List of Papers

[Unless otherwise specified, the correspondence is from or to officials in the Department of State.]

CHINA

Continued Civil War in China; Intervention of Manchurian Forces on Side of Nanking Government and Defeat of Opposition in North China

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Feb. 19 (38) From the Minister in China
Report that during the month of January the most important single element making for uncertainty in the politico-military situation was Yen Hsi-shan’s gradual assumption of independent control over all territory north of the Yellow River except Manchuria; statement of the forces under arms in China during the month; decision of the Government to collect customs duties on imports on a gold basis.
1
Mar. 26 (116) From the Minister in China
Summary of events during February: Tabulation of telegrams exchanged in a controversy between Chiang Kai-shek and Yen Hsi-shan; indication that Yen and the Shansi faction depend upon the Kuominchun for military support; information that Feng Yu-hsiang has taken up residence at the headquarters of the Shansi leader.
3
Apr. 17 (157) From the Minister in China
Report for March: Division of China into two camps, the South under Chiang based on Shanghai, and the North under Yen and Feng (commanding the Kuominchun), with Mukden under Chang Hsueh-liang remaining neutral; control of northwest Kiangsi by communists, and the Kan River region by bandits; recommendation by the Kemmerer Commission of Financial Experts that China go on a gold standard.
7
May 15 (202) From the Minister in China
Information that there was little fighting but much military preparation during April; statement of military forces under arms during April; prevalence of disorderly conditions in southern China.
10
May 23 (365) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that banditry and communism in the Yangtze Valley and South China are of as much concern to Nanking as are their adversaries in the North.
13
June 10 (257) From the Minister in China
Indication that during May the greatest danger facing Nanking lay in the rapid growth of banditry and communism; statement by Yen’s representative of the aims of the Northern coalition (extract printed); prohibition by Nanking Government of export of gold bullion and import of foreign silver coins.
14
June 11 (431) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Situation in the Yangtze Valley, where the Nationalist Government is struggling with groups of independent forces, and self-styled communist armies.
16
[Page VI]June 13 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the Foreign Minister, who denied the reports of efforts at peace by compromise and stated that the purpose of the present Government is to put into effect Sun Yat-sen’s idea of a unified China governed from the center, with some local autonomy granted to the cities.
17
July 7 (549) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Protest by Yen to representatives of powers signatory to the Treaty of Versailles and to the U. S. Legation against activities on behalf of Nanking of German military advisers and against purchases by Nanking of arms and ammunition in Germany.
18
July 10 (230) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Authorization to participate in any discussion of possible measures to be taken on the basis of Yen’s protest.
19
July 10 (310) From the Minister in China
Summary of events in June, during which neither side gained a preponderant advantage in the civil war; decision of Yen to establish a Northern government in Peiping; attempts of both North and South to win to their side Marshal Chang Hsueh-liang; further spread of banditry and communism; table showing decline of value of the silver dollar.
20
July 12 (568) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Trans-Ocean Asiatic despatch from Berlin, July 4 (text printed), stating that trading in arms and munitions is forbidden by Germany and that the Germans acting as military advisers to Chinese factions do so against the wishes of the German Government.
23
July 14 (575) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Advice that two American aviators are reported to be in the military service of the Nanking Government; request for instructions.
23
July 18 (240) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Department’s opinion that the prohibitions imposed on U. S. citizens by Revised Statutes, Sections 4090 and 4102, are still in force but that their enforcement is vested in the U. S. Court for China; opinion, therefore, that pertinent information should be referred to the District Attorney at Shanghai.
24
July 20 (596) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Article from the propaganda organ of the Northern coalition (text printed) concerning the two American aviators.
25
Aug. 1 (25) From the Consul at Nanking (tel.)
Estimate that the early return of the Yangtze Valley to comparative order will depend largely upon: (1) the extent to which farmers are able to harvest their crops and (2) the ability of the military leaders to pay and maintain order among the troops after the present hostilities.
25
[Page VII]Aug. 15 (408) From the Minister in China
Summary of events during July: Lack of clear-cut victory on either side; continued aloofness of Chang Hsueh-liang; further communist and bandit activity; meeting of “Enlarged Plenary Session of the Central Headquarters of the Kuomintang of China”; arrival in Peiping of Wang Ching-wei, leader of left wing of the Kuomintang, for conferences with Northern leaders.
26
Aug. 29 (763) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Various reports concerning the future role of Chang Hsueh-liang, including a telegram from Mukden, August 28 (text printed), stating that Chang may send Manchurian troops into Hopei to occupy it for Nanking.
30
Sept. 10 (799) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Mukden: Information that Northeastern Political Council has assembled at Mukden to reconsider attitude of Manchuria toward the civil war.
31
Sept. 10 (348) From the Consul General at Mukden to the Minister in China
Further information concerning the convening of the Northeastern Political Council at Mukden.
32
Sept. 12 (456) From the Minister in China
Report that during August the Nanking Government gained control of most of Shantung, and the Northern forces redoubled their efforts to gain the support of Chang Hsueh-liang. Information that the “Enlarged Plenary Session” had the active support of Wang Ching-wei; summary of a manifesto issued after the first formal meeting, August 7; list of names set forth in the general outline of the new government promulgated September 1.
34
Sept. 16 (818) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram sent to the Consul General at Shanghai (text printed) instructing him not to transmit a message for Wang Ching-wei to the Legation, pending the Department’s approval.
37
Sept. 17 (323) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Indication that the Department does not desire the Consul General to transmit the suggested message if it is of a political character.
37
Sept. 25 (852) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Reuter, Shanghai: Announcement by Chang Hsueh-liang that he is assuming control in North China to protect that region, and that his intervention had been delayed in order to arrange the details with Nanking.
37
Oct. 12 (521) From the Minister in China
Report of important changes during September: (1) intervention of Chang Hsueh-liang in North China, where he occupied the whole Tientsin-Peiping area; (2) disappearance of the new government which the Northern forces attempted to establish in Peiping; (3) military activities and important victories of the Nanking forces.
38
[Page VIII]Nov. 17 (600) From the Minister in China
Report that during October the crisis has passed and left Nanking largely in control, with future progress depending to a great extent upon the character of Chiang Kai-shek; extracts from Chiang’s recent utterances which illustrate his personality; comments on relations between Chiang and Chang Hsueh-liang who are left in virtual control of the fate of China; increased attacks upon foreigners by communists and bandits.
49
Dec. 18 (680) From the Minister in China
Report of (1) the visit of Chang Hsueh-liang to Nanking, where, in a series of conferences, it became evident that he had wholeheartedly alined himself with the central authorities; (2) the fourth plenary session of the Kuomintang in which many reforms were charted. Comments on Chiang Kai-shek’s new orders for bandit suppression and on the onerous financial problems now facing China.
58
1931 Jan. 12 (712) From the Minister in China
Information that during December interest was focused upon Tientsin, where Chang Hsueh-liang held many conferences with Shansi leaders; statement issued by Yen upon his departure from the country (text printed); account of the Army reorganization and of Chiang Kai-shek’s personal organization of a campaign to rid China of communists and bandits; report that the Government appears determined to abolish likin as of January 1, 1931.
73

Measures Taken by the United States for the Protection of American Lives and Property in China

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Jan. 2 (3) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Instructions issued January 1 by the commander in chief to the commanders of the Yangtze Patrol and the South China Patrol (text printed) giving procedure for applying for instructions in the event of occurrences not in accordance with present treaties in ports where no consular official is stationed.
80
Jan. 9 (28) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
From Shanghai, January 8: Opinion that the policy in regard to the protection of public utilities set forth in the Department’s 419 and 434 of December 18 and 30, 1929, is equitable; suggestion, however, that although the responsibility rests with the municipal police, the presence of a foreign naval vessel would have an excellent moral effect.
81
Jan. 16 From the Chargé in China to the Consul General at Hankow
Reply to Consul General’s despatch of December 30 conveying Bishop O’Shea’s requests in connection with damages to mission property and the need for reinforcements to be sent to south Kiangsi.
81
[Page IX]Jan. 24 (30) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Information that the United Christian Missionary Society plans to send two women missionaries to Batang and desires to know present conditions in that area and the attitude of the Consul General at Hankow toward assisting them to obtain visas for their passports.
82
Jan. 25 (81) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
From Hankow, January 24: Telegram from Bishop O’Shea (text printed) concerning reinforcements for Kanchow; information that matter has been taken up with Gen. Ho Ying-chin, who is in charge of National headquarters at Hankow.
For Hankow: Telegram sent to the Foreign Ministry at Nanking (text printed) requesting that steps be taken to permit the Americans at Kanchow to withdraw safely; instruction to advise Americans in southern Kiangsi to evacuate.
82
Jan. 29 (39) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Procedure which the Department considers would be reasonable for the Shanghai Municipal Administration to follow in securing the aid of foreign armed forces in the event of a situation with which it could not cope.
83
Jan. 29 (89) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
From Hankow, January 27: Report that the substance of Legation’s January 25 has been telegraphed to Bishop O’Shea with full concurrence.
Message from the Foreign Ministry (text printed) stating that the provincial authorities have been requested to afford protection to Americans in Kanchow.
84
Jan. 29 (92) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
From Hankow, January 28: Statement that it would not be possible, with consistency, to issue travel passes for the two missionaries to proceed to Batang nor to aid them in obtaining visas for their passports.
(Footnote: Information that on February 11 the Department wrote the United Christian Missionary Society advising that the two ladies not proceed beyond Chengtu at present.)
84
Jan. 31 (100) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
From Hankow, January 29: Report that the Ifung, a vessel of the American owned Yangtze Rapids Steamship Company, arrived in Hankow, January 28, with 40 uniformed members of the Chinese National Army aboard.
85
Feb. 5 (47) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Statement of principles in regard to the use of American armed forces in China for purposes of protection and with especial reference to the International Settlement.
85
Feb. 12 (124) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, February 11: Information that three American vessels have been fired upon by bandits 253 miles above Hankow and that a protest has been lodged with the military authorities.
88
[Page X]Feb. 12 To Mrs. Lucius O. Lee, Secretary, American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Boston
Assurance that the Department will expect to be guided by the Board’s request that no claims be presented against China on its behalf without prior consultation; explanation, however, that the Department must reserve all rights in the matter.
88
Feb. 17 (11) To the Minister in China
Transmittal of Department’s letter to Mrs. Lee; and further instructions concerning claims.
89
Feb. 17 (916) From the Consul General at Hankow to the Minister in China
Report that armed guards have been placed temporarily on American vessels plying between Hankow and Ichang; letter from the president of the Yangtze Rapids Steamship Company to the commander of the U. S. Yangtze Patrol, February 5 (text printed), expressing the view that the unarmed officers and soldiers of a friendly, recognized power cannot be put off U. S. merchant ships.
89
Mar. 2 (165) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, February 27: Information that Standard Oil vessels are being stopped and searched at Chenglingki to prevent exportation of rice from Hunan, despite orders issued by Hunan authorities exempting the vessels from search; request for instructions.
From Hankow, March 1: Report that the U. S. S. Oahu has left for Chenglingki to investigate matters and stop interference with U. S. vessels.
91
Mar. 3 (166) From the Minister in China (tel.)
To Hankow: Instructions to continue to press the appropriate civil authorities to have the exemption from search made effective.
Opinion that it is an appropriate occasion to renew representations to Nanking against the search of U. S. merchantmen on the Lower Yangtze.
91
Mar. 4 (169) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, March 3: Report that Chairman of Hunan Provincial Government states that the search is to prevent the movement of communists, but that the soldiers say it is to prevent the export of rice.
92
Mar. 4 (83) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that renewed representations to Nanking would be warranted; suggestion that the Foreign Ministry be reminded that the Chinese Maritime Customs is the agency authorized by treaty to search U. S. vessels.
92
Mar. 6 (179) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, March 4: Assurances given to the commander of the U. S. S. Oahu regarding further searches of U. S. vessels.
93
[Page XI]Mar. 12 (190) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, March 11: Telegram from Bishop O’Shea (text printed) stating that all Kanchow soldiers are departing for Fukien, leaving southern Kiangsi defenseless, with communists waiting to enter Kanchow; request that Nanking be urged to order General Chin to leave one brigade in Kanchow.
Telegram to the Foreign Minister (text printed) requesting that steps be taken to permit the Americans to withdraw.
Suggestion that the Department consult with the Catholic authorities with a view to having the Americans at Kanchow withdraw. (Repeated to Hankow.)
93
Mar. 16 (198) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, March 15: Report of firing upon U. S. merchant vessels near Ichang.
94
Mar. 21 (207) From the Minister in China (tel.)
To Hankow, Shanghai, and Nanking, March 21: Information that General Chin is being instructed to despatch troops to suppress communists, and that one detachment will be retained at Kanchow.
95
Mar. 21 To the Reverend J. J. Burke, General Secretary of the National Catholic Welfare Conference
Suggestion that the missionaries in southern Kiangsi be instructed to withdraw as soon as possible, in view of conditions there.
95
Mar. 22 (214) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram to the Foreign Minister (text printed) conveying urgent request of U. S. citizen that help be sent to Kanchow, which is besieged by communists.
96
Mar. 25 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Reports concerning the safety of Kanchow.
96
Mar. 25 (219) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from the Foreign Minister (text printed) stating that Kiangsi Provincial Government is taking strong measures to suppress communists, and requesting that U. S. nationals remain where Government forces are stationed; renewal of suggestion contained in Legation’s 190 of March 12.
97
Mar. 26 (222) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, March 25: Report that an American vessel was fired upon 219 miles above Hankow and that the armed naval guard returned the fire.
97
Mar. 26 (108) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Advice that the suggestion contained in the Legation’s 190 of March 12 was communicated to the Catholic authorities and that they are taking measures toward compliance.
98
Mar. 26 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Receipt of information that troops have been despatched to Kanchow and that the city is considered safe.
98
[Page XII]Mar. 31 (239) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram sent to the Foreign Minister (text printed) requesting liaison for the release of Miss Gemmell, reported captured by communists at Yuanchow, and other members of the mission, reported confined in Yuanchow, which has been taken by communists.
98
Apr. 2 (17) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Telegram from Changsha (text printed) stating that Miss Gemmell and Mr. and Mrs. Porteous have been abducted and held for $20,000 ransom each, and that Mr. and Mrs. Glazier are hiding in the district.
99
Apr. 5 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
To the Legation: Advice that the secretary of the China Inland Mission stated that it would be inviting trouble to pay any ransom for the Porteous party.
99
Apr. 5 (14) From the Consul at Nanking (tel.)
To the Legation: Advice from the Kiangsi Provincial Government that delegates have been despatched to Yuanchow to obtain release of U. S. and British missionaries.
99
Apr. 7 (23) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
Information that Miss Gemmell has been released.
(Footnote: Report by the Consul General at Hankow that $1,100 was paid to the bandits.)
100
Apr. 8 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Advice that the Consulate General is warning Americans at Shiuchow and Linchow of possible danger from advancing communists.
100
Apr. 11 (259) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Comments on banditry and communist disorders by the office of the Military Attaché, April 7 (extract printed). Suggestion that Department make situation known to mission boards with a view to having U. S. citizens withdrawn from exposed points; opinion that it is unreasonable to demand that the Government protect scattered groups of Americans at a time when it must concentrate its forces.
101
Apr. 16 (132) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Advice that Department is communicating with mission boards concerning the advisability of withdrawing missionaries from exposed points.
102
Apr. 19 (952) From the Consul General at Hankow to the Minister in China
Report on naval protection afforded to U. S. merchant vessels in Chinese waters.
102
Apr. 22 (141) To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
For the Minister: Recent report from Canton (to Legation, Hankow, and Department) on peril of Americans at Kanchow; instructions to make representations to Nanking for rescue of this group.
103
[Page XIII]Apr. 23 (25) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Request made to General Ho Ying-chin regarding Americans at Kanchow; uncertainty as to whether report from Canton is of a new situation or the one which prevailed four weeks before.
104
Apr. 24 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Report of two letters from Kanchow, dated April 6; information that Cantonese authorities will consider relief expedition if Kiangsi Provincial Government will cooperate; inquiry if Department has information later than April 6.
104
Apr. 24 (285) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram sent to the Foreign Minister (text printed) requesting information concerning present conditions at Kanchow.
105
Apr. 25 To the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Reply to Consul General’s inquiry of April 24 that the Department has no information later than April 6.
105
Apr. 25 (289) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the Legation is urging the Foreign Minister to instruct the Kwangtung and Kiangsi authorities to cooperate in bringing relief to foreigners in southern Kiangsi.
106
Apr. 25 (26) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Assurances from General Ho Ying-chin that communists will be exterminated and that Kanchow is safe.
106
Apr. 25 (291) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Explanation that Bishop O’Shea has not manifested any intention of withdrawing his group from Kanchow; memorandum of a conversation with Archbishop Constantini, April 10 (excerpt printed) concerning Catholic attitude toward missionaries in dangerous places.
106
Apr. 28 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Suggestion that Consul General at Hankow might ask General Ho Ying-chin if a message could be sent to Bishop O’Shea; fear that Chinese authorities do not know what is developing in Kanchow.
(To Legation, Department, and Hankow.)
108
Apr. 30 (28) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report of plan by Chinese authorities for suppressing communists and of assurances from Ho Ying-chin as to safety of Kanchow; agreement with Consul General at Canton, and information that action has been taken accordingly.
108
Apr. 30 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Efforts to warn and protect U. S. missionaries at Kweihsien, Kwangsi, in view of intention of Cantonese to attack shortly after May 6.
109
[Page XIV]May 1 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the Foreign Minister, who stated that no reinforcements were being sent to Kanchow.
109
May 2 (152) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Explanation to Father Burke of National Catholic Welfare Conference that missionaries remaining in exposed positions endanger lives of other U. S. citizens and create complications for U. S. and Chinese Governments; instructions to emphasize same considerations in conversations with Archbishop Constantini.
109
May 3 (29) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Statement by a Chinese official, Li Fong, that the Chairman of the Hupeh Provincial Government had instructed him to request that foreigners in Hupeh and south of Yencheng, Honan, withdraw to Hankow in view of plan for offensive action against Feng; advice that colleagues have been informed and that endeavor will be made to inform Americans.
110
May 6 (31) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Statement by the Chairman of the Hupeh Provincial Government that Li Fong had not been authorized to make representations on his behalf, and that he had advised that foreigners withdraw to Sinyangchow, Siangyang, and Ichang; intention, unless otherwise instructed, to advise U. S. citizens to withdraw to these three places or to Hankow.
111
May 8 (193) From the Minister in China
Information that a protest against the searching of U. S. vessels by Chinese armed forces was made to the Foreign Minister March 4; statement that the Foreign Minister’s reply of April 10 (text printed) is not considered satisfactory but that no further action will be taken unless the Department so instructs.
111
May 9 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Report that Cantonese are bombing Kweihsien almost daily; efforts to provide means for Americans to evacuate despite lack of any indication of willingness on their part.
113
May 13 (330) From the Minister in China (tel.)
(From the Counselor of Legation)
From Nanking, May 12: Aide-mémoire from the Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs (text printed) stating intention of National Government to stop and search all vessels entering or leaving the port of Tientsin for illegally transported arms and munitions which are to be treated as contraband.
To Nanking, for the Minister’s approval: Note for the Vice Minister (text printed) pointing out that the Maritime Customs are the only authorities authorized to board and search U. S. vessels.
113
May 13 (331) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking, May 12: Report that the Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs has stated that Chengchow, Honan, will be bombed, that the Government requests Americans to withdraw temporarily, and that the Government will be responsible for damage to U. S. property.
114
[Page XV]May 14 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Advice that an armed guard has been promised to escort U. S. missionaries out of Kweihsien.
115
May 14 (332) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that no objection should be made to the proposed search of vessels at Tientsin.
115
May 14 (333) From the Minister in China (tel.)
(From the Counselor of Legation)
From Nanking, May 13: Memorandum for the Minister from the Foreign Ministry (text printed) giving notice of aerial action at Chengchow and requesting Americans to evacuate; comment that no reference is made to responsibility for damage to U. S. property.
To Nanking for the Minister’s approval: Note for the Foreign Ministry (text printed) explaining efforts being made to warn Americans at Chengchow and reserving the rights of the U. S. Government.
Information that Americans at Chengchow are being advised directly by telegraph.
116
May 15 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Receipt of radio message that U. S. missionaries at Kweihsien prefer to remain in their homes.
116
May 15 (10) To the Consul at Nanking (tel.)
For the Minister: View that the Maritime Customs are the only authorities authorized to board and search U. S. vessels and that the National Government should be responsible for losses improperly inflicted; instructions to make representations accordingly.
117
May 15 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with Admiral Hughes, Chief of Naval Operations, who said that he thought it should be made clear that U. S. tolerance of search by authorized Chinese did not extend beyond the 3-mile limit, and agreed to telegraph the commander in chief of the Asiatic Squadron accordingly.
118
May 15 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Information concerning telegram sent by the Navy Department to the commander in chief.
119
May 15 (337) From the Minister in China (tel.)
List of reasons for the Minister’s opinion that the United States should not object to searching of vessels at Tientsin.
119
May 16 (344) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Instruction from the National Government (text printed) quoted in a note from the Foreign Office, April 23, to the effect that permits for shipment of military equipment to China shall not be valid unless stamped by the Chinese Legation in the exporting country and that otherwise shipments shall be dealt with as smuggling.
120
May 18 (348) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Swatow, May 16: Information that conditions in interior of district are chaotic and that U. S. women missionaries at Chiaying have been instructed to come to Swatow.
120
[Page XVI]May 21 (355) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report that representations have been made in accordance with Department’s No. 10, and that the Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs said that it might be possible to place customs officers aboard naval vessels to make the searches.
121
May 21 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs concerning methods of searching vessels at Tientsin.
122
May 22 (172) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Account of a conversation with Father Burke on May 17 from which it seems clear that Catholic authorities in Washington do not feel in a position to instruct colleagues in China; suggestion that Consul General at Hankow attempt to communicate with Americans at Kanchow to learn present situation and if and in what circumstances they would act in accordance with U. S. official advice to withdraw.
122
May 23 (360) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, May 22: Report that on May 20 a commercial vessel was fired upon 3 miles above Chenglingki, and that the customary protest has been lodged.
123
May 24 (367) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from the commander in chief of the U. S. Asiatic Fleet, April 23 (text printed), agreeing with the Minister that Americans should be discouraged from going to Kuling since it would be impracticable to afford protection with naval forces.
123
May 27 (34) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Account of bandit activities over large section of that part of China, and of steps taken to advise Americans.
124
June 1 (392) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Kankow, May 31: Report of firing by communist soldiers on U. S. commercial vessel at Hosueh on May 28.
124
June 2 (395) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Shanghai, May 30: Account of bandit attack on Whangpoo Conservancy pay boat on May 29.
125
June 4 (402) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking, June 3: Report of available military information, and of action taken to advise Americans to leave Nanking district north of Yangtze.
Legation’s approval of action taken.
125
June 4 (404) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Tsinanfu, June 3: Military situation in Tsinanfu, and decision of Consuls to request respective Legations to communicate with both sides in regard to safety measures.
Report of requests made to the Government and to Marshal Yen for protection of Americans.
126
June 5 (407) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Tsinanfu, June 4: Information that Americans are being advised to leave as Yen’s troops approach.
127
[Page XVII]June 5 (35) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Departure of Government troops from Changsha and approach of communist forces; report that many foreigners have left for temporary refuge and that the U. S. S. Luzon is proceeding to Changsha.
127
June 6 (37) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Steps taken to obtain the release of Reverend Clifford J. King, who was captured by bandits in southern Honan on June 1.
128
June 6 (410) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Conversation with the British, German, and Japanese diplomatic representatives in regard to the situation at Tsinanfu.
128
June 6 (185) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to use every effort to obtain release of Mr. King.
129
June 7 (415) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Advice that the Consul at Nanking is being instructed to make representations in regard to the early release of Mr. King.
129
June 7 (418) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking, June 6: Discussion of the safety of Americans at Tsinanfu with the Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs, who said that the matter had been taken up with Chiang Kai-shek by telegraph.
129
June 7 (39) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Receipt of formal notice of Government blockade of Siang River.
130
June 9 (422) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Amoy, June 8: Statement by Kulangsu municipal council that protection should no longer rest with the council but with interested powers; opinion of consular corps that naval protection is desirable.
Information that Legation is requesting commander in chief to afford naval protection, that British Minister has taken similar action, and that a Japanese warship has already arrived.
130
June 9 (424) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report on the situation at Amoy by the Kulangsu foreign chief of police, May 27 (text printed).
131
June 10 (428) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Foochow: Report that Foochow is now quiet after battle on June 7–8.
131
June 10 (984) From the Consul General at Hankow to the Minister in China
Occupation of the Lutheran United Mission of Sinyangchow, Honan, by army units; opinion that such action will continue unless representations to the National Government can bring forth some new method of protection.
132
June 11 (985) From the Consul General at Hankow to the Minister in China
Attack upon the Lutheran Brethren Mission at Tsaoyang, Hupeh, by Government troops endeavoring to find quarters; representations to General Ho Ying-chin.
132
[Page XVIII]June 12 (253) From the Minister in China
Despatch from the Consul General at Hankow, April 18 (text printed), inquiring as to the propriety of continuing at frequent intervals to make representations for the protection of U. S. oil products on consignment with Chinese agents, or whether representations should be confined to reporting conditions and stating that U. S. property appears to be endangered; and reply, June 12 (text printed), stating that the latter course is proper.
133
June 13 (439) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, May 27: Assurances by Ho Ying-chin as to the safety of Americans in Kanchow; report of efforts being made to carry out suggestion in Department’s 172 of May 22.
To Hankow: Inquiry as to further suggestions of measures for protection of Americans at Kanchow.
134
June 16 (49) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Information that Mr. King has been rescued from bandits by local garrison at Loshan.
135
June 16 (102) From the Consul at Tsinan to the Minister in China
Statement that most Americans have left Tsinan, Taian, Tsining, Tenghsien, and Weihsien on the advice of the Consulate.
135
June 17 (450) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, June 15: Inability to offer further suggestions as to means of relief for Americans at Kanchow, since they have more than once been advised to withdraw.
136
June 20 (204) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Reference to the situation at Amoy; assumption that the Legation has in mind at all times the possible necessity of instructing consular officials or requesting the despatch of naval vessels to protect U. S. consular officials or other citizens.
136
June 24 (490) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Tsinanfu, June 23: Intention of Government troops to withdraw; inquiry as to whether it would be possible to ask Shansi military authorities to enter Tsinanfu only after withdrawal of the Government forces.
136
June 25 (501) From the Minister in China (tel.)
To Tsinanfu: Account of steps taken to have Shansi forces protect foreign nationals; advice that it is not considered advisable to make any specific request in that regard.
137
June 27 (510) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Foochow: Report that 36 Americans are unable to evacuate from the territory of Lu Hsing-pang, who has joined the Northern Coalition.
137
June 30 (522) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Reply to Department’s No. 204 of June 20, with information that the Barker is at Amoy to protect U. S. citizens.
138
[Page XIX]July 1 (523) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report that on June 29 the commander in chief directed the Barker to proceed to Foochow and to report on conditions there.
138
July 1 (524) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow: Report of abuse of two U. S. missionaries in Suiping by a local political organization.
139
July 2 (298) From the Minister in China
Indications that Bishop O’Shea has refused permission to certain priests to return to places considered dangerous.
139
July 2 (223) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to protest against Suiping incident to military authorities now in control and to Nanking, since the political group responsible is a branch of the Kuomintang; inquiry as to whether Americans in Honan have attempted to leave and whether steps have been taken to that end.
140
July 3 (537) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Instruction by the commander in chief, July 1 (text printed), for the destroyers of the South China Patrol to visit Foochow, Amoy, and Swatow.
140
July 5 (543) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Foochow, July 2 and 3: Suggestion that Legation urge Peiping representative of Northern Coalition to instruct Lu to facilitate departure of Americans from his territory.
Information that action is being taken according to Foochow’s request.
141
July 6 (544) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, July 5: Report that all Americans left Yochow July 3 preceding its occupation by communist forces, and that the Guam was fired on near Yochow on July 4.
141
July 7 (548) From the Minister in China (tel.)
To Hankow: Concern regarding Americans in Hunan and upper river points since the occupation of Yochow; request for advice.
142
July 7 (77) To the Chargé in Japan
Instructions to express appreciation to the Japanese Government for the aid rendered to U. S. citizens by Japanese naval officers at the time of the capture of Hwangshihkang by so-called communists on June 13.
142
July 8 (553) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Intention to invite attention of the Foreign Minister to the danger to Americans in the Yangtze Valley from communists, and to request energetic measures for their protection.
143
July 9 (556) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, July 8: Advice that protest concerning Suiping incident has been made to Hankow headquarters and that Americans in interior Hupeh and southern Honan have been advised to withdraw.
Report that a protest concerning Suiping incident was sent to Foreign Minister on July 5.
143
[Page XX]July 9 (558) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Communication from the commander of the Yangtze Patrol to vessels under his command (text printed) stating that missionaries remaining in remote posts are exposing themselves to serious dangers, and giving instructions to inform consular officers and nearby missionaries.
144
July 9 (229) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Approval of note proposed in Legation’s 553 of July 8; suggestion that in communications to the Chinese Government the term “communist” be avoided or qualified.
144
July 10 (561) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, July 9: Information that communists have retired from Yochow, thus averting danger of cut-off of up-country communications; explanation that Hunan, Hupeh, Kiangsi, and Honan are bandit infested and that the situation is known to the Americans who choose to reside there; intention, however, to circularize them, stating attitude of Consulate General.
Advice that Legation is approving proposed circular.
145
July 10 (562) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, July 9: Telegram from the head of the Lutheran United Mission concerning the Suiping incident (text printed).
145
July 12 (567) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, July 11: Promise of Gen. Ho Ying-chin, who is in charge of Hankow headquarters, to instruct the Suiping magistrate to investigate Suiping incident and punish guilty persons.
146
July 15 (577) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Statement concerning the Suiping incident by one of the missionaries attacked (extract printed); letter from a missionary at Suifu concerning increasing attacks on foreigners in Szechuan (extract printed).
146
July 16 (326) From the Minister in China
Transmittal of copy of note to the British Minister expressing appreciation for the aid rendered to Americans by the commander of H. B. M. S. Cricket and by the British Consul at Changsha when the Government troops withdrew from that city in June.
147
July 18 (587) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Foochow, July 17: Arrangements to go to Yenping with a launch to bring Americans out of Lu’s territory; advice that both sides have promised safe conduct.
148
July 19 (593) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow: Report that U. S. missionaries again evacuated Yochow on July 16.
148
July 21 (600) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Shanghai, July 15: Report that a Standard Oil Company launch was held up and looted by bandits near Soochow on July 9 and that protest has been made; comment that incident illustrates degree of protection afforded by the Government in a district where it has control.
148
[Page XXI]July 21 (185) To the Minister in China
Opinion that it is permissible for the American Consuls at Tsingtao and Tientsin to give advance notice of visits of U. S. naval vessels as requested by the local authorities, but that there should be no implication of impairment of U. S. treaty rights.
149
July 25 (614) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Foochow, July 24: List of Americans who could not be brought out of Lu’s territory; information that others are now safe at Foochow.
149
July 28 (625) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, July 27: Report on communist activities in Changsha area; assertion that naval authorities are prepared to evacuate foreigners at Changsha.
150
July 29 (627) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, July 28: Information that all Americans at Changsha are safe on board U. S. S. Palos except three who refused protection, and that communists are now in control of city.
150
July 29 (62) From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Report of looting and burning in Changsha; estimate of value of U. S. property in the city.
151
July 29 (628) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Palos: Report on situation at Changsha.
151
July 29 (630) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Tsinanfu: Request by U. S. missionary at Taian that representations be made to stop bombing of Taian by Nanking forces.
To Tsinanfu: Telegram sent to the Consul at Nanking setting forth representations to be transmitted to the Foreign Ministry (texts printed); instruction to endeavor to have Americans at Taian withdraw.
152
July 30 (632) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow: Information that 419 Americans in Honan, Hunan, Hupeh, and Kiangsi have been warned by circular letter.
To Hankow: Instruction to circularize Americans again in view of increasing danger.
153
July 30 (637) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, July 29: Opinion that, in view of surprise nature of attacks on Yochow and Changsha, an American destroyer or large unit should be stationed at Hankow until conditions improve.
(Commander in chief informed.)
154
July 31 (638) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Palos: Report on continued looting and burning of Changsha.
154
[Page XXII]July 31 (640) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Note sent to Foreign Minister (text printed) requesting that action be taken to relieve Changsha and to protect the two Americans yet there, and reserving U. S. rights regarding losses. Advice that the Consul at Hankow is being instructed to make similar representations to the local authorities.
156
July 31 (641) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Palos: Opinion that most communists have left Changsha; report of exchange of fire with slight damage to Palos.
157
Aug. 1 (128) From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)
Report that Japan has offered to cooperate with the National Government to prevent the capture and looting of Hankow, and that additional Japanese forces have been ordered to Hankow.
(Copy to Peiping.)
157
Aug. 1 (647) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, July 30: Information concerning Changsha from Americans arriving from that city; possibilities of danger to Hankow.
(Commander in chief informed.)
158
Aug. 1 (648) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Communication from Reuter, Hankow, July 31 (text printed) regarding precautions being taken in and near Hankow.
158
Aug. 1 (649) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, July 31: Statement by a Chinese Army officer that aid is being rushed to Changsha and that he is confident of the local situation; continued opinion, however, that U. S. naval forces at Hankow should be augmented; intention of sending representative of Consulate to Changsha as soon as conditions permit.
Advice that Legation is approving despatch of representative to Changsha.
159
Aug. 2 (259) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Approval of action set forth in Legation’s 640 of July 31.
159
Aug. 2 (260) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the Japanese Embassy has informed the Department of demand that the National Government take effective measures, but not of offer to initiate common action or of ordering of additional forces to Hankow.
160
Aug. 2 (653) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Communication from the commander in chief, July 31 (text printed), expressing opinion that there is adequate naval protection at Hankow.
160
Aug. 3 (661) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow: Report that communists still hold Changsha; list of foreign naval vessels in Hankow; and advice that Americans in Kuling have been warned to withdraw.
160
[Page XXIII]Aug. 4 (663) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking, August 3: Telegram for the Legation from the Foreign Ministry, August 2 (text printed), advising that the Government forces are leaving Kanchow, requesting that Americans be advised to leave, and stating that otherwise the Government will assume no responsibility.
(Repeated to Hankow.)
161
Aug. 4 (665) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, August 2: Information that representations concerning Changsha situation have been made to Ho Ying-chin.
161
Aug. 4 (667) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Palos, August 4: Indications that Government forces may attempt to retake Changsha shortly.
162
Aug. 5 (668) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, August 4: Information that advice to withdraw has been telegraphed to Bishop O’Shea, and that he has been asked to notify other Americans in Kanchow.
162
Aug. 6 (670) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, August 5: Information that Changsha is reported retaken by Government forces and that National reinforcements have arrived in Hankow.
162
Aug. 6 (264) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Account of a conversation with the British Ambassador who inquired as to possibilities of international cooperation in case Hankow is seized by communists; request for opinion on the subject; desire also for estimate by Consulate General at Hankow regarding the situation there.
163
Aug. 6 (673) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Communication from the commander in chief, August 4, reporting on situation at Changsha (text printed).
164
Aug. 8 (682) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, August 7: Report of much uneasiness in Hankow despite augmented garrison.
164
Aug. 8 (684) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that there is no immediate need for an arrangement for international cooperation at Hankow and that there is no need for special instructions at present.
164
Aug. 10 (73) From the Consul at Hankow (tel.)
Indications that U. S. mission property in Changsha is considerably damaged but that business property has suffered less.
165
Aug. 11 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Telegram from Father McGillicuddy (text printed) stating that he and 11 others have arrived at Shiuchow but that Bishop O’Shea and other foreigners in Kanchow are in imminent danger. Advice to priests to leave Shiuchow for Canton: efforts in behalf of Bishop O’Shea despite fear that little can be done.
(Legation and Hankow informed.)
166
[Page XXIV]Aug. 13 (694) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, August 11: Estimate of the Hankow situation as requested in Department’s 264, August 6.
166
Aug. 14 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Report that Father McGillicuddy and party have reached Canton and that they say Bishop O’Shea insists upon remaining in Kanchow until authorities admit they are not able to give protection; information that Cantonese authorities are urging that troops remain at Kanchow.
168
Aug. 14 (695) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, August 13: Suggestion that Legation might request Foreign Ministry to arrange for Bishop O’Shea and other foreigners to withdraw with National troops.
To Nanking: Communication to be presented to Foreign Ministry (text printed) requesting that Americans be allowed to leave with troops.
169
Aug. 15 (272) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether Legation’s protection plans for Hankow include merely evacuation of Americans or the participation of U. S. forces in police work; statement of Department’s attitude.
169
Aug. 15 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
President’s approval of Department’s telegram No. 272, and statement of his opinion regarding future of China.
170
Aug. 15 (701) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Tsinanfu, August 14: Report that Tsinanfu is being bombed by Government aircraft; request that Legation suggest that city be considered outside zone of operations.
Information that Consul at Nanking has been asked to discuss matter with Foreign Office.
171
Aug. 15 (702) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow: Inquiry whether any special data should be included in the report of the Consul who is leaving for Changsha.
Legation’s reply in the negative.
172
Aug. 15 (704) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Total numbers of foreign troops now stationed at Shanghai.
172
Aug. 16 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Opinion of Cantonese authorities that Government troops have already left Kanchow; advice that under the circumstances nothing more can be done through the Cantonese for the Americans yet there.
172
Aug. 18 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Information that Consul at Yunnan has been asked to take up matter of commandeering of two Standard Oil Company lighters and cargoes by Yunnanese forces.
173
Aug. 18 (715) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking: Assurance from Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs that military authorities have already been asked to give due protection to foreign life and property in Tsinanfu.
173
[Page XXV]Aug. 19 (278) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Desire that the Consul proceeding to Changsha be instructed to examine into degree of responsibility of the Chinese Government for the damages done.
174
Aug. 21 (730) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking, August 17: Note from the Foreign Ministry stating that the U. S. missionaries at Kanchow refused to evacuate with the troops.
From Hankow, August 19: Effort made August 15 on behalf of Americans in Kanchow.
Opinion that no further action can be taken at present.
174
Aug. 22 (738) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Statements from the commander in chief and the Consulate General at Hankow concerning the protection of Hankow and what measures should be included; opinion that present instructions are still sufficiently broad.
175
Aug. 25 (743) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, August 21: Telegrams from U. S. missionary at Anjenki, Kiangsi (texts printed), reporting that Government troops are now occupying and destroying mission property; information that protests have been made to Governor of Kiangsi and to Ho Ying-chin.
To Hankow: Opinion that action taken is all that is necessary and proper.
177
Aug. 25 (745) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, August 21: Favorable effects created by augmentation of foreign naval forces at Hankow.
177
Aug. 26 (425) From the Minister in China
Transmittal of copy of a letter dated August 19 from the German Minister, expressing appreciation for services rendered by U. S. naval vessels during the communist occupation of Changsha.
178
Aug. 27 (755) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, August 26: Report that American and other foreign vessels are being fired upon above Kiukiang by communists and that Government is apparently making no effort to stop them.
178
Aug. 27 (757) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Bombing of Peiping by two Nationalist planes; request that War Department be informed.
179
Aug. 27 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Advice that Standard Oil Company lighters are still being held by Yunnanese forces; suggestion that matter be taken up with Foreign Minister at Nanking.
179
Aug. 28 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Information that the Standard Oil Company’s property at Nanning has been looted and that Yunnanese are mounting guns on all oil lighters; urgent request that the Legation impress upon the Foreign Minister seriousness of the situation.
179
[Page XXVI]Aug. 28 (758) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from the chief of Yen Hsi-shan’s Diplomatic Bureau to the Senior Minister, August 27 (text printed), requesting that the diplomatic corps protest to Nanking against the bombing of Peiping; intention neither to acknowledge nor to make any protest.
180
Aug. 28 Memorandum by the Consul at Hankow
Report of investigation at Changsha.
180
Aug. 29 (765) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Legation’s request to Foreign Ministry to take steps to bring the Yunnanese forces under control and to protect U. S. life and property.
184
Sept. 2 (775) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, August 30: Information that U. S. claims for losses at Changsha are being presented; inquiry as to whether local remedies should be exhausted before having claimants fill in formal diplomatic claim.
Opinion that claims cannot be settled locally and that diplomatic claims should be filled in at once; request for Department’s views.
184
Sept. 4 (309) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Concurrence in Legation’s suggestion set forth in its No. 775 of September 2.
185
Sept. 5 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Report that Standard Oil Company lighters have reached Wuchow from Nanning with company employees and missionaries aboard.
185
Sept. 5 (781) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, September 4: Report that situation at Changsha is still acute.
185
Sept. 7 (788) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, September 6: Report on military situation in the area.
186
Sept. 10 (79) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report that conditions along the river approach a serious state.
186
Sept. 10 (L. 1055) From the Consul General at Hankow to the Minister in China
Transmittal of copy of letter sent to British colleague expressing appreciation for services rendered U. S. citizens who evacuated Changsha.
187
Sept. 15 [81] From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Continued daily attacks upon foreign vessels by communists near Kiukiang.
187
Sept. 15 (252) To the Minister in China
Assumption that if operations against Peiping should appear to endanger U. S. life and property, the Legation will take same measures as those taken on behalf of U. S. citizens elsewhere.
188
[Page XXVII]Sept. 17 (820) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Note from the Foreign Ministry, September 15 (extract printed), stating that the Yunnan Provincial Government has given instructions for the protection of foreign life and property.
188
Sept. 17 (83) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Exchange of fire between U. S. S. Luzon and communists near Wusueh.
189
Sept. 25 (85) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report of incidents of U. S. and foreign vessels exchanging fire with communists near Kiukiang and above Hankow.
189
Sept. 30 (339) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Department’s concern over armed exchanges; request that Legation and commander in chief seek information with regard to instigation, source, and objective of Chinese firing; and instructions to repeat to Hankow and Nanking for comments on facts and possible methods of reducing number of encounters.
190
Oct. 4 (89) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report of two incidents of U. S. vessels on the Yangtze being fired upon and returning fire.
191
Oct. 7 (272) To the Minister in China
Department’s attitude toward Legation’s 253 of June 12 in regard to the protection of U. S. oil products shipped on consignment to Chinese agents in the interior; opinion that until the treaties are changed, no officer would be warranted in appearing to absolve the Chinese Government of its obligations thereunder.
191
Oct. 7 (90) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report of firing upon U. S. S. Panay near Kiukiang.
193
Oct. 8 (887) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information requested in Department’s 339 of September 30 concerning armed exchanges; comments by the Consul General at Hankow and the commander in chief (texts printed) regarding the instigation of the attacks, and suggestion by the former that the number of the encounters might be reduced by having the movements of U. S. vessels on the Yangtze reduced to a minimum.
193
Oct. 10 (347) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the suggestion of the Consul General at Hankow for reducing number of encounters has been discussed with the Navy Department and that decision has been reached that solution should be found in conferences between the Minister and the commander in chief; instructions to act accordingly.
196
Oct. 12 (898) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Foochow, October 11: Report that only two Americans remain in Upper Min River territory.
196
[Page XXVIII]Oct. 14 From the German Chargé
Expression of appreciation for the aid rendered German citizens by U. S. naval forces in the evacuation of Changsha.
197
Oct. 14 (91) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Letter from Reverend Bert N. Nelson (text printed) conveying demand for $300,000 (Mex.) ransom by communists who captured him at Kwangshan, Honan, on October 5; information that the case has been taken up with Ho Ying-chin and the Chairman of the Hupeh Provincial Government, and suggestion that it be taken up with Nanking.
197
Oct. 16 (907) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the Consul at Nanking is being instructed to take up the case of Reverend Bert N. Nelson with the Foreign Ministry.
198
Oct. 16 (92) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Protests to local authorities regarding recent attacks on U. S. vessels on the Yangtze; indications of a real effort to suppress communists and bandits in Hupeh, Hunan, and Kiangsi.
198
Oct. 18 (911) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking, October 17: Report that the case of Mr. Nelson was taken up with a Foreign Office official, who promised that everything possible would be done to effect Mr. Nelson’s release.
199
Oct. 18 (172) From the American Minister in China to the Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs
Expression of dissatisfaction with the perfunctory reply of the local authorities regarding the abuse of U. S. missionaries of the Lutheran United Mission at Suiping in June; request for more definite action.
199
Oct. 20 (916) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Legation’s concern as to safety of Mr. Nelson, especially in view of recent murder of two British missionaries; suggestion that the Department inform the Chinese Minister of its concern in the matter.
200
Oct. 21 (96) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Information that 10 foreigners, including a Filipino Sister, have been captured by communist bandits at Kian, Kiangsi, and that matter has been taken up with Chairman of Kiangsi Government and local authorities.
201
Oct. 21 (1087) To the Chargé in Switzerland
Definition of withdrawal of protection from U. S. vessels engaged in smuggling opium in Chinese waters.
201
Oct. 22 (33) From the Consul at Nanking (tel.)
To the Legation: Information from the Foreign Ministry as to steps taken to effect the release of Mr. Nelson.
202
[Page XXIX]Oct. 22 (920) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking, October 21: Foreign Ministry’s statement that Kian is held by bandits, that Government troops are en route to attack them there, and that U. S. citizens should be notified immediately to withdraw.
Instructions to Nanking to urge that steps be taken for the release of the Filipino Sister held by bandits at Kian.
202
Oct. 22 (97) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Information concerning situation at Kian as reported by priests who were released for the purpose of raising ransom of ten million dollars.
203
Oct. 22 (923) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hong Kong: Father McGillicuddy’s concern for Bishop O’Shea and seven other Americans at Kanchow.
203
Oct. 23 (98) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Representations to Ho Ying-chin and the Chairman of the Hupeh Government on behalf of Mr. Nelson.
203
Oct. 24 (99) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Letter dated October 18 (text printed) from Miss Evenson (American) and Mr. Tvedt (Norwegian) who have been captured by communists at Loshan, Honan, and are being held for $400,000 ransom; information that Norwegian Consulate has been notified, and that representations have been made to Ho Ying-chin.
204
Oct. 24 (931) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, October 23: Information that it is impossible to telegraph Kian; opinion that Filipino Sister is the only American there.
205
Oct. 25 (100) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report that Miss Evenson has been released.
205
Oct. 27 (101) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Explanation of ransom arrangement whereby Miss Evenson was released, and of further ransom demands for the release of Mr. Tvedt and Mr. Nelson; continued efforts on behalf of Mr. Nelson and Filipino Sister Ramos.
205
Oct. 28 From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report that U. S. S. Luzon silenced a fieldpiece of the communist forces above Hankow on October 27.
206
Oct. 28 (L. 1078) From the Consul General at Hankow to the Minister in China
Report of efforts to have a stop put to indiscriminate firing on U. S. vessels on the Yangtze; hope that troops now being despatched will take care of situation.
206
[Page XXX]Oct. 29 To the Reverend J. J. Burke, General Secretary of the National Catholic Welfare Conference
Request that the suggestion be transmitted to the missionary organizations concerned that the decision in regard to evacuation not be left entirely to their representatives in the field; explanation of the Department’s attitude.
(Footnote: Information that a similar letter was sent to the Secretary of the Committee of Reference and Counsel of the International Missionary Council and that in each case the reply was that the information had been passed on to the organizations concerned.)
207
Oct. 30 (943) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, October 29: Information that, after persistent urging, the Chikungshan American school has been closed and removed to Hankow.
209
Oct. 31 (L. 183) From the Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs to the American Minister in China
Note from the Finance Ministry (text printed) concerning new regulations for the guidance of revenue officers in stopping and searching vessels in Chinese waters; request that those concerned be informed.
209
Nov. 3 (106) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report that efforts are being continued in behalf of Mr. Nelson and Sister Ramos but that there are no encouraging signs at present.
210
Nov. 4 (379) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for information concerning report that vessels of the Yangtze Rapids Steamship Company are carrying Chinese guards on upper Yangtze.
210
Nov. 5 (107) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Indications that at least a serious attempt is being made to curb bandit activities.
210
Nov. 6 (574) From the Minister in China
Report of expression to the British Minister of appreciation for the action of the British Consul at Foochow in assisting Americans to places of safety.
211
Nov. 7 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Information from the Chairman of the Kiangsi Provincial Government that instructions have been issued to provide for an adequate escort for Americans who wish to leave Kanchow.
211
Nov. 8 (969) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, November 7: Assertion that there is no truth in reports of Chinese guards on Yangtze Rapids’ vessels.
212
Nov. 8 (111) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Telegram from missionaries at Sinyangchow (text printed) stating that Kwangchow, Honan, is endangered by communists, and requesting that the Government be induced to evacuate foreigners by airplane. Information that the matter has been taken up with Ho Ying-chin and the Chairman of the Hupeh Government.
212
[Page XXXI]Nov. 10 (112) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report of firing on U. S. vessels on the Yangtze on November 8.
212
Nov. 12 (113) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Reply from Ho Ying-chin that there is no landing field at Kwangchow but that instructions have been issued for the protection of foreign residents.
213
Nov. 13 (115) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Information that Panay was fired upon above Hankow on November 12 and that there has been a revival of firing on vessels above Wusueh.
213
Nov. 14 (117) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report of firing on U. S. vessels between Chenglingki and Shasi.
214
Nov. 14 (394) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Reservation of judgment in regard to proposed procedure for stopping and searching vessels; authorization to make reservation of U. S. rights.
214
Nov. 18 (120) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report of firing upon U. S. vessels above Chenglingki on November 17.
214
Nov. 19 (121) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report of firing on U. S. Naval vessel above Chenglingki November 18.
215
Nov. 24 (402) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for report on progress made in reaching understanding with the Chinese Government as to method of assessing claims for losses at Changsha and method of payment of such claims.
215
Nov. 25 (1000) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Canton, November 24: Information from Mayor of Canton that local authorities have officially requested the U. S. missionaries at Kanchow to evacuate under escort but that the missionaries declined.
215
Nov. 28 (123) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Letters from Messrs. Nelson and Tvedt—one for Ho Ying-chin; renewed representations to Ho Ying-chin and the Chairman of Hupeh Government; suggestion that the case again be brought to the attention of the Nanking authorities.
216
Nov. 30 (1014) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking, November 28: Note from the Foreign Ministry, November 27 (extract printed), regarding steps being taken for the safety of the missionaries in Kwangchow.
217
Nov. 30 (1015) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Conversation with the Foreign Minister regarding Changsha claims; Foreign Minister’s statement that an investigation is under way but that he has not decided how to handle matter.
217
[Page XXXII]Dec. 2 From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Steps being taken by Chinese authorities on behalf of Mr. Nelson and Mr. Tvedt.
218
Dec. 5 [129] From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To Nanking, December 4, for the Minister: Telegram from Dr. Skinsnes at Sinyangchow (text printed) asking whether the Consulate General would advise making an offer of $3,000 ransom for Mr. Nelson and Mr. Tvedt; opinion that there is no objection to such an offer by mission.
From the Minister, December 4: Concurrence in opinion.
Information that captors have expressed willingness to accept $3,000 and that mission has despatched money by two servants.
218
Dec. 8 [130] From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report that the two servants were unable to get through Government Army lines, but that they are now going to Sinyangchow where it is believed arrangements can be made for them to reach Mr. Nelson and Mr. Tvedt, and that Dr. Skinsnes has been advised that, if he so desires, a consular officer will be sent to aid him in his efforts.
219
Dec. 8 From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Report of several incidents of firing on U. S. vessels.
219
Dec. 9 (132) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Information that Consul Clark is being sent to aid Dr. Skinsnes in effecting release of Mr. Nelson and Mr. Tvedt.
220
Dec. 9 (424) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Authorization to state that the Department would be willing for the Changsha claims to be treated in the same manner as the Nanking claims.
220
Dec. 12 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Reported danger of communist attack on Hoihow, Hainan, where there are 36 Americans; information that steps have been taken to send the U. S. destroyer Borie to Hoihow and that British colleague has taken similar action.
220
Dec. 12 (134) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Measures taken by Chiang Kai-shek for suppression of banditry and communism; report of exchanges of fire by U. S. S. Guam near Chenglingki on December 11.
221
Dec. 15 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Telegram for the commander of South China Patrol from the commander of the Borie at Hoihow (text printed) stating that there is no present danger. Information that Borie is leaving Hoihow but that British sloop will arrive December 16.
222
Dec. 16 (136) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Information that the two servan s sent from Singyangchow to effect release of Mr. Nelson and Mr. Tvedt have again failed to reach destination, but that another channel is now being tried, and that Consul Clark has returned to Hankow.
222
[Page XXXIII]Dec. 20 (139) From the Consul General at Hankow (tel.)
To the Legation: Loss of oil by Standard Oil Company during communist occupation of Tsingshih, Honan, from December 1 to 9; exchange of fire by U. S. commercial vessel on Yangtze December 16 and 17.
223

Interference by the Opposition Government in North China With the Collection of Customs and Salt Revenues

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Apr. 22 (L–61) From the Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs to the American Minister in China
Information that Yen Hsi-shan is planning to float loans from foreign firms with the income of two Chinese railways as security; notification that no foreign loans will be recognized unless they have been approved by the National Government.
(Footnote: Information that the Legation merely acknowledged receipt of the note.)
223
May 1 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the Foreign Minister, who said that he understood Yen was attempting to seize the customshouse at Tientsin, and expressed the hope that the United States would not oppose the measures which the National Government proposed to take.
224
May 1 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Information from the Finance Minister that Yen is trying to get the Bank of Communications to hand over to him all of customs collections not needed for loan service, but that the Finance Minister has already instructed the Commissioner of Customs at Tientsin to transfer the collections to a foreign bank.
225
May 1 (296) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Newspaper announcement by Northern authorities (text printed) of the decision to retain the customs and salt revenues; report on present situation and possible outcomes.
226
May 2 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the British Minister in which it was agreed that the U. S. and British Governments could do little or nothing if the National Government should establish an effective blockade of the port of Tientsin, since that port is occupied by parties in rebellion against the recognized Government.
227
May 2 (299) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the Superintendent of Customs, at the instruction of Yen, has directed the Bank of Communications to retain all customs revenues in excess of the 5 percent for loan service; comments on possible actions to be taken by both sides.
228
May 3 (302) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Statement by Finance Minister (text printed) that the attempt to seize the revenues jeopardizes the interest of all creditors of the Government, making it the Government’s duty to prevent such action.
229
[Page XXXIV]May 5 (307) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Letter from the U. S. group representative in China of the Hukuang Railways loan banks, May 3 (text printed), pointing out the dangers to foreign interests in the interference with customs revenues and requesting that they be brought to the attention of the authorities.
229
May 5 (306) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the Commissioner of Customs at Tientsin under instruction from the Inspector General directed the Customs bank to turn over to him all customs funds on hand, that the bank declined, pleading force majeure, and that the Commissioner is now assessing and collecting customs on behalf of the Central Government.
230
May 8 (315) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Statement by Yen’s representative in Peiping (excerpt printed) of Yen’s determination to retain the revenues and of his intention to protest any foreign interference.
231
May 10 (320) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Intention not to take any action unless instructed to do so; statement by Yen that all guaranteed loans will be respected.
232
May 12 From the Consul General at Tientsin to the Minister in China
Information that the Commissioner of Customs is collecting the duties and depositing them in a British bank and that the Shansi officials are in a dilemma; possibility that a Shansi-controlled customs may be established.
232
May 23 (363) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report that the Shansi faction now insists that whole of the salt revenue pass to its control.
234
May 24 (366) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report from Consul General at Tientsin (extract printed) concerning Shansi proposal to establish an independent customshouse in the ex-German concession.
235
May 28 (377) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Letter to the Consul General at Tientsin from the Foreign District Inspector of the Changlu salt district, May 26 (text printed), asking the Consul General’s support in his request that Yen authorize remittance of the monthly quota in time to meet payment of the Hukuang loan coupon due June 3; intention to take no action in the matter.
235
June 12 (190) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that it would not be expedient to make representations to the Northern leaders.
236
June 13 (193) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether the Commissioner of Customs is at present collecting customs duties and remitting them to the National Government.
237
June 16 (448) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the Shansi authorities have taken over the Tientsin customs, appointing Mr. Lenox Simpson (British) as Commissioner of Customs.
237
[Page XXXV]June 17 (459) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Statement by Yen’s representative in Peiping concerning the taking over of the customs (text printed).
237
June 18 (461) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Tientsin, June 16: Report on the taking over of the customs; opinion that it marks the beginning of the disintegration of the customs service.
239
June 19 (465) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Statement by the Nationalist Minister of Finance regarding the seizure of the Tientsin customs (text printed).
239
June 19 (469) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Tientsin, June 18: Information that Mr. Arlington (American) was asked to come in for an interview since he seemed to have been concerned in the seizure of the customs; report on Mr. Arlington’s statements regarding Yen’s future plans and the prospects of the new customs administration.
240
June 20 (473) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Newspaper report that the National Government has protested to the British Government and requested that Mr. Simpson be deported; notice to the Consul General at Tientsin from the Nationalist Commissioner of Customs that the Tientsin customs is closed, and assertion by the Consul General that for the present he regards Tientsin as a free port.
241
June 20 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
To the Legation: Public notice by the Superintendent and the Commissioner of Customs (text printed) that the National Government is closing the Tientsin customshouse temporarily, withdrawing the staff, and will release cargo for Tientsin upon liquidation of all fiscal obligations.
242
June 21 (480) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Letter from Tientsin, June 20, repeated to the Minister at Nanking by the Counselor of the Legation (extract printed) requesting instructions concerning questions of entry and clearance of ships and in regard to a possible reopening of the customs by the Shansi faction, and expressing the opinion that Tientsin is now a free port but that duties would have to be paid to de facto authorities.
242
June 22 (481) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegrams to Tientsin, June 21 and 22, from the Counselor of the Legation, repeated to the Minister at Nanking (texts printed) approving attitude and inquiring as to interpretation of statement regarding free port.
243
June 22 From the Consul General at Tientsin to the Minister in China
Clarification of position regarding free port and de facto authorities.
244
June 23 (207) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Conversation with the Counselor of the Japanese Embassy regarding the Japanese proposal that the representatives at Peiping of the Washington Conference powers invite the attention of the Northern Coalition to the illegality of the measures they have taken, and then inform the National Government of their action; request for the Minister’s comments.
247
[Page XXXVI]June 23 (486) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information received from the Consul General at Tientsin that Yen has agreed to the release of reserved funds for service of the foreign loans secured on salt revenue.
248
June 23 (487) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegrams sent by the Counselor of the Legation to the Minister at Nanking (text printed) containing report by the Consul General at Tientsin on discussions at a meeting of the consular corps on June 21, and expressing agreement with the Consul General that a de facto customs organization functioning at Tientsin must be dealt with, and that a protest should be made against any assessment of Tientsin duties at Shanghai if followed by a second assessment at Tientsin.
249
June 24 (489) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Communication from the Senior Consul at Tientsin to the Senior Minister, June 23 (text printed), explaining National Government’s plan to collect Tientsin duties at other ports, and suggesting that the diplomatic body intimate to the National Government that unless they can control Tientsin they should not concern themselves with the customs functions there.
250
June 24 (491) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Tsingtau, June 23: Information that local Commissioner of Customs has been instructed to collect Tientsin duties and issue clearance papers for Tientsin.
250
June 24 (493) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram sent by the Minister at Nanking to the Counselor of the Legation (text printed) agreeing that customs at Tientsin should be dealt with as a de facto organization, but suggesting that Department be informed of views and of possibility that duties will be assessed twice.
251
June 24 (494) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram sent by the Counselor of the Legation to the Minister at Nanking (text printed) reporting on a diplomatic body meeting at which it was decided that draft protests for presentation to Nanking and Shansi should be prepared for consideration at the June 27 meeting, and requesting views prior to meeting.
251
June 25 (497) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram sent by the Minister at Nanking to the Counselor of the Legation (text printed) suggesting that the matter of the responsibility of a consular officer for payment of customs duties by ships be referred to the Department.
252
June 25 (499) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Despatch from Tientsin, June 23, repeated by the Counselor of the Legation to the Minister at Shanghai (extract printed) reporting on a meeting of the consular body at which the collection of Tientsin duties at other ports was discussed.
253
[Page XXXVII]June 25 (500) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram sent by the Counselor of the Legation to the Minister at Shanghai (text printed) setting forth the report of the Consul General at Tientsin regarding the representations which he made at the request of the consular body to the Superintendent of Customs.
253
June 25 From the Consul General at Tientsin to the Minister in China
Method worked out by the consular body for the continued functioning of the Hai Ho Conservancy Commission.
255
June 26 (212) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Department’s attitude in regard to the several questions involved; authorization to join with other Legations in filing protests.
256
June 26 (505) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Despatch from Tientsin, June 25, repeated by the Counselor of the Legation to the Minister at Shanghai (text printed) reporting on a meeting of the consular body and setting forth points of joint or identic representations to the National Government which it is believed would bring about a compromise solution.
258
June 27 (509) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram sent by the Counselor of the Legation to the Minister at Shanghai (text printed) setting forth the texts of notes to be sent to Yen and to the Nationalist Foreign Minister; request for authorization to concur in action.
259
June 28 (512) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram sent by the Minister at Shanghai to the Counselor of the Legation, June 27 (text printed) expressing views as requested in Department’s 207 of June 23 and in telegrams from the Legation.
260
June 28 (219) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Authorization to concur in notes set forth in Legation’s 509 of June 27.
261
June 28 (221) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Substance of Department’s views as set forth in statements handed to the Japanese and Italian Embassies (text printed).
261
June 28 (515) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that there is no justification for protest to Yen but that action was agreed to in the interest of early joint protest to Nanking.
262
Undated [Rec’d June 30] (520) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Reuter, Nanking, June 29: Report that the Customs Administration has ordered the Chinwangtao customs transferred to Shanhaikwan to prevent its seizure by Yen.
263
July 1 (527) From the Minister in China (tel.)
(From the Counselor of the Legation.) Telegram from the Minister at Shanghai (text printed) questioning the argument used in the note to the Nationalist Foreign Minister.
263
[Page XXXVIII]July 1 (529) From the Minister in China (tel.)
(From the Counselor of the Legation.) Telegram to the Minister at Shanghai (text printed) quoting portions of a despatch of June 26 from Tientsin setting forth notice issued by the de facto Commissioner of Customs (text printed) providing that when duties have already been assessed only a deposit will be required, which will be returned upon proof of (1) payment at the port of first instance, and (2) unsuccessful efforts to recover. Inquiry as to whether Legation should instruct consular officers at ports of first instance to support claims of U. S. merchants for return of duties.
264
July 2 (534) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram sent by the Counselor of the Legation to the Minister at Shanghai (text printed) suggesting that action be taken in accordance with a despatch of July 1 from Tientsin (extract printed) explaining the situation of the Golden Horn and requesting that the Consul General at Shanghai be instructed to support the protests of the Golden Horn against any imposition of tonnage dues at Shanghai since they have already been paid at Tientsin.
265
July 8 (551) From the Minister in China (tel.)
(From the Counselor of the Legation.) Information that the Minister has authorized the Legation to instruct the consular officers at Shanghai and Hankow in accordance with Legation’s 534 of July 2.
266
July 8 (554) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Tientsin, July 1: Indication that Tientsin regime has shown a disposition to respect all treaty arrangements in respect to dues and duties; report of compromise settlement being considered by the Natioral Government.
266
July 10 (560) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Shanghai, July 8: Report that upon representations from the Consulate General a new certificate was issued to the Golden Horn without additional payment and the one issued at Tientsin was taken up.
267
July 12 Memorandum by the Counselor of Legation in China
Assertion by the British Mi lister that efforts toward a compromise had apparently failed because of Yen’s attitude of unwillingness.
267
July 15 (576) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Statement issued by Tientsin customs July 14 (text printed) regarding the first transfer of foreign revenue to Shanghai and setting forth future procedure for such transfers.
268
July 17 From the Consul at Tientsin to the Minister in China
Unsuccessful efforts of the Foreign District Inspector at Tientsin to obtain promised release of salt funds earmarked for foreign loan service.
269
July 21 (333) From the Minister in China
Diplomatic Circular No. 65 of July 18 (text printed) quoting telegram from Yen to his representative in Peiping, apparently intended as a reply to the note from the Senior Minister.
270
[Page XXXIX]July 30 (634) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Chefoo: Information from Commissioner of Customs that Liu Chen-nien wished to take over local customshouse but was informed of various difficulties involved.
271
Aug. 20 (726) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Refusal of Nationalist Foreign Minister to accept the Senior Minister’s note because of objections to the practice of the senior foreign diplomat speaking on behalf of the diplomatic corps; inquiry as to whether individual protest should be made.
271
Aug. 23 (287) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that it would not be advisable to make an individual protest at this time.
272
Aug. 29 (766) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Note which the Senior Minister proposes to send to the Foreign Minister (text printed) reserving the right of the diplomatic corps to make collective representations; statement that no objections to the note are perceived.
272
Aug. 30 (767) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report that Nanking continues to urge British Government to deport and punish Mr. Lenox Simpson, but that British Government is opposed to such action.
273
Aug. 30 (300) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Concurrence in Legation’s 766 of August 29.
273
Oct. 2 (872) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Tientsin: Report of remittance to Shanghai of salt revenue for the service of foreign loan obligations.
273
Oct. 2 (876) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report that the Tientsin customs will revert to the regular Maritime Customs Administration on October 3.
274

Efforts of the United States To Meet Situation Created by Imposition in China of Taxes Considered Unfair to American Trade

Date and number Subject Page
1929 July 19 From the Minister in China to the Consul General at Shanghai
Opinion that in the absence of discrimination against the U. S. firm no protest should be made regarding the seizure by the Revenue Stamp Bureau of goods in transit belonging to the Foster-McClellan Company because of the firm’s failure to affix revenue stamps; opinion in general reference to issuance of transit passes by the Maritime Customs that protests may be made when goods covered by such passes are subjected to further taxation while en route; information that this opinion is being submitted to the Department.
274
Sept. 11 (1342) To the Minister in China
Concurrence in instruction that no protest should be made against seizure of Foster-McClellan Company’s goods; tentative approval of position regarding transit passes pending further information; request for necessary information.
276
[Page XL]Jan. 30 (1463) To the Chargé in China
Definite concurrence in Legation’s views regarding transit passes.
277
Apr. 26 (146) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion of the Departments of State and Commerce that the favored-nation provisions in the U. S. tariff agreement with China entitle U. S. trade to any reduction in rates accorded to any other country.
278
May 21 From the Minuter in China to the Consul General at Shanghai
Instructions to protest against the discrimination against U. S. goods if the announcement transmitted by the Liggett and Myers Tobacco Company concerning the exemption from advertising tax of native products is found to be based on fact.
278
May 27 (374) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether protest should be made to de facto Northern authorities against taxation of kerosene and gasoline covered by transit passes issued by the National Government.
279
May 29 From the Minister in China to the Consul at Tsingtao
Instruction that it would be in order to protest against advertising tax which discriminates against foreign goods.
279
June 5 (182) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Authorization, on request of U. S. interests, to protest to de facto Northern authorities against taxes on kerosene and gasoline covered by transit passes.
280
June 6 From the American Consul at Tsingtao to the Chinese Mayor of the Special Municipality of Tsingtao
Protest against advertising tax which violates U. S. treaty rights by discriminating in favor of Chinese products.
280
June 14 (197) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Report received from the Texas Company that Honan authorities under threat of confiscation have extorted $25,000 illegal taxes on goods stored at Taokow; request for report on steps taken.
281
June 17 (460) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report on action taken which has led the Honan authorities to admit that oil cargo on transit pass should not be taxed; information that the authorities insist, however, that cargo transshipped in North Honan should be transshipped within seven days, and that this ruling is being protested.
281
July 30 From the Minister in China to the Consul General at Tientsin
Information that support will not be given to Consul General’s representations against detention at Tsinghua, Honan, of Texas Company’s cargo destined for Shansi unless no reply or an unfavorable reply is received to the representations.
282
July 31 From the Minister in China to the Consul at Swatow
Instruction that no protest should be made against taxation if no transit dues have been paid and if there is no discrimination against U. S. goods.
283
[Page XLI]Aug. 14 From the Minister in China to the Consul General at Tientsin
Opinion that a protest should be made against the levying on U. S. goods covered by transit pass of the goods tax on the Tchengtai Railway.
283
Aug. 20 (419) From the Consul at Tsingtao to the Minister in China
Report that the authorities of the Tsingtao Municipality have replied to the Consulate’s protest of June 6 to the effect that they find nothing in the advertising tax which contravenes U. S. treaty rights; intention to take no further action unless in support of the protest of some particular U. S. firm.
284
Aug. 25 From the American Legation in China to Marshal Yen Hsi-shan’s Diplomatic Bureau at Peiping
Representations regarding detention of the Texas Company’s cargo at Tsinghua for payment of a kerosene tax.
285
Aug. 26 From the American Legation in China to Marshal Yen Hsi-shan’s Diplomatic Bureau at Peiping
Request for the release of a shipment of Liggett and Myers Tobacco Company cigarettes being detained by the Tientsin customs pending payment of an excise tax higher than that prescribed by the National Government.
286
Sept. 3 From the Consul at Tientsin to the Minister in China
Report from the Standard Oil Company that the goods tax on the Tchengtai Railway has been abolished.
287
Sept. 5 (151) From the American Minister in China to the Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs
Request that instructions be given to the Municipality of Tsingtao to end the discriminatory taxation of U. S. goods in the matter of advertisements.
288
Sept. 13 (461) From the Minister in China
Acknowledgment of Department’s instruction that Legation and Consulate General refrain from protesting to the de facto authorities against kerosene and gasoline taxes on the basis of special endorsements on transit passes but that protests by U. S. companies may be transmitted; report that Standard Oil Company has availed itself of this procedure.
288
Sept. 24 (262) To the Minister in China
Opinion, with reference to the Legation’s instruction of July 31 to the Consul at Swatow, that a transit pass does not, unless specially modified, exempt goods from a sale or consumption tax.
289
Sept. 26 (6639) From the Consul General at Shanghai to the Minister in China
Request for instructions in regard to the request by the Minister of Finance for the assistance of the consular body and the International Settlement authorities in preventing cigarettes on which the excise tax has not been paid from being sold in the Settlement and being smuggled from the Settlement to Chinese territory.
290
[Page XLII]Nov. 4 (297) To the Minister in China
Observation in regard to the Legation’s instruction of May 29 to the Consul at Tsingtao, that article I of the treaty of 1928 relates only to importations and exportations and does not undertake to provide for equality of treatment as between native goods and imported goods.
292
Nov. 13 (308) To the Minister in China
Approval of the Legation’s memorandum of August 26 to Yen Hsi-shan’s Diplomatic Bureau in regard to the excise tax on cigarettes.
293
1931 Jan. 3 (348) To the Minister in China
Opinion that imposition of higher censorship fees on U. S. motion picture films than on native films cannot be protested on the basis of treaty rights; suggestion that protests be continued but that they be based on general ground of international comity.
294

Representations Against a Proposed Tobacco Monopoly in Shansi Province

Date and number Subject Page
1930 [Feb. 14] From the American Minister in China to Marshal Yen His-shan of Shansi Province (tel.)
Request that steps be taken to prevent the establishment in Shansi of a Provincial monopoly on the sale of cigars and cigarettes, since such a monopoly would injure U. S. trade and contravene the commercial treaties between the United States and China.
295
Feb. 18 From Marshal Yen Hsi-shan of Shansi Province to the American Minister in China (tel.)
Assertion that the official sale of cigars and cigarettes does not constitute a monopoly and does not contravene the treaties.
295
Mar. 25 (105) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for comments on the advisability of the Legation’s making a protest to Nanking although it presumably would be ineffective.
296
Mar. 29 (234) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that no protest has been made to Nanking since it has no authority in Shansi and since such a protest would only irritate Yen.
297
Sept. 26 From the American Minister in China to Marshal Yen Hsi-shan of Shansi Province (tel.)
Information that Liggett and Myers Tobacco Company reports that the various restrictions have forced it almost out of business in Shansi; request that instructions be given to permit this firm to carry on unimpeded by restrictions which are contrary to treaty rights and the best interests of the two countries.
297
[Page XLIII]

Sino-Soviet Conflict Over the Chinese Eastern Railway

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Undated [Rec’d Feb. 13] From the Chinese Legation
Explanation that the Habarovsk agreement included certain general proposals which the Chinese delegate was not authorized to discuss; information that the National Government is prepared to send a delegate to the conference at Moscow to effect a final settlement of the Railway questions, and that if the Soviet Government desires to send a delegate to China to discuss questions of a general character, China will be prepared to negotiate with such a delegate.
298
Feb. 24 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the Foreign Minister concerning the present status of the negotiations.
299
Mar. 28 (114) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Note for the Foreign Office (text printed) acknowledging the Chinese Government’s note of December 3, 1929, relating to the Railway dispute.
300
May 21 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs, who stated that the Chinese delegate had arrived in Moscow.
300
May 30 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs, who expressed fear that there would be controversy over the question of the scope of the negotiations.
301
Dec. 12 (1041) From the Minister in China (tel.)
News report from Nanking, December 10 (text printed), stating that the Chinese delegate to Moscow is returning for home leave to obtain the views of his Government, as the questions of resumption of diplomatic relations and commercial intercourse have been brought up since he has been in Moscow.
301
Dec. 17 (1053) From the Minister in China (tel.)
News report from Moscow, December 16 (text printed), concerning the Soviet delegate’s statement to the departing Chinese delegate.
302
Dec. 31 (1085) From the Minister in China (tel.)
News report from Harbin, December 29 (text printed), of statements by the returning Chinese delegate.
302
[Page XLIV]

Reports of Conflict Between Chinese and Japanese Interests With Respect to Railways in Manchuria

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Dec. 15 (249) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Oral statement from the Foreign Office (text printed) regarding Japanese concern over the building by China of railway lines parallel to the South Manchuria Railway.
303
Dec. 15 (83) From the Ambassador in Japan
Memorandum by a member of the American Embassy of a conversation with the chief of the Division of Asiatic Affairs in the Foreign Office (text printed), who set forth Japan’s position with regard to the Railway and raised question concerning the chances of U. S. capital being advanced to the Chinese for the construction of railways parallel to the South Manchuria Railway.
303
Dec. 19 (1061) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Japanese press reports that the Chinese are adopting a more aggressive attitude toward Japanese railway interests in Manchuria; opinion that the Japanese are disturbed over possible cooperation between Mukden and Nanking following Chang Hsueh-liang’s visit to Nanking.
308

Treaty of Arbitration Between the United States and China, Signed June 27, 1930

Date and number Subject Page
1929 May 28 From the Chinese Minister
Two suggested changes in the U. S. draft treaty of arbitration: (1) substituting “Permanent International Commission constituted pursuant to the treaty signed at Washington, September 15, 1914” for “an appropriate commission of conciliation,” and (2) substituting “in the Chinese and English languages, both texts having equal force,” for “in the English language.”
309
June 22 To the Chinese Minister
Acceptance of the first suggested change, and suggestion of alternative for the second.
310
July 24 From the Chinese Minister
Explanation that the second change is necessary to conform with an order of the National Government that in all China’s future treaties the Chinese language shall prevail except when a third language is stipulated as authoritative.
311
1930 Jan. 31 To the Chinese Minister
Suggestion that the treaty be signed in English, Chinese, and French, with the French text prevailing.
312
Mar. 21 From the Chinese Chargé
Acceptance of the Department’s suggestion of January 31.
313
June 27 Treaty Between the United States of America and China
Text of arbitration treaty signed at Washington.
313
[Page XLV]

Agreement Relating to the Chinese Courts in the International Settlement at Shanghai, Signed February 17, 1930

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Jan. 8 (25) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Information that the heads of legation have agreed upon tentative joint instructions to the foreign delegates at the Conference in Nanking (text printed).
315
Jan. 9 (9) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Department’s views in regard to the points mentioned in the Legation’s telegram No. 18, January 4, summarizing the points under discussion at the Conference.
316
Jan. 11 (36) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Telegram from the British Minister at Nanking (extract printed) setting forth lines of a settlement which the foreign delegates have agreed upon; information that joint instructions have been sent to the foreign delegates giving them discretion to effect a settlement along the lines indicated.
317
Jan. 15 (47) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
From Bucknell, January 14: Agreement with Department’s No. 9, January 9, except on two points; opinion that further discussion between Chinese representatives and foreign delegates of points still at issue will be useless; suggestion that if no agreement is reached at next meeting, the British Minister continue the discussions informally until they reach a point where the two delegations can meet again to draft the final agreement.
To Bucknell: Inability to give instructions in anticipation of Chinese attitude; suggestion that delegates make joint report on next meeting.
318
Jan. 16 (48) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
From Jacobs, January 15: Concurrence in Bucknell’s views, and comments on additional points; opinion that together these represent the maximum of concessions.
319
Jan. 16 (52) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Concurrence in opinion that the points enumerated by Bucknell and Jacobs represent the maximum in concessions; request for instructions.
321
Jan. 17 (19) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Satisfaction with the general position taken by the Legation and the U. S. delegates.
322
Jan. 22 (68) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
From Jacobs and Bucknell, January 21: Information that agreement has been reached subject to approval of heads of legation; request for instructions if draft meets approval.
322
Jan. 22 (69) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
From Jacobs and Bucknell, January 21: Articles agreed upon and comments thereon.
323
Jan. 23 (71) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Decision of heads of legation to ask their respective governments to sanction approval of agreement; request for early authorization.
324
[Page XLVI]Jan. 25 (79) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
From Jacobs and Bucknell, January 23: Joint telegram to the Senior Minister (text printed) commenting on articles of the draft agreement.
325
Jan. 25 (80) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Joint telegram from the foreign delegates to the Senior Minister, January 24 (text printed), setting forth an amendment which the Chinese wish to make in article 6, and the opinion of the foreign delegates that it should not be accepted.
328
Jan. 25 (84) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Note from the Senior Minister, January 25 (text printed), proposing that the foreign delegates inform the Chinese that the amendment to article 6 is not acceptable; Legation’s concurrence in the Senior Minister’s suggestion.
328
Jan. 28 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
From the Chargé: Request for Department’s instructions as soon as possible for signing of agreement.
329
Jan. 28 To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
For the Chargé: Conditional authorization for delegates to sign agreement, and statement of conditions upon which the authorization is predicated.
329
Jan. 30 From the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that draft agreement represents an acceptable settlement and that signature by chiefs of missions would be preferable to signature by delegates.
330
Jan. 30 To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
For the Chargé: Request that the Minister be informed that the Department will accept the Minister’s decision with regard to points set forth in Department’s telegram of January 28 and that he is authorized to sign the agreement at his discretion.
331
Feb. 2 From the Minister in China (tel.)
British Minister’s opinion that the Chinese would not accept modifications proposed in Department’s telegram of January 28; information that British Minister is prepared to sign; expression of hope that Department will give authorization to sign agreement as is.
332
Feb. 3 To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
For the Minister: Reference to Department’s telegram of January 30 authorizing signature.
332
Feb. 13 (126) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Explanation that, because of the difficulties of obtaining simultaneous signatures of Foreign Minister and interested Ministers, it has been decided that the agreement shall be signed at Nanking on February 17 by the authorized representatives of those concerned.
333
Feb. 17 Agreement Relating to the Chinese Courts in the International Settlement at Shanghai
Texts of agreement, exchange of notes between the foreign signatories and the Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs, and unilateral declaration by the foreign signatories.
333
[Page XLVII]Mar. 7 (181) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Suggestion that the judges of the British Supreme Court and of the United States Court be designated as the foreign representatives on the commission provided for in article 9 of the agreement.
342
Mar. 12 (90) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Approval of Minister’s 181 of March 7, provided the Chinese representatives are of correspondingly high position.
342
Mar. 14 (194) From the Minister in China (tel.)
(From the Counselor of the Legation.)
From the Minister, at Shanghai: Request that interested Ministers be informed that question of appointing officials to facilitate inplementation of the agreement was discussed with the Foreign Minister, who has appointed his representative and asks that interested Ministers appoint theirs.
To the Minister: Names of foreign representatives agreed upon by interested diplomatic representatives.
342
Mar. 20 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the British Minister, in which it was decided that, if the Chinese appointed members of their delegation, it would be sufficient to name members of the American and British delegations as judges on the commission provided for in the court agreement.
(Footnote: Information that two Chinese delegates, one American, and one British were appointed.)
343
Apr. 16 (6458) From the Consul General at Shanghai to the Minister in China
Information that the new courts were inaugurated on April 1 and that they are now functioning satisfactorily.
344

American Interest in Problems Affecting the International Settlement at Shanghai

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Jan. 13 (42) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Note from the Foreign Ministry (text printed) requesting that the Shanghai Power Company be instructed to communicate directly with the Municipal Council concerning its request for the stamping of deeds; opinion that suggested procedure should not be accepted since it might appear that the Legation acquiesced in the Foreign Ministry’s implied position that foreign consuls can no longer intervene on behalf of their nationals.
345
Jan. 16 (18) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Concurrence in views expressed in Chargé’s No. 42, January 13; instructions to insist upon observance of procedure laid down in Shanghai Land Regulations.
346
Jan. 18 (1454) To the Chargé in China
Desire that the Minister, after he has taken his post, examine into the extra-Settlement road problem.
346
[Page XLVIII]Apr. 16 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
To the Legation: Resolution presented by the Municipal Council to the annual ratepayers’ meeting proposing an increase in the Chinese membership of the Council from three to five; information that it was opposed by a British ratepayer and voted down.
347
Apr. 23 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
To the Legation: Information that a special ratepayers’ meeting has been called to consider a resolution concerning the increase of the Chinese membership of the Council; opinion that it would be desirable to attend and preside; request for instructions.
348
Apr. 26 To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Concurrence in Consul General’s opinion that it would be desirable for him to preside at the special meeting; request for an expression of the Minister’s views.
348
Apr. 30 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
From the Minister: Opinion that present problem is between Council and British ratepayers and that U. S. action should consist only of support to the British Consul.
349
May 8 (312) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the diplomatic body has approved the resolution passed by the ratepayers to increase the Chinese membership of the Council.
349
May 10 (162) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Gratification that the Minister associated himself with his colleagues in approving the resolution.
350
July 18 (7036) From the Consul General at Shanghai
Information that, upon the insistence of the Consulate General, the Chinese authorities have stamped the Shanghai Power Company’s deeds in the customary manner.
350
Aug. 22 (225) To the Minister in China
Request that the Consul General at Shanghai be informed that the Department is gratified at his success in regard to the procedure for stamping the deeds.
351
Dec. 23 (6736) From the Consul General at Shanghai to the Minister in China
Conversation with the Mayor of the Municipality of Shanghai in regard to the extra-Settlement roads; intimation by the Mayor that the Chinese authorities desire that the matter be taken up through diplomatic channels.
351
Dec. 27 (447) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for opinion with regard to the question of the extra-Settlement roads.
352
1931 Jan. 1 (2) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that the claims of the Municipal Council in regard to the extra-Settlement roads are based on very slender grounds.
353
[Page XLIX]

Insistence by China Upon the Relinquishment of Extraterritorial Rights by the United States and Other Powers

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Jan. 2 (2) From the Consul at Nanking (tel.)
Information that the head of the Judicial Yuan has said with regard to negotiations on the question of extraterritoriality that China will be firm where principles are concerned but reasonable as to details.
353
Jan. 2 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the Chinese Minister, who presented a proposal for abrogating extraterritoriality as of January 1 except in Shanghai, Canton, Tientsin, Hankow, and Harbin (text printed).
354
Jan. 2 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Report that the Mayor of Canton apparently expects the consular officers to call first and formally upon him, which is contrary to established practice; request for suggestions as to some general form of procedure.
355
Jan. 2 (6) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Departure of the British Minister for Nanking to initiate negotiations for a gradual relinquishment of extraterritorial rights.
356
Jan. 2 (7) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Information that the French, Danish, and Italian Ministers are protesting to the Chinese Government with respect to the mandate of December 28, 1929, and that the British Minister has suggested to his Government that it make a reservation in some form.
356
Jan. 3 (10) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Statement to the diplomatic body that the Department is engaged in discussions with the Chinese Minister with a view to concluding an agreement, that it proposes to continue the discussions, and that it has given no instructions regarding a protest or reservation concerning the Chinese mandate.
357
Jan. 3 From the French Ambassador
Notice that a protest was delivered to the Chinese Government on January 2, but that it does not constitute a change in French policy toward China.
357
Jan. 4 (5) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Approval of statements reported in the Chargé’s No. 10 of January 3; explanation of the Department’s position that it sees no objection to signalizing January 1 as a date for the beginning of a gradual abolition of extraterritorial rights, it being understood that the process will be by steps which shall be agreed upon.
358
Jan. 4 To the French Embassy
Statement of the U. S. Government’s position regarding the Chinese declaration of December 28, 1929.
(Footnote: Similar memorandum to the British Embassy.)
359
Jan. 6 (6) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Information that the Department perceives no need for consular officers to call first and formally on the Mayor of Canton, and that it leaves the question of instructions to the Legation.
360
[Page L]Jan. 8 (26) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Japanese Chargé’s statement that his Government does not intend to make a protest with regard to the mandate of December 28, 1929.
360
Jan. 13 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Information that an informal visit to the Mayor of Canton was made January 11, that other consuls are pursuing a similar course, and that relations seem well established.
361
Jan. 13 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Chinese Minister, during which it was explained that the United States could not commit itself to the Minister’s proposal of January 2, and in which some of the points involved in a plan being worked on in the Department were discussed.
361
Jan. 15 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Report that the impression is growing in Chinese circles that the United States is the only power opposing the abolition of extraterritoriality; suggestion that the Consulate General could make good use of a statement regarding progress of negotiations in Washington.
362
Jan. 18 (20) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Statement regarding the satisfactory progress of the negotiations at Washington.
362
Jan. 20 (62) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Report that the Norwegian Chargé has left for Nanking to engage in extraterritoriality negotiations.
363
Jan. 23 To the Chinese Legation
Draft plan prepared in the Department for purposes of discussion without commitment.
(Footnote: Information that it was explained that no definite offer should be expected until after the Secretary’s return from the London Naval Conference.)
363
Feb. 3 From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report of having been shown the first definite proposal which the British Minister is prepared to lay before the Chinese Foreign Minister.
372
Feb. 4 To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Opinion that evidence of absence of agreement among the powers will not prejudice the negotiations at the present stage; desire, however, to exchange views and information with other interested Governments.
373
Undated [Rec’d Feb. 6] From the Chinese Minister
Personal observations of the Minister on the Department’s draft proposal of January 23.
373
Feb. 6 Memorandum by the Acting Secretary of State
Visit by the Japanese Ambassador, who left a statement of Japanese position and invited a statement of U. S. position.
375
[Page LI]Undated [Rec’d Feb. 6] From the Japanese Embassy
Statement of the Japanese position.
375
Feb. 10 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Brazilian Ambassador, who stated that his Government’s view coincided substantially with that of the U. S. Government.
377
Feb. 13 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Chinese Minister in regard to the most-favored-nation clause contained in the U. S. draft of January 23.
377
Undated To the Japanese Ambassador
Request for additional information in regard to Japanese views as set forth by the Ambassador on February 6.
(Footnote: Notation that this document was read to the Japanese Ambassador on February 18.)
380
Undated To the Japanese Embassy
Statement of U. S. Government’s position as requested by the Embassy on February 6.
(Footnote: Handed to the Ambassador on February 18.)
381
Feb. 19 (41) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Account of progress of Department’s negotiations with the Chinese Minister; information that the Department is still uninformed as to British proposals to the Chinese and would welcome such information as the Foreign Office may be disposed to give.
382
Feb. 21 (36) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Opinion that the British negotiations are at a deadlock; explanation that the British are much concerned as to the Department’s attitude; information that the Foreign Office will authorize the British Embassy to explain the current situation to the Department.
384
Feb. 25 To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
For the Minister: Instructions to discuss with the British Minister the subject of cooperation as distinguished from concurrent action or a “united front”; request for estimate of Chinese political situation in its bearings on whether haste or delay is desirable, and for opinion as to whether negotiations should be transferred from Washington to Nanking.
384
Feb. 25 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Netherlands Minister, in which the obstacles to identical action were pointed out to the Minister.
385
Feb. 26 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Memoranda given to the Chinese Minister (texts printed): (1) reply to the Chinese Minister’s memorandum presented on February 6; (2) rough sketch of a portion of a possible new draft plan being worked on in the Department.
387
[Page LII]Feb. 27 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Chinese Minister, in which the Minister expressed disapproval of the ideas embodied in the sketch of the Department’s new draft plan.
391
Mar. 3 (22) To the Minister in China
Transmittal of a copy of the memorandum of the conversation between the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs and the Chinese Minister on February 13, and comments thereon for the information of the Minister in China.
393
Mar. 4 From the British Chargé
Aide-mémoire setting forth the course and progress of the British negotiations with the Chinese (text printed).
394
Mar. 5 (281) To the Ambassador in Great Britain
Transmittal of a copy of the memorandum of the conversation between the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs and the Chinese Minister of February 13, sent to the Ambassador in connection with the Foreign Office inquiries regarding U. S. position.
402
Mar. 6 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
From the Minister: Opinion that there seems to be nothing in the present Chinese political situation to require haste in the negotiations; also that no purpose would be served by transferring the negotiations to Nanking until and unless agreement is reached between U. S. and British Governments on concrete proposals.
403
Mar. 7 From the French Ambassador
Comments on Japanese note handed to the Foreign Office on February 6; request to be informed of the U. S. position and of the status of the negotiations between the United States and China.
404
Undated To the British Chargé
Explanation that the materials presented to the Chinese Minister on January 23 were merely a plan submitted for purposes of study and did not constitute a proposal or involve a commitment.
(Footnote: Notation that this document was shown to and read by the Chargé on March 10.)
406
Mar. 17 To the British Chargé
Memorandum (text printed) in reply to various inquiries of the British Government as to the attitude of the U. S. Government in regard to the relative importance of two points involved in the negotiations with China.
408
Mar. 17 To the British Embassy
Reiteration that the transaction of January 23 consisted of the informal submittal of a memorandum to the Chinese Minister.
409
[Page LIII]Mar. 17 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the British Chargé during which a statement was presented to the Chargé (text printed) setting forth the Department’s view that the problem of the International Settlement is distinct from the general question of extraterritorial jurisdiction.
409
Mar. 18 To the French Embassy
Acknowledgement of the French note of March 7; and statement, as requested, of the views of the U. S. Government and of recent developments.
410
Mar. 22 (213) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Conversation with the British Minister, who presented a draft plan which it is felt will furnish a basis for a possible concrete proposal; and information that the two Legations are now working on a draft which they hope to submit shortly to their respective Governments and possibly to the Japanese.
412
Mar. 22 To the British Chargé
Comments on the Chargé’s aide-mémoire of March 4.
413
Mar. 24 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Netherlands Minister in regard to views of Foreign Office officials and their desire for information regarding U. S. negotiations; memorandum concerning U. S. views and negotiations, handed to the Minister during the conversation (text printed).
(Footnote: Information that the memorandum was also handed to the Italian Counselor of Embassy on March 26.)
416
Mar. 27 (113) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Hope that collaboration with the British Minister will produce a workable plan; authorization to exchange views with Netherlands Minister and other interested colleagues.
417
Mar. 28 (226) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Draft proposal drawn up by the American and British Ministers (text printed) for submittal to the two Governments for use in discussions with a view to finding a draft concrete proposal to be laid before the Chinese simultaneously though individually; intention to inform the French Minister on April 1 and the other interested Ministers later.
418
Apr. 2 To the British Embassy
Comments on various points under consideration; Department’s gratification at collaboration by American and British Ministers in China; information that a copy of their draft has been received and will be communicated to the Embassy.
424
Apr. 3 (245) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Comments on the draft submitted March 28; information that text has been communicated to French, Japanese, Netherlands, and Norwegian colleagues, who have communicated it to their Governments.
425
Apr. 9 Revised Draft Agreement
Department’s revision of the draft prepared by the American and British Ministers in China.
426
[Page LIV]Apr. 11 (34) To the Minister in the Netherlands (tel.)
Instructions to inform the Chinese Minister to the United States, who is attending conference on international law, that the Department is withholding materials on extraterritoriality pending the Secretary’s return from London.
434
Apr. 17 To the British Counselor of Embassy
Transmittal of Department’s revised draft; comments on variations in the two drafts; request for Foreign Office comments and suggestions.
434
Apr. 19 (137) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Transmittal of Department’s revised draft; authorization to discuss it with the British Minister; request for full comments and suggestions.
435
Apr. 28 (96) To the Minister in China
Transmittal of various documents; expression of interest in indications that Chinese officials are willing to move slowly, since recent developments in China point to the necessity of proceeding with caution.
435
May 1 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the British Minister, in which it was decided to approve the Department’s revised draft, subject to certain comments, and to recommend it to the two Governments as a basis for negotiations.
436
May 2 (151) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Information, for use in case of inquiries, that Washington and London have been conferring but that resumption of negotiations is not contingent upon previous reaching of an agreement.
437
May 3 (304) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Comments subject to which the Department’s revised draft is approved; suggestion that the U. S. and British Governments now collaborate in producing a final agreed version.
437
May 3 (113) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Telegram being sent to Peiping (text printed) making slight change in the draft.
(British Embassy also notified.)
439
May 8 (316) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that Japanese Chargé has asked for a copy of draft and that one is being prepared for him.
440
May 8 (159) To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
For the Minister: Instruction to defer action until further instructed, since Department has assumed that discussion of its latest draft would be confined for the present to U. S. and British officials.
440
May 9 To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
For the Minister: Suggestion that, unless it would be embarrassing, the copy of the draft be communicated to the Japanese Chargé by the British Minister.
441
[Page LV]May 14 (335) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that, in view of promise made, a copy of the draft was given to the Japanese Chargé on May 12.
441
May 15 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Chinese Minister with regard to the resumption of informal discussions.
441
May 15 Memorandum by the Secretary of State
Conversation with the Chinese Minister, who called to renew relations and to inquire about resumption of conversation with Chief of Division of Far Eastern Affairs.
443
May 16 From the British Counselor of Embassy
Foreign Office’s suggested amendments (text printed) to the revised draft, based mainly on the agreed comments of the U. S. and British Ministers in China.
443
June 9 (137) To the Minister in China
Transmittal of a draft as revised to June 4; information that it is based on the April 9 draft and includes amendments based on the suggestions in the Minister’s telegram No. 304 of May 3 and the British Counselor’s letter of May 16; comparison of the April 9 and June 4 drafts; request for comments.
446
June 10 To the British Counselor of Embassy
Comments on the suggestions in the Counselor’s letter of May 16; transmittal of the June 4 draft.
448
Undated Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Reiteration of Department’s views with regard to the relative merits of certain proposals.
(Footnote: Notation that this document was handed to an official of the British Embassy, June 10, as a memorandum of oral statements.)
451
Undated Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Statement that no assurance can be given that the Department will make proposals to the Chinese which conform to the June 4 draft.
(Footnote: Notation that this document was handed to an official of the British Embassy, June 10, as a memorandum of oral statements.)
451
June 12 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation between the Secretary and the Chinese Minister, in which the Minister pressed for an assurance that attention would be given to the matter of the negotiations in the near future or that the conversations would be resumed.
451
[Page LVI]Aug. 5 (194) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Instructions to inquire of the Foreign Office whether it is true that the British Government expects shortly to communicate proposals to the Chinese Government and whether Foreign Office would be willing to agree that neither U. S. nor British Government should present proposals without two weeks’ previous notice to the other.
453
Aug. 7 (173) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Foreign Office statement that the Chinese Government has already been informed that the British Minister will spend most of September in Nanking to continue the discussions to the extent that the political situation will permit.
454
Aug. 7 (175) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Foreign Office agreement with U. S. suggestion concerning two-week notification.
455
Aug. 9 (197) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Department’s understanding of agreement.
455
Aug. 9 (269) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Account of exchange of views with British Government; information that the Department is considering a possible proposal to the British that neither Government take any further initiative in the negotiations until October; request for comments.
456
Aug. 14 (698) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Approval of proposal to postpone initiating the negotiations.
457
Aug. 21 (214) To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that copies of the June 4 draft have been given to the Japanese and Netherlands Missions; instructions to state to the Foreign Office that the Department suggests that no further initiative be taken until October in view of the political situation in China.
457
Aug. 30 (206) From the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
Foreign Office memorandum (text printed) expressing agreement with the Department’s views concerning the political situation in China, but stating that the British Ambassador is committed to resume the discussions in September.
459
Sept. 4 From the British Embassy
Information that the British Minister will present to the Chinese Government a draft agreement which is the June 4 draft with a revised article 10 (text printed); reasons for revision; inquiry whether the U. S. Government feels disposed to amend its draft accordingly.
459
Sept. 5 (780) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Suggestion that simultaneously with presentation of draft by the British Minister at Nanking the Department present the June 4 draft to the Chinese Chargé and urge the Japanese Government to do likewise.
462
[Page LVII]Undated Tentative Redraft of the Final Paragraph of Article 10 of the Draft Agreement
Text handed to the British Counselor of Embassy on September 6.
463
Sept. 7 (225) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Account of recent correspondence; reply being made to the Minister in China (text printed) to the effect that this is not considered an opportune moment for the simultaneous presentation of proposals but that if the British do present theirs now, the Department would be willing to inform the Chinese that the U. S. Government has full knowledge of them and that in October it will present its own proposals, which are substantially the same; request that the Foreign Office be informed.
463
Sept. 8 (789) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Conviction that British Minister’s instructions make it impossible for him to defer presentation of draft now.
465
Sept. 8 (216) From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Foreign Office statement that the British Government’s commitments prevent it from deferring its presentation of the draft, but that it would welcome action by the Department as set forth in telegram No. 225 of September 7.
465
Sept. 10 (796) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report of having been shown certain changes which the British have made in their draft.
466
Sept. 12 (809) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report that British draft was presented to the Foreign Minister on September 11.
466
Sept. 12 To the Chinese Legation
Information that the Department has full knowledge of the contents of the British proposals, and that it has prepared a similar draft which it will be prepared to present in October.
467
Sept. 13 (812) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the British Ambassador in Japan inquired at the Japanese Foreign Office concerning its attitude toward the British proposals and was told that some time would be required to study the draft.
467
Sept. 15 (813) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for authorization to inform the interested Legations of the substance of the Department’s memorandum of September 12 to the Chinese Legation.
468
Sept. 15 (322) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Authorization as requested in telegram No. 813; inquiry as to whether presentation of draft by British Minister has received any publicity.
468
Sept. 18 (821) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report of brief press announcements; also that no public interest appears to have been aroused by British proposals.
468
[Page LVIII]Sept. 20 (834) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that Legation has received final text of British proposals, and inquiry whether changes should be telegraphed to the Department.
469
Sept. 23 (328) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to telegraph important changes.
469
Sept. 24 (849) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Texts of the important changes.
469
Sept. 26 (855) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Foreign Minister’s statement to the British Minister that the British proposals are unacceptable and that the Chinese Government will submit counterproposals.
470
Oct. 28 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Chinese Minister, during which the American draft proposals were presented to the Minister and it was agreed that a copy should be presented at Nanking by the Minister in China.
471
Oct. 28 Draft Agreement
Text of draft handed to the Chinese Minister by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs.
472
Oct. 29 (375) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Changes in June 4 draft as presented to the Chinese Minister on October 28; instructions to present October 28 draft to the Foreign Minister and to inform British and Japanese colleagues of changes; information that copies of October 28 draft are being sent to British Government.
480
Oct. 29 (376) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that there will be no immediate discussion of the October 28 draft.
481
Nov. 8 (971) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Press report of Foreign Minister’s expression of hope for action in regard to the abolition of extraterritoriality.
481
Nov. 9 (972) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report that Japanese Chargé has been given a copy of the October 28 draft.
482
Nov. 11 (977) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report that a copy of the draft proposals was given to the Foreign Minister on November 9.
482
Nov. 12 Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation with the Chinese Minister, who said that he found the October 28 proposals most unsatisfactory and that he thought it would be better for China to enter into no new agreement rather than an agreement of this type.
482
Nov. 13 To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
For the Minister: Press release in regard to Department’s action (text printed).
484
[Page LIX]Dec. 2 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the Foreign Minister, who said that until extraterritoriality was discontinued foreign firms would not be permitted to make further extensions of their business into the interior.
484
Dec. 7 Chinese Counterproposals
Text of proposals received from the Chinese Minister.
485
Dec. 10 Memorandum by Mr. Joseph E. Jacobs of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs
Conversation between the Chinese Minister and the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs and Mr. Jacobs, in which the Minister explained and amplified the Chinese counterproposals of December 7.
489
Dec. 11 (428) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for report on differences between Chinese counterproposals handed to the Department on December 7 and those handed to the British Minister at Nanking on December 1.
492
Dec. 16 (1050) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report on differences in drafts handed to the Department and to the British Minister.
492
Dec. 17 (1054) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information from the Foreign Minister that a document is being prepared which the Chinese Minister will hand to the Department in about two days.
494
Dec. 17 (437) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for opinion as to possibility of Chinese taking unilateral action; desire also to know whether British Minister is planning any new move in the near future.
494
Dec. 18 (1057) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that British Minister plans to leave on December 26 and does not expect further instructions until after his return in February.
495
Dec. 18 (1058) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the French Minister has received Chinese draft proposals accompanied by a memorandum which he regards in the nature of an ultimatum.
495
Dec. 18 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with the Chinese Minister, in which the Minister stated that he hoped to have an answer to his counterproposals before the first of the year and in which the possibility of unilateral action by China was discussed.
496
Dec. 19 From the Chinese Legation
Reiteration of Chinese desire for abolition of extraterritoriality; unacceptability of U. S. proposals of October 28; hone that solution can be reached by the end of February; and statement that the Chinese Government still believes the matter can be settled by negotiation and that it will not be necessary for China to take a different course of action toward that end.
497
[Page LX]Dec. 19 (440) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Assumption that proposals handed to French Minister are similar to those handed to Department on December 7; résumé of Chinese Legation’s memorandum of December 19; authorization to inform British and French Ministers.
498
Dec. 20 (1064) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Inclination to take seriously the last paragraph of the Chinese Legation’s memorandum of December 19; and information that it is identical with memoranda presented to the British and French Ministers.
498
Dec. 21 (1065) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Understanding that documents similar to the Chinese memorandum of December 19 have been given to other interested countries but not to Japan.
499
Dec. 22 (1073) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report on French Minister’s instructions to reply to the effect that the French Government is reluctant to believe that the Chinese will compromise international relations by unilateral action as intimated in the memorandum; information that the Netherlands Minister will seek authorization to make a similar reply.
499
[Dec. 23] (1076) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion, shared by interested Ministers, that Chinese intend forcing extraterritoriality issue at expiration of indicated period.
500
Dec. 27 To the Chinese Legation
Recapitulation of correspondence; concurrence in view that matter can be settled by negotiation.
500
Dec. 27 (448) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Transmittal of memorandum given to the Chinese Legation; instructions to give text to Foreign Minister and to inform interested colleagues of its tenor.
502
Dec. 29 (450) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the Chinese Minister has expressly requested that U. S. Minister give to the Foreign Minister a copy of the Department’s December 27 memorandum.
503
Dec. 29 (331) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Résumé of recent negotiations, including Department’s memorandum to the Chinese Legation December 27; and instructions to inform the Foreign Office.
503
Dec. 31 (334) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Information that the Department believes that the opportunity for concluding new treaties is better now than it will be later, and that it is working on a revision of the drafts of June 4 and October 28 with a view to making a new proposal; request for Foreign Office comments.
504
Dec. 31 (452) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Information set forth in Department’s 334 to the Ambassador in Great Britain; Department’s intention to confer with the British through the Embassy in London; instructions to inform British Legation; request for comments.
505
[Page LXI]

Jurisdiction Over American Citizens in China

Date and number Subject Page
1929 Sept. 13 (869) From the American Minister in China to the Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs
Account of the facts in the case of the attempt of the Nanchang authorities to arrest Dr. Walter Libby, of the Nanchang General Hospital of the Methodist Mission, on a charge of having caused the death of a Chinese boy; request that the Nanchang authorities be instructed to desist from their efforts to take direct jurisdiction over this American citizen or the hospital, an American institution.
505
Oct. 31 From the Minister in China to the Consul General at Hankow
Opinion that it is not necessary to comment to Dr. Libby on his action in allowing judges of the Chinese court to visit the hospital and question him, since no charges were made against Dr. Libby, the case being against the Chinese superintendent of the hospital.
507
1930 Feb. 5 (106) From the Minister in Chita (tel.)
From Nanking, February 4: Report of case in which Mr. Albert H. Smit was detained by the Tungchow police as the result of an automobile accident in which a Chinese pedestrian was killed; information that Mr. Smit is out on bond and that Consulate has advised him to report matter to U. S. District Attorney at Shanghai; suggestion that Legation request District Attorney to institute proceedings to forestall possible Chinese attempt to take jurisdiction.
To Nanking: Instructions to consult District Attorney and report.
507
Feb. 6 (108) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Shanghai: District Attorney’s opinion that the facts do not warrant Mr. Smit’s arrest or prosecution on a charge of manslaughter.
508
Feb. 12 (122) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking: Report that Mr. Smit went to Tungchow on February 5 to appear before the Chinese officials; request that Consul Meyer be sent to Tungchow.
Information that Consul Meyer is being sent to Tungchow at once.
509
Feb. 15 (131) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram fron Consul Meyer (text printed) stating that Tungchow court has imposed fine of $100 on Mr. Smit and that Consul has advised him not to pay it until matter is referred to Legation. Intention to suggest to Consul at Nanking that he might in his official capacity hold a preliminary investigation; proposal to address a note in the matter to the Foreign Minister; request for instructions.
509
Feb. 17 (63) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Approval of proposed suggestion to Consul at Nanking; desire that Mr. Smit not pay fine and that he keep out of Tungchow district pending settlement; disapproval of proposed note to the Foreign Minister; intention, however, to take up matter with the Chinese Minister.
510
Feb. 17 To the Chinese Legation
Explanation of Mr. Smit’s case, and expression of hope that it will not create an issue between the two countries.
511
[Page LXII]Feb. 18 (137) From the Minister in China (tel.)
District Attorney’s opinion that prosecution of Mr. Smit is not warranted and that more ill feeling would be stirred up by an inevitable acquittal than by a failure to prosecute; Legation’s adherence to the view that Consul at Nanking could properly hold a fresh investigation.
512
Feb. 20 (71) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Concurrence in view that Consul at Nanking could properly hold a fresh investigation.
512
Feb. 21 (10) From the Consul at Nanking (tel.)
Report that Mr. Smit has proceeded to Shanghai without paying fine; assertion that if District Attorney is willing to initiate American court proceedings, Consul will hold preliminary hearing provided Mr. Smit returns to Nanking jurisdiction.
513
Mar. 1 (162) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Interview with the Foreign Minister on February 26 in which the Foreign Minister promised to make inquiry into Mr. Smit’s case.
513
Mar. 4 (171) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Shanghai: Report that Mr. Smit had been uncertain as to what his legal status was in view of the Chinese mandate of December 28, 1929; suggestion by the Consul General at Shanghai that a statement be issued to all missionary societies setting forth U. S. position regarding mandate.
514
Mar. 8 (32) To the Minister in China
Commendation of the Legation and the Consul General at Hankow in connection with the decision of the procurator of the Nanchang District Court, October 18, 1929, that the Court had no jurisdiction over Dr. Libby.
515
Mar. 9 (184) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Suggestions in regard to investigation in Smit case.
515
Mar. 11 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with District Attorney, in which it was agreed that nothing should be done in regard to Mr. Smit’s motorcar license which the authorities had cancelled, since it is within their province to issue or refuse to issue a motorcar license without giving cause.
516
Mar. 11 (6) To the Consul at Nanking (tel.)
For the Minister: Hope of both Governments that the Smit case can be settled without further publicity.
516
Mar. 12 (92) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Statement which the Department is transmitting to missionary interests and desires the consular officers to communicate to Americans in China (text printed) setting forth U. S. position with regard to the Chinese mandate of December 28, 1929.
517
Apr. 7 (252) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report on present status of Smit case.
518
[Page LXIII]May 16 (6498) From the Consul General at Shanghai to the Minister in China
Report of an incident involving the question of jurisdiction over U. S. citizens in which the Chinese authorities seized the motorcar license of the commander in chief of the U. S. Asiatic Fleet but returned it after the matter was taken up by the Consulate General.
518
June 17 (147) To the Minister in China
Assertion that the Department would not be willing to concede to Chinese officials the unquestioned authority “without giving cause” to deprive U. S. citizens of the right to use their motor vehicles; request for more detailed statement of the Minister’s opinion on the subject.
520
Sept. 5 (440) From the Minister in China
Clarification of position in regard to the right of the Chinese to cancel or refuse to issue a motorcar license.
521

Dual Nationality of American Citizens of Chinese Descent

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Jan. 18 (1455) To the Chargé in China
Opinion that the present is not a suitable time for discussing with the Chinese Government the question of a possible agreement concerning dual nationality.
522
June 23 (206) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from Bessie B. Wong of San Francisco (text printed) in regard to the arrest in Peiping of her father, Wong Bock Yue, an American citizen. Instructions to investigate facts and take appropriate steps.
522
June 27 (507) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Memorandum sent to local Diplomatic Bureau of Marshal Yen’s Headquarters, June 21 (text printed), in regard to Mr. Wong; statements made by the Diplomatic Bureau to the effect that Mr. Wong is a Chinese citizen; request for instructions.
523
June 27 (216) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to assert Mr. Wong’s U. S. citizenship and demand custody of his person.
524
June 28 (514) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report that demand has been presented.
524
July 11 (565) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Diplomatic Bureau’s reply (text printed) giving evidence of Mr. Wong’s Chinese nationality; enumeration of facts which cause the Legation to question the advisability of continuing to assert Mr. Wong’s U. S. citizenship.
524
July 17 (239) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that the Legation would not be warranted in further contesting jurisdiction over Mr. Wong, but that it should request information concerning the treatment accorded to him.
525
[Page LXIV]Aug. 1 (651) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report on treatment accorded Mr. Wong.
526
Oct. 2 (874) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that Mr. Wong, who was released shortly after the turnover of Peiping, has called to express his gratitude.
526

Jurisdiction for Quarantine Purposes Over American Merchant Vessels in Chinese Ports

Date and number Subject Page
1930 July 14 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the Director of the Chinese National Quarantine Service regarding the new service which he is organizing.
527
July 26 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Report on new quarantine regulations whereby the Chinese Government seeks to take over the quarantine service of Shanghai; opinion that their enforcement is beyond the capacity of the Chinese authorities; suggestion that the Chinese authorities be notified that the present regulations must remain in effect until replaced by others arrived at by agreement.
527
July 31 To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Instructions for reply to the Chinese authorities to the effect that under the existing treaties, jurisdiction over U. S. merchant vessels visiting Chinese ports is vested in officials of the U. S. Government, but that the II. S. Government is prepared to discuss the revision of present agreements by negotiation; instructions to repeat to the Legation.
529
Aug. 4 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
To the Legation: Report on a meeting of the consular body on August 1 and the attitudes adopted by interested colleagues.
530
Aug. 7 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Information that a reply in the sense of the Department’s instructions has been sent to the Director of Quarantine.
531
Aug. 11 (689) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that a reply in the sense of the Department’s instruction is being drafted for transmittal to the Foreign Ministry.
531
Sept. 10 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Request for instructions as to whether the Consulate General should visa fumigation certificates signed by a National Quarantine Service officer but not countersigned by the harbor master; understanding that the British are tacitly accepting the new service.
532
Sept. 12 To the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Instructions not to authenticate certificates issued by National Quarantine Service officers but to request U. S. Public Health Service officer at Shanghai to issue certificate after satisfying himself that the regulations have been fulfilled.
533
[Page LXV]Sept. 22 (839) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that interested colleagues have decided not to inform the Nanking Government of an acceptance of the new regulations but to let them tacitly be enforced and watch the results; opinion that the United States should not follow a different policy; statement that no reply has been made to the Foreign Ministry and none will be made unless the Department so instructs.
533
Sept. 27 (336) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Authorization to follow procedure set forth in telegram No. 839 of September 22.
534
Sept. 29 (268) To the Minister in China
Statement of the principles involved in the Department’s reply to the September 10 telegram from the Consul General at Shanghai.
534
Nov. 11 (391) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Decision that for the present Chinese quarantine officers may be tacitly permitted to board U. S. vessels arriving at Shanghai so long as they do not interfere with the U. S. Public Health Service officer.
536
Nov. 14 (986) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Shanghai, November 13: Report of instruction given shipping companies, who do not anticipate any serious difficulties.
536
Dec. 19 To the Consul General at Shanghai
Opinion that the U. S. Public Health Service officer at Shanghai should not countersign the certificates of the Chinese officer but that he should issue his own fumigation certificates.
537

Application of Chinese Jurisdiction to American Missionary, Educational, and Medical Enterprises and Personnel in China

Date and number Subject Page
1929 Nov. 15 (1402) To the Minister in China
Opinion that U. S. citizens and organizations in China would not be justified in contesting the right of Chinese authorities to prescribe the method in which schools for the secular education of the Chinese shall be conducted; instruction that consular officers shall be so informed.
538
1930 June 5 (129) To the Minister in China
Statement of principles in regard to the conduct of hospitals and the practice of medicine by U. S. citizens and organizations in China.
541
Aug. 20 (222) To the Minister in China
Opinion that U. S. missionaries and churches would be justified in refusing to make voluntary contributions equal in amount to the Soochow house tax if Chinese citizens and organizations similarly situated are exempted; suggestion, however, that consular officers should attempt to effect equitable and satisfactory adjustments.
542
[Page LXVI]Dec. 3 (325) To the Minister in China
Statement, in connection with the Chinese attempt to collect a military fodder tax from a Seventh Day Adventist Mission near Mukden, that the Consulate General should protest against the imposition of any military tax on U. S. citizens or institutions in China.
543
Dec. 8 (327) To the Minister in China
Department’s interpretation of treaty provisions in regard to the conduct of schools by American citizens in China.
544

Attempt by Chinese Authorities To Require Registration of Foreign Corporations Desiring to Bring Suit in Chinese Courts

Date and number Subject Page
1930 June 26 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
To the Legation: Report of a ruling of the Special District Court of Shanghai in connection with the Japanese firm Mitsui Bussan Kaisha which, if sustained, will force all foreign companies to be registered with the Ministry of Commerce in order to bring suit in Chinese courts.
546
July 3 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
To the Legation: Information that the ruling regarding the Japanese firm was not modified in the June 28 hearing; press reports of articles to be included in supplemental regulations soon to be issued (text printed).
546
July 12 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
To the Legation: Statement by the President of the Shanghai Special District Court that all firms will be required to register before bringing suit in court; information that a case brought by the Singer Sewing Machine Company in the Kiangning District Court was dismissed because the firm was not registered; and request for early instructions in view of number of inquiries and importance of question.
548
July 14 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
To the Legation: Information that during the last three weeks several suits have been brought by an American firm in the Shanghai Special District Court and that two have been decided in favor of the American plaintiff; reiteration of request for early instructions.
549
July 14 (573) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether the Department feels in a position to make a ruling.
549
July 16 (579) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking, July 14: Information that on July 12 the Singer Sewing Machine Company received a summons to appear before the Kiangning District Court on July 18 for a hearing of its case, and that the Consulate has advised the Company to go to court and report developments.
550
[Page LXVII]July 16 (237) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Statement that Department desires to await receipt of summary of new regulations before expressing opinion.
550
July 17 (585) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information from the Japanese Legation that a further hearing of the Mitsui case will take place July 30 and that meanwhile the Chargé has been instructed to make vigorous representations.
551
July 18 (588) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report from Consul at Harbin concerning foreign cases pending in Chinese courts of Harbin.
552
July 19 (594) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking, July 18: Report on Singer Company’s case; information that judgment will be given on July 21.
552
July 22 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Transmittal of summary of new regulations.
553
Aug. 7 (265) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Opinion that U. S. corporations are “citizens of the United States” and entitled by treaty to bring suits in Chinese courts; statement that further consideration will be given to the general question of registration of U. S. firms upon receipt of full text of new regulations.
554
Aug. 7 (679) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking: Report that decision was in favor of Singer Sewing Machine Company and did not mention question of registration.
555
Aug. 16 (2172) From the Consul at Harbin to the Minister in China
Information that the U. S. firm G. A. Bashkiroff and Company has been informed that to continue its suit it must either register within 30 days or be represented by an individual having a certificate from the Consulate that he represented the shareholders of the company.
555
Sept. 26 (266) To the Minister in China
Decision, after consideration of the full text, that application of the new regulations to U. S. firms would violate rights granted to U. S. citizens in existing treaties; and instructions to point out to U. S. firms the loss of extraterritorial status involved in registration, and to protest any attempt by Chinese to compel such registration.
556
Oct. 27 (290) To the Minister in China
Reference to case of The Texas Company, pointing out that Department’s objection to the requirement of registration is based on the ground that enforcement of the requirement would be in derogation of extraterritorial rights of corporations involved.
559
[Page LXVIII]

Press Restrictions by Chinese Authorities Affecting American Citizens in China

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Feb. 12 From the President of the United Press (tel.)
Report that a postal ban has been applied to the Shanghai Evening Post (American) for over three months; request for assistance.
559
Feb. 14 (58) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to take such action on behalf of the Shanghai Evening Post as is proper and expedient.
560
Feb. 17 (135) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report of representations made on behalf of the Shanghai Evening Post.
560
Feb. 28 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Conversation with local official in regard to intention of Civil Governor to expel Mr. G. Edward Lyon because of news despatch offensive to local Government; information that Mr. Lyon has promised to express regret and refrain from such action in the future.
561
Mar. 1 From the Consul General at Canton (tel.)
Information that local authorities are satisfied with Mr. Lyon’s expression of regret.
562
Mar. 4 (82) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Approval of action by Consul General at Canton in regard to Mr. Lyon.
562
Mar. 26 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Report that the postal ban on the Shanghai Evening Post was removed March 23.
563
June 6 (133) To the Minister in China
Opinion, in connection with Mr. Lyon’s case, that caution should be exercised against giving ground for the belief that the U. S. Government will be able to obtain for U. S. newspaper men in China the same freedom of action they would enjoy in the United States.
563
June 23 (484) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Conversation in which the Foreign Minister stated that, although he realized that deportation was impossible, he must ask for all possible assistance in having Mr. Hallett Abend sent out of the country.
564
July 12 (566) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Nanking, July 9: Rules governing newspaper correspondents (text printed) which the Foreign Ministry states will be sent to various consulates.
564
July 16 (581) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that Marshal Yen has restored Hallett Abend’s press privileges.
(Footnote: Information as to Mr. Abend’s satisfactory adjustment of his status vis-à-vis the Nanking Government.)
565
[Page LXIX]Sept. 23 (330) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Suggestion that the Legation refrain from accepting press messages for transmittal where the sole object is to evade censorship.
566
Dec. 1 (1020) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report by Reuter at Nanking, November 30 (text printed), on new press laws adopted by the Legislative Yuan.
566

Protection of Title Deeds to Real Property of Americans in China

Date and number Subject Page
1929 Oct. 15 (885) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Advice that instructions desired by the Consul General at Hankow in regard to the latest demand by Chinese authorities in connection with the reexamination of title deeds are being withheld pending receipt of Department’s instructions with regard to the whole matter.
567
Nov. 6 (363) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Note for the Foreign Ministry (substance printed) setting forth principles which the U. S. Government considers that the National Government in its attempt to bring about uniformity in title deeds should apply so that the treatment accorded U. S. citizens may be fair and just.
567
1930 Jan. 24 (76) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Note from the Foreign Minister, January 10 (text printed), stating that the American suggestions would complicate the existing system and produce no benefit.
569
Feb. 8 (50) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to inform the Foreign Ministry that the U. S. Government reserves the right to make representations if the rights of any American holder of real property should be damaged by any action taken in disregard of the principles set forth.
569
Apr. 19 From the American Minister in China to the Senior Minister in China
Views in regard to a letter from the Senior Consul on the subject of the changes contemplated by the Chinese authorities in the procedure of issuing title deeds.
570
Apr. 28 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the American Consul General and Senior Consul at Shanghai in regard to the question of transfer fees on titles transferred between foreigners of the same nationality.
572
July 3 (165) To the Minister in China
Instructions in regard to certain restrictions placed by the Chinese authorities upon the transfer of real property held by foreigners in Tsingtao.
572
[Page LXX]Dec. 17 (682) From the Minister in China
Information that the Consul General at Shanghai has been authorized to begin the use of the new deed forms and otherwise to acquiesce in the new procedure governing the issuance of title deeds, without, however, formally recognizing the Chinese proposals.
574

Reservation of American Rights With Respect to Chinese Regulations Affecting Foreign Missionary Property

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Mar. 7 (28) To the Minister in China
Instructions to protest Chinese ruling that foreign missionary societies may no longer lease land in perpetuity, since the ruling violates U. S. treaty rights; authorization, however, to defer protest until a case arises.
575
Sept. 22 (159) From the American Minister in China to the Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs
Protest regarding the refusal of the Magistrate to register a lease in perpetuity on certain lands at Jukao, Kiangsu, by the Christian Reformed Church Mission.
575
Sept. 22 (160) From the American Minister in China to the Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs
Protest with regard to the difficulties of the Lutheran Board of Missions in securing deeds in perpetuity to property at Kweiteh, Honan, leased and paid for by the Board.
576
Nov. 12 (189) From the American Minister in China to the Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs
Renewed protest concerning the leasing of certain land at Jukao, Kiangsu, by the Christian Reformed Church Mission.
577

Difficulties in China of the Central Asiatic Expedition of the American Museum of Natural History

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Feb. 27 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the Foreign Minister in regard to the differentiation between archeological and paleontological finds and the possible removal of the latter by the expedition of the American Museum of Natural History.
578
May 1 Memorandum by the Minister in China
Conversation with the Foreign Minister, who stated that everything had been settled in connection with the expedition.
(Footnote: Information that the 1930 expedition was the last one, as permission was not granted in 1931 and further attempts were abandoned in 1932.)
580
[Page LXXI]

Efforts for the Consideration of American Claims Outstanding Against China

Date and number Subject Page
1929 Mar. 11 (1138) To the Minister in China
Opinion that claims arising from the destruction or looting of American-owned goods in the hands of native agents should continue to be presented to local authorities by Consuls, but that they should not be presented to the National Government until a plan has been worked out for the consideration of all claims.
580
1930 Feb. 3 (1467) To the Chargé in China
Suggested protocol of agreement regarding claims of U. S. citizens against the Chinese Government (text printed) for the consideration of the Minister with a view to possible early negotiations on the subject.
581
Feb. 12 From the American, British, and French Representatives in China to the Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs
Necessity, in view of the recent default, of pointing out that no means have been devised to meet the ever increasing accumulation of arrears in the service of the Hukuang Railways loan; urgent request that steps be taken to provide the necessary funds.
586
Mar. 18 (47) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Report that a pending Sino-Japanese customs agreement includes a provision for China to call a conference of creditors by October 1 for effectuating the consolidation of the unsecured and inadequately secured obligations of China.
587
Mar. 19 (51) To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether the provision is for a conference of representatives of all creditors or of only Japanese creditors.
587
Mar. 20 (52) From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
Report that provision is for a conference of all creditors, foreign and Chinese.
587
Mar. 24 (100) From the Minister in China
Request for Department’s views in regard to the Standard Oil Company claim against Yunnan Province for the looting of its agency by the military; opinion that this and other claims can best be settled by some such commission as that envisaged in Department’s 1467 of February 3.
588
Apr. 3 (247) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Expression by the American group representative of the hope that action will be taken at the earliest opportunity in regard to the Hukuang Railways loan situation; request for instructions.
589
Apr. 8 (124) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Authorization to urge the National Government to take some practical measure for the relief of U. S. creditors; transmittal of suggested note.
590
Apr. 15 (147) From the Minister in China
Note sent to the Foreign Minister, April 12 (text printed), in accordance with Department’s authorization.
590
[Page LXXII]Apr. 17 (156) From the Minister in China
Information that the Hukuang Railways loan group banks have written to the Minister of Railways expressing the hope that if likin is abolished the Hukuang loan will become a charge upon the customs revenues.
592
May 14 To the Continental Illinois Bank and Trust Company, of Chicago
Statement that the Department has taken up with the Minister in China the Company’s request for assistance to prevent the threatened destruction of the security assigned to a loan made to the Chinese Government in 1911.
593
May 14 (113) To the Minister in China
Suggestion that the Minister consider the advisability of approaching the Chinese Government in regard to the Continental Illinois Bank and Trust Company loan without awaiting the adoption of a general plan.
593
May 21 (118) To the Minister in China
Assertion, in connection with the Standard Oil Company claim, that the Department sees no reason to recede from its position set forth in instruction No. 1138 of March 11, 1929; and Department’s views on related points.
595
June 19 [20?] (471) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Advice that in view of the military situation the time has not been considered opportune for taking up the matter of a claims commission as set forth in the Department’s No. 1467 of February 3; Foreign Minister’s statement that a Chinese commission has been formed under Mr. T. V. Soong which it is hoped will be ready to meet foreign claimants by October 1.
597
June 24 (286) From the Minister in China
Information that the Hukuang Railways loan group banks have made another attempt to obtain assurance that the loan will become a charge on the customs revenues, but that the Chinese Government avoids committing itself.
598
June 26 (296) From the Minister in China
Opinion that there would be no objection to inviting the attention of the Foreign Minister “for purposes of record” to the Continental Illinois Bank and Trust Company’s claim.
599
July 7 (171) To the Minister in China
Agreement with the Minister’s view as set forth in No. 471, of June 19, concerning the postponement of formal negotiations looking toward the settlement of outstanding obligations.
601
Aug. 8 (376) From the Minister in China
Reply to the inquiry by the Consul General at Canton regarding claims for property destroyed by the rebel army (text printed) to the effect that destruction of property by troops in revolt constitutes a valid basis for a claim against the central authorities.
601
[Page LXXIII]Aug. 15 (216) To the Minister in China
Authorization to present a note to the Foreign Minister in regard to the Continental Illinois Bank and Trust Company’s claim.
602
Oct. 8 (275) To the Minister in China
Approval of Minister’s instruction to the Consul General at Canton on August 8.
603
Oct. 27 (368) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Receipt of newspaper report that the Chinese Government has asked foreign ministers to send representatives to Nanking to discuss action in connection with defaulted obligations; request for comments.
604
Oct. 31 (948) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that conference mentioned in Department’s 368 of October 27 was postponed until November 15 and that all U. S. creditors in China have been notified; intention to attend opening and receive any proposals made.
604
Nov. 11 (306) To the Minister in China
Department’s views in regard to accepting the statements of reputable Chinese firms as evidence in substantiating losses of U. S. property in the hands of Chinese agents.
605
Nov. 12 (981) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Report of the information which it has been possible to obtain so far in regard to the proposals which the Minister of Finance plans to make to the November 15 conference.
605
Nov. 20 (397) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Request for concise statement as to what transpired at the November 15 conference.
607
Nov. 21 (997) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Chinese Government’s memorandum presented to the conference November 15 (text printed) setting forth the procedure which China is prepared to follow in settling its obligations which are now in arrears; statement concerning the conference issued to the press by the Chinese Government (text printed).
607

Execution of Provisions of the Hukuang Railways Loan Agreement of May 20, 1911

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Oct. 15 (905) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Hankow, October 1: Report that Mr. Valpy (British), engineer in chief of a section of the Canton-Hankow Railway, has been dismissed by the Ministry of Railways.
Inquiry as to whether it would be appropriate to protest with respect to that portion of article 17 of the Hukuang loan agreement which provides that a European and/or American engineer in chief will be employed during the currency of the loan.
609
[Page LXXIV]Oct. 15 (351) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Authorization to join other interested Legations in protest.
609
1931 Jan. 20 (746) From the Minister in China
Transmittal of Chinese reply to the effect that Mr. Valpy’s dismissal does not contravene the terms of article 17 and that an appropriate person will be employed to succeed him.
610

Protection of American Patent Rights in China

Date and number Subject Page
1929 Nov. 16 (376) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to call the attention of the Chinese Government to the fact that the 1928 patent law fails to provide protection for U. S. patent rights, and to express hope that steps will be taken to remedy situation.
610
Nov. 20 (1019) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Chinese reply (text printed) stating that the 1928 regulations are only a temporary procedure and that a permanent patent law is being considered.
611
Nov. 27 (393) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Instructions to address a formal communication to the Chinese Government requesting definite assurances that U. S. patent rights will not be infringed by any official acts pending the promulgation of a law protecting the patent rights of foreigners.
611
1930 Feb. 15 (129) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Note from the Foreign Minister, February 6 (extract printed), stating that there is nothing in the 1928 regulations to injure foreign products.
612
Feb. 25 (74) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Suggestion that the Legation inform the Chinese Government that the U. S. Government reserves all rights in relation to patents accruing to U. S. citizens from the 1903 and other treaties.
613
Mar. 24 (105) From the Minister in China
Information that the Legation has deferred making reservation outlined in Department’s 74 of February 25 pending the outcome of a specific test of good faith, made in connection with the rights of the Claude Neon Lights, Incorporated.
(Footnote: Information that on October 18, 1932, the Minister was sent general and specific instructions in regard to the protection of U. S. patent rights in China.)
613
[Page LXXV]

Protection of American Property Sold on an Installment-Paying Plan Under Conditional Sale Contracts

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Feb. 25 From the Minister in China to the Consul at Tsingtao
Information that the Consul’s inquiry concerning the degree of financial interest which would entitle an American seller to diplomatic intervention is being sent to the Department for instructions; and Department’s instruction No. 939 of August 1, 1928, in regard to a similar case (text printed).
614
Dec. 3 (324) To the Minister in China
Opinion that an American seller is entitled to diplomatic assistance until the last installment is paid and the title passes to the purchaser.
616

Applicability to American Citizens and Military Forces in China of Chinese Regulations Governing Importation and Use of Firearms

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Apr. 24 (286) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Telegram from the Foreign Minister (text printed) requesting the U. S. Government to prohibit the sale and shipment of certain military equipment.
616
Apr. 28 (293) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Proposed reply to the Foreign Minister (text printed) pointing out the limitations of the U. S. Government in preventing the importation of the military equipment mentioned.
617
May 2 (153) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Note for the Foreign Minister (substance printed) to be substituted for the Legation’s proposed reply.
618
May 9 (317) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Provisional regulations issued April 3 (text printed) to govern the issuance of licenses for arms to be used for and by foreigners in China; information that the regulations are to be considered at the next meeting of the diplomatic body.
619
May 13 (165) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to express the opinion at the meeting of the diplomatic body that the regulations cannot be considered applicable to U. S. citizens at this time, and to refrain from transmitting the regulations to U. S. citizens in China.
620
May 21 (353) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Notification to the Foreign Office that the regulations cannot be regarded as applicable pending instructions from the Department.
(Footnote: Information received from the Foreign Ministry on May 23 of the promulgation of revised regulations.)
621
Oct, 13 (899) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Shanghai, October 9: Report that the new provisional regulations for issuance of certificates to carry firearms require that a guarantee bond be given by the consul concerned, and inquiry as to whether Consulate General should sign and seal such bonds.
Request for Department’s instructions.
621
[Page LXXVI]Oct. 23 (362) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Authorization for consular officers to sign and seal applications of U. S. citizens for licenses to carry arms for purposes of self-defense or hunting.
622
Oct. 23 (927) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the Finance Ministry has informed the Superintendent of Customs that in the future foreign government agencies must obtain permits for the importation of munitions and supplies in accordance with new regulations; request for instructions.
622
Oct. 28 (370) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Note for the Foreign Ministry (text printed) suggesting that military importations for the use of U. S. Government agencies in China be certified as such by the Legation and that this certificate be used as a basis for issuing the necessary permits.
623
Nov. 5 (961) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Advice that the Department’s note has been withheld from the Foreign Ministry pending receipt of further information regarding procedure actually followed; report of uncomplicated arrival of various shipments, and of attitude adopted by other foreign governments.
624
Nov. 7 (382) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Authorization for the Legation to follow its own judgment provided no concessions to Chinese supervision are made which are greater than those indicated in the Department’s 370 of October 28.
625
Nov. 30 (1013) From the Minister in China (tel.)
From Shanghai, November 28: Report that Finance Minister has informed customs that henceforth military importations by foreign government agencies are to be governed by former procedure.
625

Continued Negotiations Concerning the Federal Telegraph Company’s Contract With the Chinese Government

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Oct. 17 (355) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Instructions to press the Foreign Minister for a reply to the Legation’s note, draft of which was attached to the Department’s instruction No. 1353 of September 25, 1929.
626
Oct. 27 (933) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Advice that the Foreign Office is being urged to reply to the Legation’s note (sent October 31, 1929).
626
Nov. 14 (L–197) From the Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs to the American Minister in China
Note from the Ministry of Communications (text printed) stating that the continued existence of the Federal Telegraph contract cannot be permitted in view of the progress in the radio industry in the 10 years since the contract was signed.
627
[Page LXXVII]

Abrogation by China of Foreign Cable Agreements and Negotiation of New Agreements

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Jan. 17 (57) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
From Nanking, January 15: Note from the Foreign Ministry, January 14 (text printed), giving notice that the 1905 agreement with the Commercial Pacific Cable Company (American) will be abrogated as of January 1, 1931.
627
Feb. 11 (52) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the Commercial Pacific Cable Company is sending representatives to China at the request of the Chinese Government to negotiate a renewal of the landing rights for the company’s cable.
628
Nov. 25 (1002) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Information that the company will approach the Department to inquire as to the U. S. Government’s policy should the Chinese, after December 31, cut the connection between the cable and the company’s offices in the International Settlement for the purpose of enforcing their terms for a renewal agreement.
628
Dec. 3 (416) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Conversation with a company official; opinion that no objection should be made to Chinese control of cable in Chinese waters and on Chinese territory if there is no discrimination against the American company; instructions, however, to confer with the Foreign Minister in the company’s interest.
629
Dec. 5 Memorandum by the American Minister in China
Conversation with the Foreign Minister on behalf of the Commercial Pacific Cable Company.
630
Dec. 31 From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)
Report that agreement was signed by company representative December 30 for renewal of landing rights for 14 years from January 1, 1931.
630

Issuance by China of Exequaturs to American Consular Officers in China

Date and number Subject Page
1929 Dec. 5 (2462) From the Chargé in China
Receipt of a note from the Foreign Minister dated September 23, 1929, to the effect that in the future the Legation should give notice of the appointment of consular officers and transmit their commissions to the Foreign Office so that it may issue exequaturs to them; request for instructions.
631
1930 Jan. 20 (23) To the Chargé in China (tel.)
Inclination to consider favorably the Chinese request; request for information as to views of other governments; authorization to intimate to colleagues that the U. S. Government is not aware of any convincing objections which could be made.
631
Jan. 31 (97) From the Chargé in China (tel.)
Report that the British, French, and Japanese Legations have referred the changes to their home Governments.
632
[Page LXXVIII]Mar. 12 (91) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Authorization, if other governments do likewise, to transmit commissions of consular officers to the Foreign Office and to request exequaturs.
632
May 27 (124) To the Minister in China
Approval of the Minister’s opinion that if the Chinese again raise the question of exequaturs, a reply should be made to the effect that it would have to be settled in the negotiation of a new commercial treaty, and authorization to act in accordance therewith.
633
Sept. 18 (470) From the Minister in China
Information that, although the Legation has merely informed the Foreign Ministry of the appointment of U. S. consular officers, the Foreign Ministry has of its own accord forwarded exequaturs for them; intention not to acknowledge receipt of the exequaturs.
633
Dec. 17 (338) To the Minister in China
Approval of Legation’s intention not to acknowledge receipt of the exequaturs; comments on U. S. treaty position in the event China should refuse to recognize the official capacity of an American consular officer.
634

Reciprocal Arrangement Between the United States and China According the Free Importation Privilege to Consular Officers and Their Families

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Sept. 29 To the Chinese Chargé
Statement that in view of Chinese regulations granting reciprocity in such matters the U. S. Government has arranged for the free entry of articles imported by Chinese consular officers for their personal use during their official residence in the United States.
636
Dec. 16 From the Chinese Minister
Information that the Chinese Government has arranged for similar free entry privileges for U. S. consular officers in China.
637

Detention by Chinese Censorship of American Consular Correspondence

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Jan. 10 (321) From the Consul at Foochow
Note addressed by the consular body to the Defence Commissioner, January 8 (text printed), protesting the action of a censor appointed by the Commissioner in detaining telegrams sent by the consuls to their respective legations at Peiping on January 7.
637
Apr. 23 (91) To the Minister in China
Approval of the action of the Consul at Foochow in joining in protest.
639
[Page LXXIX]

Attitude of the Department of State Toward a Proposed Conference To Consider the Silver Situation

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Nov. 15 To President Hoover
Expression of views on various phases of the silver situation.
639
Dec. 10 (1039) From the Minister in China (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether the U. S. Government would receive favorably a proposal from the Chinese Government that the United States call a conference of silver-using countries for the consideration of the silver situation.
640
Dec. 17 (434) To the Minister in China (tel.)
Assertion that the indications are that such a proposal would not be received favorably.
640

COLOMBIA

Good Offices of the Department of State in Securing Suspension of Lighterage Charges on Privately Owned Lighters in the Port of Buenaventura

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Feb. 11 From W. R. Grace & Co.
Information that the customs authorities are imposing a special 25 percent tax on privately owned lighters at Buenaventura; explanation that this creates a discriminatory situation injurious to the Grace owned lighters; request that the Minister in Colombia take up the matter with Colombian authorities.
641
Feb. 13 (12) To the Minister in Colombia (tel.)
Instructions to render appropriate assistance.
642
Mar. 19 (1056) From the Minister in Colombia
Foreign Minister’s belief that the charges can be alleviated although the Ministry of Hacienda insists on the legality of the measure, alleging that similar taxes are imposed in the harbor of New York.
643
Mar. 28 (1099) From the Minister in Colombia
Information that the tax has been lowered to 15 percent.
643
Apr. 16 (1159) From the Minister in Colombia
Information that the decree which lowered the tax also provides that the lighters cannot be used after the completion of the wharf now under construction; intention to take up the matter with the Foreign Minister if the company representative is unsuccessful in his efforts.
643
Apr. 28 (1180) From the Minister in Colombia
Report that the matter has been taken up with the Foreign Minister and that the company representative is now hopeful that they will be allowed to continue to use their lighters after the completion of the wharf.
644
Apr. 29 (147) To the Minister in Colombia
Advice that the tax situation in New York harbor is being referred to the Treasury Department; instruction to take no further action until a reply is received.
645
[Page LXXX]May 9 (62) From the Minister in Colombia (tel.)
Report that the Minister of Hacienda is revoking the part of the decree which prohibits use of the lighters after the completion of the wharf.
646
June 2 From the Secretary of the Treasury
Information that it seems probable that there are port or local lighterage taxes assessed at New York which are not controlled in any way by the Federal Government.
646
June 10 (152) To the Chargé in Colombia
Advice that the Treasury Department’s reply appears not to warrant reopening the discussions with the Colombian authorities.
647
Aug. 30 (1544) From the Minister in Colombia
Information that the Council of State has suspended the 15 percent tax provisionally while it studies the whole matter.
647
Sept. 20 (1648) From the Minister in Colombia
Conversation with the company representative, who expressed his company’s pleasure at the outcome of the negotiations.
648

CUBA

Political Unrest in Cuba

Date and number Subject Page
1930 June 23 (258) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Information that numerous conversations have been held with President Machado and with Colonel Mendieta, leader of the Unión Nacionalista or Opposition party, with a view to encouraging cooperation between them.
649
July 10 (95) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Intention of President Machado to send a message to Congress asking approval of laws providing for a new census and reform of the electoral code; explanation that these projects should satisfy all the legitimate demands of the Unión Nacionalista.
650
July 15 (291) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Information that the negotiations between the two parties have failed to achieve an accord because of the Opposition demands that Machado resign.
650
July 18 (298) From the Chargé in Cuba
Report on the President’s message to Congress asking approval of certain reform projects.
651
Aug. 8 (329) From the Chargé in Cuba
Report that the Lower House has unexpectedly rejected the President’s message; comments on possible reasons for rejection. Conversation with Mr. Antonio Mendoza, who is trying to effect an accord between the President and the Nacionalista; comments upon the role of the Embassy in any agreement.
652
[Page LXXXI]Sept. 16 (360) From the Chargé in Cuba
Reactions of various groups to press reports of an alleged statement by the Under Secretary of State (text printed) regarding the possible attitude of the United States in the event of a revolution in Cuba.
655
Sept. 23 (372) From the Chargé in Cuba
Report on recent political developments in Cuba.
656
Sept. 26 (376) From the Chargé in Cuba
Press despatches (texts printed) purporting to give the substance of remarks by the Acting Secretary of State to the effect that there is no alarming situation in Cuba which would justify U. S. intervention as suggested by Senator Walsh of Massachusetts.
659
Sept. 30 (114) From the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Report of clashes between police and University students in which several were wounded.
660
Oct. 1 (115) From the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Precautionary measures being taken to prevent repetition of disorders; opinion that the Government will be strong enough to dominate any situation which may arise.
661
Oct. 2 (118) From the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Information that one of the wounded students has died and that precautions are being taken to prevent disorders at his funeral.
662
Oct. 2 Memorandum of Conference by the Secretary of State With the Press
Exposition of U. S. policy regarding interference in Cuba given by the Secretary for the background information of the correspondents.
662
Oct. 2 (119) From the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Advice that Machado has asked Congress to authorize him to suspend constitutional guarantees in Habana at his discretion.
665
Oct. 3 Memorandum of Conference by the Secretary of State With the Press
Affirmative reply of the Secretary to the question of whether there would be an objection to using his name in connection with his statement of October 2; assertion by a correspondent that the newspapers had already attributed the statement to the Secretary.
666
Oct. 3 (120) From the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Report that the student’s funeral passed off quietly and that there is no sign of further disturbances.
666
Oct. 4 (121) From the Chargé in Cuba (tel.)
Advice that Congress has passed law authorizing Machado to suspend constitutional guarantees in Habana and adjacent townships.
667
Oct. 13 (125) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Report that the hope inspired by the sugar stabilization plan and the growing realization that the U. S. policy is one of non-interference have created a distinctly better atmosphere.
667
[Page LXXXII]Oct. 23 (404) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Emergence from political retirement of Mario G. Menocal, former President of Cuba, and leader of the Conservatives; demands by both Mendieta and Menocal for U. S. intervention in Cuban affairs.
667
Nov. 1 (128) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Report that the November 1 partial congressional elections have passed without incident.
669
Nov. 11 (133) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Report of student disorders in Habana and Santiago.
669
Nov. 13 (137) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Information that student disorders have occurred daily in Habana since November 9 and have now become general throughout Cuba; report of steps taken by Machado, including the suspension of constitutional guarantees in Habana.
669
Nov. 14 (138) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Advice that unofficial good offices are being extended to bring about a modus vivendi between Machado and Menocal and Mendieta.
670
Nov. 14 (139) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Information that there have been no disorders in Habana since the knowledge of the suspension of constitutional guarantees became general; report that Arturo Tagle, who claims U. S. citizenship, has been wounded.
671
Nov. 15 (129) To the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Expression of concern in regard to Ambassador’s extension of good offices.
671
Nov. 16 (141) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Explanation of very limited nature of good offices. Information concerning a report of a plan to damage certain U. S. property; possibility that such action may be taken with the deliberate intention of provoking U. S. interference.
672
Nov. 19 (144) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Report that situation is quiet but that there is widespread dissatisfaction with the deadlock between the Government and the Opposition.
672
Nov. 22 (145) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Information that Tagle died November 21. Report that the Senate has passed a bill authorizing the President to suspend constitutional guarantees anywhere in Cuba for 60 days.
673
Nov. 24 (442) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Discussion of the four principal problems involved in Cuba’s situation; indications that the anti-Machado forces will redouble their efforts to induce U. S. intervention, and opinion that such intervention could only have the most harmful consequences for the United States.
673
Nov. 26 (146) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Information that the House has passed the Senate bill authorizing the President to suspend constitutional guarantees.
676
[Page LXXXIII]Dec. 1 (150) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Information that Machado is prepared to sign decrees restoring constitutional guarantees in Habana and reopening University of Habana.
676
Dec. 4 (155) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Account of demonstration on reopening of University December 3.
677
Dec. 8 (156) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Report that the University is open in theory but that the students refuse to attend.
677
Dec. 10 (160) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Information that President Machado has asked his Cabinet to confer and advise him whether in the best interests of Cuba he should resign.
677
Dec. 11 (162) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Report of prevalent student demonstrations and of pressure being brought to bear on Machado to resign.
678
Dec. 11 (163) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Information that Machado has signed the bill authorizing him to suspend constitutional guarantees and has simultaneously decreed their suspension.
678
Dec. 12 (164) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Analysis of the situation in Cuba: Opinion that the basic cause is poverty; discussion of possible developments.
678
Dec. 12 (142) To the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Account of press report that the U. S. Ambassador attended a secret session of the Cuban Cabinet; assumption that it is unfounded; request for report.
679
Dec. 13 (167) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Advice that order has been restored but that the Opposition continues to draw adherents from various classes.
680
Dec. 13 (169) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Assurance that report of attendance at the Cabinet meeting is without foundation; report that the Cabinet has advised Machado against resignation.
680
Dec. 15 (467) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Account of the continual embarrassment of the Embassy by rumors such as that set forth in the Department’s 142 of December 12 and by the distortion of news in the press tending to give the impression that the U. S. Government is upholding the Machado administration.
681
Dec. 16 (171) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Report of quiet conditions but many arrests.
683
Dec. 20 (174) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Information that one newspaper has been suspended and the University has been closed.
683
[Page LXXXIV]Dec. 27 (175) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Government report of attempt at uprising on Christmas Eve; arrest of Colonel Hevia, prominent leader of Nacionalista, and other alleged conspirators.
683
Dec. 29 (177) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Bitterness aroused by closing of Habana Yacht Club December 28.
684
Dec. 31 (178) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Arrest of nine associates of ex-President Menocal; understanding that the charge is that of conspiring to foment rebellion.
684

Approval by the Government of the United States of New Financing Arrangements by the Government of Cuba

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Jan. 24 (73) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Information that the Cuban Government has decided to conclude arrangements with the Chase National Bank of New York for the financing of the Central Highway; information concerning the terms of the agreement.
684
Jan. 29 (75) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Conversation with President Machado, in which the President agreed to make available the information concerning Cuban finances necessary for the Ambassador to formulate a recommendation concerning the financing, and in which the President said that, in regard to the Platt Amendment, he would like to have the Bank take up the agreement with the Department and to have the Ambassador notify him of the Department’s decision.
686
Jan. 31 (77) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Report that the investigation of Cuban finances is proceeding satisfactorily; suggested note (text printed) for informing the Cuban Government of the Department’s lack of objection to the financing.
688
Feb. 4 (23) To the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Inquiry as to when the investigation will be completed.
689
Feb. 5 (17) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Report that recommendation can be made within six hours of receipt of all financial statements.
689
Feb. 6 (20) From the Ambassador in Cuba (tel.)
Advice that investigation indicates that the present status of Cuban finances would not justify the U. S. Government in raising objection to the proposed Chase financing.
690
Feb. 8 (63) To the Ambassador in Cuba
Advice that the Chase National Bank has been informed that the Department has no objection to the proposed financing; memorandum to the same effect to be presented to the Cuban Secretary of State (text printed).
690
[Page LXXXV]Oct. 23 (402) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Information that, since the Chase National Bank is not prepared to issue any of the remaining Special Public Works Bonds, the contractors have offered to arrange for the financing of their work; essential features of the proposal; suggestion that a letter (text printed) be sent to President Machado indicating the Department’s lack of objection.
691
Oct. 31 (416) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Report that the Cuban Government has accepted the contractors’ proposals, and that on October 29 the suggested letter was sent to President Machado in accordance with the Department’s approval.
695
Nov. 6 (418) From the Ambassador in Cuba
Letter from President Machado, November 4 (text printed) stating his conformity with the Ambassador’s letter of October 29.
695

The Joseph E. Barlow Claim to Certain Property in Cuba

Date and number Subject Page
1930 May 9 Extract From a Press Release Issued by the Department of State
Statement that, in view of Mr. Barlow’s contention that the Cuban courts are prejudiced against him, the U. S. Ambassador in Cuba prepared a plan for private arbitration which the Department approved; information that Mr. Barlow refused to arbitrate, and that the Department does not feel that any action regarding the claim would now be appropriate.
697

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Revolution in the Dominican Republic

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Feb. 24 (11) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Report that in view of the danger from revolutionists, the Foreign Minister has requested asylum for President Vásquez, his wife, and the Vice President; that the President’s wife is now in the Legation and President Vásquez and his party have gone to the fortress.
699
Feb. 24 (12) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Report that the Vice President has resigned and that the Government promises to annul all amendments to the electoral law made since 1924; information that Mr. Cabot, Third Secretary of Legation, has gone out to try to prevent bloodshed between the revolutionists and the troops sent out to stop them.
699
Feb. 24 (8) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Request for names of leaders of the revolution and inquiry as to role played by the Army and its commander in chief, Trujillo.
700
[Page LXXXVI]Feb. 24 (13) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Names of leaders of the revolution; advice that Trujillo and the Army are true to the President.
700
Feb. 24 (14) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Advice that the revolutionists are advancing on the city and that a naval vessel should be sent at once; information that Mr. Cabot has proceeded to Santiago.
700
Feb. 25 (15) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that No. 14 was in error and that the revolutionists are not advancing but are awaiting the result of Mr. Cabot’s negotiations in Santiago.
700
Feb. 25 (17) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Names of other leaders of the revolution.
701
Feb. 25 (9) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Opinion that it would not be wise to send a naval vessel to Santo Domingo in the present circumstances; approval of Legation’s use of good offices in the interest of peace.
701
Feb. 25 (18) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that both sides are respecting U. S. lives and property, and that Mr. Cabot has returned with proposals of the leaders of the revolution.
702
Feb. 26 (19) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Report that the revolutionists have entered the city in violation of their promise to Mr. Cabot.
702
Feb. 26 (20) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that a small British warship will arrive in 20 hours.
702
Feb. 26 (21) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Basis of agreement suggested to Mr. Cabot by the revolutionary leaders, and advice that the Government is prepared to accept.
703
Feb. 26 (10) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Approval of action taken; advice that authorization is being sent to offer U. S. good offices, but that nothing should suggest any U. S. involvement in the elections.
703
Feb. 26 (11) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Authorization to offer good offices.
704
Feb. 26 (22) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that it is now clear that Trujillo has repeatedly betrayed the Government.
704
Feb. 26 (12) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Opinion that the situation has not developed sufficiently for any instructions to be given; request for more information.
705
Feb. 27 (23) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information on political alinements.
705
Feb. 27 (25) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Terms agreed upon by the President and Estrella Ureña, revolutionary leader, in a meeting at the Legation.
706
[Page LXXXVII]Feb. 27 (13) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that the British sloop Wistaria is approaching Santo Domingo; opinion that the situation does not warrant the presence of a warship and that it would be very unwise to land forces; authorization to inform British colleague of Department’s opinion.
706
Feb. 27 (24) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Hope that a final agreement will be reached in a conference to be held in the afternoon.
707
Feb. 27 (43) To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
Repetition of telegram No. 13 sent to the Minister in the Dominican Republic on February 27, and suggestion that the British Government be advised.
707
Feb. 28 (28) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that an agreement has been reached whereby Estrella Ureña will be appointed Secretary of the Interior, following which the President will resign, thus allowing the chief of the revolution to become the Chief of State; advice that the Legation has pointed out the undesirable precedent thus created but has made no objection; hope that no question of recognition will be raised.
708
Mar. 1 (14) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Advice that inasmuch as all legal forms are to be followed no question of recognition will arise.
708
Mar. 1 (22) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
More extensive report on the revolutionary movement; opinion that the basic cause of the revolution was the economic depression and that the immediate cause was the knowledge that the Army would tacitly assist the revolutionaries.
709
Mar. 4 (15) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Commendation on success in helping to bring about a peaceful solution.
717
Mar. 18 (35) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that Trujillo and Estrella have been formally proposed as the Government candidates in the coming elections; President’s desire that a statement be made that the U. S. Government would not recognize Trujillo; inquiry as to whether the Department will make or authorize any statement.
717
Mar. 19 (19) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Department’s regret that it cannot authorize suggested statement since it desires to avoid even the appearance of interfering; opinion that the only way to prevent candidacy of Trujillo would be by a personal appeal; and confidential information that the Department expects to recognize Trujillo or any other person coming into office in the coming elections.
718
Mar. 21 (20) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Further suggestions for a personal appeal to Trujillo.
719
Mar. 21 (37) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Intention to follow the Department’s suggestion.
720
[Page LXXXVIII]Apr. 2 (44) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that the Opposition has nominated Velázquez and Morales.
720
Apr. 7 (48) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Report that the President and the civil authorities are doing everything possible to maintain order but have no control over the Army.
721
Apr. 22 (55) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Report of leave of absence or resignation of various members of the Government to run for office.
721
Apr. 23 Memorandum by the Assistant Secretary of State
Conversation with the Dominican Minister in regard to the candidacy of Trujillo.
721
May 19 (91) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic
Report that Trujillo was elected President and Estrella Vice President.
723
June 16 (107) From the Chargé in the Dominican Republic
Report on various unsuccessful revolutionary activities of the week past.
723
July 20 (79) From the Chargé in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Recommendation that authorization be given to make a statement that the United States has no intention of not recognizing Trujillo.
725
July 22 (31) To the Chargé in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information, for use at the Chargé’s discretion, that the Department intends to recognize Trujillo.
726
July 26 (140) From the Chargé in the Dominican Republic
Report that the information concerning the Department’s intentions was given to the press.
726
Aug. 9 (34) To the Chargé in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that the Minister has been appointed the President’s special representative to attend the inaugural ceremonies of Trujillo.
727
Aug. 17 (93) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Report that inauguration took place August 16.
727

Hurricane Disaster

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Sept. 4 From the Dominican Government to the Dominican Legation at Washington (tel.)
Report of appalling situation resulting from a cyclone which destroyed 90 percent of Santo Domingo; request that it be brought to the attention of the U. S. Government, the representatives of friendly nations in Washington, the U. S. press, the Red Cross, and the U. S. people, and that the Department be sounded out as to the possibilities of a loan.
727
[Page LXXXIX]Sept. 4 (95) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Urgent request that a warship with supplies be sent immediately.
728
Sept. 4 (38) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Report of aid being sent by the Red Cross, including $15,000 to be expended by the Minister.
728
Sept. 4 (100) To the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
Inquiry as to whether the hurricane hit Haiti.
729
Sept. 4 From President Hoover to President Trujillo (tel.)
Expression of U. S. sympathy for the people of Santo Domingo.
729
Sept. 4 (39) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Instructions to express to the President and the Dominican Red Cross the sympathy of the American Red Cross.
729
Sept. 5 (193) From the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
Report of aid being sent to Santo Domingo by Haiti.
729
Sept. 5 (42) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that the Red Cross has contributed $25,000 more for relief work and has suggested that a local committee be formed to assist in its distribution.
730
Sept. 5 (192) From the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
Report that Haiti was not damaged by the hurricane.
730
Sept. 6 (45) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that the Red Cross is sending Mr. Ernest J. Swift, Director of Insular and Foreign Operations, to Santo Domingo to act in an advisory capacity.
731
Sept. 6 (98) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Names of members of local committee; report on relief supplies arriving.
731
Sept. 6 (99) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Name of an additional member of local committee.
731
Sept. 7 (101) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Request that Red Cross be informed that needs are too great to be supplied by adjacent countries, and that a shipment of surgical supplies be sent from New York.
732
Sept. 8 (194) From the Chargé in Haiti (tel.)
Report of assistance being furnished from Haiti, information that Trujillo has asked that 50 U. S. marines be sent from Haiti to Santo Domingo. (Repeated to Legation at Santo Domingo.)
732
Sept. 8 (46) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Opinion that marines should not be sent to the Dominican Republic unless the Minister sees some compelling reason for doing so.
733
Sept. 9 (104) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Opinion that presence of marines would have very beneficial moral effect.
733
[Page XC]Sept. 9 (47) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that Trujillo has requested that a Marine officer be assigned as food administrator, and that the Navy Department is prepared to designate Maj. Thomas Watson; request for opinion.
734
Sept. 9 (102) From the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Request that Major Watson be rushed to Santo Domingo, preferably as an Attaché of the Legation.
734
Sept. 10 (48) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Department’s extreme reluctance to have marines sent to Santo Domingo.
734
Sept. 10 (49) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Information that Major Watson will arrive about September 12 and that he is being designated as Naval Attaché.
735
Sept. 20 From President Trujillo to President Hoover
Expression of gratitude for assistance and especially for services of Mr. Ernest J. Swift.
735
Sept. 20 From President Trujillo to President Hoover
Tribute to the services rendered by Dr. Lucius M. Johnson, M. C. U. S. N.
736
Sept. 22 (57) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Advice that Mr. Eliot Wadsworth is being sent to Santo Domingo as the President’s special representative to report to the U. S. Government on Dominican plans for rehabilitation.
736
Sept. 24 (58) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Instructions to inform Trujillo that Mr. Wadsworth is coming, and to put all the facilities of the Legation at Mr. Wadsworth’s disposal.
737
Sept. 25 (59) To the Minister in the Dominican Republic (tel.)
Oral remarks made to the press by President Hoover (text printed) regarding Mr. Wadsworth’s mission.
737
Sept. 26 From President Trujillo to President Hoover (tel.)
Expression of gratitude for President Hoover’s message of sympathy.
738
Oct. 30 From President Hoover to President Trujillo
Expression of gratification that the efforts of Dr. Lucius M. Johnson were helpful.
738
Oct. 30 From President Hoover to President Trujillo
Response to President Trujillo’s expression of appreciation for assistance given to the Dominican people; expression of satisfaction in learning of the effective aid given by Mr. Swift of the Red Cross.
738
[Page XCI]

EGYPT

Provisional Commercial Agreement Between the United States and Egypt According Unconditional Most-Favored-Nation Treatment in Customs Matters, Signed May 24, 1930

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Jan. 29 (9) To the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Inquiry as to the correctness of the Department’s understanding of the proposed new tariff law.
740
Jan. 30 (18) From the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Verification of the Department’s understanding.
740
Feb. 6 (12) To the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Suggested statement to be made to the Egyptian Government (text printed) to the effect that the United States will consent to the application of the new customs law to its commerce as of February 17 provided the Egyptian Government will conclude a modus vivendi providing for most-favored-nation treatment until a new commercial convention can be brought into force.
741
Feb. 7 (22) From the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Suggestion that the statement be made in the form of a note and that a sentence (text printed) be added.
742
Feb. 11 (23) From the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Note from the Foreign Minister, February 10 (text printed) giving notice of the coming into force of the new tariff as of February 17, and signifying Egypt’s willingness to conclude a temporary most-favored-nation agreement.
742
Feb. 12 (24) From the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Statement that analysis of revised tariff schedules shows the position of U. S. business to be generally favorable except in the case of petroleum products.
743
Feb. 15 (15) To the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Note for the Foreign Minister (text printed) setting forth the terms of U. S. consent to application of the revised tariff rates.
743
Mar. 19 (36) From the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Information that the Foreign Minister has submitted drafts of an exchange of notes providing for a temporary modus vivendi not to extend beyond February 16, 1931.
744
Apr. 21 (29) To the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Authorization to conclude an agreement based on the Egyptian formula with certain modifications, including a provision that (a) it shall remain in force until the conclusion of a definitive agreement, and that (b) it shall lapse if the action of either legislature should prevent the execution of its terms; authorization to substitute for (a) a provision for termination after 90 days’ notice if necessary.
745
Apr. 25 (49) From the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Report of conversation with the Acting Foreign Minister from which it appears that he would prefer the provision for 90 days’ notice.
747
May 1 (32) To the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Instructions to make every effort to obtain provision for the agreement to remain in force until a definite treaty is concluded, but, if impossible, to accept the substitute.
748
[Page XCII]May 5 To the Minister in Egypt
Explanation of the necessity for the provision that the agreement shall be terminated should the action of either legislature prevent the execution of its terms.
749
May 6 (52) From the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Report of conversation with the Acting Foreign Minister, who maintains that his Government is without authority to make an agreement for the duration desired by the Department.
750
May 9 (34) To the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Instruction that the alternative provision for termination on 90 days’ notice should be accepted if the conclusion of the agreement seems likely to be delayed by further insistence on the Department’s formula.
751
May 15 (53) From the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Information that the Acting Foreign Minister has agreed to sign the agreement (with the 90 days’ provision) with the exception of one phrase.
752
May 21 (38) To the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Explanation of the phrase to which the Acting Foreign Minister objects.
753
May 26 (392) From the Minister in Egypt
Notes exchanged May 24, and letter addressed to the Foreign Minister May 22 giving the Department’s explanation of the phrase to which objection has been made (texts printed).
753
Aug. 29 (148) To the Chargé in Egypt
Transmittal of text of commercial convention with Rumania for consideration as a model for the proposed convention with Egypt; request for comments on changes needed.
756
Nov. 26 (17) From the Minister in Egypt
Information that the provisional tariff regime has been extended for another year after February 17, 1931, and that the diplomatic corps does not expect to receive from the Egyptian Government any proposals for the conclusion of definitive commercial treaties for at least another year.
756

Inquiry With Respect to the Safeguarding of Religious Liberties in Egypt

Date and number Subject Page
1930 Apr. 21 (334) To the Ambassador in Great Britain
Transmittal of a letter from the Egypt Intermission Council expressing concern with regard to the future of religious liberty in Egypt; instructions to ask the British authorities whether any steps are being taken to safeguard religious liberties in the present negotiations between Great Britain and Egypt.
758
May 5 (866) From the Ambassador in Great Britain
Discussion with a Foreign Office official, who explained the British position and said that he felt that the cause of religious liberty would not be advanced by interjecting it into the political agreement now being negotiated.
759
[Page XCIII]May 12 (37) To the Minister in Egypt (tel.)
Instructions to inform the American missionaries that the U. S. Government expects them to refrain from such activities as might give rise to anti-American feelings.
761
June 16 (406) From the Minister in Egypt
Statement by the British High Commissioner that the question of religious liberty has not been touched upon officially; account of informal steps being taken by the British Residency and the U. S. Legation which it is hoped will alleviate the situation.
762

ETHIOPIA

Reaffirmation by the Department of State of Its Attitude With Respect to the Exportation of Arms to Ethiopia

Date and number Subject Page
1930 June 6 (131) To the Chargé in Ethiopia
Statement of U. S. policy in regard to the various points involved in the efforts of Mr. George T. Wise to sell arms and ammunition to Ethiopia.
764

Application of Ethiopian Laws and Decrees to American Citizens in Ethiopia

Date and number Subject Page
1929 Dec. 26 (211) From the Minister in Ethiopia
Intention of the diplomatic corps to protest to the King against a decree providing for the direct finding of foreigners.
767
1930 Feb. 18 (122) To the Minister in Ethiopia
Statement of U. S. policy, and suggestion that a position be taken which is not calculated to obstruct the Ethiopian Government in enacting reasonable laws and that an objection be raised only if the laws discriminate against U. S. citizens or provide punishments shocking to American sensibilities.
768