a coup d’etat or revolution by the losing party after the elections, probably in December or January.
713
Oct. 14 (636) From the Minister in Honduras
Information that the political situation is deteriorating. Request for authorization to call upon the Navy for emergency assistance in case of imminent danger to the lives of Americans or other foreigners.
715
Oct. 20 (85) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
General expectation of a revolution between election and inauguration days. Request for advice as to whether it is intended that no U. S. naval force will be sent to Tegucigalpa under any circumstances.
717
[Page LXXXIV]Oct. 24 (47) To the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Explanation of U. S. policy against sending armed forces into the interior of a foreign country except in the event of a most serious emergency.
718
Oct. 28 (86) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Information that the President is taking extensive measures to insure orderly and free elections and has promised protection for the Legation and for American citizens.
719
Nov. 4 (651) From the Minister in Honduras
Information that the political situation continues peaceful; that the defeated Liberal candidate stated that he desired his party to accept defeat and work for victory in the next elections.
720
Nov. 7 (360) To the Minister in Honduras
Information that the Minister in Guatemala was instructed to make representations to President Ubico, who had indicated his willingness to loan arms and munitions to the Liberal candidate if he were successful, against non-observance of the terms of the Central American treaties; and that later the Guatemalan Government stated that the provisions of the treaties would be strictly observed.
721
Nov. 13 (91) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Report of rebel attack on San Pedro Sula barracks and contemplated Government counterattack, and of arrangements for the safety of American citizens.
722
Nov. 14 From the Vice Consul at Puerto Cortes (tel.)
Report of recapture of San Pedro Sula. Information that no foreigners were killed or wounded.
723
Nov. 23 (104) From the Chargé in El Salvador (tel.)
Information that arms and ammunition are being furnished the Honduran Government to suppress the revolution; that the impression is that the rebels are being aided by Guatemala.
723
Nov. 23 (668) From the Minister in Honduras
Transmittal of memoranda (texts printed) from the President-elect stating the domestic policy of his Government and guaranteeing that international obligations will be respected.
723
Nov. 28 (103) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Concern over possibility of attack on Tegucigalpa.
725
Nov. 28 (674) From the Minister in Honduras
Report of the progress of the insurrection and of conditions in the capital.
725
Nov. 30 (104) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Report of Government counterattacks on the revolutionists.
727
Nov. 30 (989) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Arrival in Managua of Huete, who states that the Honduran revolution has become general and represents the opinion of many people whose desires were unlawfully frustrated in the elections.
728
[Page LXXXV]Dec. 11 (110) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Information, in reply to a request from President Colindres that an American warship call at Amapala for the protection of American and foreign merchandise, that the United States is opposed to sending war vessels to foreign ports except in the case of imminent danger to American lives and property.
728
Dec. 12 (371) To the Minister in Honduras
Acknowledgment of Legation’s despatch No. 668, November 23, and authorization to express to President-elect Carias U. S. appreciation for the information.
729
Dec. 13 (57) To the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Approval of statement to President Colindres and opinion that the situation does not warrant the despatch of a war vessel to Amapala.
730
Dec. 23 (116) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Receipt of information that a German merchant vessel has been ordered to call at Amapala to take off foreigners who wish to leave the island.
730
Dec. 29 (119) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Information that Amapala has been retaken by Nationalist troops; that the insurgent forces are being pursued to the border; and that the Tegucigalpa garrison has been turned over to Nationalist troops.
730

MEXICO

Conventions Between the United States and Mexico Further Extending the General and Special Claims Conventions of September 8 and 10, 1923

Date and number Subject Page
1931 June 20 (284) To the Ambassador in Mexico
Transmittal of draft conventions (texts printed) extending the period allowed for the adjudication of the claims covered by the present General and Special Claims Conventions. Instructions for the negotiation of these agreements or for an en bloc settlement.
732
1932 June 18 (110) From the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Proposed procedure for the negotiation of an en bloc settlement to be discussed as soon as the claims convention renewals and protocols are signed.
739
June 18 Convention Between the United States of America and Mexico Extending the Duration of the General Claims Commission Provided for in the Convention of September 8, 1923
Text of Convention signed at Mexico City, June 18.
740
June 18 Protocol Concerning the Convention of June 18, 1932, Extending the Duration of the General Claims Commission Provided for in the Convention of September 8, 1923
Text of Protocol signed at Mexico City, June 18.
(Footnote: A penciled notation on the cover page of the Protocol reads: “Not to be ratified. See protocol of April 24, 1934.”)
742
[Page LXXXVI]June 18 Convention Between the United States and Mexico Extending the Duration of the Special Claims Commission Provided for in the Convention of September 10, 1923
Texts of Convention and Protocol signed at Mexico City, June 18.
(Footnote: This convention and the accompanying protocol not ratified (returned to the Department April 2, 1935); they were replaced by protocol of April 24, 1934.)
744
June 22 (84) To the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Approval of procedure outlined in telegram No. 110, June 18, and authorization to proceed with discussions when expedient.
748
June 24 (1608) From the Ambassador in Mexico
Summarization of the claims conventions and protocols relating thereto signed at Mexico City, June 18, 1932, and report of certain points relative to their negotiation.
748
June 25 (114) From the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Report of initial interview with the Foreign Minister in connection with the negotiation of an en bloc settlement, and recommendation that Colonel Moreno, of the Agency of the U. S.-Mexican Claims Commission, remain during the negotiations.
754
June 28 (93) To the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Permission for Colonel Moreno to remain in Mexico City during negotiation of the en bloc settlement.
755
[Nov. 5] (190) From the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Information that Foreign Minister has stated that he cannot accept the amount proposed for an en bloc settlement and intimated that he did not care to discuss the question. Suggestion that the matter be allowed to rest for the present.
755
Nov. 14 (169) To the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Concurrence in Ambassador’s opinion that it might be advantageous to postpone the matter of an en bloc settlement.
756

Protection of General Calles Against Threatened Arrest by District Attorney, Webb County, Texas

Date and number Subject Page
1932 June 16 (104) From the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Recommendation that a military guard of honor escort General Calles and his wife, who are traveling to New York, through Texas.
757
June 16 (105) From the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Report of departure of Calles party and renewal of recommendation in telegram No. 104, June 16.
757
June 17 To the Consul at Nuevo Laredo (tel.)
Instructions to report immediately whether District Attorney Valls is likely to create trouble on Calles’ arrival, and to request the border officials to facilitate his crossing of the border.
758
[Page LXXXVII]June 17 (79) To the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Information that a War Department telegram (text printed) has been sent directing that the Laredo garrison extend appropriate honors to Calles, and that, if he wishes, an officer accompany him to San Antonio or Houston.
758
June 17 From the Consul at Nuevo Laredo (tel.)
Information that the Calles party passed the border without difficulty.
759
June 20 (146) From the Consul at Nuevo Laredo
Report of the reception of General Calles, and of the steps taken to secure an assurance from District Attorney Valls that he would not occasion any trouble.
759
July 14 From the Consul at Nuevo Laredo (tel.)
Valls’ assurance that General Calles will encounter no difficulty on his return to Mexico via Laredo.
763
July 14 To the Secretary of War
Request that arrangements be made for General Calles’ safe journey across the Mexican border.
763
July 15 To the Consul at Nuevo Laredo (tel.)
Information as to General Calles’ diplomatic status to be used in the event of an emergency.
764
July 18 (153) From the Consul at Nuevo Laredo
Information that the Calles party passed through Laredo without encountering any difficulty, and that it was not necessary to use the confidential information furnished by the Department.
764

NICARAGUA

Adverse Opinion of the Department of State Regarding the Election of a Constituent Assembly

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Oct. 1 To the Nicaraguan Minister
Opinion that the Constitution should be amended only if public opinion favors it; that U. S. Marines should supervise the election of the Constituent Assembly which should be held at the time of the presidential elections.
766
1932 Feb. 3 (89) From the Nicaraguan Chargé
Transmittal of a letter from President Moncada (text printed) explaining his reasons for desiring a reform of the Nicaraguan Constitution.
767
Feb. 9 (21) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that Drs. Morales and Arguello are en route to Washington to discuss the constitutional reform proposal with the Department.
770
[Page LXXXVIII]Feb. 12 (25) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that the Conservative Party desires the initiation of partial reform of the Constitution by Congress rather than convocation of a Constituent Assembly which would be illegal.
771
Feb. 15 (27) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Advice that it is feared that convocation of a Constituent Assembly may result in an endeavor to continue Moncada in power for two more years; that the President will abandon his proposal if the Department disapproves.
772
Feb. 23 (667) From the Chargé in Nicaragua
Opinions and recommendations against approving President Moncada’s proposal for the convocation of a Constituent Assembly.
772
Mar. 21 (51) From the Chargé in Nicaragua
Denunciation of Dr. Morales’ mission to Washington by the Grand Convention of the Liberal Party.
775
Mar. 23 (333) To the Chargé in Nicaragua
Transmittal of memorandum (text printed) to Drs. Morales and Arguello explaining the Department’s refusal to supervise any other than the regular elections for supreme authorities, and suggesting that the present Constitution provides a method for its partial amendment.
775
Apr. 5 To the President of Nicaragua
Explanation of the decision taken by the Department and communicated to Drs. Morales and Arguello in the memorandum of March 23, supra.
781
Apr. 27 (65) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that, in a message to Congress, Moncada reviewed the history of the negotiations in Washington, pointing out that the Secretary of State said the matter was one for Nicaragua’s decision.
784
May 6 (72) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Receipt of information that, at a private meeting of Liberals, Moncada suggested using the Department’s decision against supervising any but the regular elections in November to bring about the immediate withdrawal of American armed forces in Nicaragua. Conservative assurance that the total reform project will not have that party’s support.
784
May 12 (74) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that the Congress has recessed until May 31; that the constitutional reform matter is still pending.
785

Assistance by the United States in the Supervision of Elections in Nicaragua

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Dec 29 (223) To the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Designation of Rear Admiral Woodward as the President’s representative in Nicaragua to head the American Electoral Mission, and instructions for discussion with Moncada concerning Admiral Woodward’s appointment.
785
[Page LXXXIX]Jan. 2 (1) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Advice that the Department’s telegram 223, December 29, is being communicated to Moncada and details will be discussed later.
788
Jan. 6 (2) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that both Moncada and the Nicaraguan press have commented favorably on Admiral Woodward’s appointment.
788
Jan. 12 (5) To the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Request for a report of Admiral Woodward’s conference with the Marine and Guardia Nacional commanders.
789
Jan. 12 (5) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Report requested in the Department’s telegram No. 5, January 12, recommending an additional 1800 marines for protection purposes during the electoral period.
789
Jan. 12 (6) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
From Admiral Woodward: Notification of appointment as President of the National Board of Elections by the Supreme Court, and report of conference regarding security measures during electoral period.
790
Jan. 23 (8) To the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Instructions to confer again with the Marine and Guardia Nacional commanders on the possibility of the Guardia Nacional and municipal guards providing sufficient protection for the electoral period.
790
Jan. 28 (15) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Reiteration of necessity for additional marines during the electoral period after second conference with the Marine and Guardia Nacional commanders.
792
Mar. 30 To the Chargé in Nicaragua
Transmittal of a proposed revision of the plan for supervision of the Nicaraguan elections and background information in connection with the revision.
794
Apr. 12 From the Chargé in Nicaragua
Approval of the proposed revised plan for supervision of the elections.
797
Apr. 19 From the Minister in Nicaragua to the Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs
Transmittal of a modified plan of election supervision wherein the number of mesas under Nicaraguan supervision has been increased.
798
Apr. 29 Memorandum by the Division of Latin American Affairs
Summarization of plans “A”, “B”, and “C” for supervision of the Nicaraguan elections.
799
Apr. 29 (42) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether assurances have been received from the Nicaraguan Government that its share of the electoral expense will be made available.
800
[Page XC]Apr. 30 (69) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Opinion that a discussion of electoral expenses with the Nicaraguan Government is unnecessary and inadvisable due to the political situation; request for further instructions.
800
May 7 (44) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Acquiescence in the opinion expressed in the Legation’s telegram No. 69, April 30. Admiral Woodward’s request that Nicaraguan funds be deposited in five installments.
801
May 24 (49) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Receipt of Nicaraguan note implying a moral obligation of the United States to help meet electoral expenses. Instructions to ascertain President Moncada’s position in this matter.
802
May 25 From the Chairman of the United States Electoral Mission to Nicaragua
Disapproval of electoral supervision plan, and request for suggestions as to how questions arising at mesas not supervised by American personnel are to be adjudicated.
803
Undated (Rec’d May 25) (79) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Moncada’s assurance that funds for the electoral expense in five installments will be made available, and solicitation of Department’s aid in meeting expenditures.
805
May 28 (51) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that plan “C” has been adopted and arrangements are being made to cover the U. S. share of expense.
805
June 21 (97) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Report of Admiral Woodward’s arrival in Nicaragua.
806
June 21 (57) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Advice that lack of appropriations makes it impossible to send additional marines to Nicaragua to supervise the elections. Request for revised estimates of electoral mission.
806
June 23 (98) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that Admiral Woodward has taken oath of office as President of the National Board of Elections.
807
June 23 (60) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
For Admiral Woodward from the Secretary: Appreciation of difficulties to be expected in carrying out electoral supervision and assurance of full Department support.
807
June 24 (105) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Admiral Woodward’s revised estimate of personnel and funds necessary for electoral supervision.
807
June 28 (107) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
From Admiral Woodward for the Secretary: Acknowledgment of message transmitted in Department’s telegram No. 60, June 23.
808
July 15 (124) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Report of attempts to obtain Nicaragua’s allotment of electoral expenses.
808
[Page XCI]July 16 (129) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that the possibility of securing additional funds needed by the Electoral Mission will be discussed with President Moncada.
810
July 18 (132) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
From Admiral Woodward. Transmittal of letter (text printed) sent to the rival factions of the Liberal Party suggesting that an attempt be made to settle their differences and elect a legal governing body for the presentation and certification of nominees.
810
July 22 (136) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
President Moncada’s objections to Admiral Woodward’s decision concerning the Liberal Party and Admiral Woodward’s explanation (text printed).
812
July 23 (138) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that the electoral law of 1930 has been placed in effect by executive decree.
815
July 23 (139) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Nicaraguan note (text printed) outlining the objections to Admiral Woodward’s decision relative to the Liberal Party plebiscite.
815
July 27 (77) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Request for further explanation of Admiral Woodward’s decision concerning the Liberal Party, and advice that decisions of the Nicaraguan Electoral Board should not be referred to the Department for review.
817
July 31 (146) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Admiral Woodward’s argument for his decision on the Liberal Party plebiscite, and information that the Liberal Party’s differences have been adjusted.
818
Aug. 3 (80) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
For Admiral Woodward: Acknowledgment of the detailed explanation of July 31 and congratulations for the successful settlement of the Liberal Party’s differences.
820
Aug. 3 (81) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Note in reply to the Foreign Minister’s letter of July 23 explaining the Department’s position concerning interference in the case of decisions in connection with elections.
821
Sept. 9 (172) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
From Admiral Woodward: Information that nominations have been completed and registrations will begin September 18.
822
Sept. 13 (175) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that approval for a marine escort urgently required for transportation of supplies is being withheld by Navy Department on the ground that the State Department may object.
822
Sept. 15 (92) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that the marine escort required is being authorized by the Navy Department.
823
[Page XCII]Sept. 17 (93) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
For Admiral Woodward: Request for report in connection with a telegram from President Moncada that an Electoral Board resolution provides for secret voting in contravention of the Constitution.
823
Sept. 20 (178) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
From Admiral Woodward: Defense of resolution adopted by the Board of Elections, and information that no protest has been filed by either party.
824
Oct. 3 (184) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that the Conservatives are considering withdrawing from the elections.
825
Oct. 5 (100) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Department’s conviction that the Conservative Party will wish to reconsider abstaining from the presidential elections in view of its commitments.
826
Nov. 7 (204) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
From Admiral Woodward: Information that elections were quiet and orderly and that the ratio of voters to registrations compared with the 1928 elections.
829
Nov. 12 (117) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Congratulatory message for President Moncada (text printed) on the election conditions which demonstrated Nicaragua’s growing sense of civic responsibility.
829
Nov. 13 (207) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
From Admiral Woodward: Report of election results.
829
Nov. 16 (970) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Transmittal of Moncada’s note (text printed) acknowledging the Department’s congratulatory message.
830
Nov. 26 (222) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
From Admiral Woodward: Transmittal of list of successful candidates (President-elect Sacasa, Liberal; Vice President-elect Espinosa, Liberal).
831
Dec. 17 (243) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
From Admiral Woodward: Approval of National Board of Elections’ report by Credentials Committee of Congress and declaration of election of Sacasa and Espinosa.
831
1933 Jan. 20 From the Chairman of the United States Electoral Mission
Resignation, and transmittal of report.
832
Jan. 27 From Mr. Lawrence Duggan of the Division of Latin American Affairs
Description and praise of Admiral Woodward’s four-volume report.
832
[Page XCIII]

Agreements for Cooperation Between the Two Political Parties to Effect the Pacification and to Insure the Peace of Nicaragua

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Oct. 8 (927) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Transmittal of an agreement dated October 3 (text printed) signed by political party leaders as a basis for discussion of a plan to insure peace and stability after the withdrawal of the marines in 1933.
833
Oct. 14 (934) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Transmittal of the plan (text printed) which accompanied the agreement of October 3 signed by the political leaders, and information that representatives of the two parties have met to discuss it.
836
Oct. 20 (941) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Transmittal of an agreement (text printed) signed on June 30 by party leaders obligating themselves to work toward minority representation in the new government and the maintenance of peace. Information that a draft agreement covering steps to be taken toward the pacification of the northern area is being considered.
838
Nov. 3 (202) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that three agreements have been submitted to the national and legal governing boards of the political parties and are expected to be approved prior to election day.
841
Nov. 16 (118) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Inquiry as to ratification of the three agreements submitted to the governing boards, and request for texts of the agreements.
841
Nov. 16 (969) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Transmittal of four agreements (texts printed) signed by representatives of the two parties and approved by their governing boards.
841
Nov. 17 (214) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that the governing boards of the two major parties have ratified the agreements and are now taking preliminary steps to place them into effect.
850
Nov. 22 (217) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Appointment by the National and Legal Governing Boards of the two parties of a commission to confer with Sacasa concerning the procedure to be followed to effect the pacification of Nicaragua.
851
Dec. 19 (1013) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Information that representatives of the two parties have been cooperating with Sacasa in an endeavor to initiate negotiations with the rebel leader, Sandino.
851

Transference of Control Over the Guardia Nacional to Nicaraguan Officers and Withdrawal of the United States Marines From Nicaragua

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Mar. 11 (26) To the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Instructions to confer with the Commander of the Guardia Nacional and to report on the plans for turning over the Guardia to Nicaraguan control.
852
[Page XCIV]Mar. 16 (209) From the Nicaraguan Chargé
Transmission of a message from President Moncada expressing satisfaction with the Guardia Nacional and the desire that the marines be permitted to continue direction of the Guardia.
852
Apr. 2 (53) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Estimate of the number of Nicaraguan line officers expected to be on active duty when plans call for turning over command of the Guardia Nacional. Information that higher officers will be commissioned by the newly inaugurated President.
853
Apr. 5 (740) From the Chargé in Nicaragua
Transmittal of two letters (texts printed) from General Matthews, Jefe Director of the Guardia Nacional, concerning his plans for turning the Guardia over to Nicaraguan control, and the necessity of legislation being enacted which will maintain the Guardia in its comparatively nonpartisan status.
853
Apr. 16 (346) To the Chargé in Nicaragua
Instructions to advise the Nicaraguan Foreign Office that the Navy Department regrets that it will be unable to alter its plan to relieve Colonel Matthews from his Command of the Guardia Nacional.
859
Apr. 19 (62) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Recommendation that General Matthews be permitted to retain command of the Guardia Nacional until all American officers are withdrawn.
860
Apr. 20 (354) To the Minister in Nicaragua
Instructions to discuss with President Moncada the legislation suggested by General Matthews.
861
Apr. 26 (763) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Opinion that the time is inopportune to discuss Guardia Nacional legislation.
862
May 2 (43) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Instructions to inform the Nicaraguan Government that the Navy Department has arranged to retain Colonel Matthews in command of the Guardia until all American officers are withdrawn.
862
May 3 To the Chargé in Nicaragua
Reply to Nicaragua’s note No. 209 of March 16, outlining action leading up to the decision to withdraw all U. S. forces after the elections, and to turn the Guardia over to Nicaraguan control.
863
May 7 (365) To the Minister in Nicaragua
Approval of the opinion expressed in the Legation’s despatch No. 763, April 26, and suggestion that a draft law to be held ready for presentation at the appropriate time be prepared by General Matthews.
864
May 13 (784) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Information that a draft law is being prepared and will be discussed with the Navy Department while Colonel Sheard, Chief of Staff of the Guardia Nacional, is on leave in Washington.
864
[Page XCV]June 21 (828) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Modification of General Matthews’ plan for turning the Guardia Nacional over to Nicaraguan control.
865
July 19 (72) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Disapproval of General Matthews’ suggestion that the exodus of U. S. Marines from Nicaragua be delayed, and suggestion that the Nicaraguans who will hold high commands in the Guardia Nacional be selected immediately in order that they may have the maximum training.
866
Aug. 9 (865) From the Minister in Nicaragua
General Matthews’ proposal (text printed) that a fist of prospective Guardia Nacional officers be prepared by each presidential candidate and that immediately after the elections President Moncada make the appointments from the President-elect’s list.
867
Aug. 26 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with a spokesman for Sacasa, the Liberal Party candidate for President, who expressed the hope that the U. S. Marines would be permitted to remain in Nicaragua, and to whom was explained the impossibility of changing the policy of withdrawal.
870
Aug. 30 (87) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Instructions to inform President Moncada of General Matthews’ proposal for the selection of Nicaraguan replacements for Marine officers of the Guardia Nacional.
871
Sept. 16 (176) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
President Moncada’s approval of the proposed plan for appointing Nicaraguan officers of the Guardia and suggestion that the candidates be requested to sign an agreement to carry out the provisions of the plan.
873
Sept. 19 (95) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Approval of President Moncada’s suggestion for an agreement to be signed by the presidential candidates.
873
Oct. 28 (949) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Transmittal of letter (text printed) from General Matthews to the presidential candidates outlining his plan for replacements in the Guardia Nacional.
874
Nov. 4 (954) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Report of Nicaraguan opinion that the United States is shirking its responsibilities by withdrawing its forces, and the American Minister’s attempts to explain the situation.
876
Nov. 5 (958) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Transmittal of letter (text printed) from General Matthews recommending legislative approval of the validity of courts-martial.
878
Nov. 7 (959) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Transmittal of a letter (text printed) to General Matthews outlining the negotiations which terminated in an agreement (text printed), signed by the presidential candidates, to preserve the non-partisan character of the Guardia Nacional.
881
[Page XCVI]Nov. 7 (960) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Transmittal of General Matthews’ draft (text printed) of a basic law for the foundation of the military structure of the Republic of Nicaragua.
888
Nov. 12 (962) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Information that Diaz, the Conservative candidate, has signed the Agreement for the maintenance of the nonpartisan character of the Guardia.
899
Nov. 21 (979) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Information that General Somoza has entered upon his duties as an officer of the Guardia and will take over the post of Jefe Director upon General Matthews’ departure.
899
Dec. 1 (471) To the Minister in Nicaragua
Commendation for successfully concluding negotiation of the agreement for the maintenance of the nonpartisan character of the Guardia Nacional. Notation of inconsistency in draft law and agreement.
900
Dec. 2 (475) To the Minister in Nicaragura
Comments on the draft of the proposed basic law for the Guardia Nacional which is in general viewed with favor by the Department.
901
Dec. 5 (478) To the Minister in Nicaragua
Comments on a letter from General Matthews concerning disbursements made by the Guardia under the terms of the Guardia Agreement between the United States and Nicaragua.
905
Dec. 6 (997) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Report of criticism of the agreement for the maintenance of the nonpartisan character of the Guardia Nacional.
907
Dec. 7 (232) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that officers commissioned for the higher grades in the Guardia are at their posts; arrangements for Nicaraguan officers to take command of certain posts to be evacuated by American officers on or about December 15.
907
Dec. 16 (239) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that partial evacuation of American forces has been completed and the remainder will leave January 2.
908
Dec. 16 (241) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Modifications to the draft of the proposed basic law for the Guardia Nacional.
908
Dec. 21 (1021) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Transmittal of the modified draft of the proposed basic law for the Guardia Nacional (text printed), omitting Part VII.
909
Dec. 22 (132) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Concurrence with modifications indicated in Legation’s telegram No. 241, December 16.
921
Dec. 23 (1030) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Transmittal of Part VII of the draft basic law for the Guardia Nacional and General Matthews’ letter (text printed) submitting the complete project to President Moncada.
921
[Page XCVII]Dec. 24 (247) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that the basic law for the Guardia Nacional has been submitted to Congress.
922
Dec. 28 (137) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Text of statement to be released to the Nicaraguan press for publication on the day the last marines depart from Nicaragua.
923
Dec. 30 (249) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that the statement contained in the Department’s telegram No. 137, December 28, will be released for publication January 3.
924
1933 Jan. 2 (2) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Report of evacuation of U. S. forces from Nicaragua.
924
Jan. 3 From the Nicaraguan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Expression of appreciation for the assistance given by the United States in maintaining peace and order and effecting free and fair elections in Nicaragua.
925
Jan. 4 To the Nicaraguan Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Acknowledgment of Nicaragua’s note of January 3.
925

Assistance by the United States in the Suppression of Bandit Activities in Nicaragua

Date and number Subject Page
1932 July 1 (305) To the Chargé in Honduras
Instructions to call to the attention of the President of Honduras the use of Honduran territory by Nicaraguan bandits and revolutionists and assistance given them by Honduran sympathizers.
926
July 10 (58) From the Chargé in Honduras (tel.)
Suggestion that the Honduran Government be requested to take certain specific measures to curb assistance to Nicaraguan bandits and to prevent their crossing the border.
928
July 12 (29) To the Chargé in Honduras (tel.)
Approval of the suggestion in Legation’s telegram No. 58, July 10.
929
July 14 (61) From the Chargé in Honduras (tel.)
Information that a statement regarding the Nicaraguan bandit situation and incorporating the Legation’s suggestion has been made to President Mejía.
929
July 18 (63) From the Chargé in Honduras (tel.)
Receipt of memorandum from President Mejía indicating compliance with the Legation’s suggested action to curb Honduran assistance to Nicaraguan bandits. Suggestion that the American Chargé be authorized to express the Department’s appreciation.
930
July 20 (32) To the Chargé in Honduras (tel.)
Authorization requested in the Legation’s telegram No. 63, July 18.
930
[Page XCVIII]July 23 (65) From the Chargé in Honduras (tel.)
Report of action taken in accordance with the Legation’s suggestion and President Mejía’s memorandum.
931
July 30 (579) From the Chargé in Honduras
Résumé of Honduran efforts to cooperate with the Nicaraguan Government in combatting banditry, and suggestions for further steps to be taken by the two Governments and the American Legation.
931
Aug. 16 (875) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Comments occasioned by despatch No. 579, July 30, from the Legation in Honduras.
936
Aug. 19 (599) From the Minister in Honduras
Report of representations made to President Mejía concerning the smuggling of arms and munitions to Nicaraguan bandits.
937
Aug. 23 (600) From the Minister in Honduras
Measures being taken by the Honduran Government to prevent munitions smuggling pursuant to the Legation’s representations.
938
Sept. 2 (40) To the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Instructions to continue efforts to persuade Honduran authorities to prevent the smuggling of arms and munitions.
939

PANAMA

Convention Between the United States and Panama Modifying Claims Convention of July 28, 1926

Date and number Subject Page
1932 Dec. 17 Convention Between the United States of America and Panama Modifying the Claims Convention of July 28, 1926
Text of Convention signed at Panama.
940

Statement by the Department of State That the Claims Convention Between the United States and Panama of July 28, 1926, Was Ratified by Panama on September 25, 1931

Date and number Subject Page
1932 June 4 (1095) From the Minister in Panama
Advice that an apparent error as to the date of ratification by Panama of the Claims Convention appears in a Department publication.
941
June 28 (376) To the Minister in Panama
Explanation that the date of Panama’s ratification of the Claims Convention appearing in the State Department publication is correct.
942
[Page XCIX]

PERU

Insurrection in Peru

Date and number Subject Page
1932 July 7 (96) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Report of uprising in Trujillo.
944
July 8 (97) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Further report of uprising. Information that a Panagra plane was requisitioned to carry gasoline for government bombing planes.
944
July 8 (98) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Further developments in Peruvian insurrection. Information that communications have been severed, but Americans are believed to be safe as the movement is not anti-foreign.
945
July 9 (99) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Information that prominent citizens of Trujillo offered surrender of the city after aerial bombing; that revolt is expected to be subdued promptly if troops remain loyal.
945
July 9 (100) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Suggestion that Department approval of Peruvian request for naval air bombs from Panama be deferred.
946
July 11 (101) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Advice to Panagra to allow the Peruvian Government to requisition planes in accordance with their contract and to permit, but not to order, U. S. pilots to fly them at their own risk.
946
July 11 (31) To the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Information that the Department will take no action on the Peruvian request for naval bombs until the matter is taken up by the Peruvian Embassy.
947
July 12 (103) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Information that Trujillo is only partially occupied by Government forces and street fighting and sniping continue.
947
July 12 (104) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Information that a formal note protesting the landing of a Panagra plane under fire at Trujillo was sent by the Embassy, which will endeavor to prevent American pilots flying under Peruvian army orders unless the Department instructs otherwise.
947
July 12 From the Peruvian Ambassador
Note stating quantity of war material requested by the Peruvian Government.
948
July 13 (105) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Further report of situation in Peru.
948
July 13 (106) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s threat to cancel Panagra contract unless material and personnel are placed at the disposition of the Government.
948
July 13 (107) From the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Receipt of information concerning safety of Americans in Trujillo.
949
July 13 (33) To the Chargé in Peru (tel.)
Instructions to make any further representations to the Peruvian Government informally. Agreement with Embassy’s views on the inadvisability of Americans taking part in military operations.
949
[Page C]July 15 To the Peruvian Ambassador
Note expressing the Department’s regret that the War Department finds it impossible to deplete its reserve of bombs at the present time.
950
July 17 (109) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Report of developments in Peruvian situation.
950
July 18 (1938) From the Ambassador in Peru
Outline of the Embassy’s actions in connection with the requisition of Panagra airplanes and pilots and transmittal of notes (texts printed) exchanged between the American Chargé and the Peruvian Foreign Minister.
950
Aug. 9 (40) To the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Authorization to state in a note to the Foreign Minister that the United States denies Peru’s right to compel citizens of the United States to fly airplanes in military operations.
957
Aug. 31 (2058) From the Ambassador in Peru
Ambassador’s opinion that the Government’s prompt use of bombing planes at the beginning of the insurrection was influenced by the recent showing of the American film “Hell Divers”.
957
Sept. 10 (2097) From the Ambassador in Peru
Transmittal of copies (texts printed) of the note mentioned in the Department’s telegram No. 40, August 9, the Foreign Minister’s reply of August 29, and the Ambassador’s acknowledgment thereof.
959
Dec. 10 (423) To the Ambassador in Peru
Transmittal of memoranda referring to the legal aspects of Peru’s requisitioning of American airplanes and pilots and instructions to transmit a note (text printed) to the Foreign Minister reiterating U. S. policy.
962