701.9111/240a

The Secretary of State to the Minister in Persia (Philip)

No. 528

Sir: There is enclosed herewith for your information a copy of the remarks made on December 7, 1926 by Mirza Davoud Khan Meftah, the appointed Minister of Persia, upon the presentation of his letters of credence to the President. A copy of the President’s reply is likewise transmitted.

You will note that the President in his reply to Mr. Meftah made particular reference to the services being rendered Persia by the American Financial Mission and expressed the hope that with the continued support of the Shah and of the Persian Government, Dr. Millspaugh and his assistants would be able to render even greater services in the future.

In case the substance of the President’s remarks regarding Dr. Millspaugh and his assistants is not generally known in government and court circles at Teheran you may care to make informal reference thereto in the course of your conversations with competent Persian officials should an appropriate opportunity offer itself.

I am [etc.]

For the Secretary of State:
J. Butler Wright
[Enclosure]

Remarks of the Persian Minister (Meftah), Upon the Presentation of His Letters of Credence, December 7, 1926, and the Reply of President Coolidge

Your Excellency: I have the honor to hand to you the Autograph Letters by which His Imperial Majesty Reza Shah Pahlavi, my August Sovereign, has been graciously pleased to appoint me as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of Persia to the United States of America.

The duties thus entrusted to me by my Sovereign and the Persian Government involve of course the maintenance and further consolidation of the very cordial relations which have for so long past happily existed between our two countries.

I need hardly mention how greatly I value and appreciate the high honor and privilege of being selected by the Persian Government to discharge the duties of so onerous and important a post as Persian Minister at Washington.

The real sympathy and friendship which have always been extended to Persia by your great nation, and which evoked the decision of my Government to apply to the United States for an American Mission to supervise and administer the finances of my country, inspire [Page 545]me with confidence that my work here in your beautiful Capital will meet with that success to which His Imperial Majesty and my Government look forward with keen anticipation. The task of the American Mission in coordinating and centralizing the finances of Persia was naturally not an easy one at the outset, but thanks to the zeal and the efforts of its members—so typical of such an industrious and hardworking people like the Americans—considerable progress has already been made; and without doubt the Persian Government and people can look with confidence to further progress being made and to the ultimate consolidation of their most valuable services to Persia, now that the Mission is better acquainted with the people and conditions of the country.

In conclusion may I add Mr. President, that my constant endeavor during my period of office at Washington will be to merit and gain your goodwill, and to draw still closer the bonds of friendship uniting our two people. I am convinced that in my efforts to accomplish so worthy an object I shall be honored with your valuable support and the friendly cooperation of your Government.

The President’s Reply

Mr. Minister: It affords me pleasure to receive from you the letters whereby His Imperial Majesty, the Shah, accredits you as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary near the Government of the United States and to accord you recognition in this high capacity. You may rest assured that the officials of this Government will gladly cooperate with you in furthering the cordial relations which have in the past happily existed between our two countries.

I have noted with satisfaction the references which you have made to the sympathy and friendship which have always been extended to the Government and people of Persia by the Government and people of the United States and which led your Government to apply to the United States for an American Mission to supervise and administer the finances of Persia. The success which has thus far attended the efforts of the American Mission in behalf of Persia is most gratifying and I hope that, with the continued support of His Majesty, the Shah, and of your Government, Dr. Millspaugh and his assistants will be able to render even greater services in the future. I ask that you convey to your Sovereign and to the Persian Government and people my sincere wishes for the happiness and prosperity of your nation. In conclusion let me express the hope that your stay in Washington may be an agreeable one in every way.