List of Papers

[Unless otherwise specified, the correspondence is from or to officials in the Department of State.]

GENERAL

Efforts of the United States to Prevent Financial Collapse in Europe

i. proposal by president hoover for a moratorium on intergovernmental debts

Date and number Subject Page
1931 May 27 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the governor of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in regard to the financial crisis in Austria.
1
May 29 (65) From the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Comments concerning rumors that Germany plans to seek some alleviation of reparations payments.
2
June 2 (67) From the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Report that there is strong opposition to the new emergency tax decree and that this opposition is adding to the growing pressure for revision of reparations.
3
June 3 (68) From the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Indications that the moment when Germany will take definite steps toward revision of reparations is approaching rapidly.
4
June 8 (175) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Account by the British Prime Minister of his conversations at Chequers with the German Chancellor and Foreign Minister concerning the German financial situation.
6
June 8 (70) From the Chargé in Germany (tel.)
Manifesto issued by the German Government, June 5 (text printed), explaining the necessity for its new tax decree.
9
June 8 (177) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Personal letter from the Prime Minister to the Secretary of State (text printed) concerning the conversations at Chequers.
11
June 11 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the French Ambassador, who expressed the opinion that Germany would shortly ask for a moratorium.
14
June 12 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Conversation with the British Ambassador, who presented a summary of the information received from his Government regarding the conversations at Chequers.
15
June 15 (187) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Report of a conversation with the Permanent Under Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs setting forth certain points for consideration in any discussions which the United States might initiate with France regarding relief to Germany.
16
June 15 (166) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Explanation that the United States does not contemplate any approach to the French, and that the President thinks this is primarily a European crisis in which the responsibility of the Continent should be further developed.
18
[Page XXXIV]June 15 (165) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that the Secretary of the Treasury will arrive in London June 16. Message for him from the Acting Secretary of the Treasury (text printed) explaining that the situation in Germany and Austria seems to be more critical, and asking his advice.
19
June 15 (250) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Opinion that the least objectionable plan for relief of Germany is the postponement for a year of all intergovernmental debts, but that the European countries would have to be willing to take similar action.
20
June 16 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the Acting Secretary of the Treasury in regard to possible methods of procedure.
21
June 16 From the British Ambassador
Copy of a telegram concerning the German situation sent by the British Government to its Ambassador in Paris (text printed) expressing the opinion that the first move for joint action should come from France or the United States.
21
June 17 (191) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that the Bank of England has granted a temporary loan to the Austrian banks and that France has made an offer but based it on political conditions which Austria could not accept.
23
June 18 (196) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For the President, the Secretary of State, and the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, from the Secretary of the Treasury: Account of conversations with British officials; and opinion that the situation is now such that the President would be justified in initiating a proposal under the war debt agreements for a postponement of payments, but that the French should be sounded out first.
24
June 18 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the French Ambassador in which the U. S. attitude toward offering help to Germany was set forth.
26
June 19 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the French Ambassador in which he was informed that the President was consulting with Congressional leaders in regard to a plan for suspending intergovernmental debts for one year, but that no plan would be accepted which did not involve a suspension of all claims of every nation.
28
June 19 Memorandum of Trans-Atlantic Telephone Conversation
Explanation by the Secretary of State to the British Prime Minister of the plan which the President has been discussing with Congressional leaders.
29
June 19 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the German Chargé informing him of the President’s plan.
(Footnote: Similar conversations on June 19 and 20 with the diplomatic representative of Austria, Belgium, Great Britain, Greece, Italy, Rumania, and Yugoslavia.)
31
[Page XXXV]June 20 (81) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Explanation that it would be helpful if President von Hindenburg would furnish President Hoover with a statement of the gravity of the German situation.
32
June 20 (84) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Instructions to explain that since premature information has reached the press, the President has issued a statement for publication June 21.
(Footnote: Similar telegrams to Great Britain and France.)
33
June 20 (262) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
President’s statement (text printed) with instructions to transmit it to the French Government.
33
June 20 (86) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Information that the statement requested in the Department’s No. 81 of June 20 is being prepared.
35
June 20 (87) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Telegram from President von Hindenburg to President Hoover (text printed) setting forth Germany’s position.
36
June 21 (86) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Explanation of the U. S. Government’s intention in regard to possible publication of the Hindenburg statement.
37
June 22 (90) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Information that the Foreign Office is satisfied with the U. S. plan in regard to publication.
37
June 22 (87) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Chronology of events in regard to publication of the Hindenburg letter.
38
June 24 (990) From the Ambassador in Germany
Chronology of events in regard to procuring the Hindenburg message.
39

ii. negotiations to secure acceptance by france of the moratorium proposal

Date and number Subject Page
1931 June 21 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the French Ambassador, who said that his Government was responsive to the President’s proposal, but would like more time for discussion.
42
June 21 (332) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Account of informal conversations with various officials in regard to the President’s proposal.
43
June 22 (265) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Information that the President is asking the Secretary of the Treasury to visit Paris.
45
[Page XXXVI]June 22 (179) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For the Secretary of the Treasury: Information that the President desires him to pay a visit to Paris since the French Minister of Finance feels that this would be politically helpful.
46
June 22 (334) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Report of a conversation with a Foreign Office official who indicated that France would make a reservation on the subject of the unconditional reparations payments.
47
June 22 (335) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Indications that the French bankers are interested in loaning Germany a sum of money equal to the total of the unconditional reparations payments.
48
June 22 (89) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Instructions to make it clear that Germany must work out her problems with France and that the President’s plan will not be pursued without regard for the position of France.
49
June 23 (93) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Statement by the Foreign Minister that Germany recognizes the necessity of settling many points with France before the President’s proposition can be put into effect.
50
June 23 Address by the Chancellor of the German Reich
Acceptance of the President’s proposal; review of the background for it; and explanation of the necessity for Franco-German cooperation to make it effective.
51
June 23 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Western European Affairs
Telephone conversation with the Ambassador in France, who stated that he thought political conditions would force the French Cabinet to insist upon the continuance of the unconditional payments.
54
June 23 (268) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Instructions to make it clear that the President considers that nothing short of postponement of all intergovernmental debts will be effective; and enumeration of reasons in favor of such a procedure.
55
June 24 (343) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Conversation with the Prime Minister who expressed the opinion that Germany should not be relieved of all her out-payments.
57
June 24 (351) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Receipt of copy of the reply which the French will make to the moratorium proposal; and information that the Prime Minister is making plans for direct Franco-German conversations which he hopes can take place before final decisions are made.
58
June 24 Memorandum of Trans-Atlantic Telephone Conversation
Conversation between the Ambassador in France and the Secretary of State and the Chief of the Division of Western European Affairs in regard to the contents of the French reply.
60
[Page XXXVII]Undated From the French Embassy
French reply proposing that the unconditional payments be continued but that the money therefrom be used to improve credit in Germany and other Central European countries.
(Footnote: Notation on original: “Text of French Note—June 24, 1931.”)
62
June 24 (273) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Inquiry as to when France would expect to get back the funds advanced from the unconditional payments.
65
June 24 (184) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For the Secretary of the Treasury from the Acting Secretary of the Treasury: Discussion of two respects in which the French plan is defective. Alternate plans A and B which the President would be willing to discuss if the French cannot be persuaded to accept the original proposal.
(Footnote: Information that the same message was sent to Paris.)
65
June 25 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the French Ambassador
U. S. objections to the French proposal.
68
June 25 (352) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Suggestion by the Italian Ambassador to France that an acknowledgment by President Hoover of the French reply would help the position of the French Government.
69
June 25 (287) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Message for the Foreign Minister.
70
June 25 (357) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Foreign Office statement (text printed) to the effect that the funds advanced from the unconditional payments would come due at the end of the one-year suspension period.
70
June 25 Memorandum of Trans-Atlantic Telephone Conversation
Conversation between the Acting Secretary of the Treasury and the Chief of the Western European Division in Washington and the Secretary of the Treasury and the Counselor of Embassy in Paris in which plans A and B were cancelled.
71
June 25 (280) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Secretary of the Treasury from the Acting Secretary of the Treasury: Request by the President for an appraisal of the situation after the original proposal has been discussed with the French; arguments to be used in favor of the original plan; and suggestion of another plan for consideration and advice.
74
June 26 (289) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Ambassador and the Secretary of the Treasury: Opinion that Germany would be afforded no relief if the sums advanced had to be refunded in one year; alternate plans C and D suggested for meeting French demands.
77
[Page XXXVIII]June 27 (361) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Information that the Chamber of Deputies has adopted a motion (text printed) approving the French reply to President Hoover’s proposition.
82
June 27 (1) From the Acting Secretary of State to the Secretary of State (tel.)
Summary of discussions on the proposal to lend part of the money from German unconditional payments to other Central European countries; and of the question of the time to be allowed for repayment.
(Footnote: Information that the Secretary of State was en route to Italy.)
83
June 27 (94) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
British opinion that some financial reassurance or material sacrifice by Germany would be helpful; explanation that U. S. Government cannot attach political conditions to the plan, but that any action which the British might take is not to be discouraged.
84
June 27 (365) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Compromise proposal which emerged from a 2–hour discussion with the French on the basis of Department’s No. 289 of June 26.
85
June 27 (298) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Secretary of the Treasury and the Ambassador: Discussion of French proposition and of changes necessary to make it acceptable; indication that U. S. Government is considering continuing offer to its debtors individually if collective agreement cannot be reached.
88
June 28 (99) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Conversation with the Foreign Minister in regard to the French proposal; explanation that the present political situation makes the Germans reluctant to commit themselves.
91
June 28 (300) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Secretary of the Treasury and the Ambassador: Instructions to make clear that the United States would deprecate any attempt by France to obtain political concessions from Germany in return for agreement to the President’s plan.
93
June 28 (302) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Secretary of the Treasury from the Acting Secretary of the Treasury: Letter from the British Treasury, June 27 (text printed), stating that French reservation radically alters the proposal which the British Government accepted, and insisting upon advantages of the original proposal.
94
June 28 (370) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Political conditions which it is believed France will try to impose on Germany.
96
June 28 (303) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Reiteration of instructions given in Department’s No. 300 of June 28.
97
[Page XXXIX]June 29 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Telephone conversation with the Ambassador in Germany explaining in connection with the British proposal, that it would be helpful if Germany would, in the interest of disarmament, give up the proposed new battleship.
97
June 29 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State of a Conversation With the German Chargé
Suggestion that it would be helpful if the Germans gave up the new battleship.
98
June 29 (371) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Report of a conversation with the Finance Minister on the basis of Department’s No. 298 of June 27.
99
June 29 (372) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Agreement by the Prime Minister to present to the Cabinet the counterproposal set forth in the Department’s No. 298 of June 27.
101
June 29 (373) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Report of the discussions at a conference with the French Ministers.
101
June 30 (377) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Conference at which the Prime Minister reviewed the Cabinet’s refusal to accept the U. S. counterproposal.
105
June 30 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Western European Affairs of a Conversation With the British Ambassador
Ambassador’s indication that his Government intended to suggest to the Germans that they accommodate the French with respect to the customs union; and request that the U. S. Ambassador in Germany be instructed to indicate U. S. sympathy with the suggestion.
108
July 1 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Telephone conversation on June 30 with the Ambassador in Germany in regard to the German attitude toward various phases of the negotiations, including the suggestions that Germany give up the customs union and the proposed new battleship.
109
June 30 (98) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Intention of the French to offer to forego construction of a 23,000-ton cruiser if the Germans will halt construction of vessels of the Deutschland type.
111
July 1 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Telephone conversation on June 30 with the Ambassador in Germany, who reported further on some of the points discussed in the earlier conversation on the same day.
111
June 30 (106) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Confidential assertion by the German Chancellor that Germany would declare a moratorium as of July 14 if the negotiations with the French were broken off.
112
[Page XL]June 30 (313) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Ambassador and the Secretary of the Treasury: Note for the French Government (text printed) setting forth the points on which the two Governments differ and expressing the hope that the French can find a means of reconciling the differences.
112
June 30 (314) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Secretary of the Treasury and the Ambassador: Authorization to make known to the French that the President is considering making his offer to the debtors of the United States individually if France cannot accept his original offer.
117
July 1 (390) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Discussion with the French Ministers on the basis of the note contained in Department’s No. 313 of June 30; arrangements for the publication of the note.
118
July 2 (392) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Conversation with the German Ambassador to France, who suggested that Germany might issue 25-year bonds to France covering the amount of the French loan to Germany.
120
July 2 Memorandum of Trans-Atlantic Telephone Conversation
Conversation between the Acting Secretary of State, the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, and Senator Morrow in Washington and the Ambassador in Paris to clear up certain points before the next conversations with the French.
121
July 2 (396) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Points discussed at meeting with the Finance Minister, who stated that he thought an agreement could be reached.
123
July 2 (322) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Department’s position in regard to the points still under discussion with the French.
(Instructions to repeat to Berlin.)
126
July 2 (106) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Assertion that it would be helpful if Germany would make some expression of appreciation for the cooperative support given by all countries, France included.
129
July 2 (108) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
For the President and the Acting Secretary of State: Conversation with the Chancellor, who explained the economic and political conditions which would make it dangerous for the German Government to state publicly that it had given up any of its treaty rights with regard to the construction of cruisers.
130
July 3 (109) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Statement from the Chancellor (text printed) to the effect that the sums released by the reparation holiday will not be used to increase armaments; advice that the Chancellor still hopes it will not be necessary to publish the statement.
(Footnote: Publication of the statement in Washington on July 5.)
132
[Page XLI]July 4 (328) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Opinion that if an acceptance is not obtained from the French on July 5, consideration should be given to handing them the President’s second proposal as set forth in Department’s No. 314 of June 30.
133
July 4 (329) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Suggestion that the French be given a memorandum (text printed) reviewing the situation and suggesting that the French accept the President’s proposal and refer all matters not agreed upon to a committee of experts.
133
July 4 (402) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Communiqué issued at the close of the evening meeting (text printed) stating that the negotiations will continue and that agreement is expected.
135
July 4 (403) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Account of the evening meeting, from which it seems that the only remaining questions are the period for repayment of the money to be loaned to Germany and the current contracts for deliveries in kind.
135
July 4 (404) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Finance Minister’s assurance that the French will agree to the 12-year repayment period provided the United States will interpose no objection if France, Germany, and the other interested powers can agree on the continuance of deliveries in kind.
138
July 4 (330) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Secretary of the Treasury and the Ambassador: Position that the continuance of deliveries in kind would violate the principle of the President’s plan and endanger its success.
138
July 4 (332) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Instructions to inform the French that the United States cannot consent to the continuance of payments in kind and that unless the French can accept the U. S. position, negotiations will be broken off July 6.
140
July 5 (405) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Proposed agreement (text printed) based on a text agreed to at the afternoon meeting of the French Council.
141
July 5 (407) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Conference with the Finance Minister on the basis of Department’s Nos. 329 and 332 of July 4; request for Department’s decision with regard to the Finance Minister’s proposal (text printed) concerning deliveries in kind.
144
Undated Memorandum of Trans-Atlantic Telephone Conversation
Conversation on July 5 between the Ambassador in France and the Acting Secretary of the Treasury in Washington concerning a U. S. counterproposal being submitted through the French Ambassador; agreement that the French proposal transmitted in the Ambassador’s No. 405 of July 5 was unacceptable.
145
[Page XLII]July 5 (335) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Secretary of the Treasury and the Ambassador: Comments on the Finance Minister’s proposal relating to deliveries in kind and the French proposal set forth in the Ambassador’s No. 405 of July 5. Note for the French Government (text printed) stating the terms upon which the United States is ready to conclude an agreement.
150
July 6 (408) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Receipt from the Finance Minister of an outline (text printed) of the French viewpoint on the question of deliveries in kind.
157
July 6 (410) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Advice that a hasty reading of the comments in Department’s No. 335 of July 5 indicates difficulties of drafting which it is believed can be adjusted.
159
July 6 (411) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Conversation with the Finance Minister who suggested that the controversy over deliveries in kind be referred to a committee of experts.
(Note: Résumé of available information concerning the final stages of the negotiations.)
160
July 7 (1634) From the Ambassador in France
Basis of agreement arrived at between the French and American negotiators on July 6 (text printed).
161
July 6 Statement by President Hoover
Announcement that the moratorium proposal has been accepted by all the important creditor governments.
163
July 7 From President von Hindenburg to President Hoover (tel.)
Expression of gratitude of the German people.
164
July 9 From President Hoover to President von Hindenburg (tel.)
Response to President von Hindenburg’s message of July 7.
164

iii. the london conference of experts, july 17–august 11

Date and number Subject Page
1931 July 8 (43) To the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Appointment to represent the United States as observer on the Committee of Experts which is called for under the accord with France; information that Mr. Livesey will be sent to London to render assistance.
(Footnote: Mr. Gibson’s acceptance on July 9.)
164
July 9 From the French Ambassador
Information concerning the agreement arrived at with the British for holding the meeting of experts at London on July 17.
165
July 10 (235) From the British Ambassador
Invitation for the United States to be represented at the meeting of experts.
167
[Page XLIII]July 16 To the British Ambassador
Designation of Mr. Gibson as U. S. representative; explanation that his function will be largely that of an observer.
168
July 17 (240) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Gibson: Report that the Committee met in the morning and that a subcommittee on deliveries in kind will meet in the afternoon.
168
July 24 (264) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Gibson: Suggestion that the United States be represented by Livesey and Ambassador Dawes as soon as the Ambassador returns to London.
168
July 24 (236) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Gibson: Agreement with plan; instructions, however, to remain until Ambassador Dawes feels certain of all important matters.
169
July 25 (268) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Gibson: Report on the discussions at two meetings of the Committee.
169
July 27 (240) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Gibson: Comments on the three points under discussion.
170
July 27 (270) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Gibson: Request for instructions regarding the three methods of repayment proposed by the British, who advocate a longer repayment period than the 10 years provided by the Franco-American agreement.
171
July 31 (283) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
From Gibson: Information that the Committee has recessed until August 11, leaving the preparation of texts to a drafting committee.
173
Aug. 7 (261) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For the Ambassador and Mr. Livesey: Receipt of texts of all the important documents; information that the U. S. Government is prepared to state that the protocol is not inconsistent with the President’s proposal.
173
Aug. 11 Press Release Issued by the Department of State
Statement regarding work of the Committee of Experts.
174

iv. attitude of interested governments toward the moratorium proposal

Austria

Date and number Subject Page
1931 June 25 (120/R) From the Austrian Minister
Austria’s acceptance of the President’s proposal regarding debts and reparations.
175
[Page XLIV]

Belgium

Date and number Subject Page
1931 June 25 (53) From the Chargé in Belgium (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether the President’s proposal applies to Belgium.
175
June 25 (38) To the Chargé in Belgium (tel.)
Assurance that the President’s proposal does apply to Belgium; instructions to inform the Foreign Minister.
176
June 26 (56) From the Chargé in Belgium (tel.)
Indication that the Belgian Government will not be able to accept without certain reservations.
176
June 30 (1816) From the Belgian Ambassador
Adherence to the President’s plan with reservations in regard to Belgium’s special situation and rights.
177
June 30 (63) From the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Suggestion that it would be helpful if the Department would acknowledge the Belgian reply in the warmest possible terms.
178
June 30 (41) To the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Acknowledgment presented to the Belgian Ambassador (text printed).
179
June 30 (1819) From the Belgian Ambassador
Information that the moratorium can be accepted only if the United States will (1) agree to exclude from it the 1929 agreement with Germany relating to marks, and (2) support Belgium in negotiations with Germany for payments in kind to cover the balance of the sacrifice which Belgium would make under the moratorium.
179
July 8 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Western European Affairs of a Conversation With the Belgian Ambassador
U. S. willingness to suggest to Germany the opportuneness of conversations with Belgium regarding the two subjects mentioned in the Belgian note of June 30; opinion that the U. S. Government could not construe the mark claim as excluded from the President’s plan.
181
Undated [Rec’d July 8] Memorandum From the Belgian Embassy
Assertion that Belgium cannot take part in the conference at London unless first assured as to Germany’s reception of her demands; insistence that only the United States has authority to declare that the moratorium does not apply to the marks agreement.
182
July 10 (46) To the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Instructions to facilitate direct conversations between Belgium and Germany; opinion that if Germany agreed to continue the mark payments to Belgium and all the other powers accepted the arrangement, the U. S. Government would not object.
183
[Page XLV]July 14 (81) From the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Information that the Belgian Cabinet has decided to withhold action on postponement of German payments and Belgian participation in the conference at London, pending German initiative toward conversations; reasons for Belgian position.
184
July 14 (82) From the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Information that Belgium has decided to send representatives to the conference at London.
185
July 14 (83) From the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Advice that Germany has initiated conversations with Belgium.
185
July 14 (84) From the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Information that Belgium is now working out a formula for notification of the provisional postponement of Germany’s July 15 payments.
185
July 27 (239) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Gibson (Ambassador to Belgium): Instructions as to attitude to be adopted in regard to the Belgian-German conversations.
186
July 28 (273) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
From Gibson: Report on the progress of the Belgian-German conversations.
187
Aug. 6 (98) From the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Information from the German Minister that the German Cabinet has decided to continue the payments under the marks agreement.
188
Aug. 8 (101) From the Chargé in Belgium (tel.)
Report that Belgium will adhere to the final protocol drawn up in London by the Committee of Experts.
188
Aug. 10 (330) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Livesey (U. S. expert at conference): Information that Belgium has annexed its German mark agreement to the Committee report by a footnote (text printed).
189

Bulgaria

Date and number Subject Page
1931 July 1 Memorandum by Mr. Paul Alling, of the Division of Near Eastern Affairs, of a Conversation With the Bulgarian Minister
Opinion of Bulgarian Government that the Greek payments under the Molloff-Caphandaris convention are not an intergovernmental debt and that there should be no postponement in their payment.
189
[Page XLVI][July 8?] From the Bulgarian Legation
Reasons why Bulgaria considers that the Molloff-Caphandaris payments by Greece are not affected by the moratorium.
191
July 20 (14) From the Chargé in Bulgaria (tel.)
Position of the Bulgarian Government regarding the President’s debt postponement proposal.
191
Aug. 21 To the Minister in Bulgaria
Explanation that the U. S. Government cannot act as arbiter in the various points in dispute between the Balkan countries; instructions, however, to take all available opportunities to recommend to the Bulgarian Government that it make a speedy settlement.
193
Sept. 8 (110) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Information that on September 7 the Bulgarian Government brought a complaint before the Council of the League concerning the nonpayment by Greece of sums due under the Molloff-Caphandaris agreement; account of the arguments presented by both sides.
194
Sept. 9 Memorandum by the Economic Adviser of a Conversation With the Bulgarian Minister
Minister’s assertion that his Government sees a parallel to its arguments in the U. S. arguments regarding continuation of German-American payments on claims account.
194
Sept. 22 (119) From the Consul General at Geneva (tel.)
Resolution adopted by the Council, September 19 (text printed), inviting the two Governments to confer together to reach a practical solution, the service of their reciprocal debts being carried on in the interval, and requesting the Permanent Court of International Justice to give an opinion.
195
Oct. 3 (299) From the Minister in Bulgaria
Information that Bulgaria has initiated conversations and plans to propose a settlement whereby Greece will continue the Caphandaris-Molloff payments and Bulgaria will continue to pay reparations for the benefit of Greece in like amount.
196
Oct. 31 (28) From the Minister in Bulgaria (tel.)
Advice that Greek reply has not been received, but is expected to be in the affirmative.
198
Nov. 6 (29) From the Minister in Bulgaria (tel.)
Information that Greece has proposed conditions which Bulgaria cannot accept.
198
Nov. 11 (30) From the Minister in Bulgaria (tel.)
Report that Greece has amended its reply and that the Foreign Minister thinks the amended reply offers possibilities of agreement.
199
[Page XLVII]Dec. 12 (334) From the Minister in Bulgaria
Information that the financial agreement signed with Greece November 11 will be appended to the protocol agreed upon by the London Conference of Experts proclaiming the moratorium in force as regards Bulgaria and Greece and will be ratified as part of that document.
200

Czechoslovakia

Date and number Subject Page
1931 June 27 (25) From the Minister in Czechoslovakia (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s assurances that the President’s proposal will be formally accepted within a few days.
200
July 3 (411) From the Minister in Czechoslovakia
Explanation that the delay in Czechoslovakia’s acceptance is due to a desire to accept on terms agreeable to France.
201
July 15 From the Czechoslovak Minister
Acceptance by Czechoslovakia of the President’s moratorium plan.
202

Egypt

Date and number Subject Page
1931 July 15 From the Egyptian Chargé
Egypt’s acceptance of President Hoover’s moratorium proposal.
202

Finland

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Oct. 8 From the Finnish Minister
Request for verification of the understanding that Finland is not expected to meet the debt payments due to the United States on December 15, 1931, and June 15, 1932.
203
Oct. 24 To the Finnish Minister
Explanation of the President’s proposal and suggestion that Finland should have no difficulty in accepting unconditionally.
203
Nov. 27 From the Finnish Minister
Acceptance by Finland of the President’s proposal.
204
[Page XLVIII]

Great Britain, the British Dominions and India

Date and number Subject Page
1931 June 24 From the British Ambassador
Statement by the Chancellor of the Exchequer in the House of Commons (text printed) explaining the steps to be taken to give effect to President Hoover’s proposal.
204
July 10 From the British Ambassador
Letter from the British Treasury to the Bank for International Settlements, July 9 (text printed), giving notice of Britain’s acceptance of the President’s plan and stating that Germany will not be expected to meet the annuity payment due July 15, 1931.
206

Greece

Date and number Subject Page
1931 June 26 (21) From the Minister in Greece (tel.)
Prime Minister’s assertion that Greece cannot accept any agreement whereby she grants relief to others in excess of relief received from the United States.
207
June 29 (18) To the Minister in Greece (tel.)
Advice that the United States is not ready to indicate plans for adjusting the financial agreements of Balkan states but that discussions among the states concerned will be necessary.
208
July 1 (25) From the Minister in Greece (tel.)
Information that Greece will accept the President’s plan if her situation with respect to Bulgaria, Canada, and Czechoslovakia can be cleared up.
209
July 1 (19) To the Minister in Greece (tel.)
Advice that the questions raised by Greece cannot be answered until the larger issues are settled.
210
July 2 (1779) From the Minister in Greece
Statement by the Prime Minister, July 1 (text printed), in support of the Greek point of view.
210
Oct. 3 (31) To the Chargé in Greece (tel.)
Instructions to express the U. S. Government’s satisfaction that Greece and Bulgaria are trying to arrive at a practical solution.
212
Nov. 5 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Near Eastern Affairs of a Conversation Between the Secretary of Stale and the Greek Minister
Discussion of the U. S. Treasury’s demand for the Greek payment due November 10, 1931, in the absence of a satisfactory acceptance by Greece of the President’s proposal.
213
Nov. 5 (50) From the Minister in Greece (tel.)
Report that the International Financial Commission considers itself authorized to suspend payment of the amounts due the United States from Greece on November 10, 1931, and May 10, 1932.
213
[Page XLIX]Nov. 5 (35) To the Minister in Greece (tel.)
Instructions to give notice that the United States cannot authorize suspension of payments in the absence of a satisfactory acceptance of the President’s plan.
214
Nov. 7 (36) To the Minister in Greece (tel.)
Instructions to take the necessary steps for the withholding of the November 10 payment, in view of the receipt of the Greek letter of acceptance.
214
Nov. 9 (1923) From the Minister in Greece
Letter from the Prime Minister (text printed) accepting the President’s proposal without reservation.
215
Nov. 12 (54) From the Minister in Greece (tel.)
Information that a temporary agreement has been reached in the negotiations between Greece and Bulgaria.
217

Hungary

Date and number Subject Page
1931 June 29 (8) To the Minister in Hungary (tel.)
Instruction, in case there is any question, to make clear that President Hoover’s proposal is intended to include Hungary.
217
July 1 (19) From the Minister in Hungary (tel.)
Information that the Hungarian Government is studying the moratorium plan before replying, in view of its fear that the question of Eastern reparations and the optants may be reopened.
(Note: Information that no formal acceptance by Hungary has been found in the Department files, although Hungary did accept.)
218

Italy

Date and number Subject Page
1931 June 22 (101) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Assertion by the Foreign Minister that Italy cannot grant Germany a moratorium without an undertaking by Germany not to proceed further with the German-Austrian Customs Union.
219
June 23 (90) To the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Expression of surprise and concern at the Italian attitude; explanation of the adverse situation which would be created by an attempt to use the President’s proposal to exact political concessions in Europe; and instructions for conversation with the Foreign Minister.
220
[Page L]June 23 (105) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Telegram from the Chief of Government to the Ambassador at Washington (text printed) accepting the plan in principle but expressing the intention of conveying some observations to the U. S. Government later.
221
June 23 (92) To the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Instructions for procedure in the event the Italian Government still intends to link the Customs Union matter to the President’s proposal.
222
June 24 (107) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Assurances by the Foreign Minister that Italy’s acceptance is not limited by any political reservations.
223
June 25 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Telephone conversation with the Italian Ambassador, who gave assurances that Italy’s acceptance was unconditional.
223
June 25 From the Italian Ambassador
Telegram from the Foreign Minister (text printed) stating that the other governments have been notified of Italy’s acceptance.
224
July 1 (116) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Communiqué concerning the steps taken to put the President’s plan into effect (text printed).
225

Japan

Date and number Subject Page
1931 July 3 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Japanese Ambassador, July 2, 1931
Ambassador’s assertion that his Government would accept the President’s plan as soon as it received a formal notification.
(Note: Information that no formal acceptance by Japan has been found in the Department files, although Japan did accept.)
225

Lithuania

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Nov. 19 From the Lithuanian Minister
Lithuania’s acceptance of President Hoover’s moratorium plan.
226

Latvia and Estonia

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Oct. 24 (38) To the Chargé in Latvia (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain the attitude of the Latvian and Estonian Governments regarding the President’s proposal.
226
[Page LI]Oct. 28 (46) From the Chargé in Latvia (tel.)
Information that Latvia accepts unconditionally.
227
Nov. 4 (48) From the Chargé in Latvia (tel.)
Information that Estonia accepts unconditionally.
227

Poland

Date and number Subject Page
1931 June 27 (168/T/31) From the Polish Chargé
Poland’s acceptance of President Hoover’s proposal.
227

Portugal

Date and number Subject Page
1931 July 3 (14) To the Minister in Portugal (tel.)
Instructions to express U. S. appreciation of Portuguese decision to postpone for a year the collection of German reparations.
227
July 4 (19) From the Minister in Portugal (tel.)
Advice that action on Department’s No. 14 of July 3 has been deferred inasmuch as Portugal has taken no definite decision as yet regarding the Hoover proposal.
228
July 19 (24) From the Minister in Portugal (tel.)
Report that Portugal has acceded to British invitation to adopt the Hoover plan but has made reservations in respect of reparations in kind and has made no public announcement; request for instructions.
228
July 20 (16) To the Minister in Portugal (tel.)
Instructions not to deliver the message contained in Department’s No. 14 of July 3.
229
July 25 (28) From the Minister in Portugal (tel.)
Communication published (text printed) giving notice of acceptance with reservation.
229
July 27 (18) To the Minister in Portugal (tel.)
Message for the Foreign Minister (text printed) in place of Department’s No. 14.
229

Rumania

Date and number Subject Page
1931 July 4 From the Rumanian Minister
Adherence of Rumanian Government to President Hoover’s proposal.
230
[Page LII]

Yugoslavia

Date and number Subject Page
1931 June 23 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Western European Affairs of a Conversation Between the Secretary of State and the Yugoslav Minister
Minister’s explanation of the exceptions which his Government would have to make; Secretary’s reply that it would be best to take up these details after the plan had been accepted by the larger nations.
230
July 13 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Yugoslav Minister
Minister’s presentation of an aide-mémoire regarding the Yugoslav position (text printed) and indication that his Government was not willing to leave matters to a London conference to which it was not invited.
232
Aug. 10 From the Yugoslav Minister
Advice that Yugoslavia cannot sign the report of the Committee of Experts.
233
Aug. 21 (1129) From the Minister in Yugoslavia
Report of a conversation with King Alexander, who appealed for U. S. help in Yugoslavia’s budget difficulties.
234
Aug. 22 (39) From the Minister in Yugoslavia (tel.)
Message from King Alexander to President Hoover (text printed) requesting help in Yugoslavia’s present dilemma.
235
Aug. 24 (40) From the Minister in Yugoslavia (tel.)
Yugoslav concern over semi-official reports that the Hoover plan will be applied to Yugoslavia despite non-acceptance.
235
Aug. 25 (16) To the Minister in Yugoslavia (tel.)
Assurance that there is no basis for the semi-official reports; suggestion that Yugoslavia might endeavor to solve its difficulties through the Bank for International Settlements.
236
Aug. 26 (17) To the Minister in Yugoslavia (tel.)
Instructions for a reply to the King; and advice to refrain from giving encouragement to the apparent impression of the Yugoslav authorities that a solution of this problem is incumbent upon the United States.
236
Sept. 10 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Near Eastern Affairs of a Conversation Between the Secretary of State and the Yugoslav Minister
Minister’s assertion that unless relief could be afforded Yugoslavia, the Government would take steps not only to secure its share of German reparations, but to prevent other powers from releasing Germany from her obligations to them.
236
Sept. 10 (541) From the Yugoslav Minister
Conditions upon which Yugoslavia would agree to a delay in the payments due from Germany.
238
Sept. 21 To the Yugoslav Minister
Explanation that the United States cannot deal with the difficulties of governments desirous of participating in the debt-suspension arrangement.
239
[Page LIII]

v. congressional approval of the moratorium

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Dec. 16 From the Under Secretary of State to the Secretary of State
Information that, in response to inquiry, the British, Finnish, Italian, Lithuanian, and Polish representatives were given the opinion that they would not be subject to just criticism if they failed to make the December 15 payment on their respective debts.
240
Dec. 16 To the Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee of the House of Representatives
History of the President’s moratorium proposal.
240
Dec. 17 (897) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
French press reactions to the opposition in Congress to the President’s proposal.
246
Dec. 23 Public Resolution No. 5 (H. J. Res. 147), 72d Congress, 1st Session
Resolution providing for the moratorium, but carrying a rider stating that Congress is opposed to the reduction or cancelation of any foreign debts due to the United States.
248
Dec. 23 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State of a Conversation With the German Ambassador
Ambassador’s pessimism as to the effect of the Congressional rider.
249
Dec. 24 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the British Ambassador
Discussion regarding the rider which Congress added to the ratification.
249

vi. participation of the united states in efforts to halt the withdrawals of short-term credits from germany

Date and number Subject Page
1931 July 11 (120) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Suggested steps which Germany might take to remedy her financial situation.
250
July 12 (123) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Cabinet reactions to the suggested remedies; proposals now being considered by the Cabinet.
251
July 12 From the Consul at Basel (tel.)
Attitude of the Bank of England and the Bank of France that Germany’s situation is no longer a question for Central Banks but a political question for governments.
254
July 13 From the Consul at Basel (tel.)
Summary of the meeting of the Directors of the Bank for International Settlements at which it was decided to extend the $100,000,000 credit for 90 days; communiqué issued at close of meeting (text printed).
255
July 14 (354) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Secretary of State: Favorable attitude toward the holding of a meeting of responsible ministers for the sole purpose of dealing with the present emergency.
256
[Page LIV]July 15 (358) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Secretary of State: Necessity for making clear to the British that the United States could not participate in any conference other than one to meet the present emergency.
257
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With Mr. Arthur Henderson at the American Embassy, Paris, July 15, 1981, at 6 p.m.
Discussion concerning the French proposal of a loan to Germany guaranteed by Great Britain, France, and America.
257
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Telephone conversations, July 15, with (1) the Ambassador in Germany, who gave an account of the current situation and of the emergency measures being taken by Germany; (2) President Hoover, who pointed out the impossibilities of a loan as proposed by the French, but stated that the New York banks would agree to continue to hold the current amount of trade acceptances if the British and French banks would do likewise.
260
July 16 (245) From the British Ambassador
Invitation to a Conference of Ministers at London on July 20.
(Footnote: Information that a reply was sent on July 22 stating that the Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Treasury would attend.)
263
July 16 (237) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Message sent to Paris for the Secretary of State: Information that the German Chancellor is going to Paris for conversations before the Conference of Ministers.
264
Undated Memorandum of a Conversation at the Residence of the American Ambassador in France, July 16, 1931, at 3:45 p.m.
Conference of American, British, and French officials in which the French Minister of Finance outlined his proposal for a loan to Germany.
265
July 16 (362) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Secretary of State: Opinion that the French loan plan is completely impractical; advice that the Governor of the Bank of England has expressed the same view.
268
Undated Memorandum of Telephone Conversation
Conversation between the Secretary of State in Paris and the Counselor of Embassy in London, July 17, in which the Secretary said that it should be made clear in London that the British Foreign Minister had agreed to the suggestion that the Germans should visit Paris first.
270
Undated Memorandum of a Conference at the Office of Prime Minister Laval in the Ministry of the Interior, Paris, July 17, 1981, at 11 a.m.
Conference of American, British, and French officials to discuss the character of the conference to be held at Paris.
270
[Page LV]Undated Memorandum of Telephone Conversation
Conversation between the Secretary of State in Paris and the Prime Minister in London regarding the purposes of the forthcoming Conference in London.
271
July 17 (265) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Secretary of State: Indications that the French are trying to prolong the Paris conversations; suggestion that U. S. representatives state their intention of leaving for London July 19.
273
Undated Memorandum of Telephone Conversation
Conversation between the Secretary of State in Paris and President Hoover in Washington, July 17, regarding the conversations to be held in Paris; President’s approval of the attempt to thrash out political questions in Paris before going to London.
273
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the German Ambassador in France, Paris, July 17, 1931, at 7 p.m.
Secretary’s emphasis on the importance of the German representatives’ adopting a conciliatory attitude in their conversations with the French.
274
July 17 (369) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For the Secretary of State: Critical analysis of the situation facing the London Conference; and request for expression of views.
275
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of Conversations With M. Flandin and With Mr. Jay, of Morgan & Company, at the Residence of the American Ambassador in France, July 17, 1931
Conversation with the French Finance Minister in regard to the importance of a conciliatory attitude on the part of the French; and with Mr. Jay in regard to the bad effects which would result from the proposed action of Morgan & Co.
278
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With M. Laval, Paris, July 18, 1931
Secretary’s opinion that Laval would meet a helpful attitude in London.
280
July 19 (218) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For the Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Treasury: Proposals to be put before the Conference: vigorous action by the German Government and the Reichsbank to stop internal flight from the mark; maintenance for an adequate period of the present lines of credit; strict control by the Reichsbank of all foreign exchange transactions; and selection of a committee to consider further credit needs of Germany.
280
July 19 (137) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Provisions of the Presidential decrees of July 18 and 19 concerning taxes and the flight of capital; provisions of the governmental regulation issued July 18 respecting banking practices.
282
[Page LVI]July 19 (219) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For the Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Treasury: Considerations in support of the proposal set forth in Department’s No. 218 of July 19.
283
July 19 (461) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Account of a conversation on July 18 between German and U. S. representatives in which the German Chancellor agreed with the American ideas but insisted that a cash loan would be necessary; report of the July 19 conference at which were set forth in general terms the American, British, French, German, Italian, Belgian, and Japanese positions.
286
July 19 (462) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Communiqué issued following the final Franco-German conversation in Paris (text printed).
297
July 20 (255) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From the Secretary of State: Report of the first session of the Conference at London, in which the needs of Germany were set forth by the German Chancellor.
298
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Telephone conversation, July 20, with President Hoover, who was informed that the British were in accord with the U. S. proposals as set forth in the Department’s Nos. 218 and 219.
299
July 21 (257) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From the Secretary of State: Report on the morning session, at which the French and Germans finally agreed with the U. S. position that the stabilizing of credit was the primary necessity, following which the U. S. proposition was presented and a committee of the Finance Ministers appointed to draw up a formula for some such recommendation.
301
July 21 (258) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From the Secretary of State: Minute drafted by the Finance Ministers (text printed) providing for: (1) renewal for 3 months of Central Bank credit of $100,000,000, (2) rediscount by Central Banks of internal commercial bills, and (3) measures for stabilizing credit.
305
July 22 (260) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From the Secretary of State: Account of the morning session, at which provisions (1) and (3) of the Finance Ministers’ minute were adopted, and at which the Secretary submitted the U. S. proposal for a committee to consider the further credit needs of Germany.
306
July 22 (261) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that the Finance Ministers have drafted a resolution which omits paragraph (2) of their previous minute; opinion that the resolution will be adopted by the Conference.
312
July 23 Declaration of the London Conference, 1931
Text of the declaration approved at the final session, July 23.
313
[Page LVII]July 23 (234) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For the Secretary of State: Message of congratulation from President Hoover.
314
Aug. 8 From the Consul at Basel (tel.)
Report on the first meeting of the committee of 10 nominees of Central Banks (the Wiggin Committee) set up in accordance with the recommendation of the London Conference.
(Footnotes: List of personnel of the Committee; information that on August 11 invitations were extended to bankers in countries having credits in Germany to confer with the Committee in regard to prolonging such credits.)
314
Aug. 11 To President Hoover
Explanation of the course followed at the Conference in London; report of later conversations with various groups.
315
Aug. 19 From the Consul at Basel (tel.)
Information that the banking representatives have reached an agreement (“Standstill” Agreement) providing for the continuation for 6 months of the present German credits. Report on the recommendations of the Wiggin Committee.
323
Aug. 21 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State of a Conversation With the German Ambassador
Ambassador’s desire for advice as to steps Germany should take to obtain further relief following the moratorium year.
324
Oct. 3 From the Ambassador in Germany
Conversation with the Chancellor, who explained necessity for extension of the Standstill Agreement and for further relief from reparations.
326
Oct. 20 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State of a Conversation With the German Ambassador
Ambassador’s presentation of a statement of Germany’s present financial position which his Government felt President Hoover should have before beginning his talks with the French Prime Minister.
331

vii. meeting of the young plan advisory committee, basel, december 8–23, 1931

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Oct. 26 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the German Ambassador
Ambassador’s inquiry about the conversations between President Hoover and the French Prime Minister, and request for advice.
332
Oct. 27 (193) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Information that the President and the French Prime Minister agreed that (1) Germany should seek relief from reparations by applying for the designation of an advisory committee under the Young Plan, and (2) if the committee should recommend such relief, the President would recommend to Congress a reconsideration of the debt settlements.
333
[Page LVIII]Oct. 31 (210) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Chancellor’s opinion that a request for the appointment of the Young Plan Committee would jeopardize negotiations for a prolongation of the short-term credits, which he considers more important at present.
335
Nov. 4 (710) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
Report of a conversation between French officials and the German Ambassador in France in regard to the terms of reference to the Young Plan Committee.
337
Nov. 6 (213) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s account of the conversations at Paris in which the Germans expressed the hope to obtain French agreement that the Committee’s investigations shall cover the whole field of German finances.
339
Nov. 10 (195) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Advice that negotiations in relation to the Standstill Agreement are being left to the private interests concerned.
340
Nov. 12 (214) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Report on the conversations at Paris; information that the French are seeking a side agreement with the Germans to guarantee the French position regardless of the eventual recommendations of the Committee.
341
Nov. 13 (196) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Advantages of a prompt settlement of the Standstill credits; and instructions to inform the German Government that the bankers are ready to discuss the subject.
342
Nov. 14 (215) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s assertion that the prompt appointment of a committee of bankers to consider the Standstill credits is being held up by French opposition.
343
Nov. 14 (122) From the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Report on a conversation with the German Legation indicating that the chief difficulty in the Paris negotiations is the French demand for a separate agreement guaranteeing payments to France.
344
Nov. 17 (198) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
U. S. opposition to any limitation on the scope of the Committee’s work or to the securing of a special advantage by any country; opinion that the French opposition regarding the committee of bankers is unreasonable.
345
Nov. 19 (221) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Conversation with the Chancellor regarding the efforts to reach an agreement with the French for the convoking of the Young Plan Committee.
347
Nov. 19 (223) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Information that the Germans have reached an agreement with the French.
349
[Page LIX]Nov. 23 From the Consul at Basel
German memorandum to the Bank for International Settlements, November 19 (text printed), applying for convocation of the Special Advisory Committee under the Young Plan.
349
Dec. 3 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the French Ambassador
U. S. inability to agree with certain statements made in a recent speech by the French Prime Minister.
352
[Dec. 2] To the French Ambassador
Assertion that the U. S. Government does not regard the recent statements of the Prime Minister as representing an agreement or understanding arrived at with the United States.
353
Dec. 9 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the French Ambassador
Memorandum (text printed) setting forth French Government’s position, including the opinion that an intergovernmental conference should meet to consider the recommendations of the Young Plan Committee.
354
Dec. 23 From the Consul at Basel (tel.)
For the Under Secretary of State: Advice that final agreement on report has been reached and will be signed at 8:30 p.m.
357

Negotiations Looking Toward a Solution of the Problem of French and Italian Naval Construction

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Jan. 9 (3) From the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Opinion that the negotiations should not be pushed until the French Government becomes stabilized.
358
Feb. 3 (35) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Understanding that suggestions have been made to Paris as a result of the visits of Craigie, British Foreign Office official, to Geneva and Rome; British suggestion that the U. S. Ambassador in France indicate informally to the Foreign Minister the concern of the United States in the outcome of the negotiations.
359
Feb. 4 (34) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Instructions for informal conversation with the Foreign Minister.
359
Feb. 14 (1259) From the Ambassador in France
Information that Craigie is coming to Paris for conversations with Massigli, of the French Foreign Ministry; decision to postpone meeting with Foreign Minister until after Craigie’s visit; and report on Craigie’s account of conversations held so far.
360
Feb. 19 (47) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Conversation with the Prime Minister regarding Craigie’s conversations in Paris and the attitude of the British Government.
365
[Page LX]Feb. 23 (50) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that French proposals brought back by Craigie cannot be accepted by the British and that the Foreign Minister, the First Lord of the Admiralty, and Craigie have gone to Paris for further conversations.
367
Feb. 25 (54) From the British Ambassador
Terms of a provisional agreement reached by the British and French officials in Paris; information that the British have proceeded to Rome to present the proposals to the Italians.
368
Feb. 26 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Opinion that the form of the arrangement is important and that joint declarations by France and Italy might be the most practical.
370
Feb. 28 (29) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Communiqué issued in Rome (text printed) stating that an agreement has been reached and that the British are leaving to present it to the French.
370
Mar. 1 (93) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Foreign Office statement (text printed) setting forth a telegram sent to the Italian Foreign Minister (text printed) accepting the accord reached at Rome.
371
Mar. 2 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the British Ambassador
U. S. attitude toward any reduction in the size of battleships.
372
Mar. 5 From the British Ambassador
British views regarding the agreement; and opinion that it should take the form of separate declarations.
373
Mar. 6 To the British Ambassador
U. S. views with regard to the form which the agreement should take.
374
Mar. 10 From the British Ambassador
Foreign Minister’s opinion that a drafting committee should be convoked, and hope that the United States will be represented.
376
Mar. 11 From the British Ambassador
Request for early reply as to whether the United States will be represented on the drafting committee.
376
Mar. 12 From the Italian Ambassador
Last-minute modifications which the French have asked of the Italians; and reasons why Italy cannot accept them.
377
Mar. 13 To Senator Dwight W. Morrow (tel.)
Advice that the British wish the United States to be represented on the drafting committee; request that the Senator (en route to Europe) stop by London and talk over the matter with the British.
379
Mar. 14 (1753) From the Counselor of Embassy in Great Britain
Bases of agreement reached March 1 (text printed).
379
[Page LXI]Mar. 14 To the British Ambassador
Explanation that no decision will be made on U. S. participation in the drafting committee until after Senator Morrow’s visit to London.
382
Mar. 14 (69) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Advice concerning Senator Morrow’s coming visit; essential points of Department’s views on the drafting problem.
383
Mar. 18 Memorandum of Trans-Atlantic Telephone Conversation
Conversation between the Secretary of State in Washington and Senator Morrow in London regarding the conversations taking place in London.
384
Mar. 25 From Senator Dwight W. Morrow
Report on the status of the disarmament question.
387
Mar. 28 (45) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s attitude of exasperation with respect to the last-minute changes in the agreement.
390
Mar. 30 (86) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Request for information on the difficulties which have arisen with regard to the final terms.
390
Apr. 1 (97) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Statement obtained from Craigie of the difficulties which have arisen (text printed).
391
Apr. 2 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Western European Affairs of a Conversation With the Italian Ambassador
Ambassador’s explanation of the last-minute difficulties with the French.
392
Apr. 20 (115) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that the French are preparing to present a new suggestion.
392
Apr. 23 (206) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Receipt of an outline of the new French proposal of April 20.
393
Apr. 27 (123) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
British memorandum sent to the French Ambassador on April 25 (text printed) setting forth reasons why the French suggestion cannot be accepted, and proposing a compromise solution. British memorandum sent to the Italian Ambassador on April 25 (text printed) transmitting a copy of the reply sent to the French and expressing the hope that the Italians can accept the compromise solution.
394
Apr. 29 Memorandum by the French Embassy
Text of April 20 note to the British and Italian Governments.
400
May 1 (112) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether the French are likely to accept the British counterproposal.
404
May 2 (130) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Indications that an atmosphere of compromise is being produced by consideration of what a final failure would mean.
405
[Page LXII]May 2 (131) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Assertion by the First Lord of the Admiralty that he has no information as to whether the French will accept the British proposal; and statement (text printed) of the Admiralty’s position on the French proposal.
406
May 5 (1912) From the Ambassador in Great Britain
Memorandum from the Italian Government to the British Government, May 1 (text printed), accepting the British suggestion of April 25 and enclosing a memorandum to the French Government, May 1 (text printed), setting forth the reasons why the French proposal of April 20 cannot be accepted.
407
May 7 From the British Chargé
Aide-mémoire (text printed) explaining the difference of opinion regarding the interpretation of the March 1 bases of agreement, and setting forth the reasons why neither the French interpretation nor the French proposal of April 20 can be accepted.
411
May 9 Memorandum by the Assistant Chief of the Division of Western European Affairs
Conversation between the Secretary of State, the Under Secretary of State, and the British Chargé in regard to the possibilities of meeting the French position.
414
May 16 (57) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Advice that the British-French-Italian conversations cannot be resumed until it is known whether Briand will remain in office as French Foreign Minister.
417
May 21 (140) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Inquiry concerning report that the British are studying a new French proposal; tentative suggestions to be presented to the Prime Minister only upon later instructions.
418
May 22 (141) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to delay speaking to the Prime Minister in order to review the matter with Marriner, newly assigned Counselor of Embassy in France.
419
May 26 (81) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Indications that the tension between Italy and France has lessened.
419
June 5 (169) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that Marriner will come to London and see the Foreign Minister at an early date; report that Craigie, in conversation with French and Italian representatives, made a personal suggestion of a 5–year agreement.
420
June 11 (183) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
From Marriner: Conversations with Craigie and with the Foreign Minister indicating that the British Government has not accepted the 5–year plan; Craigie’s opinion that a like plan may emerge from Franco-Italian conversations following the reconstitution of the French Government on June 13.
421
Aug. 22 (525) From the Chargé in France (tel.)
Advice that the French have sent a new proposal to the Italians.
424
[Page LXIII]Aug. 27 (1763) From the Chargé in France
Memorandum from the French Government to the Italian Government, August 21 (text printed), setting forth new proposals.
424
Aug. 31 (159) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Information that the Italians find the new French proposals unacceptable.
428
Aug. 31 (160) From the Ambassador in Italy (tel.)
Personal views of the Foreign Minister regarding the latest French proposal.
429
Sept. 20 (146) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information that Craigie informed Massigli that the latest French proposal was unacceptable to the British; inquiry by Craigie as to whether the United States might indicate a willingness to discuss a reduction in the maximum size of battleships.
430
Sept. 22 (120) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
View that it would be unwise to indicate any willingness to consider the question of the size of battleships.
431
Oct. 9 (1080) From the Chargé in Italy
Memorandum from the Italian Government to the French Government (text printed) explaining why the August 21 French proposal is unacceptable, but expressing willingness to continue the negotiations on the basis of agreement reached on March 1.
432
Oct. 20 (231) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Resume” of facts surrounding the decision of Craigie and the Italian representative to recommend a proposal involving the application of the March 1 basis of agreement to a period of 5 instead of 6 years.
435
Nov. 12 (435) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that the 5–year proposal has been sent to the French.
437
Nov. 18 From Mr. Augusto Rosso
Proposal sent to the French Government November 11 (text printed).
437
Dec. 3 (619) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
For Dawes: Hope that an occasion will arise for pointing out to the Foreign Minister and the Prime Minister the desirability of examining the Italian memorandum sympathetically.
438
Dec. 17 (896) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Information that no reply has been made to the Italian proposal.
439
1932 Jan. 19 (18) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Advice that the French have asked the British for more information on the 5–year proposal, but that no reply will be made before the General Disarmament Conference.
439
[Page LXIV]

GENERAL

The Armaments Truce of November 1, 1931

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Sept. 8 (119) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Speech made by the head of the Italian delegation to the Assembly of the League of Nations (extract printed) proposing an armaments truce during the 1932 Disarmament Conference; request for guidance in expressing opinions on this matter.
440
Undated Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Current Information of the Press Conference of the Secretary of State, September 9, 1931
Indication by the Secretary that details of the Italian proposal have not been received but that the United States is friendly to such moves.
441
Sept. 10 (120) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Report on a speech by the head of the British delegation in support of the Italian proposal.
442
Sept. 11 (103) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Instructions to deliver a message of sympathetic interest to the head of the Italian delegation.
442
Sept. 11 (575) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Information that the Italian proposal is being received in France with animosity; and report of grounds upon which the opposition is based.
443
Sept. 11 (124) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Resolution introduced by the Danish delegation (extract printed) providing for the proposed truce; information that the Italians desire the matter to be referred to the Third Committee for discussion.
444
Sept. 16 (132) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Formula which the Italian delegate plans to submit to the Third Committee; inquiry as to whether the United States could be represented on the Committee for the purpose of discussing the proposed truce.
445
Sept. 18 (113) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Opinion that the United States should be represented; advice that the United States cannot give up the destroyers for which bids have already been let.
446
Sept. 18 (141) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Views as to how the destroyer situation might be handled, and request for further information on the subject.
447
Sept. 18 (139) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Indications that on September 19 the Third Committee will invite the United States, Russia, and Turkey to participate in its discussions of the proposed truce.
448
Sept. 18 [19?] (142) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information that invitations will be sent to all countries not members of the League.
448
Sept. 19 (114) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Authorization to accept the invitation and to act as the U. S. representative.
449
[Page LXV]Sept. 20 (147) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Request for approval of speech to be made to the Committee (extract printed).
450
Sept. 20 (115) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Further information concerning the destroyer program, and suggestions for handling the situation.
451
Sept. 21 (149) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Final paragraph of proposed speech (text printed) revised in accordance with Department’s No. 115 of September 20.
452
Sept. 21 (150) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Advice that the Scandinavian proposal was discussed at the afternoon session.
452
Sept. 22 (154) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information as to whether various countries have accepted or declined the invitation to be represented on the Committee.
453
Sept. 22 (155) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Speech by the Italian delegate (extract printed) setting forth the Italian formula.
453
Sept. 23 (158) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Positions taken by various countries in the afternoon session.
454
Sept. 24 (162) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Suggestion put forward by the Spanish delegate.
455
Sept. 24 (163) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
French counterproposal which several countries supported. Appointment as member, in a consultative capacity, of a drafting committee which it is hoped can formulate a text that will be adopted unanimously.
456
Sept. 25 (164) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Indications in meeting of drafting committee that no proposal made so far will be accepted unanimously; alternative formula proposed. Request for Department’s views.
456
Sept. 25 (128) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Opinion that the proposal set forth in the Minister’s No. 164 would not provide a real truce; formula which it is thought will best meet the U. S. position.
457
Sept. 26 (167) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Draft resolution submitted by the Bureau of the subcommittee of the Third Committee (text printed) providing for a budgetary limitation; alternative French draft (text printed) which omits all reference to the budgetary limitation. Hope that authorization can be given to accept whichever the majority favors.
458
Sept. 27 (168) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Indications that the British and Italians will accept the French draft.
461
Sept. 27 (129) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Authorization to acquiesce in the French draft.
461
[Page LXVI]Sept. 27 (169) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Advice that conversations have revealed that French text may permit France to continue its 5-year building program, and that Italy now refuses to accept it; opinion that agreement cannot be reached except on the Scandinavian resolution.
462
Sept. 27 (130) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information that the Scandinavian resolution is unacceptable; instructions to consult with the French and Italians in the hope of arriving at a suitable text.
462
Sept. 29 (170) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information that the Third Committee has adopted a resolution which is a slightly revised version of the French text; opinion that its chief merit is that it will prevent surprises during the Disarmament Conference.
463
Sept. 29 (171) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Report finally adopted by the Third Committee (text printed).
464
Sept. 29 (172) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Advice that the Assembly has adopted the resolution and report of the Third Committee.
468
Oct. 1 (133) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Request for texts of any statements made by delegates expressing the opinion that the truce does not affect ships under construction.
468
Oct. 2 (177) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information requested in the Department’s No. 133 of October 1.
468
Oct. 2
[C.L.257. 1931. IX]
From the Secretary-General of the League of Nations
Request for U. S. acceptance of armaments truce.
469
Oct. 29 (144) To the Chargé in Switzerland (tel.)
Note for the Secretary-General of the League (text printed) accepting the armaments truce.
470
Nov. 14
[C. L. 293. 1931. IX]
From the Secretary-General of the League of Nations
Advice that the truce has been accepted for one year as from November 1 by all the governments invited to the Disarmament Conference.
470

Preparations for the General Disarmament Conference

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Dec. 6 From the Chairman of the American Delegation on the Preparatory Commission for the Disarmament Conference
Report on the kind of Conference which seems to be in prospect. Opinion that the most to be hoped for is an agreement to stabilize armaments at existing levels; that the U. S. role will be limited to exerting a helpful influence. Indications that Beneš will be chairman.
471
[Page LXVII]Dec. 7 From the Minister in Switzerland
Information concerning arrangements being made for the Conference.
476
1931 Jan. 2 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Western European Affairs of a Conversation with the British Ambassador
Desire of the British and other European Governments that one of the two vice presidents should be an American.
477
Jan. 6 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the British Ambassador
U. S. reasons for inability to accept a vice presidency of the Conference.
478
Jan. 10 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Western European Affairs of a Conversation With the British Ambassador
Discussion of U. S. refusal to accept a vice presidency.
479
Undated [Rec’d Jan. 10] From the British Embassy
Foreign Minister’s disappointment at U. S. refusal, and hope that the Secretary will reconsider.
480
Jan. 13 (11) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Note sent to the British Ambassador (text printed) explaining why the United States cannot accept so great a responsibility; instructions to discuss the substance of the note with the Prime Minister.
(Footnote: Similar note handed to the French Ambassador on January 19.)
481
Jan. 15 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State of a Conversation With the British Ambassador
Assurance given to the Ambassador that the U. S. refusal to accept a vice presidency did not mean that the United States had changed its views on disarmament.
482
Jan. 18 (10) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Impressions which have arisen as to the U. S. position in regard to the Conference; request for views.
483
Jan. 19 (8) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Advice that the United States wishes to hold aloof from commitments with respect to the Conference until the Versailles Treaty powers have initiated direct conversations among themselves, since the success of the Conference depends on such initiative.
485
Jan. 21 (11) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Report on the activities of the Council, and indication that there is no opposition to the Secretary’s views regarding the necessity for direct conversations.
485
Jan. 22 (25) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Account of conversation with the Prime Minister, who agreed with the Secretary’s views regarding the necessary preparations for the Conference, and mentioned some of the problems involved.
487
Jan. 23 (14) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Council’s decision that the Conference shall meet at Geneva February 2, 1932; that the chairman shall be named at a later sitting of the Council; and that the preparatory work shall be carried on by the rapporteur.
488
[Page LXVIII]Jan. 24 From the Minister in Switzerland
Explanation of the Council’s method of preparation, which does not as yet include a recommendation of direct conversations.
488
Feb. 20 (48) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s desire to know whether he may expect any suggestions from the Secretary on means of giving effect to the idea of consultations between the principal powers.
490
Feb. 28 (52) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
List of problems which it seems evident require direct consultation before the Conference convenes; and suggestions as to possible procedure.
491
Apr. 17 From the Minister in Switzerland
Account of conversation with the Secretary-General of the League, who expressed his views regarding the election of a president and preparation for the Conference, and also indicated that he thought the British Foreign Minister would be willing to accept the chairmanship.
492
May 4 Address by President Hoover
Emphasis upon the importance of the Disarmament Conference in connection with efforts toward the economic rehabilitation of the world.
(Footnote: Delivered before the Sixth General Congress of the International Chamber of Commerce.)
493
May 21 To the British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Congratulations upon appointment as President of the Conference.
495
May 22 From the British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Expression of appreciation for congratulatory message.
496
May 25 Memorandum by the Assistant Chief of the Division of Western European Affairs
Conversation between officials of the State and Navy Departments in which the Chief of Naval Operations reported on his studies of the size and armament of battleships, and in which various points regarding the future U. S. naval program were discussed.
496
May 26 From the Minister in Switzerland
Report on the atmosphere of the Council session in which it seems that no one except the British regarded the prospect of the Conference with anything but apprehension.
498
May 28 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the British Ambassador
Secretary’s assurance that the United States had not asked for nor suggested a postponement of the Conference.
500
May 28 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the French Ambassador
Prospects of the Conference.
500
June 9 From the Ambassador in France to President Hoover
General review of current situation in France, and suggestion that United States might propose financial aid in the form of debt reduction in return for substantial disarmament concessions.
501
[Page LXIX]June 10 (158) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that figures have been submitted to League Secretariat and are being released to the press showing position of U. S. armaments, that Russia is only country which has submitted similar figures, and that hers are being kept secret; request to be informed of any public comment on Russia’s secrecy.
505
July 24 (1672) From the Chargé in France
Information that in the memorandum published July 22 for the purpose of informing the League of the present status of French armed forces, France has made it clear that she can make no further armament reduction unless her security and the status quo in Europe are guaranteed.
506
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, London, July 80, 1981, at 12:15 p.m.
British preparations for the Conference.
508
July 30 From the Ambassador in France to President Hoover
Report on the reception given President Hoover’s moratorium proposal; opinion that now is the time to strike the next blow for armament reduction; views as to present and possible future policy in France; and suggestions as to ways of overcoming French opposition to disarmament.
509
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the British Prime Minister at Sciberscross Farmhouse, Scotland, August 7, 1981
Discussion regarding French and British policies regarding military assistance in the event of aggression, the Prime Minister’s opinion that the Versailles Treaty must be amended eventually, the steps which he thought should be taken to that end, and the recent British resolution on disarmament.
514
Aug. 5 From the Chargé in Great Britain
Corrected copy of a German memorandum on the replacement of German battleships (text printed) which the Counselor of the German Embassy in Great Britain has requested that the Secretary substitute for the one handed him in Berlin.
517
Aug. 28 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State of a Conversation With President Hoover
Discussion of reports that the Disarmament Conference would be postponed; President’s authorization of a statement that the United States would be exceedingly disappointed at any postponement.
520
Aug. 28 (97) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Instructions to make clear whenever possible that the United States would deplore any idea of postponing the Conference.
520
Sept. 10 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the German Ambassador
Secretary’s opinion that the change in the British Government would not make any change in British policy toward the Conference.
521
Sept. 10 (102) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Summary of views on disarmament questions as given to the press for background material.
522
[Page LXX]Sept. 10 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the French Chargé
Variance in French and U. S. views on security and disarmament.
523
Sept. 16 (2258) From the Ambassador in Great Britain
Information that the new British “National” Government is opposed to any postponement of the Conference; that the British feel that a change of attitude in France can best be brought about by persuasion rather than by active opposition; and that there is a small group in England, with Winston Churchill as spokesman, who maintain that Great Britain is descending into unpreparedness and who oppose further disarmament.
526
Oct. 2 (629) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Conversation with the French Foreign Minister, who stated that he thought a percentage budgetary reduction would win general support, that a formula for implementing the Pact of Paris could be found, and that France would be satisfied with a Franco-American consultative pact.
531
Undated [Rec’d Dec. 5] From the British Embassy
British view that the naval figures to be inserted in the disarmament convention will be in accordance with the Washington and London naval treaties and that they will be coterminous; request for information as to whether the United States shares this view.
532
Dec. 17 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State of a Conversation With the British Ambassador
British opposition to any postponement of the Disarmament Conference, and suggestion that the opening days of the Conference be devoted to making clear the positions of the various Governments and presentation of any propositions that they might wish to make.
533
Dec. 22 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the French Ambassador
Ambassador’s assertion that France had not consented to any postponement of the Conference but that Great Britain had made a démarche in favor of postponement to France, Poland, and Czechoslovakia.
533
Dec. 29 (176) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Personnel of the American delegation to the Conference, for the information of the Secretary-General of the League.
534
Undated [Rec’d Dec. 30] To the British Embassy
Agreement with the British view regarding the naval figures for the disarmament convention; opinion, however, that it should not be limited to the period up to December 31, 1936; suggestion for providing a possible longer duration.
535

Visit of the Secretary of State to Europe

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Apr. 16 (143) To the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Plan to visit Rome, Berlin, Paris, and London; request for comments on advisability of such a trip so far as France is concerned.
536
[Page LXXI]Apr. 18 From the Ambassador in France
Opinion that much good could be accomplished through a visit by the Secretary to Paris; comments on French public opinion.
537
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of Conversations With the Italian Minister for Foreign Affairs, Rome, July 9, 1931, 12 noon and 4 p.m.
Discussion of the debt moratorium; the question of disarmament and preparations for the Conference; Franco-Italian relations, including the naval disagreement; the proposed Austro-German Customs Union; and the effects of the depression on Italy.
538
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Head of the Italian Government, Rome, July 9, 6 p.m.
Favorable attitude of Mussolini toward the debt moratorium and the Disarmament Conference.
542
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of Conversations With the Italian Minister for Foreign Affairs, Rome, July 9, 11, and 12, and With the Head of the Italian Government, Rome, July 12, 1931
Discussions of current international problems; Foreign Minister’s suggestion of a naval holiday and his agreement that it would be well for the Secretary to sound out other nations on the subject.
Mussolini’s concurrence in the suggested procedure concerning the naval holiday.
544
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the German Chancellor, London, July 23, 1931
Discussion of militarism in Germany and the positions of the United States and Germany in the coming Disarmament Conference.
547
July 24 (266) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For the President and the Acting Secretary from the Secretary of State: Information regarding the German financial situation; account of conversation with Laval, President of the French Council of Ministers, concerning French relations with Germany, Italy, and Great Britain.
549
July 24 (133) To the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
For the Secretary of State: Explanation that it is impossible to do anything further for Germany unless the Germans change their pessimistic tone; request that this be made clear to them.
551
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With Members of the German Government at Embassy Dinner, Berlin, July 25, 1931
Secretary’s expression of his views on German militarism, and on the impossibility of getting bankers to loan money to Germany as long as she sounds so pessimistic.
552
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With President von Hindenburg, Berlin, July 27, 1981, 11:80 a.m.
Von Hindenburg’s hope for continued peace; Secretary’s explanation of the necessity for German courage and self-help in the financial crisis.
553
[Page LXXII]July 29 (274) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For the President and Acting Secretary from the Secretary of State: Account of visit to Berlin, and opinion that the situation has somewhat improved.
554
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the French Ambassador in Great Britain, London, July 30, 1931
Discussion of the underlying economic difficulty of the German situation and of the disarmament question.
555
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the British Prime Minister, London, July 31, 1931
Discussion of the financial situation, the disarmament question, and the methods of investment in France and Great Britain.
556
Aug. 12 From the Italian Minister for Foreign Affairs
Account of conversations held at Rome between the German Chancellor and the Head of the Italian Government and between the German and Italian Foreign Ministers.
558
Aug. 20 To the Italian Minister for Foreign Affairs
Expression of appreciation for the Foreign Minister’s letter of August 12 and pleasure at the progress indicated.
561
Undated Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the British Prime Minister, London, August 27, 1931, 8 a.m.
Discussion of British political and financial situation, the recent more optimistic view of the accomplishments of the London Conference, and the British delegation to the Disarmament Conference.
563

Interest of the United States in the Proposed Austro-German Customs Union

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Mar. 23 (35) From the Ambassador in Germany (tel.)
Information concerning a customs-union agreement being negotiated between Austria and Germany; German opinion that the treaties of St. Germain and Versailles and the Geneva protocol of 1922 would not be violated and that the most-favored-nation clause of the U. S.–German commercial treaty would not apply.
565
Mar. 24 (823) From the Ambassador in Germany
Report on the main features of the agreement, the attitude of the press, and the position taken by the German Government.
566
Mar. 26 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Italian Ambassador
Secretary’s statement that he had made no comment on the Customs Union; Ambassador’s assertion that Italy is inclined to favor it.
570
Mar. 26 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the French Ambassador
Temperate statements by the Ambassador concerning the Customs Union.
571
[Page LXXIII]Mar. 26 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the German Ambassador
Secretary’s indication that he had not reached a conclusion as to the effect upon the Customs Union of the most-favored-nation treaties.
572
Mar. 26 (21) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Report on various diplomatic moves relating to the Customs Union, including the British suggestion that the matter be submitted to the League Council; information concerning statements attributed to the U. S. State and Commerce Departments.
573
Mar. 26 (13) To the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether any country had claimed the advantages of the Belgo-Luxemburg Economic Union of 1921 under a most-favored-nation treaty with either country.
574
Mar. 27 (12) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Information that the U. S. Departments have taken no action since they have not as yet received a text of the agreement.
574
Mar. 28 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State of a Conversation With the German Ambassador
Ambassador’s view that the Customs Union has nothing to do with most-favored-nation treatment.
575
Mar. 28 (19) From the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Reply to Department’s No. 13 of March 26 to the effect that nothing pertinent has been found; views of the Secretary-General of the Belgian Foreign Office regarding the Customs Union.
575
Mar. 30 (15) To the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether in 1921 either Belgium or Luxemburg was a party to an unconditional most-favored-nation treaty.
576
Mar. 30 (14) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Instructions to make a report on how the proposed Union will affect Austro-American trade relations.
576
Mar. 30 (21) From the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Views of the German Government as expressed by a member of the Legation Staff: that the legal position of the Union is sound, that it would act as a stimulant in place of the Hitler Nationalist movement, and that it would eventually embrace Hungary, Rumania, Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, and Poland.
576
Mar. 31 (22) From the Ambassador in Belgium (tel.)
Information that in 1921 Belgium had unconditional most-favored-nation treaties with France, Great Britain, and the Netherlands.
577
Apr. 1 (43) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Position of the Swiss Government in regard to its most-favored-nation treaties and its customs union with Liechtenstein.
578
[Page LXXIV]Apr. 4 (30) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Information concerning effect the proposed Customs Union would have upon Austro-American trade.
578
Apr. 6 (19) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Inquiry as to the meaning of “interim duties,” referred to in Minister’s telegram No. 30.
579
Apr. 10 (1981) From the Minister in Switzerland
Report on current attitude of the Swiss Government toward the Customs Union.
579
Apr. 16 (577) From the Chargé in the Netherlands
Report on various reactions to the German-Austrian action and on the position of the Netherlands.
580
Apr. 21 (583) From the Chargé in the Netherlands
Background for view of the Netherlands Government that it has no grounds for protest against the proposed Union.
582
May 13 (255) From the Ambassador in France (tel.)
Information concerning French plans for opposing the Union, and an alternate plan for solving Europe’s problems, which France will present at Geneva.
583
May 18 (18) From the Minister in the Netherlands
Report on the present point of view of the Foreign Office regarding the relation of the most-favored-nation clause to the proposed Union.
585
May 18 (65) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Information that the British have proposed that the League Council seek an advisory opinion from the Permanent Court of International Justice on the juridical questions involved in the relationship of the Customs Union to the protocol of 1922 and the treaty of St. Germain.
586
May 19 (67) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Advice that the British proposal has been adopted, but that the powers have reserved their position on all but the legal side of the question.
587
May 21 (22) From the Minister in the Netherlands
Information from the President of the Permanent Court of International Justice concerning the expected procedure for considering the Customs Union matter.
588
June 12 From the Solicitor for the Department of State
Conclusion that under the most-favored-nation provision the United States would be entitled to claim from Austria and Germany any advantages which they might extend to each other.
588
Aug. 31 (100) From the Chargé in Austria (tel.)
Report that the Austrian Government has decided to abandon the idea of a Customs Union.
590
Sept. 3 (106) From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Statement by the Austrian Vice Chancellor (text printed) that Austria will pursue the Customs Union project no further; and similar statement by the German Foreign Minister.
591
[Page LXXV]Sept. 5 (29) From the Chargé in the Netherlands (tel.)
Decision by the Court that the Customs Union is not compatible with the Geneva Protocol.
591
Sept. 9 (120) From the Chargé in the Netherlands
Information concerning the Court’s decision.
592

Attendance of an Unofficial American Observer at Meetings of the Conference of Ambassadors

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Jan. 16 (1170) From the Ambassador in France
Information that Counselor of Embassy was sent to the 327th meeting of the Conference of Ambassadors as an unofficial observer in accordance with the precedent set by the preceding Ambassador of not attending in person.
593
Feb. 3 From the Ambassador in France
Further explanation of action in sending Counselor of Embassy to Conference of Ambassadors.
594
Feb. 18 To the Ambassador in France
Instructions to let future meetings go unattended unless there is some particular reason for American interest.
(Note: Explanation that the matter was left to the Embassy’s discretion; also that the Conference of Ambassadors apparently ceased to meet at this time.)
595

Tension Arising From German-Polish Relations With Respect to the Polish Corridor, Danzig, and East Prussia

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Apr. 11 From the Consul at Danzig (tel.)
Reports of alleged physical attacks on Polish citizens by members of the Hitler party; suggestion by Polish High Commissioner that a committee of U. S., British, and Belgian consuls be formed to investigate; and inquiry as to advisability of serving on committee if invited.
595
Apr. 15 To the Consul at Danzig (tel.)
Instructions to decline to serve, as Department desires to avoid becoming involved in controversies arising between Polish and Danzig authorities.
596
Apr. 16 From the Consul at Danzig (tel.)
Acknowledgment of the Department’s telegram of April 15.
596
June 9 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Polish Ambassador
Ambassador’s assertion that the question of the Polish Corridor is really another name for the actual difficulty, which is East Prussia; his opinion that an international agreement similar to the Locarno Agreement would help alleviate Germany’s fear for the safety of East Prussia.
596
[Page LXXVI]Oct. 15 (105) From the Ambassador in Poland (tel.)
Concern of Foreign Minister over U. S. press campaign in respect to Corridor question and appeal to the Secretary to use influence to abate disturbing publicity because of disquieting effect on Polish public opinion.
597
Oct. 20 (1025) From the Ambassador in Poland
Confirmation of Embassy’s No. 105, October 15; Polish attitude toward France and Germany in respect to the Corridor.
597
Undated Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Polish Ambassador, October 22, 1931
Ambassador’s account of his presentation to President Hoover, under instructions from Marshal Pilsudski, of political situation, including assertion that if Polish territory were invaded by German troops, Poland would march into Germany. Ambassador’s observations on increasing militaristic spirit of Germany.
599
Oct. 22 (1032) From the Ambassador in Poland
Report of conversation of member of Embassy staff with the Acting Political Director of the Foreign Office, who stressed the point that in addition to the unfortunate effect made by the American press comments on Polish public opinion, it was feared that the German point of view would also be affected at a time when cooperation between the two countries was so necessary.
601
Oct. 25 Press Release Issued by the White House
Statement that the President has made no suggestions of any kind for the revision of the Polish Corridor.
603
Dec. 2 (1144) From the Chargé in Poland
Explanation that the statement made by Marshal Pilsudski, that Poland would march into Germany if Polish territory were threatened by German irregular troops, was simply an attempt to silence the revisionist campaign on the part of the American press regarding the Corridor.
603

Refusal by the United States of Invitation by the League of Nations to Participate in a Special Committee to Study a Pact of Economic Non-Aggression

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Sept. 30 (No. 2260 L. N. No. 2136) From the Minister in Switzerland
Communication from the Secretary-General of the League of Nations (text printed) inviting the U. S. Government to participate in a committee to study a pact of economic non-aggression (text printed) proposed by the Russian delegate.
605
Oct. 16 (138) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Instructions to decline the invitation.
(Footnote: Information that a memorandum of October 13, prepared in the Division of Western European Affairs, states that the pact appears to offer nothing sufficiently practical to justify acceptance.)
607
[Page LXXVII]

Proposals for an International Conference on the Stabilization of Silver

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Feb. 12 (48) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Advice that the Pittman Subcommittee has recommended that the Senate advise the President to take certain measures in connection with the silver situation, including the calling of an international silver conference.
607
Feb. 16 (38) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions for sounding out the British Government as to its possible readiness to call an international silver conference, and reasons why it would be less appropriate for the U. S. Government to call such a conference.
608
Feb. 18 (57) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Advice as to instructions given to the Ambassador in Great Britain.
609
Feb. 20 (49) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Reply from the British Prime Minister (text printed) giving opinion that the conference should be called by the United States; expressing view that the silver problem is only a part of the larger economic problem, and making inquiry as to possible terms of reference and scope of deliberations.
609
Feb. 28 (51) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to inform the Prime Minister that matter is being considered but that reply cannot be made immediately.
610
Mar. 5 (67) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Communication from the Prime Minister, March 4 (text printed), asking if the President and the Secretary of State could exchange views with him regarding some big international move to ameliorate world economic conditions.
611
Mar. 11 (65) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Opinion that best results are achieved by concentration on particular subjects; instructions to express willingness to give sympathetic attention to specific ideas.
611
Apr. 7 (737) To the Ambassador in Great Britain
Information that the French Ambassador called and expressed interest in the silver question, indicating that he thought a conference would be beneficial, but would not commit himself as to his Government’s attitude.
612
May 7 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Japanese Ambassador
Possibility of Japan’s calling a silver conference.
613
May 14 (78) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Reasons for the Department’s belief that Japan should call the conference, and instructions for encouraging the idea.
614
May 18 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State
Conversation with the Japanese Ambassador in which the subject of a silver conference was again brought up in response to a request by President Hoover.
615
May 20 (137) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that Japan will not call a conference without assurance of attendance by Great Britain.
616
[Page LXXVIII]May 21 (158) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Report of a conversation with the Prime Minister, who spoke unfavorably of an official silver conference at this time.
617
June 1 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Japanese Ambassador
Further emphasis on the importance of a conference, and Ambassador’s indication that he had heard nothing from his Government and that he attributed the delay to opposition in London and Paris.
618
June 3 (76) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Report of a conversation with Japanese officials, who stated that any attempt by the Japanese Government to call a conference would probably be politically embarrassing to itself.
619
June 11 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Japanese Ambassador
Japanese Government’s decision that in view of British and French opposition, the present is not the time to call a conference.
619
July 25 (84) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information that Senator Swanson has suggested that the League of Nations extend invitations to a silver conference and that the United States attend; instructions to ascertain League’s attitude.
620
July 28 (99) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Report on conversation with the Acting Secretary-General of the League, who said that he thought he could prompt his Government (Germany) to present a resolution on a silver conference in the next session of the Assembly; request for Department’s attitude.
621
Aug. 7 (88) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Approval of plan to have Germany present proposal; instructions to push matter discreetly.
622
Aug. 12 (103) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Explanation that nothing further can be done in Geneva at present and that the matter can now best be handled in Berlin; suggestion that Italy be approached if Germany declines to act.
623
Aug. 26 (109) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information that Germany is not willing to sponsor the resolution; that suggestion has been made that Norman Davis bring the matter before the Finance Committee with a view to having that body present a recommendation to the Council.
624
Aug. 31 (111) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Advice that the Finance Committee is amenable to a resolution to create a committee to study the silver problem and the advisability of a conference; inquiry as to whether this would be satisfactory; opinion that Secretariat would not want a conference summoned without preliminary investigation.
625
Sept. 3 (101) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Instructions to sound out representatives of British and other governments at Geneva regarding proposal outlined in telegram No. 109 of August 26.
626
[Page LXXIX]Sept. 14 (128) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Report that the League does not wish to commit itself on a conference until the outlook is brighter; resolution providing for a study of the question (text printed) which it might be possible to have passed now.
627
Sept. 16 (108) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Opinion that the resolution might complicate matters; request for views.
628
Sept. 17 (135) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Reasons for the Finance Committee’s preference for a “study” rather than a “conference;” opinion that there are no indications that a study would be used to block a proposal for a conference.
628
Sept. 20 (144) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information that the Finance Committee has adjourned and that, in view of the Department’s apprehensions, no action was taken to bring about adoption of the resolution.
629
Oct. 7 (404) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Advice that the British Government has postponed further consideration of a silver conference until after the October 27 elections.
629
Oct. 23 (363) From the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Report of a conversation with the President of El Banco de Mexico, who reacted favorably to a suggestion that Mexico sponsor a silver conference.
629
Nov. 3 (370) From the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Report of a conversation with the Finance Minister; opinion that Mexico would call a conference if assured that the major powers would attend.
630
Nov. 4 (429) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that the Prime Minister manifests a prejudice against the calling of any conference in which the views of Great Britain and the United States do not coincide.
631
Nov. 19 (331) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to sound out the British in regard to accepting an invitation from Mexico.
632
Dec. 16 (462) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Assurance from the Foreign Secretary that the proposal of a conference in Mexico will be discussed in the Cabinet.
632

Participation of the United States in the Conference of Wheat Exporting Countries, London, May 18–23, 1931

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Apr. 24 (119) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Invitation from the Chairman of the forthcoming Conference of Wheat Exporting Countries (text printed) expressing hope that the United States will be represented.
632
[Page LXXX]Apr. 24 (316) From the Minister in Canada
Conversations between members of the Legation staff and Canadian officials in which the latter said that apparently the European nations were attempting to unite against the exporting nations of the American Continent and that there seemed little prospect of an agreement.
634
Apr. 25 (105) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that the Canadian Government is transmitting an official invitation to the U. S. Government and that the Ambassador will be advised when a decision is reached.
635
Apr. 27 (66) From the Canadian Chargé
Official invitation to the Conference of Wheat Exporting Countries to be held at Canada House in London.
635
Apr. 28 (124) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that no agenda has been prepared for the Conference.
636
Apr. 30 To the Canadian Chargé
Acceptance of Canadian Government’s invitation.
636
May 6 (118) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
List of U. S. representatives, and instructions to inform the Chairman.
637
May 23 (163) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Federal Farm Board from delegate at Conference: Resolution adopted at final session (text printed) proposing, among other things, a clearing house of information to serve exporting countries.
637
May 26 (147) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
For Olsen (Agriculture Department delegate at Conference) from Department of Agriculture: Request for opinion on value of clearing house.
639
May 27 (1976) From the Chargé in Great Britain
Report on the Conference prepared by the Secretary of the American delegation, May 26 (text printed).
639
May 28 (166) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
For Department of Agriculture from Olsen: Opinion that clearing house may be helpful and that U. S. participation is desirable.
642
June 15 From the Chairman of the American Delegation
Copy of report made June 12, to the Federal Farm Board relative to Conference (text printed), snowing contrast in European interest in export quotas and U. S. interest in acreage reduction.
642

Convention between the United States and other powers for limiting the manufacture and regulating the distribution of narcotic drugs, concluded at Geneva, July 13, 1931

Date and number Subject Page
[Page LXXXI]1930 Aug. 22 (323) From the British Ambassador
Inquiry as to whether the United States would be disposed to participate in a preliminary Conference on the Limitation of Manufacture of Dangerous Drugs; information that the present plans are to hold the Conference at Geneva.
646
Sept. 12 To the British Ambassador
Indication that John K. Caldwell will probably represent United States at the Conference; request for materials to be used by the Conference.
647
Sept. 26 (365) From the British Ambassador
Information concerning materials for the Conference.
647
Oct. 28 (1723–L. N.
1843)
From the Chargé in Switzerland
Decision of the Council of the League of Nations to convert the preliminary Conference of October 27, 1930, which was limited to 11 countries, to a general Conference for all states to be held May 27, 1931.
648
Nov. 12 (293) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
From Caldwell: Report that preliminary Conference closed with no agreement on quotas.
649
Dec. 23 To the Consul at Geneva (tel.)
Explanation of the character of the preliminary Conference, involving no commitments on the part of the governments participating.
649
1931 Jan. 20 To President Hoover
Recommendation that the United States participate in the conference of all states to be convened at Geneva on May 27, 1931, under the sponsorship of the Council of the League.
650
Mar. 12 (1931–L. N. 1955) From the Minister in Switzerland
Transmittal of various documents from the Secretary-General of the League, who requests that the U. S. delegates be empowered to deal with the questions involved.
652
Mar. 17 (31) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
U. S. acceptance of League’s invitation to the Conference; list of U. S. delegates.
653
May 6 To Certain Diplomatic Representatives in Latin America (cir. tel.)
Instructions to inform Government to which accredited of U. S. acceptance and to inquire as to that Government’s intentions.
(Footnotes: List of countries to which communication was sent, and indication of whether they replied in the affirmative or negative.)
653
May 8 To the Chairman of the American Delegation
General instructions for participation in Conference, including explanation that the United States favors, in addition to the import-export certificate system, a direct limitation of the quantities manufactured and of the raw materials allowed to factories.
654
May 30 (4) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Report on statement of U. S. principles made at morning plenary session.
657
[Page LXXXII]June 10 (13) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Unsuccessful efforts of certain countries to have principle of quota plan accepted; information that Japanese and French delegates have presented amendments along same lines as U. S. proposals and that the three can probably be worked into an acceptable plan.
658
June 15 (17) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Report on statement of U. S. views made in Limitation Committee, June 13.
659
June 22 (21) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Activities of past week, during which Japanese-French amendments were adopted as basis of discussion.
660
June 30 (31) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Additional proposals by Turkey and Yugoslavia.
661
July 2 (34) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Request for instructions concerning (1) proposed articles from Geneva Convention and (2) article proposed by Switzerland regarding possible disputes.
661
July 3 (15) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Request for delegation’s comment and recommendations on the points referred to in telegram No. 34, July 2.
662
July 4 (36) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information that the articles from the Geneva Convention may be included in an annex to the new convention; explanation that delegation does not feel competent to make recommendation concerning question of policy involved in leaving certain action to the League Council.
662
July 4 (37) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Information that Swiss amendment has been adopted but that U. S. delegation reserves its position.
663
July 7 (18) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Instructions concerning (1) article which would violate certain U. S. commercial treaties, and (2) provision for national measures stricter than those provided for in convention.
663
July 9 (42) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Summary of essential provisions of draft which is coming up for second reading.
664
July 11 (21) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Instructions in reply to the delegation’s No. 34, July 2; No. 36, July 4; and No. 42, July 9.
667
July 12 (44) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Indication that convention will be signed July 13; information that most of important U. S. proposals have been included; and further explanation concerning certain articles.
668
July 13 (22) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Instructions to remain in Geneva pending further instructions and to cable full final text.
670
[Page LXXXIII]July 14 (45) From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
List of countries who signed convention July 13, and advice that text is being cabled.
671
July 14 (89) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Considerations in favor of immediate signature of convention.
671
July 17 (24) To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
Authorization to sign convention with certain reservations (text printed); instructions not to sign final act but to present to President of Conference an explanatory letter (text printed).
672
July 26 (85) To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Explanation of the advisability of retaining the reservation concerning unrecognized regimes.
674
July 13 International Convention for Limiting the Manufacture and Regulating the Distribution of Narcotic Drugs
Text of convention and protocol of signature signed at Geneva.
675

Conference on the Suppression of Opium Smoking, Held at Bangkok, Siam, November 9–27, 1931

Date and number Subject Page
1931 June 19 (84) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Information that the Secretary-General of the League of Nations has invited the U. S. Government to participate in a conference on the control of opium smoking to be held in Bangkok, Siam, November 9, 1931.
699
Sept. 8 (118) From the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)
Additional information regarding the proposed Conference.
700
Sept. 14 To Mr. John K. Caldwell
Instructions to attend the Conference as an observer; explanation that, since the Conference apparently will not consider steps as drastic as the United States has already taken, it is unlikely that the United States will sign any resultant agreement.
700
Oct. 17 (27) To the Minister in Siam (tel.)
Instructions to inform the Foreign Office that a member of the Philippine Constabulary is being sent to the Conference.
702
Nov. 9 From the American Observer (tel.)
Report on opening session of Conference.
702
Nov. 11 Press Release Issued by the Department of State
U. S. position on questions to be considered at the Conference, as outlined in a statement by the American Observer on November 11 (text printed).
702
Nov. 12 From the American Observer (tel.)
Explanation that the statement of November 11 was made on the invitation of the President of the Conference and that so far there has been no hostile criticism.
705
[Page LXXXIV]Nov. 26 From the American Observer (tel.)
Information that agreement will be signed November 27; opinion that little has been accomplished.
706

Refusal of the United States to Adhere to the Convention of September 30, 1921, on Traffic in Women and Children

Date and number Subject Page
1931 July 1 (2111–L. N. 2054) From the Minister in Switzerland
Letter from the Secretary-General of the League of Nations, June 29 (text printed), enclosing, at the direction of the League Council, an invitation to the United States (text printed) to adhere to the 1921 convention at this time.
(Footnote: Excerpt from U. S. letter to the Secretary-General of March 8, 1922, explaining the constitutional difficulties which made U. S. adherence impossible.)
706
Aug. 18 To the Secretary-General of the League of Nations
Explanation that the situation described in U. S. letter of March 8, 1922, has not changed, and that, although sympathetic, the United States cannot adhere.
709

Cooperation of the United States With Several Other Governments in Reconnaissance Surveys for an Inter-American Highway

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Feb. 20 (301) From the Minister in Costa Rica
Advice that the Costa Rican Government, through the Pan American Union, will invite American engineers to come to Costa Rica to make preliminary surveys for the proposed Inter-American Highway.
709
Oct. 9 From the Acting Chief of the Bureau of Public Roads of the Department of Agriculture
Outline of program to be followed to complete the surveys, and request to be informed as soon as permission is granted by the various countries to make aerial surveys along the general routes indicated.
710
Oct. 15 (413) To the Ambassador in Mexico
Desire of the Bureau of Public Roads to obtain permission for Army airplanes to land in Mexico during survey of region in Guatemala near Mexican border; instructions to take matter up with proper authorities and report by cable.
712
Oct. 15 (145) To the Minister in Guatemala
Instructions to take up with the appropriate authorities the matter of the aerial surveys and report by cable results of action.
(Footnote: Similar instructions to missions in El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua.)
712
Oct. 27 (190) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that Nicaragua has granted permission to make aerial surveys for Inter-American Highway.
713
[Page LXXXV]Oct. 28 (177) From the Chargé in Honduras (tel.)
Permission granted by Honduras.
714
Nov. 2 (61) From the Minister in Guatemala (tel.)
Permission granted by Guatemala.
714
Nov. 20 (94) From the Minister in El Salvador (tel.)
Information that the President of Salvador has orally given permission for survey.
714
Dec. 11 (407) From the Ambassador in Mexico (tel.)
Note received from Foreign Office granting permission for possible landings by Army airplanes to be used in survey.
(Note: Information that final details of the reconnaissance survey were not completed until 1933.)
714

The Chaco Dispute Between Bolivia and Paraguay

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Apr. 25 (207) From the Chargé in Paraguay
Note from the Foreign Minister, April 20 (text printed), reaffirming Paraguay’s acceptance of good offices of neutrals and stating opinion that the time has come for Bolivia to indicate its acceptance or rejection.
715
May 12 (27) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Inquiry by the Foreign Minister as to whether the Department would favor cooperating with Brazil in proposing a plan for harmonizing all differences between Bolivia and Paiaguay.
717
May 14 (33) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Explanation that the Department does not favor Brazil’s proposal but would be prepared to cooperate if Brazil should make recommendations to the five neutral countries.
718
May 27 From the Bolivian Minister
Circular addressed by the Foreign Minister to the Legations of Bolivia abroad, April 11 (text printed), taking issue with certain statements made by the President of Paraguay on April 2.
719
June 8 To the American Diplomatic Representatives in Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, and Uruguay (cir. tel.)
Information that the neutral representatives have agreed on text of a note to be transmitted to Bolivia and Paraguay; transmittal of text, and instructions to present it to Government to which accredited for approval.
722
June 19 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State of Conversations With the Bolivian Minister and With the Paraguayan Chargé
Advisability of avoiding newspaper discussions, in view of the tension caused by a recent statement to the press by the Minister and the Chargé’s answer thereto.
723
June 22 To the American Diplomatic Representatives in Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, and Uruguay (cir. tel.)
Instructions to inform the Government to which accredited that the agreed-upon note will be delivered June 25.
724
[Page LXXXVI]June 22 (23) To the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Instructions to present agreed-upon note on June 25 (text printed) inquiring whether Bolivia is prepared to authorize its representatives in Washington to enter into direct negotiations, and reaffirming readiness of neutrals to have their representatives cooperate.
725
June 22 (20) To the Chargé in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to present agreed-upon note to Paraguayan Government on June 25 (text printed).
727
June 23 (41) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Account of action taken; instructions to inform the Foreign Minister and to state that the United States would welcome any support which Brazil might care to give.
729
June 23 (38) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s view that definite measures should be taken to effect reconciliation.
730
June 24 (24) To the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Advice that Bolivia has sent a note to Paraguay threatening to recall Bolivian Minister at Asuncién unless statements made by Paraguayan Chargé at Washington are rectified; telegram being sent to Paraguay (text printed) stressing inportance of conciliatory attitude; instructions to endeavor to prevent rupture of relations.
731
June 24 (61) From the Chargé in Paraguay (tel.)
Information that in note of June 23 Paraguay refused Bolivia’s request that Chargé at Washington be discredited.
731
June 24 (39) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Advice that Foreign Minister is prepared to support June 25 notes to Bolivia and Paraguay.
732
June 24 (45) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Information that Bolivia has refused to consider suggestion made by Brazilian Foreign Minister.
732
June 25 (59) From the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Report that suggestion was made to the Foreign Minister that present difficulty could perhaps be settled through neutrals.
732
June 26 (25) To the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Request for report on situation.
733
June 26 (22) To the Chargé in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to point out to the Foreign Minister the advantages of adopting a conciliatory attitude so that negotiations can proceed.
734
June 26 (60) From the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Report on second Bolivian note which has been sent to Asuncién but not delivered as yet; suggestion that Paraguay be urged to reply in such a way as to keep discussion open.
734
June 27 (65) From the Chargé in Paraguay (tel.)
Advice that Paraguay chooses to let matters rest with sending of note to Bolivia on June 23; opinion that further counsel would be futile.
735
[Page LXXXVII]June 27 (61) From the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Report on current attitudes of the press, and of political and military leaders.
736
June 27 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Paraguayan Chargé
Discussion of Paraguayan attitude toward Bolivia, and of U. S. hope that diplomatic relations will not be broken off between the two countries.
736
June 29 (42) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s concern over Bolivian-Paraguayan situation and willingness to support U. S. efforts.
737
June 29 (63) From the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Information that the second Bolivian note has not yet been delivered.
738
June 30 (49) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Explanation of policy being followed by the United States and neutrals; assertion that any support which Brazil can give along these lines will be welcomed.
738
June 30 (27) To the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Information that Bolivian Minister in Asuncién has been instructed to leave; instructions to try to get Bolivia to withhold action and discuss matter with neutrals in La Paz.
739
June 30 (64) From the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Advice that Foreign Minister was receptive to idea of conversations with neutrals and urged that Paraguay be sounded out along same lines; information that second Bolivian note was delivered June 29.
739
July 1 (23) To the Chargé in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to inquire whether Paraguay would accept efforts of neutrals and what are its views regarding a suitable settlement.
740
July 1 (28) To the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Instructions to ascertain Bolivian views regarding settlement of the incident.
740
July 1 (65) From the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Decision of Bolivian Government to accept Argentine arbitration.
741
July 1 (74) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Assertion by Under Secretary for Foreign Affairs that Argentina has not offered arbitration.
741
July 2 (69) From the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Report on current situation in Bolivia.
742
July 2 (67) From the Chargé in Paraguay (tel.)
Assertion by Foreign Minister that Paraguay considers matter closed and that recourse to good offices would be out of proportion to incident.
742
July 2 (70) From the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Report that Paraguayan reply to second Bolivian note has been received and considered unsatisfactory, and that Argentine offer of mediation has been withdrawn.
743
[Page LXXXVIII]July 3 (69) From the Chargé in Paraguay (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s explanation of Argentine offer.
743
July 3 (71) From the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Information that Bolivian Minister in Asuncién has been given definite instructions for departure.
743
July 3 (72) From the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Advice that Argentine activity is continuing despite withdrawal of mediation offer.
744
July 5 (70) From the Chargé in Paraguay (tel.)
Information that Bolivian Minister has left Asuncién.
744
July 5 (76) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Information from Argentine President that Argentina had offered to send a commission to the Chaco to prevent armed conflicts, but that neither country had yet accepted.
744
July 6 (73) From the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Information that Paraguayan Minister’s mission has been terminated; report on evidence of military movement.
745
July 7 (78) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Advice that Bolivia has accepted in principle the Argentine suggestion for reestablishing diplomatic relations with Paraguay.
745
July 10 (32) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Instructions to endeavor to obtain Bolivia’s views as to satisfactory settlement of matter with a view to renewing diplomatic relations.
746
July 10 (26) To the Chargé in Paraguay (tel.)
Instructions to obtain views of Paraguay as to how relations could be restored.
746
July 11 (78) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Assertion by Foreign Minister that informal conversations with Argentine Minister are in progress.
746
July 13 (79) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Report that no further steps have been taken in view of various reports concerning possibility of mediation by Argentina or by neutrals.
747
July 18 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State of a Conversation With the Brazilian Ambassador
Brazil’s urgent desire that the United States offer to arbitrate the boundary dispute; Ambassador’s apparent disappointment that the Department thought it necessary to have the neutrals take up the matter.
747
July 25 (84) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Note from the Foreign Office (text printed) stating, in reply to U. S. note of June 25, that Bolivia confirms its conditional acceptance of neutral good offices, and would be disposed to study a nonaggression pact in the Chaco.
748
[Page LXXXIX]July 28 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with the Argentine Ambassador in which the Ambassador explained Argentina’s unsuccessful efforts to adjust the Bolivian-Paraguayan diplomatic incident, and was in turn informed of the proposed U. S. action in regard to the Bolivian note of July 25.
750
July 30 (40) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Note which the representatives of the neutral Governments have agreed to recommend to be delivered to Bolivia (text printed) approving proposed nonaggression pact and suggesting that both Governments agree not to send more troops into the Chaco, to withdraw those already there, and give orders to prevent further clashes.
751
July 30 (29) To the Chargé in Paraguay (tel.)
Note similar to the one for Bolivia, which the neutral representatives have agreed to recommend to be delivered to Paraguay (text printed).
752
Aug. 5 (41) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Instructions to deliver agreed-upon note on August 6.
(Footnote: The same, mutatis mutandis, to the Chargé in Paraguay.)
753
Aug. 13 (85) From the Chargé in Paraguay (tel.)
Report that Argentine suggestion concerning policing of Chaco has been turned down by Paraguay.
753
Aug. 14 (95) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Explanation of Bolivia’s resentment of intervention by neutrals.
753
Aug. 17 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Latin American Affairs
Conversation with the Argentine Ambassador, who stated that his Government had abandoned its representations with respect to policing the Chaco but was continuing its efforts in behalf of a renewal of diplomatic relations.
754
Aug. 22 (87) From the Chargé in Paraguay (tel.)
Note from Foreign Minister, August 21 (extract printed), accepting proposal to study nonaggression pact but making no reference to suggestion regarding troops.
754
Sept. 4 (99) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Note from Foreign Office (text printed) expressing readiness to study nonaggression pact but refusing to withdraw troops already in Chaco.
755
Sept. 18 (52) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Note to be presented September 21 on behalf of the neutrals (text printed) suggesting that first meeting to study nonaggression pact be held in Washington October 1.
(Footnote: The same, mutatis mutandis, to the Minister in Paraguay.)
756
[Page XC]Oct. 3 (56) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Note for the Foreign Minister (text printed) stating that the neutral representatives have acceded to requests of both Governments that the first meeting be postponed and have now set the date as November 11.
(Footnote: The same, mutatis mutandis, to the Minister in Paraguay.)
757
Oct. 3 (57) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Note for the Foreign Minister (text printed) expressing concern of neutrals regarding recent clashes in the Chaco, and suggesting that each Government restrict its military forces to their forts.
(Footnote: The same, mutatis mutandis, to the Minister in Paraguay.)
757
Oct. 9 (70) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Indications that the military party in Bolivia tends to prevent the meeting in Washington or at least to obstruct its work. Advice that Foreign Minister is concerned and would like to know how he can cooperate with neutrals.
758
Oct. 9 (69) To the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Transmittal of telegram No. 70 from Ambassador in Brazil and reply being sent by Department (No. 70); instructions to take up matter with Foreign Minister with a view to securing any support which he can give.
(Footnote: The same, mutatis mutandis, to the Ambassadors in Chile and Peru.)
758
Oct. 9 (41) To the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether Paraguay has accepted the proposal to hold first meeting November 11 and the suggestion that military forces be confined within forts.
758
Oct. 9 (70) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Resume’ of action taken so far; instructions to explain the situation to the Foreign Minister and to say that any support which he can give will be welcomed.
759
Oct. 10 (103) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Names of members of Paraguayan Commission to study nonaggression pact; Foreign Office note (extract printed) stating that Paraguayan troops have already been ordered to refrain from acts of provocation.
761
Oct. 10 (127) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s assurance that he will continue his efforts to persuade Bolivia and Paraguay to submit their dispute to the neutrals.
762
Oct. 10 (334) From the Ambassador in Peru (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s assurances of complete Peruvian cooperation.
762
Oct. 11 (109) From the Ambassador in Argentina (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s assertion that he will recommend that Bolivia be represented at November 11 conference and that both parties keep their troops within limits.
763
Oct. 13 (124) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Report on activities of other members of the diplomatic corps in Bolivia.
763
[Page XCI]Oct. 14 (104) From the Minister in Paraguay (tel.)
Foreign Office note (extract printed) stating that the Paraguayan delegation will be in Washington on November 11 prepared to open the meeting.
764
Oct. 14 (128) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Activities of Foreign Minister on behalf of peace.
764
Oct. 15 (126) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Efforts to find a method for preventing armed clashes; advice that Bolivia is willing to have conference meet on November 11, although Bolivian delegate cannot reach Washington until later.
765
Oct. 15 (48) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Instructions to express Secretary’s appreciation for action taken by Foreign Minister.
765
Oct. 15 (59) To the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Opinion that there will be no objection at the November 11 meeting to a postponement until the Bolivian delegate arrives.
766
Oct. 16 To Certain Diplomatic Representatives in Latin America (cir. tel.)
Information that neutral representatives are inviting all other American countries to sign a joint telegram to Bolivia and Paraguay (text printed) urging them to sign a nonaggression pact and to continue to seek a definitive solution of the Chaco question. Instructions to urge Foreign Minister to take action suggested.
(Footnote: Sent to diplomatic representatives in all Latin American Republics except Bolivia, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Paraguay, and Uruguay.)
766
Oct. 17 [18?] (127) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Information that Bolivia accepts November 11 as opening date, but that Bolivian delegate will not arrive until about November 17.
767
Oct. 18 (128) From the Minister in Bolivia (tel.)
Bolivian reply of October 17 (extract printed) to the neutral notes of October 3 (quoted in Department’s telegrams No. 56 and No. 57, October 3).
767
Oct. 19 To Certain Diplomatic Representatives in Latin America (cir. tel.)
Information that joint telegram has been signed by the 19 other American countries and sent to Bolivia and Paraguay.
(Footnote: Sent to diplomatic representatives in all Latin American Republics except Bolivia and Paraguay.)
768
Oct. 20 From the Bolivian Minister for Foreign Affairs (tel.)
Reiteration of Bolivian acceptance, in reply to joint telegram of October 19.
769
Oct. 21 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with the Bolivian Minister in regard to the despatch of the joint telegram of October 19.
769
Oct. 22 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with a representative of the British Embassy in regard to the purpose of sending the joint telegram of October 19.
769
[Page XCII]Oct. 22 From the Paraguayan Minister for Foreign Affairs to the Secretary of State and the Diplomatic Representatives of the American Republics in Washington (tel.)
Acceptance of views expressed in joint telegram of October 19.
(Note: Information that first meeting was held November 11, at which it was agreed to call another one November 24 in order that the Bolivian delegation might be present.)
770

Boundary Disputes

dominican republic and haiti

Date and number Subject Page
1931 May 28 [45] From the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Information that Dominican Government has demanded the withdrawal of Haitian Garde patrols from a section of the southern frontier, stating that the Dominican Army has been ordered to clear the region of foreign troops. Recommendation that Dominican Government be warned to avoid such action.
771
May 29 (20) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Instructions to express U. S. concern over orders said to have been given to Dominican Army especially in view of fact that Haitian Garde is largely officered by members of U. S. Marine Corps, and to express expectation that orders will be rescinded.
771
May 29 (33) To the Minister in Haiti (tel.)
Instructions to urge Haitian Government to take steps to prevent aggressive action by the Garde.
772
May 31 (35) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Report that Dominican President asserts he gave no orders to clear the region of foreign troops.
772
June 12 (149) From the Minister in Haiti
Report on the situation on the southern frontier, concluding with the information that there are now no Haitian posts in the territory regarded as under dispute.
773
July 13 (436) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Memorandum from the Foreign Ministry (text printed) endeavoring to show that the Dominican Government has sincerely tried to obtain final demarcation of the frontier but that the Haitian Government has refused to proceed further with the work, and requesting U. S. mediation.
775
Aug. 1 (182) From the Minister in Haiti
Assertion by the Foreign Minister that Haiti does not intend to proceed with the demarcation of the boundary as provided in the 1929 treaty, since that treaty was a disastrous one for Haiti.
784
Oct. 28 (177) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Memorandum for presentation to the Dominican Government (text printed) explaining that the U. S. Government did not proffer its mediation and that it considers the provisions of articles 4 and 7 of the 1929 treaty adequate to meet the present situation.
786
[Page XCIII]Oct. 28 (33) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Information that the Dominican Foreign Minister hopes to initiate direct conversations with the Haitian Foreign Minister with a view to clearing up the dispute.
788
Nov. 3 (46) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Inquiry as to whether action set forth in Department’s No. 177 of October 28 may not be withheld in view of possibility of direct conversations.
789
Nov. 25 (192) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Authorization to defer action indicated in Department’s No. 177; instructions, however, to make clear informally that the United States has not proffered its mediation.
791
Dec. 2 (101) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Foreign Minister’s intention to seek to initiate direct conversations as soon as January congressional elections in Haiti are over.
791

honduras and nicaragua

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Jan. 21 (17) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that Honduran-Nicaraguan boundary protocol has been signed by Nicaragua and will be submitted to the Congress for ratification.
(Repeated to Tegucigalpa.)
792
Feb. 3 (27) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Report of conversation with the Foreign Minister, who advised that every effort will be made to gain the favorable support of the Liberal members who make up two-thirds of the Congress.
792
Feb. 5 (28) From the Chargé in Nicaragua (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s hope that the protocol will remain in committee long enough for the Government to line up the recalcitrant members of the Liberal Party.
793
Feb. 10 (32) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Information that the Honduran Congress ratified the protocol on February 9 without reservation.
(Repeated to Managua.)
794
Feb. 17 (33) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Indications that protocol will not be ratified unless sentiment can be changed; suggestions of Foreign Minister for possible issuance of statements by the Department and the Legation.
794
Feb. 19 (19) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Department’s opinion that the action of the Nicaraguan Congress should not be influenced by a third state; authorization to discuss matter with persons in a position to be of assistance.
795
Feb. 19 (13) To the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Transmittal of telegram No. 19 to Nicaragua for Legation’s information and action; request for report on results.
796
[Page XCIV]Undated [Rec’d Feb. 20] (35) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Telegram to Legation at Tegucigalpa, February 20 (text printed), advising of imminent departure of Nicaraguan Senator for Tegucigalpa to endeavor to obtain further concessions on the boundary matter from Honduras.
797
Feb. 21 (39) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Telegram to the Legation at Managua (text printed) giving information of acceptance by Honduras of informal suggestion to increase frontier patrol.
797
Mar. 6 (355) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Information that Senator has left for Honduras with instructions to bring about more effective cooperation on part of Honduran Government; belief that Nicaraguan public opinion is becoming more favorable toward the protocol
798
Mar. 21 (51) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Telegram to Legation in Managua (text printed) indicating that Honduran President realizes Nicaragua will not ratify the protocol unless Honduras makes some concessions.
799
Mar. 23 (52) From the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Telegram to Legation in Managua (text printed): Advice that only hope of ratification lies in Honduran sacrifice; request for Department’s and Legation’s opinion as to whether Minister should talk informally to Hondurans along those lines.
801
Mar. 24 (18) To the Minister in Honduras (tel.)
Department’s opinion that it would be inadvisable to attempt to influence negotiations until views of both parties are more concretely defined; request to repeat to Managua.
801
May 6 (64) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that boundary protocol has been resubmitted to Nicaraguan Congress because of destruction by fire of original documents; chance that it will be approved in a few days.
801
May 8 (111) To the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Department’s gratification at the resubmission of the protocol to Congress and earnest hope that favorable action will be taken.
802
June 12 (106) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that protocol has been under discussion for several days and that the President is giving the matter his personal attention.
803
June 20 [114] From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Information that Senate approved majority report on protocol on June 19; that report represents best compromise obtainable but makes radical changes in protocol.
(Repeated to Tegucigalpa.)
803
June 30 (125) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Senate decree (excerpts printed) modifying protocol; information that President and Chamber of Deputies will approve protocol in amended form soon.
(Repeated to Tegucigalpa.)
803
[Page XCV]July 8 (134) From the Minister in Nicaragua (tel.)
Advice that amended protocol has been passed by both Houses; opinion that outcome of negotiations now depends on attitude of Honduras.
804
Aug. 13 (472) From the Minister in Nicaragua
Text of the Protocol of Agreement of the Boundary Question with Honduras, as passed by Nicaraguan Congress on June 25, 1931.
805

Representations by Foreign Governments With Respect to Senate Bill Relating to Payment of Advance Wages to Seamen on Foreign Vessels

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Mar. 19 From the British Embassy
Protest that Senate Bill No. 314 if enacted would be contrary to accepted principles of international law and would have a serious effect upon British-American commerce.
(Footnote: Information that on February 24, 1931, the British Ambassador orally reminded the Department of the British attitude.)
808
Apr. 7 From the Canadian Legation
Apprehension of Canadian shipping interests with respect to S. 314.
(Footnote: Information that on February 11, 1931, the Department was informally advised of Canada’s continued opposition to the pending bill.)
810
1931 Feb. 28 From the British Embassy
Recapitulation of British objections to S. 314.
(Footnote: Information that on January 4, 1932, the Department advised the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce of its opposition to the bill.)
811

Representations by Foreign Governments Regarding Senate Bills for the Deportation of Certain Alien Seamen

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Feb. 21 From the British Embassy
British objections to Senate Bill No. 202.
815
Feb. 25 (634) From the Netherlands Legation
Netherlands objections to S. 202.
816
Mar. 3 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State of a Conversation With the German Ambassador
Information given to the Ambassador that the Department had already signified its opposition to the bill in its present form.
817
Mar. 3 From the German Embassy
German objections to S. 202.
818
[Page XCVI]Mar. 3 Memorandum by the Secretary of State of a Conversation With the British Ambassador
Discussion of British objections to S. 202.
818
Oct. 6 From the French Chargé
Explanation of ways in which S. 202 would cause loss to French merchant marine interests.
819

Immunity of Foreign States From Suits in Federal and State Courts; Representation of the United States Before Foreign Courts

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Nov. 13 (5334) From the Czechoslovak Chargé
Inquiry as to whether foreign states may be sued in U. S. courts, and whether U. S. representatives abroad may represent the United States in foreign courts.
821
1931 Mar. 14 To the Czechoslovak Minister
Explanation of procedure whereby it has become established that foreign states are immune from suit in U. S. courts, and of procedure whereby the United States may be represented in foreign courts.
822

Diplomatic Immunity of a Foreign Commercial Attachés in the United States

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Nov. 6 From the Attorney General
Inquiry as to what constitutes a commercial attaché and whether such an official is entitled to diplomatic immunity.
823
Nov. 7 To the Attorney General
Definition of a commercial attaché, and information that such an official is entitled to diplomatic immunity.
823

AFGHANISTAN

Disinclination of the United States to Establish Official Relations With the Government of Afghanistan

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Apr. 15 (109) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Advice that the Afghan Minister desires to call and discuss the question of recognition; request for instructions.
825
Apr. 16 (97) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to express willingness to transmit the Afghan Minister’s statements to the Department.
825
Sept. 19 (177) From the Chargé in Italy (tel.)
Report of conversation in which the Afghan Minister expressed his Government’s interest in establishing relations with the United States and negotiating a treaty.
825
[Page XCVII]Sept. 24 (143) To the Chargé in Italy (tel.)
Instructions to say that the U. S. Government has given no recent consideration to the question of establishing relations with the Afghan Government and that the present is not considered an opportune time to negotiate a treaty.
826

ALBANIA

Unperfected Treaty of Naturalization Between the United States and Albania, Signed January 21, 1931

Date and number Subject Page
1929 Oct. 23 (254) To the Minister in Albania
Transmittal of draft naturalization treaty with instructions for entering upon negotiations with the Albanian Government; instructions to endeavor in the meantime to obtain an informal agreement whereby persons born in the United States of Albanian parentage may visit Albania temporarily without molestation.
827
1930 Mar. 13 (765) From the Chargé in Albania
Note from the Foreign Minister, March 8 (text printed), establishing informal agreement desired by Department.
830
Apr. 3 (11) From the Chargé in Albania (tel.)
Modifications desired by Albania in proposed naturalization treaty.
831
Apr. 14 (10) To the Chargé in Albania (tel.)
Indication of the modifications which can be accepted and those which cannot; authorization to sign a treaty drawn accordingly.
831
Aug. 28 (67) From the Minister in Albania
Note from the Foreign Minister, August 25 (text printed), proposing an alternate article II.
832
Dec. 15 (48) From the Minister in Albania (tel.)
Advice that the treaty has been approved as submitted by Department with modifications authorized in Department’s No. 10 of April 14.
835
1931 Jan. 21 Treaty of Naturalization Between the United States of America and Albania
Text of treaty signed at Tirana.
835
Nov. 2 (91) To the Minister in Albania
Advice that the Department has concluded that article I, paragraph 3 of the treaty should be clarified before it is presented to the Senate for ratification; instructions to discuss matter with Foreign Minister and to say that the United States would be glad to sign a new treaty with the paragraph omitted.
837
[Page XCVIII]

AUSTRALIA

Proposed Treaty Between the United States and Australia Relating to Rights of Entry for Businessmen

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Apr. 29 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State of a Conversation With the British Ambassador
Ambassador’s suggestion that an ad hoc treaty with Australia be drafted relating to rights of entry for Australian businessmen.
839
Dec. 19 (474) From the British Ambassador
Explanation of Australia’s desire to conclude a treaty extending to Australian businessmen the right to enter the United States as treaty traders.
839
Dec. 19 From the British Ambassador
Expression of hope that draft can be agreed upon in time to be considered in present session of Congress.
840
Dec. 23 To the British Ambassador
Willingness to consider draft treaty; assumption that first draft will come from the Ambassador.
841
1931 Apr. 27 From the Under Secretary of State to the Chief of the Treaty Division
Request for study of two drafts left by the British Ambassador.
841
Aug. 6 From the British Chargé
Explanation of desire for Department’s expression of preference regarding the two provisional drafts submitted by the British Ambassador.
841
Nov. 17 From the Counselor of the British Embassy
Reiteration of desire for expression of U. S. preference.
842
Dec. 1 To the Counselor of the British Embassy
Advice that the matter will be brought to the attention of the appropriate committee soon after Congress reconvenes in December.
843

Policy in Regard to American Citizens Abroad Joining Associations Engaged in Subversive Activities in Foreign Countries

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Mar. 19 (587) From the Consul General at Sydney
Request for instructions as to U. S. policy concerning U. S. citizens who join certain organizations.
843
May 15 To the Consul General at Sydney
Explanation of U. S. policy and factors which would affect decisions in individual cases.
844
[Page XCIX]

AUSTRIA

Ratification of Commercial Treaty of June 19, 1928, Between the United States and Austria, With Supplementary Agreement Signed January 20, 1931

Date and number Subject Page
1929 Feb. 12 (3) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Advice that the Senate has consented to ratification of commercial treaty subject to a reservation limiting article VII.
847
Feb. 26 (2122) From the Minister in Austria
Explanation of Foreign Office discomfort at having to submit treaty to Parliament again.
848
July 23 From the Minister in Austria
Information that situation is becoming difficult in view of lack of further instructions from Department; explanation of importance of pushing matter along.
849
Aug. 28 To the Minister in Austria
Explanation of political situation which continues to impede progress on treaty matter
850
1930 June 25 (28) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Foreign Office advice that if treaty is resubmitted to Parliament it will be amended to expire in 1935 instead of 6 years after ratification; suggestion that effort be made to eliminate Senate reservation.
851
July 7 (27) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Difficulties involved in Senate reconsideration of reservation; hope that Austria will accept reservation without change.
852
Aug. 5 (67) From the Minister in Austria
Report that treaty question has been taken up again with Foreign Office; advice that Austria is reluctant to have any commercial treaties extend beyond 1935 and is cool toward the most-favored-nation clause itself; explanation of one argument which may have influence.
853
Aug. 26 (34) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Approval of proposed argument, and request for opinion concerning advisability of accepting 1935 limitation.
856
Aug. 29 (38) From the Minister to Austria (tel.)
Information that Austrian Government now asserts that it cannot exchange ratifications with or without Senate reservation without also shortening term of treaty.
857
Sept. 2 [40] From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Report that Foreign Office has suggested an exchange of notes providing for Senate reservation and shortened term.
857
Nov. 25 (61) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Information that new Parliament will convene December 2; request for instructions concerning treaty.
858
Dec. 8 (45) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Instructions to propose supplementary article to provide for shortened term, and exchange of notes in regard to Senate reservation.
858
[Page C]Dec. 11 (64) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Information that Foreign Office agrees to method proposed.
859
1931 Jan. 20 (3) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Advice that Austrian Government has signed acceptance of Senate reservation and supplemental article.
859
Jan. 23 (5) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Emphasis upon importance of early ratification in view of growing Austrian dislike for most-favored-nation clause.
860
Feb. 17 (9) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Advice that Foreign Minister has inquired concerning prospects of Senate action during present session.
860
Feb. 24 (9) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Information that Senate consent to ratification of supplementary agreement was given February 20.
861
Mar. 14 (13) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
National Council’s approval of supplemental article and Senate reservation, March 13.
861
Mar. 18 (14) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Federal Council’s approval of supplemental article and reservation, March 17.
861
Mar. 30 (24) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Advice that Austrian Government is prepared to effect exchange as soon as American instrument is received.
861
Apr. 1 (15) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Information that the U. S. Government has construed Austrian ratification as condition precedent to U. S. ratification and now awaits Austrian President’s action.
862
Apr. 2 (26) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Information that President ratified supplemental article and reservation March 28.
862
Apr. 10 (34) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Receipt of formal advice from Foreign Office of its readiness to exchange ratifications, and its inquiry when the Legation will be prepared to do so.
863
Apr. 11 (21) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Advice that question of ratification is being considered and that instructions will be sent later.
863
Apr. 30 (72) To the Minister in Austria
Transmittal of instruments of ratification with instructions for exchange; note to be presented to the Foreign Minister at time of exchange (text printed) making clear that the fact of ratification after the Austrian announcement of its projected customs treaty with Germany has no significance in relation to the most-favored-nation clause; instructions not to proceed with exchange until further notification.
863
[Page CI]May 14 (38) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Fear that exchange of ratifications might be jeopardized by note to Foreign Minister.
865
May 21 (25) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Authorization to exchange ratifications without presenting note.
865
May 27 (42) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Notice that ratifications have been exchanged.
865

Opposition in Austria to the Showing of the Motion Picture “All Quiet on the Western Front”

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Mar. 27 (11) To the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Distributors’ desire that U. S. Government take up with Austria the matter of the ban on “All Quiet on the Western Front”; request for report on situation.
866
Apr. 2 (27) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Advice that Austrian action was taken at request of Germany.
866
Apr. 8 (33) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Information from the Foreign Minister that Austria will follow Germany’s lead; opinion that it would be inadvisable to take up matter formally until film is released in Germany.
867
Apr. 13 (262) From the Minister in Austria
Detailed report on situation and on action taken.
867
Nov. 5 (122) From the Minister in Austria (tel.)
Information that, although Germany has permitted the film to be shown, Austria has decided that in view of the present unrest the ban cannot be removed in Austria at present.
872
Nov. 7 (412) From the Minister in Austria
Report on action taken following German showing of the film, and an Austrian decision not to remove the ban at present.
872

BOLIVIA

Representations to Bolivia Against the Imposition of a Tax Upon Diplomatic Telegrams

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Apr. 15 (33) From the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Information concerning Government’s intention to collect taxes on diplomatic cables; intention to protest if Department approves.
874
Apr. 23 (15) To the Chargé in Bolivia (tel.)
Approval of plans to protest, and instructions concerning grounds.
874
July 27 (192) From the Minister in Bolivia
Information that the President issued a decree on July 7 providing for exemption of diplomatic cables from tax.
874
[Page CII]

BRAZIL

Representations Against Brazilian Decree Establishing a Discount of 50 Percent on Consular Fees to Shippers by the Lloyd Brasileiro Navigation Company

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Mar. 20 (20) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Instructions to take up with the authorities the possible modification of Decree No. 19682, which favors the Lloyd Brasileiro Navigation Company over U. S. shipping companies.
876
Apr. 29 (24) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s assertion that favors of Decree 19682 are a form of subvention and cannot injure rights of other nationals.
876
May 9 (3591) From the Ambassador in Brazil
Further report on the Foreign Minister’s views regarding the decree.
877
May 16 (34) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Department’s view that decree discriminates against U. S. lines; instructions to make further effort to secure modification.
878
May 23 (3604) From the Ambassador in Brazil
Report that Foreign Office attitude is unchanged; opinion of members of diplomatic corps that an official attempt to secure modification might incite action more injurious than Decree 19682.
878
Aug. 27 (1662) To the Ambassador in Brazil
Department’s views regarding decree; advice that unless it is modified, U. S. Shipping Board may take retaliatory action as provided by the Shipping Act of 1916; instructions for further communication to Brazilian Government.
879
Dec. 10 (96) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Request for report in reply to Department’s No. 1662 of August 27.
882
Dec. 11 (3748) From the Ambassador in Brazil
Report that the Brazilian attitude has not altered; opinion that terms of decree are not severe in comparison with retaliatory measures which Brazil could take.
882
1932 Feb. 10 (1707) To the Ambassador in Brazil
Advice that, in view of the Ambassador’s opinion, the Shipping Board will give further consideration to the matter.
883

Inability of the United States to Sell Warships to Brazil Because of Treaty Restrictions

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Dec. 1 (97) From the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Understanding that Brazil has instructed its Ambassadors to ask whether America or Great Britain could sell Brazil two light cruisers; desire to know Department’s reply.
883
Dec. 1 (92) To the Ambassador in Brazil (tel.)
Information that the Department has advised the Brazilian Ambassador that, in view of the provisions of the Washington Naval Treaty and the London Naval Treaty, the United States cannot make the desired sale.
884
[Page CIII]Dec. 1 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with the Brazilian Ambassador, who was informed of the treaty provisions which prevent the United States from making the desired sale.
884

BULGARIA

Representations on Behalf of Standard Oil Interests in Bulgaria With Respect to Government Action Fixing the Price of Kerosene

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Sept. 21 (291) From the Minister in Bulgaria
Advice that the Standard Oil Company representative asserts that the new price set for kerosene is below the cost of importation, that his company will not sell at that price, and that it fears confiscation; report of conversations with Acting Prime Minister, who finally stated that confiscation would not be applicable to foreign firms, but that new price is necessary to relieve peasants.
886
Oct. 24 (8) To the Minister in Bulgaria (tel.)
Assumption that accuracy of Standard Oil contention has been established; instructions for making representations.
888
Oct. 27 (27) From the Minister in Bulgaria (tel.)
Advice that the Prime Minister has given assurance that Standard Oil will be accorded full satisfaction.
890
Nov. 27 (10) To the Minister in Bulgaria (tel.)
Department’s surprise at Standard Oil’s ability to sell kerosene at some places below price fixed; request for explanation.
890
Nov. 30 (33) From the Minister in Bulgaria (tel.)
Explanation that company was selling kerosene at lower price for reasons of business competition.
891

CANADA

Project for Improvement of the St. Lawrence Waterway by Joint Action of the United States and Canada

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Oct. 6 (537) From the Minister in Canada
Note from the Canadian Secretary of State for External Affairs, September 12 (text printed), summarizing present situation in the matter of the proposed St. Lawrence Waterway development.
892
Oct. 7 Press Release Issued by the Department of State
Information that a direct and verbal exchange of views has been agreed upon as the procedure for the initial negotiations.
(Footnote: Identical statement given out at Ottawa.)
893
Nov. 15 Press Release Issued by the Department of State
Account of exchange of views which took place at Washington, November 14, during which arrangements were made for reconvening of the Joint Engineering Board.
893
[Page CIV]

CANADA

Representations by Canada Against Changes in Border Crossing Privileges Between Canada and the United States

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Dec. 26 (256) From the Canadian Chargé
Representations against recent stringent application of General Order No. 86 whereby many daily workers have been prevented from entering the United States.
894
1931 May 11 To the Canadian Chargé
Instructions issued for the guidance of U. S. immigration officials (text printed), and additional information received by the Department regarding the status of commuters (text printed).
896

Immunity of Consular Officers and Employees From Testifying as to Official Acts and Producing Official Records

Date and number Subject Page
1931 May 18 To the Consul General at Montreal (tel.)
Instructions not to appear in response to subpoena nor to let employee appear or produce records, and to inform appropriate authorities accordingly.
898
May 18 (48) To the Minister in Canada (tel.)
Instructions to take matter up with Department of External Affairs, pointing out principle involved, and advising them of instructions given Consul General.
898
May 22 (361) From the Minister in Canada
Communication from the Secretary of State for External Affairs, May 20 (text printed), noting that the Consul General and employee were not required to appear or produce records.
899

CHILE

Revolution in Chile

Date and number Subject Page
1931 May 5 (42) From the Chargé in Chile (tel.)
Report of increased feeling against the Government and of steps being taken by the President.
901
July 11 (64) From the Chargé in Chile (tel.)
Cabinet resignation and President’s efforts to form new Cabinet.
901
July 13 (67) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Formation of new Cabinet.
902
July 21 (70) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that new Cabinet has resigned and that there are fears of political trouble.
902
July 22 (71) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that new Cabinet has been formed, and although there are some favorable aspects of the situation, conditions are still critical.
902
July 23 (72) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that Cabinet has resigned and that demonstrations are, taking place.
903
[Page CV]July 24 (73) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Formation of new Cabinet.
904
Undated [Rec’d July 24] (74) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report of clashes between police and students.
904
July 25 (76) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that city is practically under martial law and that feeling against President is bitter.
904
July 25 (77) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Assurances from the Chief of Cabinet that the Government has the situation well in hand.
904
July 26 (78) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Account of reactions to President’s assertion of intention to resign.
905
July 26 (79) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that President has resigned, that a civilian junta is forming, and that there is public rejoicing.
905
July 26 (80) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report that junta consists of President of Senate and two members of previous week’s Cabinet.
906
July 26 (81) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that organization of new Government conforms with Chilean Constitution; report on Cabinet being formed and on financial situation.
906
July 27 (82) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Opinion of Under Secretary for Foreign Affairs that, since transfer of authority followed Constitution, question of recognition is not raised.
906
July 27 (83) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that President of Senate has resigned and turned over power to Minister of Interior Montero.
907
July 27 (31) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Concurrence in view that no recognition of new Chilean Government is necessary.
907
July 28 (84) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Opinion that the United States should continue to consider that no question of recognition is raised; explanation that elections must be held within 60 days.
907
Aug. 1 (32) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Inquiry as to when elections will be held.
908
Aug. 6 (87) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that elections have been called for October 4.
908
Aug. 18 (95) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Montero is to be the candidate of all parties except the Left and that, in order to avoid precedent of chief executive being a candidate, he intends to resign as Vice President.
908
[Page CVI]Aug. 21 (96) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that Senate has refused to accept resignation of Montero but that he is turning over power to Minister of Interior.
908
Sept. 2 (100) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report of mutiny in Chilean Navy by enlisted men and petty officers, who have taken command of all ships and given the Government 48 hours to meet their demands.
909
Sept. 3 (102) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report on strikes and other uncertainties of current situation.
909
Sept. 4 (40) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Department’s concern in connection with report on situation received from representative of National City Bank of New York.
910
Sept. 5 (105) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information concerning Government plans for attack on rebels, and steps taken to protect U. S. interests.
910
Sept. 5 (106) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report of sharp fighting in various places.
911
Sept. 5 (107) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Conversation with the Foreign Minister regarding Chilean Government’s obligation to protect U. S. interests.
911
Sept. 5 (108) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that Congress has declared a state of siege throughout Chile for one month.
912
Sept. 6 (109) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Conversation regarding the naval situation with the Minister of War, who sees it as a part of an international movement against social order and desires U. S. help in the form of war materials and permission to announce negotiations with U. S. Government for purchase of two submarines.
912
Sept. 6 (110) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report on fleet movements.
913
Sept. 6 (111) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Alessandri has been nominated for presidency by all Left parties except extreme Communists.
914
Sept. 6 (42) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that sale of submarines is forbidden by Washington Naval Treaty but that the United States is disposed to cooperate in regard to war materials; explanation, however, of difficulties involved.
914
Sept. 7 (112) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
General Vergara’s assertion that naval vessels have been bombed and that he believes resistance of the insurgent crews is almost at an end.
915
Sept. 7 (113) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Opinion of Government authorities that war materials requested will not be necessary in view of recent favorable turn of events.
915
[Page CVII]Sept. 7 (114) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Navy Department’s assertion that last three mutinous ships have agreed to surrender.
916
Sept. 7 (115) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Desire of Government officials to secure services of U. S. specialist in communistic activities to assist in investigation of communist movement which they believe instigated mutiny.
916
Sept. 12 (43) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Instructions to inform authorities that there is not available in U. S. Government service a specialist in communist activities.
917
Oct. 5 (125) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that elections were orderly and that Montero was elected President.
917
Oct. 6 (126) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that Montero will resume executive power November 15 but that date for inauguration has not been fixed.
918
Nov. 5 (1013) From the Chargé in Chile
Information that inauguration will take place December 5.
918
Nov. 16 (139) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that Montero has reassumed Vice Presidency; that Balmaceda is Foreign Minister and Izquierdo, Minister of Hacienda.
918
Nov. 27 (56) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Instructions for extending the President’s congratulations to Montero at the time of his inauguration.
918

Provisional Commercial Agreement Between the United States and Chile Effected by Exchange of Notes, Signed September 28, 1931

Date and number Subject Page
1931 July 18 (30) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Expression of Department’s concern with regard to new Chilean-French modus vivendi which discriminates against American commercial interests; instructions to propose a U. S.-Chilean modus vivendi securing most-favored-nation treatment for American commerce.
(Footnote: Background information on negotiations.)
919
July 24 (75) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that action is under way to grant to the United States unconditional most-favored-nation treatment on all matters covered by French modus vivendi.
920
Aug. 12 (93) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that Chile is considering the establishment of a system of licensing imports; request for Department’s views.
920
[Page CVIII]Aug. 25 (97) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that Chile is prepared to give to American commerce the same treatment as French commerce but desires assurance of U. S. willingness to discuss general commercial treaty incorporating unconditional most-favored-nation guarantee together with special lists; proposed paragraph (text printed) to be included in exchange of notes.
921
Sept. 1 (99) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Exchange of two notes proposed by Foreign Minister (texts printed) separating the two provisions set forth in No. 97 of August 25.
922
Sept. 2 (39) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Explanation of Department’s unwillingness to enter into a new departure in the field of commercial policy as desired by Chile; instructions for continuing efforts to obtain modus vivendi.
923
Sept. 25 (119) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Transmittal of draft note from Foreign Minister providing for most-favored-nation treatment, and leaving door open for negotiation of treaty without commitment to any special provisions.
925
Sept. 28 (45) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Approval of note transmitted in No. 119.
925
Sept. 28 (121) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Notification that modus vivendi has been signed.
925
Sept. 30 (976) From the Ambassador in Chile
Transmittal of copies of notes exchanged on September 28.
926
Sept. 28 Exchange of Notes Between the Ambassador in Chile and the Chilean Minister for Foreign Affairs
Text of modus vivendi signed at Santiago.
926

Representations Against Holding op an American Citizen Incommunicado Following Arrest

Date and number Subject Page
1931 Mar. 18 (21) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report on arrest of Manager of General Motors (Bethune) and of unsuccessful efforts to communicate with him.
(Footnote: Extract from instruction No. 604 of October 21, 1925, setting forth Department’s view that U. S. citizens should not be held incommunicado.)
928
Mar. 19 (10) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Reiteration of Department’s views, and instructions to renew efforts to communicate with Bethune.
928
Mar. 19 (22) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that Bethune has been released on bond but that U. S. views on incommunicado have been presented to Foreign Office nevertheless.
929
[Page CIX]Mar. 19 (809) From the Ambassador in Chile
Explanation of criminal charges against Bethune, of situation leading up to charges, and of action taken; memorandum of conversation with the Foreign Minister on March 19, and two notes presented to him (texts printed).
929
Mar. 22 (23) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Court of Appeals has released Bethune’s bond and that a reviewing judge is to be appointed to take case out of hands of Judge of First Instance.
933
Mar. 27 (15) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Instructions for presenting note to the Foreign Minister (text printed) in order to avoid possible misunderstanding of U. S. position.
934
Mar. 28 (16) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Explanation that General Motors is apprehensive regarding the safety of its personnel in Chile; instructions for bringing matter to the attention of the authorities.
934
Mar. 30 (28) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Report on protection arranged for General Motors personnel.
935
Apr. 1 (33) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Foreign Office note (text printed) setting forth Chilean position regarding principle of incommunicado and Bethune case in particular; opinion that Chilean position cannot be defended under international law.
935
Apr. 2 (18) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether Bethune was held incommunicado by order of the judge or of police authorities.
936
Apr. 2 (35) From the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Information that Bethune was held incommunicado by order of the judge.
937
Apr. 6 (21) To the Ambassador in Chile (tel.)
Advice that Chilean Ambassador has suggested that U. S. notes and Chilean reply be withdrawn; that Department has refused but has agreed to make no further reply provided the Chilean note is not published.
937
Apr. 21 (845) From the Chargé in Chile
Report on Chilean Supreme Court decision which confirms justice of Embassy’s protests.
938